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Fullmetal Alchemist
Fullmetal Alchemist
(Japanese: 鋼の錬金術師, Hepburn: Hagane no Renkinjutsushi, lit. "Alchemist of Steel") is a Japanese shōnen manga series written and illustrated by Hiromu Arakawa. It was serialized in Square Enix's Monthly Shōnen
Shōnen
Gangan magazine between August 2001 and June 2010; the publisher later collected the individual chapters into twenty-seven tankōbon volumes. The world of Fullmetal Alchemist
Fullmetal Alchemist
is styled after the European Industrial Revolution. Set in a fictional universe in which alchemy is one of the most advanced scientific techniques, the story follows two alchemist brothers named Edward and Alphonse Elric, who are searching for the philosopher's stone to restore their bodies after a failed attempt to bring their mother back to life using alchemy. The manga was published and localized in English by Viz Media
Viz Media
in North America, Madman Entertainment in Australasia, and Chuang Yi in Singapore. Yen Press
Yen Press
also has the rights for the digital release of the volumes in North America due to the series being a Square Enix title.[2] It has been adapted into two anime television series, two animated films—all animated by Bones studio—and light novels. Funimation
Funimation
dubbed the television series, films and video games. The series has generated original video animations, video games, supplementary books, a collectible card game, and a variety of action figures and other merchandise. A live action film based on the series was also released in 2017. The manga has sold over 70 million volumes worldwide, making it one of the best-selling manga series. The English release of the manga's first volume was the top-selling graphic novel during 2005. In two TV Asahi web polls, the anime was voted the most popular anime of all time in Japan. At the American Anime
Anime
Awards in February 2007, it was eligible for eight awards, nominated for six, and won five. Reviewers from several media conglomerations had positive comments on the series, particularly for its character development, action scenes, symbolism and philosophical references.

