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Gabriel
Gabriel
(Hebrew: גַּבְרִיאֵל‎, lit. 'Gavri'el "God is my strength"', Ancient Greek: Ⲅαβριήλ, lit. 'Gabriel', Coptic: ⲅⲁⲃⲣⲓⲏⲗ); in the Abrahamic religions, is an archangel who typically serves as God's messenger. In the Jewish scriptures, Gabriel
Gabriel
appears to the prophet Daniel, to explain his visions (Daniel 8:15–26, 9:21–27). Gabriel
Gabriel
the archangel is also a character in other ancient Jewish writings such as the Book of Enoch. In the Christian
Christian
New Testament
New Testament
in the Gospel
Gospel
of Luke, the angel Gabriel
Gabriel
appears to Zechariah and the Virgin Mary, foretelling the births of John the Baptist
John the Baptist
and Jesus, respectively (Luke 1:11–38). In many Christian
Christian
traditions including Anglican, Eastern Orthodox and Roman Catholic, Gabriel
Gabriel
is also referred to as a saint.[1][6] In Islam, Gabriel
Gabriel
is an archangel whom God
God
sent with revelation to various prophets, including Muhammad.[7] The 96th chapter of the Quran, the Clot, is believed by Muslims to have been the first chapter revealed by Gabriel
Gabriel
to Muhammad. In the Latter-day Saint
Saint
faith, the angel Gabriel
Gabriel
is the same individual as the prophet Noah
Noah
in his mortal ministry. In Yazidism, Gabriel
Gabriel
is one of the Seven Mysteries, the Heptad to which God
God
entrusted the world.

Contents

1 Judaism 2 Intertestamental literature 3 Christianity

3.1 New Testament 3.2 Gabriel's horn 3.3 Feast days 3.4 Latter-day Saint
Saint
teachings

4 Islam 5 Bahá'í Faith 6 Art, entertainment, and media

6.1 Gabriel
Gabriel
sculptures 6.2 Festivals 6.3 Film 6.4 Games 6.5 Literature 6.6 Music 6.7 Visual art 6.8 Television

7 See also 8 References 9 Bibliography 10 External links

Judaism[edit] Jewish rabbis interpreted the "man in linen" as Gabriel
Gabriel
in the Book of Daniel and the Book of Ezekiel. In the Book of Daniel, Gabriel
Gabriel
is responsible for interpreting Daniel's visions. Gabriel's main function in Daniel is that of revealer, a role he continues in later literature. In the Book of Ezekiel, Gabriel
Gabriel
is understood to be the angel that was sent to destroy Jerusalem. According to the Jewish Encyclopedia, Gabriel
Gabriel
takes the form of a man, and stands at the left hand of God.[8] Shimon ben Lakish (Syria Palaestina, 3rd century) concluded that the angelic names of Michael, Raphael, and Gabriel
Gabriel
came out of the Babylonian exile (Gen. Rab. 48:9).[9] Alongside archangel Michael, Gabriel
Gabriel
is described as the guardian angel of Israel, defending this people against the angels of the other nations.[10] In Kabbalah, Gabriel
Gabriel
is identified with the sephirot of Yesod. Gabriel also has a prominent role as one of God's archangels in the Kabbalah literature. There, Gabriel
Gabriel
is portrayed as working in concert with Michael as part of God's court. Gabriel
Gabriel
is not to be prayed to because only God
God
can answer prayers and sends Gabriel
Gabriel
as his agent.[8] According to Jewish mythology, in the Garden of Eden
Garden of Eden
there is a tree of life or the "tree of souls"[11] that blossoms and produces new souls, which fall into the Guf, the Treasury of Souls. Gabriel
Gabriel
reaches into the treasury and takes out the first soul that comes into his hand. Then Lailah, the Angel
Angel
of Conception, watches over the embryo until it is born.[12] Intertestamental literature[edit] The intertestamental period (roughly 200 BCE – 50 CE) produced a wealth of literature, much of it having an apocalyptic orientation. The names and ranks of angels and devils were greatly expanded, and each had particular duties and status before God. In 1 Enoch 9:1–3, Gabriel, along with Michael, Uriel
Uriel
and Suriel, "saw much blood being shed upon the earth" (9:1) and heard the souls of men cry, "Bring our cause before the Most High." (9:3) In 1 Enoch 10:1, the reply came from "the Most High, the Holy and Great One" who sent forth agents, including Gabriel—

And the Lord said to Gabriel: "'Proceed against the bastards and the reprobates, and against the children of fornication: and destroy [the children of fornication and] the children of the Watchers from amongst men [and cause them to go forth]: send them one against the other that they may destroy each other in battle: for length of days shall they not have." —1 Enoch 10:9

Gabriel
Gabriel
is the fifth of the five angels who keep watch: "Gabriel, one of the holy angels, who is over Paradise
Paradise
and the serpents and the Cherubim." (1 Enoch 20:7) When Enoch asked who the four figures were that he had seen: "And he said to me: 'This first is Michael, the merciful and long-suffering: and the second, who is set over all the diseases and all the wounds of the children of men, is Raphael: and the third, who is set over all the powers, is Gabriel: and the fourth, who is set over the repentance unto hope of those who inherit eternal life, is named Phanuel.' And these are the four angels of the Lord of Spirits and the four voices I heard in those days." (Enoch 40:9) Christianity[edit] New Testament[edit]

Archangel
Archangel
Gabriel. A fresco from the Tsalenjikha Cathedral
Tsalenjikha Cathedral
by Cyrus Emanuel Eugenicus. 14th century

First, concerning John the Baptist, an angel appeared to his father Zacharias, a priest of the course of Abia, (Luke 1:5-7) whose barren wife Elisabeth was of the daughters of Aaron, while he ministered in the temple:

Luke 1:10 And the whole multitude of the people were praying without at the time of incense. 11 And there appeared unto him an angel of the Lord standing on the right side of the altar of incense. 12 And when Zacharias saw him, he was troubled, and fear fell upon him. 13 But the angel said unto him, Fear not, Zacharias: for thy prayer is heard; and thy wife Elisabeth shall bear thee a son, and thou shalt call his name John. 14 And thou shalt have joy and gladness; and many shall rejoice at his birth. 15 For he shall be great in the sight of the Lord, and shall drink neither wine nor strong drink; and he shall be filled with the Holy Ghost, even from his mother's womb. 16 And many of the children of Israel shall he turn to the Lord their God. 17 And he shall go before him in the spirit and power of Elias, to turn the hearts of the fathers to the children, and the disobedient to the wisdom of the just; to make ready a people prepared for the Lord. 18 And Zacharias said unto the angel, Whereby shall I know this? for I am an old man, and my wife well stricken in years. 19 And the angel answering said unto him, I am Gabriel, that stand in the presence of God; and am sent to speak unto thee, and to shew thee these glad tidings. 20 And, behold, thou shalt be dumb, and not able to speak, until the day that these things shall be performed, because thou believest not my words, which shall be fulfilled in their season. (Luke 1:10-20 KJV) (other versions: Luke 1:1-25)

Gabriel
Gabriel
on the southern deacons' door of the iconostasis in the Cathedral of Hajdúdorog, Hungary.

