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Funai
Funai
Electric Company, Limited (船井電機株式会社, Funai
Funai
Denki Kabushiki Kaisha) is a Japanese consumer electronics company headquartered in Daitō, Osaka, Japan. Its United States-based subsidiary Funai
Funai
Corporation, Inc., based in Torrance, California, markets Funai
Funai
products in the US along with Funai-licensed brands including Magnavox, Emerson Radio, and Sanyo.[3] Funai
Funai
is the main supplier of electronics to Walmart
Walmart
and Sam's Club stores, with production quantities easily topping 2 million flat-panel televisions during the summertime per year for Black Friday sale. Funai
Funai
is the OEM providing assembled televisions and video players/recorders to major corporations such as Sharp, Toshiba, Denon, and others.[citation needed] Funai
Funai
also manufactures printers for Dell and Lexmark
Lexmark
and produces printers under the Kodak name.

Contents

1 History

1.1 Lexmark

2 VHS
VHS
videotape 3 See also 4 References 5 External links

History[edit] Funai
Funai
was founded by Tetsuro Funai, the son of a sewing machine manufacturer. During the 1950s before the company was formed, Funai produced sewing machines and was one of the first Japanese makers to enter the United States retail market. Then, the introduction of transistor technology had begun to change the face of the electronics market. The Funai
Funai
company was formed, Tetsuro Funai
Funai
became CEO for 47 years and a self-made billionaire, and the first actual products produced were the transistor radios. In 1980, Funai
Funai
launched a sales and manufacturing subsidiary in Germany. Funai
Funai
also developed the Compact Video Cassette
Compact Video Cassette
(CVC) format in the same year, a joint development with Technicolor, trying to compete with VHS
VHS
and Betamax. Sales were poor and not well-received due to ongoing VHS
VHS
vs. Beta war, and the CVC format was abandoned a few years later. Funai
Funai
began to see rising sales of the VHS
VHS
format, so in 1984, Funai released its first VHS
VHS
video cassette player (VP-1000) for the worldwide market, while ordering all transport chassis mechanisms from Shintom for quick and efficient production. Funai's belief in lower competitive prices, high production quantities; without sacrificing quality; were their biggest keys to success. By the late 1980s, Funai quickly became the largest 2-head mono VHS
VHS
video cassette recorder (VCR) manufacturer in Japan. In 1991, a U.S. sales subsidiary was established in New Jersey, and it began to sell cathode ray tube (CRT) televisions. In 1992, Funai canceled its contract from Shintom due to the rising cost of VCR chassis mechanism and the expensive Japanese labor, and decided to build its own lower-cost chassis mechanism instead. This creative move dramatically boosted up profits and reduced VCR prices down fast. Funai
Funai
developed a new, permanent strategy in 1993 by opening two new state-of-the-art factories in China, which transferred all VHS
VHS
VCRs production out from Japan. By 1997, Funai
Funai
became the first manufacturer to sell a new VHS
VHS
VCR below $100 for the North American Market, while Philips
Philips
Magnavox
Magnavox
brand they produced for was the best-seller. Quickly, Tetsuro Funai, the founder, became Japan's very first billionaire electronic CEO. Later, the DVD
DVD
technology was formed, and by 2001, Funai
Funai
sold its first DVD
DVD
player for less than $100. By then, Funai's U.S. subsidiary had relocated to Torrance, California. Today, Funai
Funai
is one of the world's largest producer of DVD players, and is now one of the major suppliers of electronics to Wal-Mart on Black Friday In 2008, CEO and founder Tetsuro Funai
Funai
retired and stepped down from CEO to become chairman. Philips
Philips
signed a seven-year contract with Funai
Funai
to license, sell, and distribute Philips- and Magnavox-branded televisions in North America.[4] In 2013, Funai
Funai
acquired the option to buy the rest of Philips' consumer electronics operations and a license to globally market Philips
Philips
branded consumer electronics.[1] But that purchase was terminated by Philips
Philips
because of what Philips
Philips
saw as breach of contract.[5] Lexmark[edit] Funai
Funai
has made inkjet hardware for Lexmark
Lexmark
International, Inc since 1997.[6] In August 2012, Lexmark
Lexmark
announced that it would be ceasing production of its inkjet printer line.[7][8] In April 2013, Funai announced that it had signed an agreement to acquire Lexmark's inkjet-related technology and assets for approximately $100 million (approximately ¥ 9.5 billion).[6] Upon closing of the transaction, Funai
Funai
will acquire more than 1,500 inkjet patents, Lexmark's inkjet-related research and development assets and tools, all outstanding shares and the manufacturing facility of Lexmark
Lexmark
International (Philippines), Inc., and other inkjet-related technologies and assets. Through this transaction, Funai
Funai
will acquire the capabilities to develop, manufacture and sell inkjet hardware as well as inkjet supplies. The transaction is subject to customary closing conditions and is expected to close within the first half of 2013. However, in the year 2015 they started the process of analyzing printers and its firmware. As of 2015-2016 year, Kodak is now one of the many projects Funai
Funai
service corporation has taken on. From refurbishing printers to updating firmware on new printers and even selling the ink jet cartridges.[9] VHS
VHS
videotape[edit]