Contents

1 Synopsis

1.1 Setting 1.2 Plot

2 Production 3 Themes 4 Media

4.1 Manga 4.2 Anime 4.3 Film

4.3.1 Animation 4.3.2 Live-action

4.4 Light novels 4.5 Audio dramas 4.6 Video games 4.7 Other

5 Reception

5.1 Manga
Manga
reception

5.1.1 Sales 5.1.2 Critical reception

5.2 Light novels reception

6 See also 7 References 8 External links

Synopsis[edit] See also: List of Fullmetal Alchemist
Fullmetal Alchemist
characters Setting[edit] Fullmetal Alchemist
Fullmetal Alchemist
takes place in an alternate history, in the fictional country of Amestris (アメストリス, Amesutorisu). In this world, alchemy is one of the most-practiced sciences; Alchemists who work for the government are known as State Alchemists (国家錬金術師, Kokka Renkinjutsushi) and are automatically given the rank of Major
Major
in the military. Alchemists have the ability, with the help of patterns called Transmutation Circles, to create almost anything they desire. However, when they do so, they must provide something of equal value in accordance with the Law of Equivalent Exchange. The only things Alchemists are forbidden from transmuting are humans and gold. There has never been a successful human transmutation; those who attempt it lose a part of their body and the result is a horrific inhuman mass. Attemptees are confronted by Truth (真理, Shinri), a pantheistic and semi-cerebral God-like being who tauntingly regulates all alchemy use and whose nigh-featureless appearance is relative to the person to whom Truth is conversing with; the series' antagonist, Father, and some other characters, claim and believe that Truth is a personal God who punishes the arrogant, a belief that Edward denies, citing a flaw in Father's interpretation of Truth's works. Attemptees of Human Transmutation are also thrown into the Gate of Truth (真理の扉, Shinri no Tobira), where they receive an overwhelming dose of information, but also allowing them to transmute without a circle. All living things possess their own Gate of Truth, and per the Gaea hypothesis
Gaea hypothesis
heavenly bodies like planets also have their own Gates of Truth. It is possible to bypass the Law of Equivalent Exchange (to an extent) using a Philosopher's Stone, a red, enigmatic substance. Philosopher's Stones can be used to create Homunculi, artificial humans of proud nature. Homunculi have numerous superhuman abilities unique amongst each other and look down upon all humanity. With the exception of one, they do not age and can only be killed via the destruction of their Philosopher's Stones. There are several cities throughout Amestris. The main setting is the capital of Central City (セントラルシティ, Sentoraru Shiti), along with other military cities such as the northern city of Briggs (ブリッグズ, Burigguzu). Towns featured include Resembool (リゼンブール, Rizenbūru), the rural hometown of the Elrics; Liore (リオール, Riōru), a city tricked into following a cult; Rush Valley (ラッシュバレー, Rasshu Barē), a town that specializes in automail manufacturing; and Ishbal, a conservative-religion region that rejects alchemy and was destroyed in the Ishbalan Civil War instigated after a soldier (actually the homunculus Envy) shot an Ishbalan child. Outside of Amestris, there are few named countries, and none are seen in the main story. The main foreign country is Xing. Heavily reminiscent of China, Xing has a complex system of clans and emperors, as opposed to Amestris's government-controlled election of a Führer. It also has its own system of alchemy, called Alkahestry
Alkahestry
(錬丹術, Rentanjutsu), which is more medical and can be bi-located using kunai; in turn, it is implied that all countries have different forms of alchemy. Plot[edit] Edward and Alphonse Elric
Alphonse Elric
live in the rural town of Resembool with their mother Trisha, their father Van Hohenheim having left without a reason. Edward since bore a grudge against their father as he and Alphonse showed a talent for alchemy before Trisha died of the plague. After finishing their alchemy training under Izumi Curtis, the brothers attempt to bring their mother back with alchemy. But the transmutation backfires and in law with equivalent exchange, Edward lost his left leg while Alphonse was dragged into the Gate of Truth. Edward sacrifices his right arm to retrieve Alphonse's soul, binding it to a suit of armor with a blood seal. Edward is invited by Roy Mustang to become a State Alchemist to research a way to restore Alphonse's body, passing his exams while given the title of Fullmetal Alchemist back on his prosthetic automail limbs and use of metal in his alchemy. The Elrics spent the next three years searching for the mythical Philosopher's Stone
Philosopher's Stone
to achieve their goals. One such lead resulted in them exposing a corrupt religious leader in the city of Liore while unaware of events occurring behind the scenes by the mysterious Homunculi. Following their time with the State Alchemist Shou Tucker, which taught them a horrific lesson, the Elric brothers had a near-death experience from encountering an Ishbalan serial killer labeled as Scar who targets State Alchemists for his people's genocide in the Ishbalan civil war. After returning to Resembool to have Edward's limbs repaired by their childhood friend and mechanic, Winry Rockbell, the Elrics meet the guilt-ridden former State Alchemist Dr. Marcoh who provided them with clues to learn that a Philosopher's Stone
Philosopher's Stone
is created from human souls. After the Homunculi hindered them by destroying the hidden laboratory, the brothers are joined by Winry as they attempt to find an alternate means to restore themselves. At the same time, Mustang's friend Maes Hughes continued the Elrics' research and ends up murdered by a disguised Envy
Envy
when he learned of the Homunculi's plan. Being abducted by Izumi, who disciplines them upon realizing what they have done, the Elrics learn she committed human transmutation on her stillborn child. Alphonse is captured by the rogue homunculus Greed, who then ends up being captured by Amestris' president King Bradley, who is revealed to be the homunculus Wrath. When Greed
Greed
refuses to rejoin his fellow Homunculi, Greed
Greed
is consequently melted down by and reabsorbed within the Homunculi's creator, Father. After running into the Xingese prince Lin Yao, who is also after a Philosopher's Stone
Philosopher's Stone
to cement his position as heir to his country's throne, the Elrics and Winry return to Central City where they learn of Hughes's death with Lieutenant Maria Ross framed for the murder. Mustang fakes Maria's death and smuggles her out of the country with Lin's help so he can focus on the Homunculi. The events that follow result in the death of Lust, revealing that a Philosopher's Stone forms a Homunculus's core along with an upcoming event the Homunculi are working towards. Meanwhile, Scar forms a small band with the Xingese princess May Chang, who also seeks the stone, and a former military officer named Yoki whom the Elrics exposed as a corrupt official. Following an attempt to capture Gluttony
Gluttony
using Lin's sensory skills, the Homunculus end up accidentally swallowing Edward, Lin, and Envy into his void-like stomach, with the two humans learning the Homunculi orchestrated Ametris's history over the centuries. Gluttony
Gluttony
takes Alphonse to meet Father as the others manage to escape from Gluttony's stomach, meeting Father who considered killing Lin for not being one of the human sacrifice like the Elrics. But Father instead makes Lin the vessel of a new incarnation of Greed
Greed
with the Elrics attempting to escape upon seeing Scar. Edward has Envy
Envy
admit to having caused the Ishbalan civil war. Soon after, with Winry used against them as a hostage, the Elrics are allowed to continue their quest as long as they no longer oppose Father. Mustang receives a similar threat with his subordinates scattered to the other military branches. At the same time, finding Dr. Marcoh held captive, Scar spirited him out of Central as Scar's group head north. The Elrics eventually reach Fort Briggs under the command of General Olivier Armstrong, revealing what they know following the discovery of an underground tunnel beneath Briggs made by the Homunculus Sloth. The brothers soon learn from Hughes's research that Father created Amestris to amass a large enough population to create a massive Philosopher's Stone. Forced to work with Solf J. Kimblee, a murderous former State Alchemist and willing ally of the Homunculi in tracking down Scar, the Elrics make their move to save Winry and split up with Kimblee's chimera subordinates joining them. As Edward is joined by Lin and Greed, who regained his former self's memories, Alphonse encounters Honenheim in Liore. Honenheim reveals he was made an immortal when Father, once simply known as Homunculus, arranged the fall of Xeres four centuries ago to create his body while giving half of the sacrificed souls to him. Honenheim also explains he left his family to stop Father from sacrificing the Amestrisan people to achieve godhood by absorbing the being beyond the Gate of Truth on the Promised Day. The Promised Day arrives and Father prepares to initiate his plan using an eclipse and capture the human sacrifices to trigger the transmutation, the protagonists having assembled days prior and orchestrate an all-out attack on Central with Sloth, Envy, and Wrath killed in the process while Gluttony
Gluttony
was devoured by Pride. But despite the opposition, Father manages to activate the nationwide transmutation once the Elrics, Izumi, Hohenheim are gathered along with Mustang after being forced by Pride
Pride
to perform Human Transmutation. But Hohenheim and Scar activate countermeasures to save the Amestrians, causing Father to become unstable from housing the absorbed superior being within him without the souls needed to subdue it. Father is confronted above ground where the protagonists battle him to wear down his Philosopher's Stone
Philosopher's Stone
while he attempts to replenish himself, Edward managing to defeat the gravely weakened Pride
Pride
before joining the fray. Alphonse, whose armor is all but destroyed, sacrifices his soul to restore Edward's right arm while Greed
Greed
leaves Lin's body and sacrifices himself to weaken Father's body enough for Edward to destroy Father's Philosopher's Stone. This causes Father to implode out of reality while dragged into the Gate of Truth from which he was created. Edward sacrifices his ability to perform alchemy to retrieve a fully restored Alphonse, Lin receiving a Philosopher's Stone