After completing his week[13] of ministry, Zacharias returned to his house (in Hebron)[14] and his wife Elizabeth conceived. After she completed "five months" (Luke 1:21-25) of her pregnancy, Gabriel
Gabriel
is mentioned again:

Luke 1:26 ¶ And in the sixth month the angel Gabriel
Gabriel
was sent from God
God
unto a city of Galilee, named Nazareth, 27 To a virgin espoused to a man whose name was Joseph, of the house of David; and the virgin's name was Mary. 28 And the angel came in unto her, and said, Hail, thou that art highly favoured, the Lord is with thee: blessed art thou among women. 29 And when she saw him, she was troubled at his saying, and cast in her mind what manner of salutation this should be. 30 And the angel said unto her, Fear not, Mary: for thou hast found favour with God. 31 And, behold, thou shalt conceive in thy womb, and bring forth a son, and shalt call his name JESUS. 32 He shall be great, and shall be called the Son of the Highest: and the Lord God
God
shall give unto him the throne of his father David: 33 And he shall reign over the house of Jacob
Jacob
for ever; and of his kingdom there shall be no end. 34 Then said Mary unto the angel, How shall this be, seeing I know not a man? 35 And the angel answered and said unto her, The Holy Ghost shall come upon thee, and the power of the Highest shall overshadow thee: therefore also that holy thing which shall be born of thee shall be called the Son of God. 36 And, behold, thy cousin Elisabeth, she hath also conceived a son in her old age: and this is the sixth month with her, who was called barren. 37 For with God
God
nothing shall be impossible. 38 And Mary said, Behold the handmaid of the Lord; be it unto me according to thy word. And the angel departed from her. (Luke 1:26-38 KJV) (other versions: Luke 1:26-38)

Gabriel
Gabriel
only appears by name in those two passages in Luke. In the first passage the angel identified himself as Gabriel, but in the second it is Luke who identified him as Gabriel. The only other named angels in the New Testament
New Testament
are Michael the Archangel
Archangel
(in Jude 1:9) and Abaddon
Abaddon
(in Revelation 9:11) . Gabriel
Gabriel
is not called an archangel in the Bible. Believers are expressly warned not to worship angels (in Colossians 2:18-19 and Revelation 19:10).[15] Gabriel's horn[edit] The trope of Gabriel
Gabriel
blowing a trumpet blast to indicate the Lord's return to Earth
Earth
is especially familiar in Negro spirituals. However, though the Bible
Bible
mentions a trumpet blast preceding the resurrection of the dead, it never specifies Gabriel
Gabriel
as the trumpeter. Different passages state different things: the angels of the Son of Man (Matthew 24:31); the voice of the Son of God
God
(John 5:25-29); God's trumpet (I Thessalonians 4:16); seven angels sounding a series of blasts (Revelation 8-11); or simply "a trumpet will sound" (I Corinthians 15:52).[16] In related traditions, Gabriel
Gabriel
is again not identified as the trumpeter. In Judaism, trumpets are prominent, and they seem to be blown by God
God
himself, or sometimes Michael. In Zoroastrianism, there is no trumpeter at the last judgement. In Islamic tradition, it is Israfil
Israfil
who blows the trumpet, though he is not named in the Qur'an. The Christian
Christian
Church Fathers
Church Fathers
do not mention Gabriel
Gabriel
as the trumpeter; early English literature similarly does not.[16] The earliest known identification of Gabriel
Gabriel
as the trumpeter comes in John Wycliffe's 1382 tract, De Ecclesiæ Dominio.[17] In the year 1455, in Armenian art, there is an illustration in an Armenian manuscript showing Gabriel
Gabriel
sounding his trumpet as the dead climb out of their graves.[18] Two centuries later, Gabriel
Gabriel
is identified as the trumpeter, in John Milton's Paradise Lost
Paradise Lost
(1667):[16][19]

Betwixt these rockie pillars Gabriel
Gabriel
sat Chief of the Angelic guards (IV.545f)... He ended, and the Son gave signal high To the bright minister that watch'd, he blew His trumpet, heard in Oreb since perhaps When God
God
descended, and perhaps once more To sound at general doom. (XI.72ff).

Later, Gabriel's horn is omnipresent in Negro spirituals, but it is unclear how the Byzantine conception inspired Milton and the spirituals, though they presumably have a common source.[16] Gabriel's horn also makes an appearance in The Eyes of Texas (1903) where it signifies the rapture.[20] In Marc Connelly's play based on spirituals, The Green Pastures (1930), Gabriel
Gabriel
has his beloved trumpet constantly with him, and the Lord has to warn him not to blow it too soon.[16] Four years later "Blow, Gabriel, Blow" was introduced by Ethel Merman
Ethel Merman
in Cole Porter's Anything Goes
Anything Goes
(1934). Feast days[edit]

Icon
Icon
of Gabriel, Byzantine, ca. 1387–1395 (Tretyakov Gallery)

Saint
Saint
Gabriel
Gabriel
Archangel's festivity day was exclusively celebrated the 18th of March as of many sources dating between the years 1588 and 1921, except for a source published in 1856,[21] where the feast was celebrated on April 7th for unknown reasons (a parentheses notes that the day is normally celebrated on March 18). Writer Elizabeth Drayson mentions the feast being celebrated in March 18 the year of 1588 in her 2013 book: "The Lead Books of Granada". Drayson, Elizabeth (January 13, 2016). The Lead Books of Granada. Palgrave Macmillan - 2013 edition. p. 3. ISBN 113735884X.  One of the oldest out of print sources pronouncing the feast for March 18th, was first published in 1608 and has the name "Flos sanctorum: historia general de la vida y hechos de Jesu-Christo ... y de los santos de que reza y haze fiesta la Iglesia Catholica ..." by the Spanish writer Alonso de Villegas, a newer edition of this book was published in the year 1794. de Villegas, Alonso (1794). "Flos sanctorum: historia general de la vida y hechos de Jesu-Christo...". Spain: Imprenta de Isidro Aguasvivas. p. 250.  Another source published in Ireland in 1886 «The Irish Ecclesiastical Record» also mentions March 18. The Irish Ecclesiastical Record. Browne and Nolan, 1886. 1886. p. 1112.  There is a painting from 1886 by the Italian artist Diodore Rahoult, the 18th of March appears on the painting as well.[22] The feast of Saint
Saint
Gabriel
Gabriel
was included for the first time in the General Roman Calendar
General Roman Calendar
in 1921, for celebration on March 24.[citation needed] It is unknown whether this was a temporary change, however there is no recent mention of the feast commemoration between the years 1921 and 1969. In 1969 the day was officially transferred to September 29 for celebration in conjunction with the feast of St. Michael and St. Raphael.[23] The Church of England
Church of England
has also adopted the September 29 date, known as Michaelmas. The Eastern Orthodox Church
Eastern Orthodox Church
and those Eastern Catholic Churches
Eastern Catholic Churches
which follow the Byzantine Rite
Byzantine Rite
celebrate his feast day on November 8 (for those churches that follow the traditional Julian Calendar, November 8 currently falls on November 21 of the modern Gregorian Calendar, a difference of 13 days). Eastern Orthodox commemorate him, not only on his November feast, but also on two other days: March 26 is the " Synaxis
Synaxis
of the Archangel
Archangel
Gabriel" and celebrates his role in the Annunciation. July 13 is also known as the " Synaxis
Synaxis
of the Archangel
Archangel
Gabriel", and celebrates all the appearances and miracles attributed to Gabriel throughout history. The feast was first established on Mount Athos when, in the 9th century, during the reign of Emperor Basil II
Basil II
and the Empress Constantina Porphyrogenitus and while Nicholas Chrysoverges was Patriarch
Patriarch
of Constantinople, the Archangel
Archangel
appeared in a cell[24] near Karyes, where he wrote with his finger on a stone tablet the hymn to the Theotokos, "It is truly meet...".[25] The Coptic Orthodox Church
Coptic Orthodox Church
celebrates his feast on Paoni 13[26], Koiak 22 and Paoni 26.[27] The Ethiopian Church
Ethiopian Church
celebrates his feast on December 28, with a sizeable number of its believers making a pilgrimage to a church dedicated to " Saint
Saint
Gabriel" in Kulubi on that day.[28] Additionally, Gabriel
Gabriel
is the patron saint of messengers, those who work for broadcasting and telecommunications such as radio and television, remote sensing[citation needed], postal workers, clerics, diplomats, and stamp collectors.[5] Latter-day Saint
Saint
teachings[edit] In Latter-day Saint
Saint
theology, Gabriel
Gabriel
is believed to have lived a mortal life as the prophet Noah. The two are regarded as the same individual; Noah
Noah
being his mortal name and Gabriel
Gabriel
being his heavenly name.[29] Islam[edit] Main article: Holy Spirit in Islam See also: Angel
Angel
of the Lord "Jibril" redirects here. For the 2018 German film, see Jibril (film).

