HOME
The Info List - Ganglion


--- Advertisement ---



A ganglion is a nerve cell cluster[1] or a group of nerve cell bodies located in the autonomic nervous system and sensory system.[2][3] Ganglia house the cell bodies of afferent nerves and efferent nerves. A pseudoganglion looks like a ganglion, but only has nerve fibers and has no nerve cell bodies.

Contents

1 Structure

1.1 Basal ganglia 1.2 Pseudoganglion

2 See also 3 References 4 External links

Structure[edit] Ganglia are primarily made up of somata and dendritic structures which are bundled or connected. Ganglia often interconnect with other ganglia to form a complex system of ganglia known as a plexus. Ganglia provide relay points and intermediary connections between different neurological structures in the body, such as the peripheral and central nervous systems. Among vertebrates there are three major groups of ganglia:

Dorsal root ganglia (also known as the spinal ganglia) contain the cell bodies of sensory (afferent) neurons. Cranial nerve ganglia contain the cell bodies of cranial nerve neurons. Autonomic ganglia contain the cell bodies of autonomic nerves.

In the autonomic nervous system, fibers from the central nervous system to the ganglia are known as preganglionic fibers, while those from the ganglia to the effector organ are called postganglionic fibers. Basal ganglia[edit] The term "ganglion" refers to the peripheral nervous system.[4] However, in the brain (part of the central nervous system), the "basal ganglia" is a group of nuclei interconnected with the cerebral cortex, thalamus, and brainstem, associated with a variety of functions: motor control, cognition, emotions, and learning. Partly due to this ambiguity, the Terminologia Anatomica recommends using the term basal nuclei instead of basal ganglia; however, this usage has not been generally adopted. Pseudoganglion[edit] A pseudoganglion is a localized thickening of the main part or trunk of a nerve that has the appearance of a ganglion[5] but has only nerve fibers and no nerve cell bodies. Pseudoganglia are found in the teres minor muscle[6] and radial nerve.[citation needed] See also[edit]

Sympathetic ganglion Ganglion
Ganglion
cyst Nervous system Neuron

References[edit]

^ Sadava, David; Heller, H. Craig; Orians, Gordon H.; Purves, William K.; Hillis, David M. (2008). Life: The Science of Biology (8th ed.). W. H. Freeman. p. 943. ISBN 9780716776710.  ^ "ganglion" at Dorland's Medical Dictionary ^ Brodal, Per (2010). The Central Nervous System. Oxford University Press. p. 5. ISBN 9780195381153. In the CNS, such a group is called a nucleus and in the peripheral nervous system (PNS), a ganglion.  ^ "UNSW Embryology- Glossary G". Archived from the original on 14 December 2007. Retrieved 2008-01-13.  ^ "pseudoganglion". The Free Dictionary. Retrieved 19 December 2016.  ^ Gitlin, G. (Oct 1957). "Concerning the gangliform enlargement (pseudoganglion) on the nerve to the teres minor muscle". Journal of Anatomy. 91 (4): 466–70. PMC 1244902 . PMID 13475146. 

External links[edit]

Media related to Ganglia at Wikimedia Commons

v t e

Nervous tissue

CNS

Tissue Types

Grey matter White matter

Projection fibers Association fiber Commissural fiber Lemniscus Funiculus Fasciculus Nerve tract Decussation Commissure

Neuropil Meninges

Cell Types

Neuronal

Pyramidal Purkinje Granule

Glial

insulating:

Myelination: Oligodendrocyte

other

Astrocyte

Radial glial cell

Ependymal cells

Tanycyte

Microglia

PNS

General

Dorsal

Root Ganglion Ramus

Ventral

Root Ramus

Ramus communicans

Gray White

Autonomic ganglion
Autonomic ganglion
(Preganglionic nerve fibers Postganglionic nerve fibers)

Connective tissues

Epineurium Perineurium Endoneurium Nerve fascicle

Neuroglia

Myelination: Schwann cell

Neurilemma Myelin
Myelin
incisure Node of Ranvier Internodal segment

Satellite glial cell

Neurons/ nerve fibers

Parts

Soma

Axon
Axon
hillock

Axon

Telodendron Axon
Axon
terminals Axoplasm Axolemma Neurofibril/neurofilament

Dendrite

Nissl body Dendritic spine Apical dendrite/Basal dendrite

Types

Bipolar Unipolar Pseudounipolar Multipolar Interneuron

Renshaw

Afferent nerve
Afferent nerve
fiber/ Sensory neuron

GSA GVA SSA SVA fibers

Ia or Aα Ib or Golgi or Aα II or Aβ and Aγ III or Aδ or fast pain IV or C or slow pain

Efferent nerve fiber/ Motor neuron

GSE GVE SVE Upper motor neuron Lower motor neuron

α motorneuron β motorneuron γ motorneuron

Termination

Synapse

Electrical synapse/Gap junction Chemical synapse

Synaptic vesicle Active zone Postsynaptic density

Autapse Ribbon synapse Neuromuscular junction

Sensory receptors

Meissner's corpuscle Merkel nerve ending Pacinian corpuscle Ruffini ending Muscle spindle Free nerve ending Nociceptor Olfactory receptor neuron Photoreceptor cell H

.