Philosopher's Stone
while promising May to be a just ruler. Hohenheim takes his leave and visits Trisha's grave where he dies with a smile on his face. The Elrics return home months later, still motivated by those they failed to save in learning new forms of alchemy to prevent repeated tragedies. This leads to the Elrics leaving Ametris two years later to learn about other cultures and their knowledge, with Alphonse leaving for Xing in the east while Edward heads westward. The epilogue finishes with a family photo of Alphonse, May, Edward, Winry, and Ed's and Winry's son and daughter. Production[edit] After reading about the concept of the Philosopher's Stone, Arakawa became attracted to the idea of her characters using alchemy in the manga. She started reading books about alchemy, which she found complicated because some books contradict others. Arakawa was attracted more by the philosophical aspects than the practical ones.[3] For the Equivalent Exchange (等価交換, Tōka Kōkan) concept, she was inspired by the work of her parents, who had a farm in Hokkaido
Hokkaido
and worked hard to earn the money to eat.[4] Arakawa wanted to integrate social problems into the story. Her research involved watching television news programs and talking to refugees, war veterans and former yakuza. Several plot elements, such as Pinako Rockbell caring for the Elric brothers after their mother dies, and the brothers helping people to understand the meaning of family, expand on these themes. When creating the fictional world of Fullmetal Alchemist, Arakawa was inspired after reading about the Industrial Revolution
Industrial Revolution
in Europe; she was amazed by differences in the culture, architecture, and clothes of the era and those of her own culture. She was especially interested in England during this period and incorporated these ideas into the manga.[3] When the manga began serialization, Arakawa was considering several major plot points, including the ending. She wanted the Elric brothers to recover their bodies—at least partly.[5] As the plot continued, she thought that some characters were maturing and decided to change some scenes.[4] Arakawa said the manga authors Suihō Tagawa
Suihō Tagawa
and Hiroyuki Eto are her main inspirations for her character designs; she describes her artwork as a mix of both of them. She found that the easiest of the series's characters to draw were Alex Louis Armstrong, and the little animals. Arakawa likes dogs so she included several of them in the story.[6] Arakawa made comedy central to the manga's story because she thinks it is intended for entertainment, and tried to minimize sad scenes.[4] When around forty manga chapters had been published, Arakawa said that as the series was nearing its end and she would try to increase the pace of the narrative. To avoid making some chapters less entertaining than others, unnecessary details from each of them were removed and a climax was developed. The removal of minor details was also necessary because Arakawa had too few pages in Monthly Shōnen
Shōnen
Gangan to include all the story content she wanted to add. Some characters' appearances were limited in some chapters.[7] At first, Arakawa thought the series would last twenty-one volumes but the length increased to twenty-seven. Serialization finished after nine years, and Arakawa was satisfied with her work because she had told everything she wanted with the manga.[5] During the development of the first anime, Arakawa allowed the anime staff to work independently from her, and requested a different ending from that of the manga. She said that she would not like to repeat the same ending in both media, and wanted to make the manga longer so she could develop the characters. When watching the ending of the anime, she was amazed about how different the homunculi creatures were from the manga and enjoyed how the staff speculated about the origins of the villains.[3] Because Arakawa helped the Bones staff in the making of the series, she was kept from focusing on the manga's cover illustrations and had little time to make them.[7] Themes[edit] The series explores social problems, including discrimination, scientific advancement, political greed, brotherhood, family, and war.[8] Scar's backstory and his hatred of the state military references the Ainu people, who had their land taken by other people.[3] This includes the consequences of guerrilla warfare and the amount of violent soldiers a military can have.[9] Some of the people who took the Ainus' land were originally Ainu; this irony is referenced in Scar's use of alchemy to kill alchemists even though it was forbidden in his own religion.[3] The Elrics being orphans and adopted by Pinako Rockbell reflects Arakawa's beliefs about the ways society should treat orphans. The characters' dedication to their occupations reference the need to work for food.[10] The series also explores the concept of equivalent exchange; to obtain something new, one must pay with something of equal value. This is applied by alchemists when creating new materials and is also a philosophical belief the Elric brothers follow.[5][11] Media[edit] Manga[edit] Main article: List of Fullmetal Alchemist
Fullmetal Alchemist
chapters Written and drawn by Hiromu Arakawa, Fullmetal Alchemist
Fullmetal Alchemist
was serialized in Square Enix's monthly manga magazine Monthly Shōnen Gangan. Its first installment was published in the magazine's August 2001 issue on July 12, 2001; publication continued until the series concluded in June 2010 with the 108th installment.[12] A side-story to the series was published in the October 2010 issue of Monthly Shōnen Gangan on September 11, 2010.[13] In the July 2011 issue of the same magazine, the prototype version of the manga was published.[14] Square Enix
Enix
compiled the chapters into twenty-seven tankōbon volumes. The first volume was released on January 22, 2002, and the last on November 22, 2010.[15][16] A few chapters have been re-released in Japan in two "Extra number" magazines and Fullmetal Alchemist, The First Attack, which features the first nine chapters of the manga and other side stories.[17] On July 22, 2011, Square Enix
Enix
started republishing the series in kanzenban format.[18] Viz Media
Viz Media
localized the tankōbon volumes in English in North America between May 3, 2005, and December 20, 2011.[19][20] On June 7, 2011, Viz started publishing the series in omnibus format, featuring three volumes in one.[21] Yen Press
Yen Press
has the rights for the digital release of the volumes in North America since 2014[2] and on December 12, 2016 has released the series on the ComiXology
ComiXology
website.[22][23] Other English localizations were done by Madman Entertainment for Australasia
Australasia
and Chuang Yi in Singapore.[24][25] The series has been also localized in Polish, French, Portuguese, Italian, and Korean.[26][27][28][29][30] Anime[edit] Main articles: Fullmetal Alchemist (anime)
Fullmetal Alchemist (anime)
and Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood Fullmetal Alchemist
Fullmetal Alchemist
was adapted into two anime series for television: a loose adaptation titled Fullmetal Alchemist
Fullmetal Alchemist
in 2003–2004, and a more faithful 2009–2010 retelling titled Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood.[31][32] Film[edit] Animation[edit] Two feature-length anime films were produced; Fullmetal Alchemist
Fullmetal Alchemist
the Movie: Conqueror of Shamballa, a sequel/conclusion to the 2003 series, and Fullmetal Alchemist: The Sacred Star of Milos, set during the time period of Brotherhood.[33][34] Live-action[edit] Main article: Fullmetal Alchemist
Fullmetal Alchemist
(film) A live-action film based on the manga was released on November 19, 2017. Fumihiko Sori
Fumihiko Sori
directed the film.[35] The film stars Ryosuke Yamada as Edward Elric, Tsubasa Honda
Tsubasa Honda
as Winry Rockbell
Winry Rockbell
and Dean Fujioka as Roy Mustang. Light novels[edit] Main article: List of Fullmetal Alchemist
Fullmetal Alchemist
light novels Square Enix
Enix
has published a series of six Fullmetal Alchemist
Fullmetal Alchemist
Japanese light novels, written by Makoto Inoue.[36] The novels were licensed for an English-language release by Viz Media
Viz Media
in North America, with translations by Alexander O. Smith and illustrations—including covers and frontispieces—by Arakawa.[37][38] The novels are spin-offs of the manga series and follow the Elric brothers on their continued quest for the philosopher's stone. The first novel, Fullmetal Alchemist: The Land of Sand, was animated as the episodes eleven and twelve of the first anime series.[39] The fourth novel contains an extra story about the military called "Roy's Holiday".[40] Novelizations of the PlayStation 2
PlayStation 2
games Fullmetal Alchemist
Fullmetal Alchemist
and the Broken Angel, Curse of the Crimson Elixir, and The Girl Who Succeeds God have also been written, the first by Makoto Inoue and the rest by Jun Eishima.[36] Audio dramas[edit] There have been two series of Fullmetal Alchemist
Fullmetal Alchemist
audio dramas. The first volume of the first series, Fullmetal Alchemist
Fullmetal Alchemist
Vol. 1: The Land of Sand (砂礫の大地, Sareki no Daichi), was released before the anime and tells a similar story to the first novel. The Tringham brothers reprised their anime roles.[41] Fullmetal Alchemist
Fullmetal Alchemist
Vol. 2: False Light, Truth's Shadow (偽りの光 真実の影, Itsuwari no Hikari, Shinjitsu no Kage) and Fullmetal Alchemist
Fullmetal Alchemist
Vol. 3: Criminals' Scar (咎人たちの傷跡, Togabitotachi no Kizuato) are stories based on different manga chapters; their State Military characters are different from those in the anime.[36] The second series of audio dramas, available only with purchases of Shōnen
Shōnen
Gangan, consists two stories in this series, each with two parts. The first, Fullmetal Alchemist: Ogutāre of the Fog (霧のオグターレ, Kiri no Ogutāre), was included in Shōnen
Shōnen
Gangan's April and May 2004 issues; the second story, Fullmetal Alchemist: Crown of Heaven (天上の宝冠, Tenjō no Hōkan), was issued in the November and December 2004 issues.[36] Video games[edit] Video games based on Fullmetal Alchemist
Fullmetal Alchemist
have been released. The storylines of the games often diverge from those of the anime and manga, and feature original characters. Square Enix
Enix
has released three role-playing games (RPG)— Fullmetal Alchemist
Fullmetal Alchemist