A medieval Islamic depiction of the archangel Gabriel
Gabriel
from the Arab manuscript The Wonders of Creation and the Oddities of Existence (14th century)

Gabriel
Gabriel
(Arabic: جبريل, Jibrīl or جبرائيل Jibrāʾīl)[30] is venerated as an archangel and as the Angel
Angel
of Revelation in Islam. As the Bible
Bible
portrays Gabriel
Gabriel
as a celestial messenger sent to Daniel,[31] Mary,[32] and Zechariah,[33] so too Islamic tradition holds that Gabriel
Gabriel
was sent to numerous pre-Islamic prophets with revelation and divine injunctions, including Adam, whom Muslims believe was consoled by Gabriel
Gabriel
some time after the Fall.[34] According to Muslim
Muslim
belief, God
God
revealed the Quran
Quran
to the Islamic prophet Muhammad
Muhammad
through the angel Gabriel,[34] and the fifty-third chapter of the text describes the angel without naming him, in a passage that Islamic commentators have unanimously interpreted as referring to Gabriel. The passage in question, 53:4-11, reads:

This is naught but a revelation revealed, taught him by one mighty in power, very strong; he stood poised being on the higher horizon, then drew near and suspended hung, two bows'-length away, or nearer, then revealed to His servant that he revealed.

Gabriel
Gabriel
is also named numerous times in the Qur'an
Qur'an
(2:97 and 66:4 for example). In 2:92-96, the Quran
Quran
mentions Gabriel
Gabriel
along with Michael, who is also venerated as an exalted angel in Islam. In Muslim tradition, Gabriel
Gabriel
is considered one of the primary archangels. Exegesis
Exegesis
narrates that Muhammad
Muhammad
saw Gabriel
Gabriel
in his full angelic splendor only twice, the first time being when he received his first revelation.[35] Muslims also revere Gabriel
Gabriel
for a number of historical events predating the first revelation. Muslims believe that Gabriel
Gabriel
was the angel who informed Zachariah of John's birth as well as Mary of the future nativity of Jesus,[36] and that Gabriel
Gabriel
was one of three angels who had earlier informed Abraham
Abraham
of the birth of Isaac.[37] All of these events can be found also in the Quran. Gabriel
Gabriel
also makes a famous appearance in the Hadith of Gabriel, where he questions Muhammad
Muhammad
on the core tenets of Islam. Bahá'í Faith[edit] The Bahá'í Faith
Bahá'í Faith
sees Gabriel
Gabriel
as a messenger of God
God
who delivered messages to Muhammad. He is mentioned in the Kitáb-i-Íqán, the primary theological work of the Baha'i religion.[38] Art, entertainment, and media[edit]

The Annunciation, Henry Ossawa Tanner
Henry Ossawa Tanner
(1898)

Angels are described as pure spirits. [39][40] The lack of a defined form allows artists wide latitude in depicting them.[41] Amelia R. Brown draws comparisons in Byzantine iconography between portrayals of angels and the conventions used to depict court eunuchs. Mainly from the Caucasus, they tended to have light eyes, hair, and skin; and those "castrated in childhood developed a distinctive skeletal structure, lacked full masculine musculature, body hair and beards...." As officials, they would wear a white tunic decorated with gold. Brown suggests that "Byzantine artists drew, consciously or not, on this iconography of the court eunuch".[42] Some recent popular works on angels consider Gabriel
Gabriel
to be female or androgynous.[43][44] Gabriel
Gabriel
sculptures[edit]

Archangel
Archangel
Gabriel
Gabriel
Millennium Monument at Heroes' Square in Budapest

Archangel
Archangel
Gabriel
Gabriel
in the church of St. Georg in Bermatingen

Archangel
Archangel
Gabriel
Gabriel
in the church of St. Magnus in Waldburg

Archangel
Archangel
Gabriel
Gabriel
at the facade of the Cathedral of Reims

Archangel
Archangel
Gabriel
Gabriel
at the Liberty square, Budapest

Festivals[edit]

Baltimore's "Little Italy" has for over 80 years hosted an annual "end of summer" St. Gabriel
Gabriel
Festival that features a procession with a statue of the saint carried through the streets.[45][46]

The Annunciation, Gabriel
Gabriel
kneeling on one knee. Llanbeblig Book of Hours (f. 1r.)

Film[edit]

In the 1947 western Heaven Only Knows, Gabriel
Gabriel
was portrayed by William Farnum. In the 1995 horror film The Prophecy
The Prophecy
– Gabriel, portrayed by Christopher Walken, searches for an evil soul on Earth
Earth
during an end-of-days angelic civil war. Gabriel
Gabriel
is also a character in The Prophecy II (1998) and The Prophecy
The Prophecy
3: The Ascent (2000). In the 2004 action / horror film Van Helsing – Hugh Jackman
Hugh Jackman
plays Gabriel
Gabriel
Van Helsing, called Abraham
Abraham
Van Helsing in Bram Stoker's Dracula. It has been suggested that he is the archangel in human form.[47] In the 2005 fantasy/horror film Constantine – Tilda Swinton
Tilda Swinton
portrays an androgynous archangel Gabriel, the film's main antagonist on the brink of the Apocalypse. In the 2007: action / horror film Gabriel
Gabriel
Gabriel
Gabriel
(portrayed by Andy Whitfield) fights to save the souls in purgatory by defeating the evil fallen angels. In the 2010: apocalyptic supernatural action film Legion – Kevin Durand plays the role of Archangel
Archangel
Gabriel, the leader of the angel army, and the main antagonist. The story was continued in the TV series Dominion, which was cancelled after two seasons.

Games[edit]

2005: Spanish role-playing game Anima: Beyond Fantasy - Gabriel
Gabriel
is as the humans know one of the seven "Beryls" (godlike beings of light) and is identified with the archangel of the same name. She has associated love, friendship, arts, and peace. In the Japanese role-playing game Shin Megami Tensei
Shin Megami Tensei
- Gaberiel is one of the Demons the player can summon to assist in battle. In the video game El Shaddai: Ascension of the Metatron, based on the Book of Enoch, Gabriel
Gabriel
is featured alongside Michael, Raphael and Uriel
Uriel
as a guide for Enoch on his quest. All four archangels take the form of swans while on Earth. Gabriel
Gabriel
is depicted as female in this interpretation, and implied to be an angel of wisdom. She is associated with the Veil weapon Enoch uses.

