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The General Electric CF34 is a civilian high-bypass turbofan developed by GE Aircraft Engines from its TF34 military engine. The CF34 is used on a number of business and regional jets, including the Bombardier CRJ series, the Embraer E-Jets, and the Chinese ARJ21.[4][5] In 2012, there were 5,600 engines in service.

Design and development

The original engine contained a single stage fan driven by a 4-stage low pressure (LP) turbine, supercharging a 14-stage HP compressor driven by a 2-stage high pressure (HP) turbine, with an annular combustor. Later higher thrust versions of the CF34 feature an advanced technology core, with only 10 HP compressor stages. Latest variants, the -10A and -10E, were derived from the CFM56 engine family,[citation needed] and have a radically different HP spool, containing a 9-stage compressor driven by a single stage turbine. The LP spool has 3 core booster stages behind the fan. Static thrust is 82 kilonewtons (18,500 lbf) for the -10E variant.

On wing times can reach 14,000 hours, an overhaul costs over $1.5 million and a set of LLPs $2.1 million for a 25,000 cycle life.[6] In 1995, GE invested $200 million to develop the -8C derivative for the CRJ700.[7]

GE has proposed updating the Boeing B-52 Stratofortress with CF34-10 engines.[8]

Applications

CF34-1A
CF34-3A
CF34-3A1
CF34-3A2
CF34-3B
CF34-3B1
CF34-8C1
CF34-8C5
CF34-8C5A1
CF34-8C5A2
CF34-8C5B1
CF34-8E
CF34-10A
CF34-10E

Specifications

See also

Related development

Comparable engines

Related lists

References

  1. ^ GE Aviation at flightglobal.com
  2. The original engine contained a single stage fan driven by a 4-stage low pressure (LP) turbine, supercharging a 14-stage HP compressor driven by a 2-stage high pressure (HP) turbine, with an annular combustor. Later higher thrust versions of the CF34 feature an advanced technology core, with only 10 HP compressor stages. Latest variants, the -10A and -10E, were derived from the CFM56 engine family,[citation needed] and have a radically different HP spool, containing a 9-stage compressor driven by a single stage turbine. The LP spool has 3 core booster stages behind the fan. Static thrust is 82 kilonewtons (18,500 lbf) for the -10E variant.

    On wing times can reach 14,000 hours, an overhaul costs over $1.5 million and a set of LLPs $2.1 million for a 25,000 cycle life.[6] In 1995, GE invested $200 million to develop the -8C derivative for the CRJ700.[7]

    GE has proposed updating the Boeing B-52 Stratofortress with CF34-10 engines.[8]

    Applications

    CF34-1A
    CF34-3A
    CF34-3A1
    • overhaul costs over $1.5 million and a set of LLPs $2.1 million for a 25,000 cycle life.[6] In 1995, GE invested $200 million to develop the -8C derivative for the CRJ700.[7]

      GE has proposed updating the Boeing B-52 Stratofortress with CF34-10 engines.[8]

      Related development

      Comparable engines

      Related lists

      References

      1. ^ GE Aviation at flightglobal.com
      2. ^ http://www.geaviation.com/press/cf34/cf34_20121206.html
      3. ^ http://www.geaviation.com/press/cf34/cf34_20110620.html
      4. ^ The CF34 at aviationpros.com
      5. ^ GE's CF34-3 Engines Celebrate 20 Years of Regional Jet Service at aviationpros.com
      6. ^ "E190 Values Start to Take Note of E2". Aircraft Value News. October 29, 2018.
      7. ^ David Hughes (Feb 13, 1995). "CF34-8C to power new regional jet". Aviation Week.
      8. ^ ((cite website |url=https://www.geaviation.com/military/engines/b-52%7Cretreived= Jun 25,2020}}
      9. ^ "The CF34 Engine". GE Aviation.
      10. ^ "CF34-3 turbofan engine" (PDF). GE Aviation. Comparable engines

        References

        1. ^