and the Broken Angel, Curse of the Crimson Elixir, and Kami o Tsugu Shōjo. Bandai
Bandai
has released two RPG titles, Fullmetal Alchemist: Stray Rondo (鋼の錬金術師 迷走の輪舞曲, Hagane no Renkinjutsushi Meisō no Rondo) and Fullmetal Alchemist: Sonata of Memory (鋼の錬金術師 想い出の奏鳴曲, Hagane no Renkinjutsushi Omoide no Sonata), for the Game Boy Advance
Game Boy Advance
and one, Dual Sympathy, for the Nintendo DS. In Japan, Bandai
Bandai
released an RPG Fullmetal Alchemist: To the Promised Day (鋼の錬金術師 Fullmetal Alchemist 約束の日へ, Hagane no Renkinjutsushi Fullmetal Alchemist
Fullmetal Alchemist
Yakusoku no Hi e) for the PlayStation Portable
PlayStation Portable
on May 20, 2010.[42] Bandai
Bandai
also released a fighting game, Dream Carnival, for the PlayStation 2. Destineer
Destineer
released a game based on the trading card game in North America for the Nintendo DS.[43][44] Of the seven games made in Japan, Broken Angel, Curse of the Crimson Elixir, and Dual Sympathy have seen international releases. For the Wii, Akatsuki no Ōji (暁の王子, lit. Fullmetal Alchemist: Prince of the Dawn) was released in Japan on August 13, 2009.[45] A direct sequel of the game, Tasogare no Shōjo (黄昏の少女, lit. Fullmetal Alchemist: Daughter of the Dusk), was released on December 10, 2009, for the same console.[46] Funimation
Funimation
licensed the franchise to create a new series of Fullmetal Alchemist-related video games to be published by Destineer
Destineer
Publishing Corporation in the United States.[47] Destineer
Destineer
released its first Fullmetal Alchemist
Fullmetal Alchemist
game for the Nintendo DS, a translation of Bandai's Dual Sympathy, on December 15, 2006, and said that they plan to release further titles.[48] On February 19, 2007, Destineer announced the second game in its Fullmetal Alchemist
Fullmetal Alchemist
series, the Fullmetal Alchemist
Fullmetal Alchemist
Trading Card Game, which was released on October 15, 2007.[49] A third game for the PlayStation Portable
PlayStation Portable
titled Fullmetal Alchemist: Senka wo Takuseshi Mono (背中を託せし者) was released in Japan on October 15, 2009.[50] A European release of the game, published by with Namco Bandai, was announced on March 4, 2010.[51] The massively multiplayer online role-playing game MapleStory
MapleStory
also received special in-game items based on the anime series.[52] Arakawa oversaw the story and designed the characters for the RPG games, while Bones—the studio responsible for the anime series—produced several animation sequences. The developers looked at other titles—specifically Square Enix's action role-playing game Kingdom Hearts
Kingdom Hearts
and other games based on manga series, such as Dragon Ball, Naruto or One Piece games—for inspiration. The biggest challenge was to make a "full-fledged" game rather than a simple character-based one.[53] Tomoya Asano, the assistant producer for the games, said that development took more than a year, unlike most character-based games.[54] Other[edit] The Fullmetal Alchemist
Fullmetal Alchemist
has received several artbooks. Three artbooks called The Art of Fullmetal Alchemist
Fullmetal Alchemist
(イラスト集 FULLMETAL ALCHEMIST, Irasuto Shū Fullmetal Alchemist) were released by Square Enix; two of those were released in the US by Viz Media.[55][56] The first artbook contains illustrations made between May 2001 to April 2003, spanning the first six manga volumes, while the second has illustrations from September 2003 to October 2005, spanning the next six volumes.[17] The last one includes illustrations from the remaining volumes.[57] The manga also has three guidebooks; each of them contains timelines, guides to the Elric brothers' journey, and gaiden chapters that were never released in manga volumes.[17] Only the first guidebook was released by Viz Media, titled Fullmetal Alchemist
Fullmetal Alchemist
Profiles.[58] A guidebook titled " Fullmetal Alchemist
Fullmetal Alchemist
Chronicle" (鋼の錬金術師 CHRONICLE), which contains post-manga story information, was released in Japan on July 29, 2011.[59] Action figures, busts, and statues from the Fullmetal Alchemist
Fullmetal Alchemist
anime and manga have been produced by toy companies, including Medicom and Southern Island. Medicom has created high end deluxe vinyl figures of the characters from the anime. These figures are exclusively distributed in the United States and UK by Southern Island.[60] Southern Island released its own action figures of the main characters in 2007, and a 12" statuette was scheduled for release the same year. Southern Island has since gone bankrupt, putting the statuette's release in doubt.[61] A trading card game was first published in 2005 in the United States by Joyride Entertainment.[62] Since then, six expansions have been released. The card game was withdrawn on July 11, 2007.[63] Destineer
Destineer
released a Nintendo DS
Nintendo DS
adaptation of the game on October 15, 2007.[49] Reception[edit] Overall, the franchise has received widespread critical acclaim and commercial success. Manga
Manga
reception[edit] Along with Yakitate!! Japan, the series won the forty-ninth Shogakukan Manga
Manga
Award for shōnen in 2004.[64] It won the public voting for Eagle Award's "Favourite Manga" in 2010 and 2011.[65][66] The manga also received the Seiun Award
Seiun Award
for best science fiction comic in 2011.[67] In a survey from Oricon
Oricon
in 2009, Fullmetal Alchemist
Fullmetal Alchemist
ranked ninth as the manga that fans wanted to be turned into a live-action film.[68] The series is also popular with amateur writers who produce dōjinshi (fan fiction) that borrows characters from the series. In the Japanese market Super Comic City, there have been over 1,100 dōjinshi based on Fullmetal Alchemist, some of which focused on romantic interactions between Edward Elric
Edward Elric
and Roy Mustang.[69] Anime
Anime
News Network said the series had the same impact in Comiket
Comiket
2004 as several female fans were seen there writing dōjinshi.[70] Sales[edit] The series has become one of Square Enix's best-performing properties, along with Final Fantasy
Fantasy
and Dragon Quest.[71] With the release of volume 27, the manga sold over 50 million copies in Japan.[72] As of January 10, 2010, every volume of the manga has sold over a million copies each in Japan.[73] Square Enix
Enix
reported that the series had sold 67 million copies worldwide as of May 16, 2017, fifteen million of those outside Japan.[74] The series is also one of Viz Media's best sellers, appearing in "BookScan's Top 20 Graphic Novels" and the "USA Today Booklist".[75][76][77] It was featured in the Diamond Comic Distributors' polls of graphic novels and The New York Times
The New York Times
Best Seller Manga
Manga
list.[78][79] The English release of the manga's first volume was the top-selling graphic novel during 2005.[80] By November 2017, the series had sold over 70 million copies worldwide.[81] During 2008, volumes 19 and 20 sold over a million copies, ranking as the 10th and 11th best seller comics in Japan respectively.[82] In the first half of 2009, it ranked as the seventh best-seller in Japan, having sold over 3 million copies.[83] Volume 21 ranked fourth, with more than a million copies sold and volume 22 ranked sixth with a similar number of sold copies.[84] Producer Kouji Taguchi of Square Enix
Enix
said that Volume 1's initial sales were 150,000 copies; this grew to 1.5 million copies after the first anime aired. Prior to the second anime's premiere, each volume sold about 1.9 million copies, and then it changed to 2.1 million copies.[85] Critical reception[edit] Fullmetal Alchemist
Fullmetal Alchemist
has generally been well received by critics. Though the first volumes were thought to be formulaic, critics said that the series grows in complexity as it progresses. Jason Thompson called Arakawa one of the best at creating action scenes and praised the series for having great female characters despite being a boys' manga. He also noted how the story gets dark by including real-world issues such as government corruption, war and genocide. Thompson finished by stating that Fullmetal Alchemist
Fullmetal Alchemist
"will be remembered as one of the classic shonen manga series of the 2000s."[86] Melissa Harper of Anime
Anime
News Network praised Arakawa for keeping all of her character designs unique and distinguishable, despite many of them wearing the same basic uniforms.[87] IGN's Hilary Goldstein wrote that the characterization of the protagonist Edward balances between being a "typical clever kid" and a "stubborn kid", allowing him to float between the comical moments and the underlying drama without seeming false.[88] Holly Ellingwood for Active Anime
Anime
praised the development of the characters in the manga and their beliefs changing during the story, forcing them to mature.[89] Mania Entertainment's Jarred Pine said that the manga can be enjoyed by anybody who has watched the first anime, despite the similarities in the first chapters. Like other reviewers, Pine praised the dark mood of the series and the way it balances the humor and action scenes.[90] Pine also praised the development of characters who have few appearances in the first anime.[91] In a review of volume 14, Sakura Eries—also of Mania Entertainment—liked the revelations, despite the need to resolve several story arcs. She also praised the development of the homunculi, such as the return of Greed, as well as their fights.[92] Light novels reception[edit] The first Fullmetal Alchemist
Fullmetal Alchemist
novel, The Land of the Sand, was well received by Jarred Pine of Mania Entertainment as a self-contained novelization that remained true to the characterizations of the manga series. He said that while the lack of backstory aims it more towards fans of the franchise than new readers, it was an impressive debut piece for the Viz Fiction line.[93] Ain't It Cool News
Ain't It Cool News
also found the novel to be true to its roots, and said that while it added nothing new, it was compelling enough for followers of the series to enjoy a retelling. The reviewer said it was a "work for young-ish readers that's pretty clear about some darker sides of politics, economics and human nature".[94] Charles Solomon of the Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles Times
said that the novel has a different focus than the anime series; The Land of Sand "created a stronger, sympathetic bond" between the younger brothers than is seen in its two-episode anime counterpart.[95] See also[edit]