Literature[edit]

In his epic poem Paradise
Paradise
Lost, John Milton
John Milton
made Gabriel
Gabriel
chief of the angelic guards placed over Paradise The Hebrew
Hebrew
poem "Elifelet" (אליפלט) by Nathan Alterman, put to music and often heard on the Israeli Radio, tells of a heroic, self-sacrificing Israeli soldier being killed in battle. Upon the protagonist's death, the angel Gabriel
Gabriel
descends to Earth, in order to comfort the spirit of the fallen hero and take him up to Heaven[48][49] The main character of Salman Rushdie's The Satanic Verses
The Satanic Verses
(1988) believes that he is the modern incarnation of Gabriel 2012: Japanese light novel series No Game No Life, Jibril is a member of the Flügel race and was a member of the Council of 18 Wings, a prominent section in the government. She is depicted as loving knowledge and books. In the volume 3 of the Japanese light novel series The Devil
Devil
Is a Part-Timer!, an archangel named Gabriel
Gabriel
appeared and is the guardian of the Sephirah
Sephirah
Yesod.

Music[edit] The eccentric English hagiographer and antiquarian, Sabine Baring-Gould (1834–1924), wrote the English lyrics to Gabriel's Message, which he translated from the Basque Christmas
Christmas
carol Birjina gaztetto bat zegoen, which was probably related to the 13th or 14th-century Latin chant Angelus
Angelus
Ad Virginem, which itself is based on the biblical account of the Annunciation
Annunciation
in the Gospel
Gospel
of Luke. In Creed's song, "My Own Prison", Gabriel
Gabriel
is mentioned deciphering the visions to the main character in the song. "Sugar Baby", the last track on Bob Dylan's Love and Theft album, contains this reference: "Just as sure as we're living, just as sure as we're born/ Look up, look up - seek your Maker - 'fore Gabriel
Gabriel
blows his horn." Visual art[edit] See also Gabriel
Gabriel
gallery in Commons

Detail of Gabriel
Gabriel
from Leonardo da Vinci's Annunciation

Angel
Angel
of the Annunciation
Annunciation
by Titian

Daniel 8:15 describes Gabriel
Gabriel
as appearing in the "likeness of man" and in Daniel 9:21 he is referred to as "the man Gabriel." David Everson observes that "such anthropomorphic descriptions of an angel are consistent with previous ... descriptions of angels," as in Genesis 19:5.[9] Gabriel
Gabriel
is most often portrayed in the context of scenes of the Annunciation. In 2008 a 16th-century drawing by Lucas van Leyden of the Netherlands was discovered. George R. Goldner, chairman of the department of prints and drawings at New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art, suggests that the sketch was for a stained glass window. "The fact that the archangel is an ordinary-looking person and not an idealized boy is typical of the artist", said Goldner.[50] In chronological order (to see each item, follow the link in the footnote):[51]

Archangel
Archangel
Gabriel
Gabriel
(Triptych), early 10th century, Benaki Museum The Archangel
Archangel
Gabriel, Pisan, c. 1325/50, National Gallery of Art The Archangel
Archangel
Gabriel, Masolino da Panicale, c. 1420/30, National Gallery of Art Justice between the Archangels Michael and Gabriel, Jacobello del Fiore, 1421 Merode Altarpiece (Triptych), Robert Campin, c. 1425, Metropolitan Museum of Art The Angel
Angel
Gabriel, Agostino di Duccio, c. 1450 Annunciation, Leonardo da Vinci, c. 1475 The Angel
Angel
Gabriel, Neroccio d'Landi, c. 1490 The Angel
Angel
Gabriel, late 15th or early 16th century, Flemish, National Gallery of Art The Angel
Angel
Gabriel, Ferrari Gaudenzio, 1511, National Gallery, London Gabriel
Gabriel
delivering the Annunciation
Annunciation
El Greco, 1575 (pictured above) Go Down Death, Aaron
Aaron
Douglas, 1934

Television[edit]

1960: The Twilight Zone episode, "A Passage for Trumpet" – The down-and-out musician Joey Crown (Jack Klugman) meets an enigmatic trumpet player named "Gabe" (played by John Anderson), in what has been described as Rod Serling's version of It's a Wonderful Life.[52] 2005: TV series Supernatural – Gabriel
Gabriel
(Richard Speight Jr.) is a runaway archangel posing as the demi-god Loki
Loki
who kills people he deems evil with a sense of humor, but series protagonists Sam and Dean Winchester eventually discover his true nature. He is also known as "the Trickster". 2014: Syfy Channel original series Dominion – Gabriel
Gabriel
(portrayed by Carl Beukes) is the series antagonist, who plans to kill the Archangel Michael and annihilate humanity.

See also[edit]

Saints portal

List of angels in theology Angel
Angel
of the Lord Angelus Annunciation Archangel Christian
Christian
angelic hierarchy Fleur de lys Gabriel's Horn, a mathematical figure Hermes List of names referring to El Michael (archangel) Seraph

References[edit]

