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The Info List - Garhgaon



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GARGAON (Pron:/gɑ:ˈgɑ̃ʊ/) was the capital of the Ahom kingdom for many years. It was built by the Ahom king Suklenmung (Gargoyaan Rojaa) in 1540. It lies 13 km east of present-day Sivasagar town. The palace structures were made of wood and stones. In 1747 Pramatta Singha , son of Rudra Singha
Rudra Singha
, constructed the brick wall of about 5 km in length surrounding the Gargaon Palace and the masonry gate leading to it.

The old palace was destroyed and the present seven-storied palace was rebuilt around 1752 by Rajeswar Singha ( Suremphaa , 1751-1769).

CONTENTS

* 1 Description

* 1.1 _Solang ghar_ * 1.2 The palace ground

* 2 Photo gallery * 3 See also * 4 References

DESCRIPTION

During the expedition of Mir Jumla in 1662, he was accompanied by a writer named Shihabuddin who wrote a detailed account of the expedition and gave a very full description of the people and the country. About the capital he wrote,

"The city of Gargaon has four gates of stone set in mud, from each of which to the Raja's palace, for a distance of three _kos_, an extremely strong, high and wide embankment (al) has been constructed for the passage of men. Around the city, in the place of wall, there is an encompassing bamboo plantation running continuously, two _kos_ or more in width" ... "In short the city of Gargaon appeared to us to be circular, wide and an aggregation of villages. Round the Raja's house an embankment has been made and strong bamboos have been planted on it close together to serve as a wall. Round it a moat has been dug which is deeper than a man's height in most places and is always full of water. The enclosure is one _kos_ and fourteen chains in circumference inside it high and spacious thatched houses have been built."

_SOLANG GHAR_

"The Raja's audience hall, called, _solang_, is 120 cubit long (~60m) and 30 cubit broad (~15m), measured on the inside. It stands on 66 pillars, each of them about four cubits round (~2m). They have smoothed these huge pillars so well, that at first sight they seemed to have been turned on a lathe. Thoug