A Sanyo-branded VHS
VHS
tape

The decline of VHS
VHS
videotape began with the introduction to market of the DVD
DVD
format in 1997.[10] Funai
Funai
continued to manufacture VHS
VHS
tape recorders well into the 21st century, mostly under the Sanyo
Sanyo
brand in China and North America. In July 2016, Funai
Funai
ceased production of VHS equipment, the last known company in the world to do so, after poor sales of its last VCR/ DVD
DVD
player combos.[11] See also[edit]

TP Vision
TP Vision
acquired Philips
Philips
branded TVs in some countries

References[edit]

^ a b "Notice of Acquisition of Lifestyle Entertainment Businesses of PHILIPS" (html) (Press release). Funai
Funai
Electric Co., Ltd. January 29, 2013. Retrieved September 21, 2013.  ^ " Funai
Funai
Electric Co., Ltd. Lowers Consolidated Full-year Outlook for FY 2012". Reuters. Archived from the original on May 3, 2012.  ^ "Our Brands". 10 November 2016. Archived from the original on 10 November 2016.  ^ Lawler, Richard (April 8, 2008). " Philips
Philips
handing over North American TV manufacturing to Funai". engadget. Retrieved September 5, 2010.  ^ " Philips
Philips
to take legal action against Funai". 25 October 2013. Retrieved 23 July 2016.  ^ a b " Funai
Funai
acquiring Lexmark'sinkjet‐related technology and assets" (PDF). Press Information (Press release). funaiworld.com. April 2, 2013. p. 1. Retrieved September 21, 2013.  ^ " Lexmark
Lexmark
announces restructuring". Lexmark. August 28, 2012. Retrieved August 28, 2012.  ^ " Lexmark
Lexmark
to exit inkjet printer market". pcpro.co.uk. August 28, 2012. Retrieved August 28, 2012.  ^ " Funai
Funai
acquiring Lexmark's inkjet-related technology and assets". Newsroom.lexmark.com. April 1, 2013. Retrieved September 21, 2013.  ^ Chaney, Jen (28 August 2005). "Parting Words For VHS
VHS
Tapes, Soon to Be Gone With the Rewind". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on 18 October 2005. Retrieved 22 May 2017.  ^ Walton, Mark (21 July 2016). "Last known VCR maker stops production, 40 years after VHS
VHS
format launch". Ars Technica. Archived from the original on 22 May 2017. Retrieved 22 May 2017. 

External links[edit]

Funai
Funai
Global Funai
Funai
Corporation USA Funai
Funai
Business Unit Germany u;oi;oi;jn././. About Us- Funai
Funai
Electric Co., Ltd. Funai
Funai
Electric Company, Limited-Company profile

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