Anime
Anime
and manga portal Japan portal 2000s portal 2010s portal

List of Square Enix
Enix
franchises

References[edit]

^ "The Official Website for Fullmetal Alchemist". Viz Media. Retrieved October 24, 2017.  ^ a b c Fullmetal Alchemist
Fullmetal Alchemist
– Yen Press ^ a b c d e "Equivalent Change". Newtype
Newtype
USA. A.D. Vision. January 2006.  ^ a b c インタビュー (in Japanese). Yahoo. Archived from the original on December 9, 2007. Retrieved April 6, 2008.  ^ a b c "Interview : Hiromu Arakawa". Animeland (in French). Asuka Editions (189). January 2013.  ^ Arakawa, Hiromu (2006). Fullmetal Alchemist
Fullmetal Alchemist
Profiles. Viz Media. pp. 100–105. ISBN 1-4215-0768-4.  ^ a b Arakawa, Hiromu (2005). 鋼の錬金術師 パーフェクトガイドブック 2. Square Enix. pp. 168–172. ISBN 978-4-7575-1426-3.  ^ Johnston, Chris (October 2006). " Fullmetal Alchemist
Fullmetal Alchemist
The Movie: Conqueror of Shamballa". Newtype
Newtype
USA. A.D. Vision. Archived from the original on November 24, 2006. Retrieved June 4, 2015.  ^ Smith, David (March 18, 2008). "Ten Things I Learned From Fullmetal Alchemist". IGN. Retrieved May 17, 2010.  ^ Arakawa, Hiromu (2007). Fullmetal Alchemist, Volume 12. Viz Media. p. 185. ISBN 978-1-4215-0839-9.  ^ Thompson, Jason (June 6, 2013). "Jason Thompson's House of 1000 Manga". Anime
Anime
News Network. Retrieved September 6, 2013.  ^ "FMA's Irie Confirms Animating Manga's End in 2 Months". Anime
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News Network. May 6, 2010. Retrieved May 7, 2010.  ^ " Fullmetal Alchemist
Fullmetal Alchemist
Special
Special
side story manga in September". Anime News Network. August 7, 2010. Retrieved August 25, 2010.  ^ " Fullmetal Alchemist
Fullmetal Alchemist
'Prototype' Manga
Manga
to Run in June". Anime
Anime
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Fullmetal Alchemist
Editora JBC" (in Portuguese). Editora JBC. Archived from the original on September 8, 2008. Retrieved July 16, 2008.  ^ "Fullmetal Alchemist" (in Italian). Panini Comics. Retrieved March 31, 2009.  ^ 강철의 연금술사 26권 (in Korean). Haksan. Retrieved September 5, 2013.  ^ "New Fullmetal Alchemist
Fullmetal Alchemist
TV Anime
Anime
Series Confirmed". Anime
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News Network. August 20, 2008. Retrieved August 20, 2008.  ^ " Manga
Manga
UK Adds New Fullmetal Alchemist, Sengoku Basara". Anime
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Anime
News Network. 27 July 2005. Retrieved 2 April 2009.  ^ "Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood Movie Teaser Streamed". Anime
Anime
News Network. November 14, 2010. Retrieved November 15, 2010.  ^ Chapman, Paul (March 30, 2016). "Live-Action "Fullmetal Alchemist" Film Works Its Magic in 2017". Crunchyroll.  ^ a b c d 原作/荒川 弘 著者/井上 真 (in Japanese). Square Enix. Archived from the original on March 5, 2008. Retrieved April 11, 2008.  ^ " Fullmetal Alchemist
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(Novel series)". Viz Media. Archived from the original on October 17, 2006. Retrieved April 11, 2008.  ^ "Fullmetal Alchemist, Under the Faraway Sky (Novel)". SimonSays.com. Retrieved April 18, 2008.  ^ 小説「鋼の錬金術(1) 砂礫の大地」 原作/荒川弘 著者/井上真 (in Japanese). Square Enix. Archived from the original on April 16, 2008. Retrieved April 11, 2008.  ^ " Fullmetal Alchemist
Fullmetal Alchemist
(Novel): Under the Far Away Sky". Viz Media. Retrieved April 11, 2008. [permanent dead link] ^ "コミックCDコレクション「鋼の錬金術師 偽りの光、真実の影」" (in Japanese). Square Enix. Archived from the original on May 10, 2008. Retrieved April 11, 2008.  ^ "罪を背負いし兄弟の物語がRPGに! PSP「鋼の錬金術師FA 約束の日へ」" [The Tale of Brothers Burdened with Sin
Sin
Gets an RPG! PSP Fullmetal Alchemist: To the Promised Day] (in Japanese). ASCII Media Works. March 19, 2010. Retrieved March 19, 2010.  ^ " Fullmetal Alchemist
Fullmetal Alchemist
DS-bound". GameSpot. Archived from the original on December 17, 2008. Retrieved September 5, 2008.  ^ " Fullmetal Alchemist
Fullmetal Alchemist
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Fullmetal Alchemist
Continues on Wii". IGN. Retrieved October 29, 2008.  ^ " Funimation
Funimation
Announces Series of Fullmetal Alchemist
Fullmetal Alchemist
Games". Anime News Network. June 16, 2006. Retrieved April 17, 2008.  ^ " Fullmetal Alchemist
Fullmetal Alchemist
Video Games coming from Destineer". Anime
Anime
News Network. June 6, 2006. Retrieved August 5, 2006.  ^ a b "Fullmetal Alchemist: Trading Card Game product page". Gamestop.com. Archived from the original on March 15, 2008. Retrieved October 20, 2007.  ^ Spencer (July 17, 2009). "Portable Fullmetal Alchemist
Fullmetal Alchemist
Fighting Game Teased". Siliconera.com. Retrieved August 7, 2009.  ^ Spencer (2010-03-04). "Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood Game Picked Up For Europe". Siliconera. Retrieved 2010-03-04.  ^ Ishann (2010-03-21). "Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood Makes Its Way Into MapleStory". Siliconera. Retrieved 2010-03-21.  ^ Alfonso, Andrew (May 13, 2004). "E3 2004: Fullmetal Alchemist
Fullmetal Alchemist
- Interview". IGN. pp. 1–3. Retrieved May 27, 2008.  ^ Gantayat, Anoop (September 24, 2004). "TGS 2004: Fullmetal Alchemist Q&A". IGN. Retrieved May 28, 2008.  ^ "The Art of Fullmetal Alchemist". Viz Media. Archived from the original on November 12, 2011. Retrieved April 19, 2008.  ^ "The Art of Fullmetal Alchemist
Fullmetal Alchemist
2". Viz Media. Archived from the original on November 12, 2011. Retrieved September 27, 2011.  ^ "荒川弘イラスト集 FULLMETAL ALCHEMIST 3". Square Enix. Retrieved September 21, 2011.  ^ " Fullmetal Alchemist
Fullmetal Alchemist
Profiles (manga)". Viz Media. Archived from the original on November 12, 2011. Retrieved April 19, 2008.  ^ " Fullmetal Alchemist
Fullmetal Alchemist
Chronicle" (in Japanese). Square Enix. Retrieved August 9, 2011.  ^ "Mediacom Fullmetal Alchemist
Fullmetal Alchemist
Figures Available from Southern Island This Month". Anime
Anime
News Network. January 6, 2007. Retrieved April 13, 2008.  ^ " Anime
Anime
Collectible Maker Southern Island Goes Bankrupt". Anime
Anime
News Network. November 28, 2007. Retrieved April 13, 2008.  ^ " Fullmetal Alchemist
Fullmetal Alchemist
TCG Announced". Anime
Anime
News Network. March 15, 2005. Retrieved April 16, 2008.  ^ "R.I.P. 'FMA TCG'". ICv2. July 31, 2007. Retrieved April 16, 2008.  ^ 小学館漫画賞:歴代受賞者 (in Japanese). Shogakukan. Archived from the original on September 29, 2007. Retrieved August 19, 2007.  ^ "Previous Winners: 2010". eagleawards.co.uk. Archived from the original on March 14, 2012. Retrieved December 12, 2014.  ^ "Previous Winners: 2011". eagleawards.co.uk. Archived from the original on March 14, 2012. Retrieved December 12, 2014.  ^ "日本SFファングループ連合会議: 星雲賞リスト" (in Japanese). Retrieved October 20, 2012.  ^ "Survey: Slam Dunk Manga
Manga
is #1 Choice for Live-Action (Updated)". Anime
Anime
News Network. May 3, 2009. Retrieved June 12, 2009.  ^ Pink, Daniel (October 22, 2007). "Japan, Ink: Inside the Manga Industrial Complex". Wired. Retrieved September 10, 2013.  ^ Kemps, Heidi; Lamb, Lynzee (October 25, 2013). "Interview: BONES Studio President Masahiko Minami". Anime
Anime
News Network. Retrieved October 25, 2013.  ^ Crocker, Jeremy (May 11, 2004). " Fullmetal Alchemist
Fullmetal Alchemist
Episodes 1–30". Anime
Anime
News Network. Retrieved April 17, 2008.  ^ " Fullmetal Alchemist
Fullmetal Alchemist
Manga: Over 50 Million Served". Anime
Anime
News Network. October 25, 2010. Retrieved November 14, 2010.  ^ "Japanese Comic Ranking, December 28-January 10". Anime
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Manga
Back on Booklist". Anime
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News Network. November 4, 2006. Retrieved April 5, 2008.  ^ "September 3 Booklist". Anime
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News Network. September 13, 2006. Retrieved April 5, 2008.  ^ "Top 100 Graphic Novels Actual--December 2007". ICv2. January 21, 2008. Retrieved August 3, 2009.  ^ "New York Times Manga
Manga
Best Seller List, July 19–25". Anime
Anime
News Network. August 1, 2009. Retrieved August 3, 2009.  ^ "ICv2 2005 Manga
Manga
Awards--Part 1". ICv2. March 22, 2008. Retrieved January 3, 2006.  ^ [1] IGN
IGN
Japan ^ "2008's Top-Selling Manga
Manga
in Japan, #1-25". Anime
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News Network. December 19, 2008. Retrieved December 19, 2008.  ^ "Top-Selling Manga
Manga
in Japan by Series: 1st Half of 2009". Anime
Anime
News Network. June 15, 2009. Retrieved June 15, 2009.  ^ "Top-Selling Manga
Manga
in Japan by Volume: 1st Half of 2009 (Updated)". Anime
Anime
News Network. June 15, 2009. Retrieved June 15, 2009.  ^ "Producer: No Square- Enix
Enix
Anime
Anime
Lost Money in 8 Years". Anime
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News Network. October 9, 2009. Retrieved October 9, 2009.  ^ Thompson, Jason (June 6, 2013). "Jason Thompson's House of 1000 Manga
Manga
- Fullmetal Alchemist". Anime
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News Network. Retrieved April 1, 2015.  ^ Harper, Melissa (November 11, 2006). " Anime
Anime
News Network - Fullmetal Alchemist G. Novel 1-3". Anime
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News Network. Retrieved April 6, 2008.  ^ Goldstein, Hilary (March 5, 2005). " Fullmetal Alchemist
Fullmetal Alchemist
Vol. 1 Review". IGN. Retrieved March 23, 2008.  ^ Ellingwood, Holly (March 4, 2007). " Fullmetal Alchemist
Fullmetal Alchemist
(Vol. 11)". activeAnime. Retrieved March 14, 2011.  ^ Pine, Jarred (June 8, 2005). "Mania Entertainment: Fullmetal Alchemist (VOL. 1)". Mania Entertainment. Archived from the original on February 9, 2009. Retrieved August 4, 2009.  ^ Pine, Jarred (July 25, 2007). " Fullmetal Alchemist
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Vol. #6". Mania Entertainment. Archived from the original on April 2, 2015. Retrieved July 13, 2009.  ^ Eries, Sakura (March 6, 2008). "Mania Entertainment: Fullmetal Alchemist (VOL. 14)". Mania Entertainment. Archived from the original on September 17, 2009. Retrieved August 4, 2009.  ^ Pine, Jarred (September 26, 2005). " Fullmetal Alchemist
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(novels) Vol.#01". Mania Entertainment. Archived from the original on December 17, 2008. Retrieved August 15, 2008.  ^ "Novel Preview:Fullmetal Alchemist: The Land of Sand Volume 1 By Makoto Inoue". Ain't It Cool News. August 20, 2005. Retrieved August 15, 2008.  ^ Solomon, Charles (April 29, 2007). "For manga, a novel approach". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved August 15, 2008. 