^ a b Zimmerman, Julie. "Friar Jack's Catechism Quiz: Test Your Knowledge on Angels". AmericanCatholic.org. Archived from the original on 21 May 2012. Retrieved 16 February 2012.  ^ a b c d e OrthodoxWiki. " Archangel
Archangel
Gabriel" (Internet). OrthodoxWiki. Retrieved 2013-11-15. Because the Angels are incorporeal beings, though they nevertheless take on human form when appearing to mankind, it can be difficult to differentiate one from another in icons. However, Gabriel
Gabriel
is usually portrayed with certain distinguishing characteristics. He typically wears blue or white garments; he holds either a lily (representing the Theotokos), a trumpet, a shining lantern, a branch from Paradise
Paradise
presented to him by the Theotokos, or a spear in his right hand and often a mirror—made of jasper and with a Χ (the first letter of Christ (Χριστος) in Greek)—in his left hand. He should not be confused with the Archangel
Archangel
Michael, who carries a sword, shield, date-tree branch, and in the other hand a spear, white banner (possibly with scarlet cross) and tends to wear red. Michael's specific mission is to suppress enemies of the true Church (hence the military theme), while Gabriel's is to announce mankind's salvation.  ^ a b c Ronner, John (March 1993). Know Your Angels: The Angel
Angel
Almanac With Biographies of 100 Prominent Angels in Legend & Folklore-And Much More!. Murfreesboro, TN: Mamre Press. pp. 70–72, 73. ISBN 9780932945402. LCCN 93020336. OCLC 27726648. Retrieved 2013-11-15. Artists like to show Gabriel
Gabriel
carrying a lily (Mary's flower), a scroll and a scepter.  ^ Catholic Online. "St. Gabriel, the Archangel". Catholic.org. Retrieved 2013-11-15.  ^ a b c d e f g h Guiley, Rosemary (2004). Encyclopedia of Angels (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Facts on File, Inc. p. 140. ISBN 9780816050239. OCLC 718132289. Retrieved 2013-11-15. He is the patron saint to telecommunication workers, radio broadcasters, messengers, postal workers, clerics, diplomats, and stamp collectors.  ^ For example, Book of Common Prayer
Book of Common Prayer
1662, Calendar (29 September) "S. Michael and all Angels", page xxix; or propers, page 227, "Saint Michael and All Angels". ^ Ali, Maulana Muhammad; Gallegos, Christopher (1936). The Religion of Islam. Lahore: eBookIt.com. p. 69. ISBN 9781934271186.  ^ a b Gabriel. Jewish Encyclopedia. 5. 1906. pp. 540–543. Retrieved December 2, 2016.  ^ a b Student. "Everson, David. " Gabriel
Gabriel
Blow Your Horn! - A Short History of Gabriel
Gabriel
within Jewish Literature", Xavier University, December 2009". Bibleinterp.com. Archived from the original on April 28, 2014. Retrieved 2014-05-01.  ^ Ginzberg, Louis (1909). Legends of the Jews Vol I : The Creation of The World - The First Things Created (Translated by Henrietta Szold) Philadelphia: Jewish Publication Society. ^ Origins of the Kabbalah. Books.google.com. 1990. ISBN 0691020477. Retrieved 2014-05-01.  ^ "200_ THE TREASURY OF SOULS for Tree
Tree
of Souls: The Mythology of Judaism". Scribd. Archived from the original on 2012-10-30. Retrieved 15 June 2015.  ^ THE Dedication (Jesus' birth) "The priests serve 4 weeks per year: 1 week twice a year in courses, and the two week-long feasts, unleavened bread and tabernacles. Pentecost is a one-day observance, which would have come before Zacharias' (the 8th) course began, or at the latest, the 1st day of his course, which was from 12 thru 18 Sivan, or noon on the 19th, if Josephus is correct that courses changed at noon on the sabbaths." Josephus Antiquities b.7 ch.14 s.7 "eight days, from sabbath to sabbath." Josephus against Apion b.2 sect.8 "mid-day" ^ Joshua 21:9-11 with Luke 1:39-40 ^ See also Easton's Bible
Bible
Dictionary angel entry ^ a b c d e S. Vernon McCasland, "Gabriel's Trumpet", Journal of Bible and Religion 9:3:159–161 (August 1941) JSTOR 1456405 ^ Vaughn, Robert (1845). Tracts & Treatises of John De Wycliffe, D.D. Wycliffe Society. p. 79.  ^ Walters MS 543, fol. 14. ^ Milton, Paradise
Paradise
Lost, XI.72ff ^ Nicar, Jim. "The Origins of "The Eyes of Texas"". Longhorn Band. Retrieved 6 July 2015.  ^ "The Catholic Directory, Ecclasiastical Register, and Almanac". Retrieved April 29, 2017.  ^ " Archangel
Archangel
Gabriel, divine messenger; commemoration on 18 March, 1886". Retrieved April 30, 2017.  ^ Calendarium Romanum (Libreria Editrice Vaticana, 1969), p. 119 ^ "The miracle of "Axion Estin"".  ^ Velimirovic, Bishop
Bishop
Nikolai (1985). "July 13: The Holy Archangel Gabriel". Prologue from Ochrid. Birmingham, UK: Lazarica Press. ISBN 978-0-948298-05-9. Archived from the original on 2007-09-28. Retrieved 2007-07-31.  ^ https://st-takla.org/Full-Free-Coptic-Books/Synaxarium-or-Synaxarion/Saints-Feasts/10-Bawoonah/13-Bawoonah-1-Gabriel-Angel.html ^ https://st-takla.org/Full-Free-Coptic-Books/FreeCopticBooks-014-Various-Authors/001-Al-Mala2ka/The-Angels__37-Archangel-Gabriel.html ^ Nega Mezlekia, Notes from the Hyena's Belly: An Ethiopian Childhood (New York: Picador, 2000), p. 266. ISBN 0-312-28914-6. ^ Skinner, Andrew C (1992), "Noah", in Ludlow, Daniel H, Encyclopedia of Mormonism, New York: Macmillan Publishing, pp. 1016–1017, ISBN 0-02-879602-0, OCLC 24502140 . ^ Nader, M. The Holy Spirit in the Quran. Submission.org. Retrieved 11 August 2009. ^ Daniel 8.16, 9.21. ^ Luke 1.26. ^ Luke 1.19. ^ a b Glasse, Cyril (2000). The Concise Encyclopedia of Islam. Lahore: Suhail Academy. p. 136. ISBN 969-519-018-9.  ^ Encyclopedia of Islam, Djabrail ^ Stories of the Prophets, Ibn Kathir, Story of Zachariah; Story of Jesus ^ Stories of the Prophets, Ibn Kathir, Story of Ishmael ^ [1] "The Kitáb-i-Íqán
Kitáb-i-Íqán
PART ONE". BAHA'I REFERENCE LIBRARY. Retrieved 2014-09-10. ^ Gorgievski, Sandra. Face to Face with Angels: Images in Medieval Art and in Film, McFarland (2010) ISBN 9780786457564 ^ Dr. Christopher Evan Longhurst (1970-01-01). "Longhurst S.T.D., Christopher Evan. "The Science of Angelology in the Modern World: The Revival of Angels in Contemporary Culture", ''The Catholic Response'', Volume IX, No.2, September/October 2012 (pp. 32-36) ISSN 1553-0221". Academia.edu. Retrieved 2014-05-01.  ^ "Angels Exist But Have No Wings, Says Church". News.sky.com. 2013-12-20. Retrieved 2014-05-01.  ^ Brown, Amelia (1970-01-01). "Brown, Amelia R., Painting the Bodiless: Angels and Eunuchs in Byzantine Art and Culture, University of Queensland (2007)". Academia.edu. Retrieved 2014-05-01.  ^ Giovetti, Paola (1993). Angels: The Role of Celestial Guardians and Beings of Light. Translated by Toby McCormick. York Beach, ME: Samuel Weiser. ISBN 978-0877287797. OCLC 27173025. Retrieved 2013-10-09.  ^ Godwin, Malcolm (1990). Angels An Endangered Species. New York, NY: Simon and Schuster. p. 43. ISBN 0671706500. OCLC 21227232. Retrieved 2013-11-13. But Gabri-el is unique amongst an otherwise male or androgynous host, for it is almost certain that this great Archangel
Archangel
is the only female in the higher echelons.  ^ "Little Italy Hosts 83rd Annual St. Gabriel
Gabriel
Festival". Baltimore.cbslocal.com. 2012-08-17. Retrieved 2014-05-01.  ^ "Little Italy celebrates the Feast of Saint
Saint
Gabriel
Gabriel
in style". Baltimoreguide.com. 2011-08-17. Archived from the original on 2014-01-16. Retrieved 2014-05-01.  ^ http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0338526/trivia?ref_=tt_trv_trv IMDb Film Trivia ^ "התרנגולים - אליפלט - שירונט". Shiron.net. Retrieved 2010-08-16.  ^ "אין לו אופי אפילו במיל". Haayal.co.il. Retrieved 2010-08-16.  ^ Vogel, Carol. "Angels Appear, and Museums Rejoice", New York Times, 25 July 2008 ^ "Links to images of Gabriel". The Text This Week. Retrieved 2007-02-12.  ^ TV.com (2011-11-22). " A Passage for Trumpet - the Twilight Zone". Tv.com. Retrieved 2014-05-01. 