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Fullmetal Alchemist.

Wikiquote has quotations related to: Fullmetal Alchemist

Official Gangan Fullmetal Alchemist
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manga and novel website (in Japanese) Official Viz Fullmetal Alchemist
Fullmetal Alchemist
manga website Fullmetal Alchemist
Fullmetal Alchemist
(manga) at Anime
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News Network's encyclopedia Official Gangan Online Fullmetal Alchemist
Fullmetal Alchemist
homepage (in Japanese)

v t e

Fullmetal Alchemist
Fullmetal Alchemist
by Hiromu Arakawa

Media

Chapters Light novels 2003 anime

Episodes Conqueror of Shamballa

Brotherhood

Episodes The Sacred Star of Milos

Fullmetal Alchemist
Fullmetal Alchemist
(film)

Video games

Broken Angel Curse of the Crimson Elixir Kami o Tsugu Shōjo Dream Carnival Dual Sympathy

Characters

Edward Elric Alphonse Elric Roy Mustang Scar Winry Rockbell

v t e

Shogakukan Manga
Manga
Award – Shōnen

1970s

Poe no Ichizoku
Poe no Ichizoku
and They Were Eleven by Moto Hagio
Moto Hagio
(1975) Captain and Play Ball by Akio Chiba and Ganbare Genki by Yū Koyama (1976) Galaxy Express 999
Galaxy Express 999
and Senjo Manga
Manga
series by Leiji Matsumoto
Leiji Matsumoto
(1977) Dame Oyaji by Mitsutoshi Furuya (1978) Toward the Terra
Toward the Terra
and Kaze to Ki no Uta by Keiko Takemiya (1979)

1980s

Urusei Yatsura
Urusei Yatsura
by Rumiko Takahashi (1980) Dr. Slump
Dr. Slump
by Akira Toriyama
Akira Toriyama
(1981) Miyuki and Touch by Mitsuru Adachi
Mitsuru Adachi
(1982) Musashi no Ken by Motoka Murakami (1983) Futari Daka
Futari Daka
and Area 88
Area 88
by Kaoru Shintani (1984) Hatsukoi Scandal and Tobe! Jinrui II by Akira Oze (1985) Ginga: Nagareboshi Gin by Yoshihiro Takahashi
Yoshihiro Takahashi
(1986) Just Meet and Fuyu Monogatari by Hidenori Hara (1987) B.B. by Osamu Ishiwata (1988) Ucchare Goshogawara by Tsuyoshi Nakaima (1989)

1990s

Mobile Police Patlabor
Patlabor
by Masami Yuki (1990) Ushio and Tora
Ushio and Tora
by Kazuhiro Fujita
Kazuhiro Fujita
(1991) Ghost Sweeper Mikami
Ghost Sweeper Mikami
by Takashi Shiina and Yaiba
Yaiba
by Gosho Aoyama (1992) Yu Yu Hakusho
Yu Yu Hakusho
by Yoshihiro Togashi (1993) Slam Dunk by Takehiko Inoue (1994) Major
Major
by Takuya Mitsuda (1995) Firefighter! Daigo of Fire Company M
Firefighter! Daigo of Fire Company M
by Masahito Soda (1996) Ganba! Fly High by Shinji Morisue and Hiroyuki Kikuta (1997) ARMS by Kyoichi Nanatsuki and Ryōji Minagawa
Ryōji Minagawa
(1998) Monkey Turn
Monkey Turn
by Katsutoshi Kawai and Hikaru no Go
Hikaru no Go
by Yumi Hotta and Takeshi Obata (1999)

2000s

Detective Conan
Detective Conan
by Gosho Aoyama
Gosho Aoyama
and Cheeky Angel
Cheeky Angel
by Hiroyuki Nishimori (2000) Inuyasha
Inuyasha
by Rumiko Takahashi (2001) Konjiki no Gasshu!! by Makoto Raiku
Makoto Raiku
(2002) Yakitate!! Japan
Yakitate!! Japan
by Takashi Hashiguchi and Fullmetal Alchemist
Fullmetal Alchemist
by Hiromu Arakawa (2003) Bleach by Tite Kubo (2004) Wild Life by Masato Fujisaki (2005) Kekkaishi
Kekkaishi
by Yellow Tanabe (2006) Ace of Diamond
Ace of Diamond
by Yuji Terajima (2007) Cross Game
Cross Game
by Mitsuru Adachi
Mitsuru Adachi
(2008) Sket Dance by Kenta Shinohara
Kenta Shinohara
(2009)

2010s

King Golf
King Golf
by Ken Sasaki (2010) Nobunaga Concerto
Nobunaga Concerto
by Ayumi Ishii (2011) Silver Spoon by Hiromu Arakawa (2012) Magi: The Labyrinth of Magic by Shinobu Ohtaka (2013) Be Blues! - Ao ni Nare
Be Blues! - Ao ni Nare
by Motoyuki Tanaka (2014) Haikyu!!
Haikyu!!
by Haruichi Furudate
Haruichi Furudate
(2015) Mob Psycho 100
Mob Psycho 100
by ONE (2016) The Promised Neverland
The Promised Neverland
by Kaiu Shirai and Posuka Demizu (2017)

v t e

Seiun Award
Seiun Award
for Best Comic

1978–2000

Toward the Terra
Toward the Terra
(1978) Fujōri Nikki (1979) Star Red (1980) Kibun wa Mō Sensō (1982) Gin no Sankaku (1983) Domu: A Child's Dream (1984) X + Y (1985) Appleseed (1986) Urusei Yatsura
Urusei Yatsura
(1987) Kyūkyoku Chōjin R (1988) Mermaid Saga
Mermaid Saga
(1989) So What? (1990) Uchū Daizakka (1991) Yamataika (1992) Oz (1993) Dai-Honya and Grant Leauvas Monogatari (1994) Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind (1995) Parasyte
Parasyte
(1996) Ushio and Tora
Ushio and Tora
(1997) SF Taishō (1998) Runnahime Hourouki (1999) Itihaasa (2000)

2001–present

Cardcaptor Sakura
Cardcaptor Sakura
(2001) Planetes
Planetes
(2002) Chronoeyes (2003) From Far Away (2004) Bremen II (2005) Onmyōji (2006) Yokohama Kaidashi Kikō
Yokohama Kaidashi Kikō
(2007) 20th Century Boys
20th Century Boys
(2008) Trigun
Trigun
Maximum (2009) Pluto (2010) Fullmetal Alchemist
Fullmetal Alchemist
(2011) Mobile Suit Gundam: The Origin (2012) Inherit the Stars (2013) The World of Narue (2014) Moyasimon: Tales of Agriculture (2015) Knights of Sidonia
Knights of Sidonia
(2016) Kochira Katsushika-ku Kameari Kōen-mae Hashutsujo
Kochira Katsushika-ku Kameari Kōen-mae Hashutsujo
(2017)

v t e

Seven deadly sins

Lust Gluttony Greed Sloth Wrath Envy Pride

Persons who categorized and described the sins

Evagrius Ponticus John Cassian Pope Gregory I Dante Alighieri Peter Binsfeld Tarrare

In art and culture

Divine Comedy

Inferno Purgatorio

The Seven Deadly Sins (1585 play) The Seven Deadly Sins and the Four Last Things
The Seven Deadly Sins and the Four Last Things
(painting) The Seven Deadly Sins (1933 ballet) The Seven Deadly Sins (1952 film) The Seven Deadly Sins (1962 film) The Muppet Show: Sex and Violence (1975) Seven (1995 film) Fullmetal Alchemist
Fullmetal Alchemist
(manga series) The Seven Deadly Sins (manga series) The Seven Deadly Sins of Modern Times
The Seven Deadly Sins of Modern Times
(painting) House of Anubis: The Re-Awakening (2013) Jack (webcomic) Evillious Chronicles (song and book series)

Related

Seven Heavenly Virtues Seven Social Sins Sin

Christian views on sin

Christian views on the Old Covenant Hamartiology

Catholicism portal

v t e

Tezuka Osamu Cultural Prize

Grand Prize

1990s

Fujiko Fujio
Fujiko Fujio
for Doraemon
Doraemon
(1997) Jiro Taniguchi
Jiro Taniguchi
and Natsuo Sekikawa for the trilogy Bocchan No Jidai (1998) Naoki Urasawa
Naoki Urasawa
for Monster (1999)

2000s

Daijiro Morohoshi
Daijiro Morohoshi
for Saiyū Yōenden (2000) Reiko Okano and Baku Yumemakura
Baku Yumemakura
for Onmyōji (2001) Takehiko Inoue for Vagabond (2002) Fumiko Takano for The Yellow Book: A Friend Named Jacques Thibault (2003) Kyoko Okazaki
Kyoko Okazaki
for Helter Skelter (2004) Naoki Urasawa
Naoki Urasawa
for Pluto (2005) Hideo Azuma
Hideo Azuma
for Disappearance Diary
Disappearance Diary
(2006) Ryoko Yamagishi for Terpsichora
Terpsichora
(2007) Masayuki Ishikawa for Moyashimon (2008) Fumi Yoshinaga for Ōoku: The Inner Chambers and Yoshihiro Tatsumi
Yoshihiro Tatsumi
for A Drifting Life
A Drifting Life
(2009)

2010s

Yoshihiro Yamada for Hyouge Mono (2010) Motoka Murakami for Jin and Issei Eifuku and Taiyō Matsumoto
Taiyō Matsumoto
for Takemitsuzamurai
Takemitsuzamurai
(2011) Hitoshi Iwaaki for Historie
Historie
(2012) Yasuhisa Hara for Kingdom (2013) Chica Umino for March Comes in like a Lion
March Comes in like a Lion
(2014) Yoiko Hoshi for Aisawa Riku (2015) Kei Ichinoseki for Hanagami Sharaku and Kiyohiko Azuma for Yotsuba&! (2016) Fusako Kuramochi for Hana ni Somu (2017)