Bibliography[edit]

Bamberger, Bernard J. (2006). Fallen Angels: Soldiers of Satan's Realm. Philadelphia, PA: Jewish Publication Society. ISBN 978-0-8276-0797-2. Briggs, Constance Victoria (1997). The Encyclopedia of Angels: An A-to-Z Guide with Nearly 4,000 Entries. New York, NY: Plume. ISBN 978-0-452-27921-6. Bunson, Matthew (1996). Angels A to Z: A Who's Who of the Heavenly Host. New York, NY: Crown Trade Paperbacks. ISBN 0517885379. Cruz, Joan C. (1999). Angels and Devils. Rockford, IL: Tan Books & Publishers. ISBN 0-89555-638-3. Davidson, Gustav (1994). A Dictionary of Angels: Including the Fallen Angels. New York, NY: Simon & Schuster. ISBN 978-0029070529. Dennis, Geoffrey (2007). The Encyclopedia of Jewish Myth, Magic, and Mysticism. Woodbury, MN: Llewellyn Publications. ISBN 9780738709055. Graham, Billy (1994). Angels: God's Secret Agents. Woodbury, MN: Llewellyn Publications. ISBN 9780849950742. Guiley, Rosemary (1996). "G". Encyclopedia of Angels (1st ed.). New York, NY: Facts on File, Inc. pp. 69–70. ISBN 0-8160-3825-2. LCCN 96-12009. Guiley, Rosemary (2004). Encyclopedia of Angels (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Facts on File, Inc. ISBN 9780816050239. LCCN 2003-60147. Kreeft, Peter J. (1995). Angels and Demons: What Do We Really Know About Them?. San Francisco, CA: Ignatius Press. ISBN 9780898705508. Lewis, James R.; Oliver, Evelyn Dorothy (2008-05-01). Angels A to Z (2nd ed.). Detroit, MI: Visible Ink Press. pp. 156–157. ISBN 978-1-578592-12-8. Melville, Francis (2001). The Book of Angels: Turn to Your Angels for Guidance, Comfort, and Inspiration (1st ed.). Hauppauge, NY: Barron's Educational Series. ISBN 978-0-7641-5403-4. Ronner, John (1993). Know Your Angels: The Angel
Angel
Almanac With Biographies of 100 Prominent Angels in Legend & Folklore-And Much More!. Murfreesboro, TN: Mamre Press. ISBN 9780932945402.

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Gabriel.

Archangel
Archangel
Correspondence. Archangel
Archangel
Gabriel, Angelic & Planetary Symbols. Last accessed March 24, 2017. Catholic Encyclopedia. St. Gabriel
Gabriel
the Archangel. Last accessed March 24, 2017. Celdrán, José Alfredo González, and Ruck, Carl A. P. Daturas for the Virgin Last accessed March 24, 2017. Christian
Christian
Art. Icons of the Archangel
Archangel
Gabriel. Last accessed March 24, 2017. Jewish Encyclopedia.com. Gabriel. Last accessed March 24, 2017. Hassett, Maurice. "Early Christian
Christian
Representations of Angels." The Catholic Encyclopedia. Vol. 1. New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1907. Last accessed March 24. 2017

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son of David) ‘ Uzair
Uzair
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(or Whale)" or "Owner of the Fish
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(or Whale)") Ṣāḥib al-Ḥūṫ ("Companion of the Whale")

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son of Jacob) Zakariyyā (Zechariah)

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Moses
He who spoke to God) Ibrāhīm Khalīlullāh ( Abraham
Abraham
Friend of God) Nūḥ (Noah)

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Irmiyā (Jeremiah) Ṣamû’îl (Samuel) Yūsha‘ ibn Nūn (Joshua, companion and successor of Moses)

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Pharaoh
of Moses' time) Hāmān Jâlûṫ (Goliath) Qārūn (Korah, cousin of Moses) As-Sāmirī Abî Lahab Slayers of Saleh's she-camel (Qaddar ibn Salif and Musda' ibn Dahr)

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Aaron
and Moses

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Mother Abiona or Amtelai the daughter of Karnebo Ishmael's mother Isaac's mother

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Mother

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Zayd

Implied or not specified

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People of Paradise People of the Burnt Garden

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Aṣ-ḥāb al-Aykah
("Companions of the Wood")

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Muhammad
ibn Abdullah ibn Abdul-Muttalib ibn Hashim

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(Ummah of Muhammad)

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Medina
who helped Muhammad
Muhammad
and his Meccan followers, literally 'Helpers')

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Umm Jamil (wife of Abu Lahab)

Children of Ayyub Dead son of Sulaiman Qabil/Cain (son of Adam) Wali'ah or Wa'ilah/Waala (wife of Nuh) Walihah or Wahilah (wife of Lut) Ya’jūj wa Ma’jūj (Gog and Magog) Yam or Kan'an (son of Nuh)

Implicitly mentioned

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Christian
priest)

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Polytheists

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Abraham
and Lot

Locations

Mentioned

Al-Arḍ Al-Mubārakah
Al-Arḍ Al-Mubārakah
("The Land The Blessed")

Al-Arḍ Al-Muqaddasah ("The Land The Holy")

In the Arabian Peninsula
Arabian Peninsula
(excluding Madyan)

Al-Aḥqāf ("The Sandy Plains," or "the Wind-curved Sand-hills")

Iram dhāṫ al-‘Imād (Iram of the Pillars)

Al-Madīnah (formerly Yathrib) ‘Arafāṫ Al-Ḥijr (Hegra) Badr Ḥunayn Makkah (Mecca)

Bakkah Ka‘bah (Kaaba) Maqām Ibrāhīm (Station of Abraham) Safa and Marwah

Saba’ (Sheba)

‘Arim Saba’ (Dam of Sheba)

Rass

Jahannam
Jahannam
(Hell) Jannah
Jannah
(Paradise, literally 'Garden') In Mesopotamia:

Al-Jūdiyy

Munzalanm-Mubārakan ("Place-of-Landing Blessed")

Bābil (Babylon) Qaryaṫ Yūnus ("Township of Jonah," that is Nineveh)

Door of Hittah Madyan (Midian) Majma' al-Bahrain Miṣr (Mainland Egypt) Salsabîl (A river in Paradise) Sinai Region or Tīh Desert

Al-Wād Al-Muqaddas Ṭuwan (The Holy Valley of Tuwa)

Al-Wādil-Ayman (The valley on the 'righthand' side of the Valley of Tuwa and Mount Sinai)

Mount Sinai
Mount Sinai
or Mount Tabor

Implied

Antioch

Antakya

Arabia Ayla Barrier of Dhul-Qarnayn Bayt al-Muqaddas
Bayt al-Muqaddas
& 'Ariha Bilād ar-Rāfidayn (Mesopotamia) Canaan Cave of Seven Sleepers Dār al-Nadwa Al-Ḥijāz (literally "The Barrier")

Black Stone
Black Stone
(Al-Ḥajar al-Aswad) & Al-Hijr of Isma'il Cave of Hira
Hira
& Ghar al-Thawr (Cave of the Bull) Ta'if

Hudaybiyyah Jordan River Nile
Nile
River Palestine River Paradise
Paradise
of Shaddad

Religious locations

Bay'a (Church) Mihrab Monastery Masjid (Mosque, literally "Place of Prostration")

Al-Mash‘ar Al-Ḥarām
Al-Mash‘ar Al-Ḥarām
("The Monument the Sacred") Al-Masjid Al-Aqṣā (Al-Aqsa Mosque, literally "The Place-of-Prostration The Farthest") Al-Masjid Al-Ḥarām (The Sacred Mosque
Mosque
of Mecca) Masjid al-Dirar A Mosque
Mosque
in the area of Medina, possibly:

Masjid Qubâ’ (Quba Mosque) The Prophet's Mosque

Salat (Synagogue)

Plant
Plant
matter

Fruits

Ḥabb dhul-‘aṣf (Corn of the husk) Rummān (Pomegranate) Ṫīn (Fig) Ukul khamṭ (Bitter fruit or food of Sheba) Zayṫūn (Olive) In Paradise

Forbidden fruit of Adam

Bushes, trees or plants

Plants of Sheba

Athl (Tamarisk) Sidr (lote-tree)

Līnah (Tender palm tree) Nakhl (date palm) Rayḥān (Scented plant) Sidraṫ al-Munṫahā Zaqqūm

Texts

Al-Injîl (The Gospel
Gospel
of Jesus) Al-Qur’ân (The Book of Muhammad) Ṣuḥuf-i Ibrâhîm (Scroll(s) of Abraham) Aṫ-Ṫawrâṫ (The Torah)

Ṣuḥuf-i-Mûsâ (Scroll(s) of Moses) Tablets of Stone

Az-Zabûr (The Psalms
Psalms
of David) Umm al-Kiṫâb ("Mother of the Book(s)")

Objects of people or beings

Heavenly Food of Christian
Christian
Apostles Noah's Ark Staff of Musa Ṫābūṫ as-Sakīnah (Casket of Shekhinah) Throne of Bilqis Trumpet of Israfil

Mentioned idols (cult images)

'Ansāb Idols of Israelites:

Baal The ‘ijl (golden calf statue) of Israelites

Idols of Noah's people:

Nasr Suwā‘ Wadd Yaghūth Ya‘ūq

Idols of Quraysh:

Al-Lāṫ Al-‘Uzzá Manāṫ

Jibṫ and Ṭâghûṫ

Celestial bodies

Maṣābīḥ (literally 'lamps'):

Al-Qamar (The Moon) Kawâkib (Planets)

Al-Arḍ (The Earth)

Nujūm (Stars)

Ash-Shams (The Sun)

Liquids

Mā’ ( Water
Water
or fluid)

Nahr (River) Yamm ( River
River
or sea)

Sharâb (Drink)

Events

Battle of al-Aḥzāb ("the Confederates") Battle of Badr Battle of Hunayn Battle of Khaybar Battle of Tabouk Battle of Uhud Conquest of Mecca Incident of Ifk Laylat al-Mabit Mubahala Sayl al-‘Arim
Sayl al-‘Arim
(Flood of the Great Dam of Marib
Marib
in Sheba) The Farewell Pilgrimage
The Farewell Pilgrimage
(Hujja al-Wada') Treaty of Hudaybiyyah Umrah al-Qaza Yawm al-Dār

Implied

Event of Ghadir Khumm

Note: The names are sorted alphabetically. Standard form: Islamic name / Biblical name (title or relationship)

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Angels in Abrahamic religions

Judaism

Individuals

Michael Gabriel Raphael Uriel Azrael Ariel Raziel Arariel Camael Dumah Cassiel Eisheth Hadraniel Haniel Jerahmeel Jophiel Metatron Nuriel Samyaza Pravuil Sachiel Samael Tzaphqiel Yahoel Zadkiel Zerachiel Dobiel Kushiel

Satan
Satan
(rebuked)

Groups

Seraphim Chayot Ophanim Cherubim Ishim Recording angels

Christianity

Individuals

Michael Gabriel Abaddon Raphael Uriel Ariel Sariel Sandalphon Raguel Ramiel Selaphiel Barachiel Jegudiel Camael Jerahmeel Jophiel Metatron Samyaza Pravuil Sachiel Zadkiel Sarathiel Zerachiel Phanuel Aker Gabuthelon Arphugitonos Zebuleon Daniel Kerubiel Kokabiel Kushiel Leliel Muriel Pahaliah Seraphiel Shamsiel Moroni

Groups

Seraphim Ophanim Cherubim Thrones Dominions Virtues Powers Principalities Recording angels Guardian angels

Islam

Individuals

Mikha'il Jibra'il (Holy Spirit) Israfil Azrael Artiya'il Harut and Marut Azazil Maalik Ridwan Munkar and Nakir

Groups

Hafaza Recording angels Mu'aqqibat Nāzi'āt and Nāshiṭāt Darda'il Cherubim Seraphim Nineteen Angels of Hell Praying angels

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Saints of the Catholic Church

Virgin Mary

Mother of God
God
(Theotokos) Immaculate Conception Perpetual virginity Assumption Marian apparition

Guadalupe Laus Miraculous Medal Lourdes Fatima

Titles of Mary

Apostles

Andrew Barnabas Bartholomew James of Alphaeus James the Greater John Jude Matthew Matthias Paul Peter Philip Simon Thomas

Archangels

Gabriel Michael Raphael

Confessors

Anatolius Chariton the Confessor Edward the Confessor Maximus the Confessor Michael of Synnada Paphnutius the Confessor Paul I of Constantinople Salonius Theophanes the Confessor

Disciples

Apollos Mary Magdalene Priscilla and Aquila Silvanus Stephen Timothy Titus Seventy disciples

Doctors

Gregory the Great Ambrose Augustine of Hippo Jerome John Chrysostom Basil of Caesarea Gregory of Nazianzus Athanasius of Alexandria Cyril of Alexandria Cyril of Jerusalem John of Damascus Bede
Bede
the Venerable Ephrem the Syrian Thomas Aquinas Bonaventure Anselm of Canterbury Isidore of Seville Peter Chrysologus Leo the Great Peter Damian Bernard of Clairvaux Hilary of Poitiers Alphonsus Liguori Francis de Sales Peter Canisius John of the Cross Robert Bellarmine Albertus Magnus Anthony of Padua Lawrence of Brindisi Teresa of Ávila Catherine of Siena Thérèse of Lisieux John of Ávila Hildegard of Bingen Gregory of Narek

Evangelists

Matthew Mark Luke John

Church Fathers

Alexander of Alexandria Alexander of Jerusalem Ambrose
Ambrose
of Milan Anatolius Athanasius of Alexandria Augustine of Hippo Caesarius of Arles Caius Cappadocian Fathers Clement of Alexandria Clement of Rome Cyprian
Cyprian
of Carthage Cyril of Alexandria Cyril of Jerusalem Damasus I Desert Fathers Desert Mothers Dionysius of Alexandria Dionysius of Corinth Dionysius Ephrem the Syrian Epiphanius of Salamis Fulgentius of Ruspe Gregory the Great Gregory of Nazianzus Gregory of Nyssa Hilary of Poitiers Hippolytus of Rome Ignatius of Antioch Irenaeus
Irenaeus
of Lyons Isidore of Seville Jerome
Jerome
of Stridonium John Chrysostom John of Damascus Maximus the Confessor Melito of Sardis Quadratus of Athens Papias of Hierapolis Peter Chrysologus Polycarp
Polycarp
of Smyrna Theophilus of Antioch Victorinus of Pettau Vincent of Lérins Zephyrinus

Martyrs

Canadian Martyrs Carthusian Martyrs Forty Martyrs of England and Wales Four Crowned Martyrs Great Martyr The Holy Innocents Irish Martyrs Joan of Arc Lübeck martyrs Korean Martyrs Martyrology Martyrs of Albania Martyrs of China Martyrs of Japan Martyrs of Laos Martyrs of Natal Martyrs of Otranto Martyrs of the Spanish Civil War Maximilian Kolbe Perpetua and Felicity Saints of the Cristero War Stephen Three Martyrs of Chimbote Uganda Martyrs Vietnamese Martyrs