Special Award

1990s

Toshio Naiki (1997) Shotaro Ishinomori
Shotaro Ishinomori
(1998) Fusanosuke Natsume (1999)

2000s

Frederik L. Schodt (2000) Akira Maruyuma (2001) Shigeru Mizuki
Shigeru Mizuki
(2003) Tarō Minamoto (2004) Kawasaki City Museum (2005) Kousei Ono (2006) International Institute for Children's Literature, Osaka Prefecture (2008)

2010s

Yoshihiro Yonezawa
Yoshihiro Yonezawa
(2010) Weekly Shōnen
Shōnen
Jump (2012) Fujiko Fujio
Fujiko Fujio
(A) (2014) Chikako Mitsuhashi for Chiisana Koi no Monogatari (2015) Kyoto International Manga
Manga
Museum (2016) Osamu Akimoto for Kochira Katsushika-ku Kameari Kōen-mae Hashutsujo (2017)

Award for Excellence

Moto Hagio
Moto Hagio
for A Cruel God Reigns
A Cruel God Reigns
(1997) Yūji Aoki for Naniwa Kin'yūdō (1998) Akira Sasō for Shindō (1999) Minetarō Mochizuki for Dragon Head (2000) Kotobuki Shiriagari for Yajikita in Deep (2001) Kentaro Miura
Kentaro Miura
for Berserk (2002)

Creative Award

Yumi Hotta and Takeshi Obata for Hikaru no Go
Hikaru no Go
(2003) Takashi Morimoto for Naniwadora ihon (2004) Fumiyo Kōno for Town of Evening Calm, Country of Cherry Blossoms (2005) Asa Higuchi for Big Windup!
Big Windup!
(2006) Nobuhisa Nozoe, Kazuhisa Iwata and Kyojin Ōnishi for Shinsei Kigeki (2007) Toranosuke Shimada for Träumerei (2008)

New Artist Prize

Suehiro Maruo for The Strange Tale of Panorama Island
The Strange Tale of Panorama Island
(2009) Haruko Ichikawa for Mushi to Uta (2010) Hiromu Arakawa for Fullmetal Alchemist
Fullmetal Alchemist
(2011) Yu Itō for Shut Hell
Shut Hell
(2012) Miki Yamamoto for Sunny Sunny Ann! (2013) Machiko Kyō for Mitsuami no Kamisama (2014) Yoshitoki Ōima for A Silent Voice (2015) Yuki Andō for Machida-kun no Sekai (2016) Haruko Kumota for Descending Stories: Showa Genroku Rakugo Shinju (2017)

Short Story Award

Hisaichi Ishii for Gendai Shisō no Sōnanshātachi (2003) Risu Akizuki for OL Shinkaron (2004) Rieko Saibara for Jōkyō Monogatari and Mainichi Kaasan (2005) Risa Itō for One Woman, Two Cats, Hey Pitan! , Onna no Mado (2006) Hiromi Morishita for Ōsaka Hamlet (2007) Yumiko Ōshima for Cher Gou-Gou...mon petit chat, mon petit ami (2008) Hikaru Nakamura for Saint Young Men
Saint Young Men
(2009) Mari Yamazaki for Thermae Romae
Thermae Romae
(2010) Keisuke Yamashina for C-kyū Salaryman Kōza, Papa wa Nanda ka Wakaranai (2011) Roswell Hosoki for Sake no Hosomichi (2012) Yoshiie Gōda for Love of Machine (2013) Yuki Shikawa for Onnoji (2014) Sensha Yoshida (2015) Tatsuya Nakazaki for Jimihen (2016) Kahoru Fukaya for Yomawari Neko (2017)

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Gangan Comics

Monthly Shōnen
Shōnen
Gangan

B. Ichi Blast of Tempest A Certain Magical Index Corpse Princess Doubt Dragon Quest
Dragon Quest
Retsuden: Roto no Monshō Fullmetal Alchemist Guilty Crown Haré+Guu He Is My Master Hero Tales Heroman High School! Kimengumi Higurashi When They Cry Magical Circle Guru Guru Mamotte Shugogetten Material Puzzle Moribito: Guardian of the Spirit The Mythical Detective Loki Ragnarok Nagasarete Airantō Ninpen Manmaru O-Parts Hunter Pani Poni Papuwa Peacemaker Kurogane The Record of a Fallen Vampire Soul Eater Soul Eater Not! Spiral: The Bonds of Reasoning Star Ocean: The Second Story Today's Cerberus Tokyo Underground Twin Signal UFO Ultramaiden Valkyrie Violinist of Hameln Watashi no Messiah-sama The World Ends with You

Monthly GFantasy

Aoharu x Machinegun Black Butler Cuticle Detective Inaba Dance with Devils Dazzle Devil Survivor 2: The Animation Durarara!! E's Gestalt Hakata Tonkotsu Ramens Hori-san to Miyamura-kun I, Otaku: Struggle in Akihabara The Irregular at Magic High School K Kimi to Boku Nabari no Ou Nil Admirari no Tenbin: Teito Genwaku Kitan Pandora Hearts The Royal Tutor Saiyuki Samurai Flamenco Silent Möbius
Silent Möbius
Tales Superior Switch Toward the Terra Yumekui Kenbun: Nightmare Inspector Zombie-Loan

Young Gangan

+Tic Elder Sister Arakawa Under the Bridge Aria the Scarlet Ammo
Aria the Scarlet Ammo
AA Astro Fighter Sunred Baccano! Bamboo Blade Bitter Virgin Black God The Comic Artist and His Assistants Darker than Black Dimension W Ghost Slayers Ayashi Hanamaru Kindergarten Hōzuki Island I Couldn't Become a Hero, So I Reluctantly Decided to Get a Job. Is It Wrong to Try to Pick Up Girls in a Dungeon? Knight's & Magic Lagrange: The Flower of Rin-ne Mononoke Mōryō no Yurikago No-Rin Restaurant to Another World The Ryuo's Work is Never Done! Saki Sekirei Space Dandy Sumomomo Momomo Übel Blatt Until Death Do Us Part Working!!

Gangan Online

Barakamon Chivalry of a Failed Knight Chronicles of the Going Home Club Daily Lives of High School Boys Day Break Illusion The Legend of the Legendary Heroes Monthly Girls' Nozaki-kun The Morose Mononokean Tanaka-kun is Always Listless Undefeated Bahamut Chronicle

Monthly Gangan Joker

Akame ga Kill! Book Girl The Case Study of Vanitas Corpse Party Dusk Maiden of Amnesia Grimgar of Fantasy
Fantasy
and Ash Gugure! Kokkuri-san Hanasaku Iroha The Idolmaster Cinderella Girls Imōto Sae Ireba Ii. Gaiden: Imōto ni Saenareba Ii! Inu x Boku SS Is It Wrong to Try to Pick Up Girls in a Dungeon?: Sword Oratoria Kakegurui – Compulsive Gambler My Bride is a Mermaid Natsu no Arashi! One Week Friends Oreshura Sengoku Strays Shitsurakuen Tari Tari Umineko When They Cry WataMote

Monthly Big Gangan

ACCA: 13-Territory Inspection Dept. Goblin Slayer High Score Girl My Youth Romantic Comedy Is Wrong, As I Expected Re:Zero − Starting Life in Another World Rose Guns Days Saekano: How to Raise a Boring Girlfriend Scum's Wish Servant × Service WIXOSS

Discontinued

Alice on Deadlines Dear Enchanter Juvenile Orion Kamui KimiKiss Mahoraba Tenka Musō

Other

List of Gangan Comics
Gangan Comics
manga franchises Squa

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