Patriarchs

Adam Abel Abraham Isaac Jacob Joseph Joseph
Joseph
(father of Jesus) David Noah Solomon Matriarchs

Popes

Adeodatus I Adeodatus II Adrian III Agapetus I Agatho Alexander I Anacletus Anastasius I Anicetus Anterus Benedict II Boniface I Boniface IV Caius Callixtus I Celestine I Celestine V Clement I Cornelius Damasus I Dionysius Eleuterus Eugene I Eusebius Eutychian Evaristus Fabian Felix I Felix III Felix IV Gelasius I Gregory I Gregory II Gregory III Gregory VII Hilarius Hormisdas Hyginus Innocent I John I John XXIII John Paul II Julius I Leo I Leo II Leo III Leo IV Leo IX Linus Lucius I Marcellinus Marcellus I Mark Martin I Miltiades Nicholas I Paschal I Paul I Peter Pius I Pius V Pius X Pontian Sergius I Silverius Simplicius Siricius Sixtus I Sixtus II Sixtus III Soter Stephen I Stephen IV Sylvester I Symmachus Telesphorus Urban I Victor I Vitalian Zachary Zephyrinus Zosimus

Prophets

Agabus Amos Anna Baruch ben Neriah David Dalua Elijah Ezekiel Habakkuk Haggai Hosea Isaiah Jeremiah Job Joel John the Baptist Jonah Judas Barsabbas Malachi Melchizedek Micah Moses Nahum Obadiah Samuel Seven Maccabees and their mother Simeon Zechariah (prophet) Zechariah (NT) Zephaniah

Virgins

Agatha of Sicily Agnes of Rome Bernadette Soubirous Brigid of Kildare Cecilia Clare of Assisi Eulalia of Mérida Euphemia Genevieve Kateri Tekakwitha Lucy of Syracuse Maria Goretti Mother Teresa Narcisa de Jesús Rose of Lima

See also

Military saints Virtuous pagan

Catholicism portal Saints portal

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Coptic Orthodox Saints

Theotokos

Our Lady of Assiut Our Lady of Warraq Our Lady of Zeitoun

,

,

,

Seven Archangels

Michael Gabriel Raphael Suriel Zedekiel Sarathiel Aniel

Patriarchs

Abraham Isaac Jacob Joseph

Prophets

Moses Job Samuel David Hosea Amos Micah Joel Obadiah Jonah Nahum Habakkuk Zephaniah Haggai Zechariah Malachi Isaiah Jeremiah Baruch Ezekiel Daniel John the Baptist

Apostles

Andrew Bartholomew James, son of Alphaeus James, son of Zebedee John Jude Matthew Matthias Peter Philip Simon Thomas

Evangelists

Matthew Mark Luke John

Disciples

Apollos Barnabas Mary Magdalene Philemon Priscilla and Aquila Silvanus Stephen Timothy Titus Seventy disciples

Martyrs

21 martyrs in Libya Abāmūn Abāmūn Abanoub Abaskhiron Alexandrian Martyrs Apollonia Barbara Bashnouna Basilides Catherine Chiaffredo Theodore Stratelates Chrysanthus Colluthus Cyprian Cyrus Sarah Damian Daria Dasya George Demiana Dorothea Epimachus Faustus, Abibus and Dionysius Felix Gallicanus George el-Mozahem Gereon Theban Legion Varus Theodora and Didymus Hor, Besoy, and Daydara Otimus Memnon Rais Imbaba Martyrs John Moura John of Senhout Elias and four companions Justina Kosheh Martyrs Saint
Saint
Marina the Martyr Malati Maspero Martyrs Maurice Menas Mohrael Nah Hammadi Philotheos Potamiana Regula Sidhom Bishay Thecla Theoclia Veronica Wanas Wadamoun

Popes

Mark I Anianus Avilius Kedron Primus Justus Eumenes Markianos Celadion Agrippinus Julian Demetrius I Heraclas Dionysius Maximus Theonas Peter I Achillas Alexander I Athanasius I Peter II Timothy I Theophilus I Cyril I Dioscorus I Timothy II Peter III Athanasius II John I John II Dioscorus II Timothy III Theodosius I Peter IV Damian Anastasius Andronicus Benjamin I Agathon John III Isaac Simeon I Alexander II Cosmas I Theodore I Michael I Mina I John IV Mark II James Simeon II Joseph
Joseph
I Michael II Cosmas II Shenouda I Michael III Gabriel
Gabriel
I Cosmas III Macarius I Theophanes Mina II Abraham Philotheos Zacharias Shenouda II Christodolos Cyril II Michael IV Macarius II Gabriel
Gabriel
II Michael V John V Mark III John VI Cyril III Athanasius III John VII Gabriel
Gabriel
III John VII Theodosius III John VIII John IX Benjamin II Peter V Mark IV John X Gabriel
Gabriel
IV Matthew I Cyril VI Shenouda III Tawadros II (current)

Bishops

Abadiu of Antinoe Abraam of Faiyum Alexander of Jerusalem Amun of Scetes Athanasius of Beni Suef Basil of Caesarea Cyril of Jerusalem Epiphanius of Cyprus Eusebius
Eusebius
of Caesarea Gregory of Nyssa Gregory of Neocaesarea Hadra of Aswan Ignatius of Antioch Isidorus of Hermonpolis Jacob
Jacob
of Nisibis James of Cairo James of Jerusalem John of Nikiu John of Jerusalem Karas of California Macarius of Edkow Mikhaeil of Asyut Narcissus of Jerusalem Nicholas of Myra Paphnutius of Scetes Paphnutius of Thebes Peter Elrahawy of Gaza Pisentius of Qift Pisentius of Hermonthis Pisora of Masil Polycarp
Polycarp
of Smyrna Porphyry of Gaza Ptolemy of Minuf Psote
Psote
of Ebsay Sarapamon of Monufia Sarapamon of Niku Serapion of Thmuis Severian of Gabala Yousab el-Abah of Girga Timothy of Ansena Zacharias of Sakha

Anchorites

Annasimon Babnuda Balamon Elisa Ezekiel Ghalion Hedra Hermina Karas Keriakos Latsoun Mary Misael Olaghi Onuphrius Paphnutius Paul Pijimi Shenouda Silas Stephanos Stratios Timothy Thomas Yousab Zosimas

Monks

Ababius Abdel Messih El-Makari Abib and Apollo Abraham
Abraham
of Farshut Abraham
Abraham
of Scetes Amun Anthony the Great Awgin Bashnouna Hilarion Isaac
Isaac
of Nineveh Isidore of Pelusium John Climacus John the Dwarf Macarius of Alexandria Macarius of Egypt Moses
Moses
the Black Mother Irini Hospitius Nilus of Sinai Pachomius the Great Pambo Parsoma Paul of Thebes Paul of Tammah Paul the Simple Patapios of Thebes Pishoy Poemen Samuel
Samuel
the Confessor Saint
Saint
Patapios of Thebes Tekle Haymanot Clement of Alexandria Sisoes the Great Theodorus of Tabennese Theodora of Alexandria

Other Saints

Ambrose Didymus the Blind Euphrosyne Freig Candidus Simon the Tanner Verena

Oriental Orthodoxy portal

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 286452

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