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Sobibór, 28 April 1942 – 30 August 1942 Treblinka, 1 September 1942 – August 1943

Franz Paul Stangl[1] (26 March 1908 – 28 June 1971) was an Austrian-born police officer who became an employee of the T-4 Euthanasia Program and an SS commander in Nazi Germany. He was the commandant of the Sobibór
Sobibór
and Treblinka
Treblinka
extermination camps during the Operation Reinhard
Operation Reinhard
phase of the Holocaust. He worked for Volkswagen do Brasil
Volkswagen do Brasil
and was arrested in Brazil in 1967, extradited to West Germany
West Germany
and tried for the mass murder of 900,000 people. In 1970, he was found guilty and sentenced to the maximum penalty, life imprisonment. He died of heart failure six months later.[2][3]

Contents

1 Early life and Nazi affiliations 2 T-4 Euthanasia program, 1940-3/1943- 3 Extermination camps

3.1 Sobibór, 4-8/1942 3.2 Treblinka, 9/1942-8/1943 3.3 Trieste, 8/1943-1945

4 Post-war escape, 1945-1961 5 Arrest, trial, and death 6 See also 7 Notes 8 External links

Early life and Nazi affiliations[edit] Stangl was born in 1908 in Altmünster, located in the Salzkammergut region of Austria. He was the son of a night-watchman and had such an emotionally distressing relationship with his father that he was deeply frightened by and hated the sight of the elder Stangl's Habsburg
Habsburg
Dragoons uniform.[4] Stangl claimed his father died of malnutrition in 1916. To help support his family, Franz learned to play the zither and earned money giving zither lessons. Stangl completed his public schooling in 1923.[5] In his teens he secured an apprenticeship as a weaver, qualifying as a master weaver in 1927. Concerned that this trade offered few opportunities for advancement – and having observed the poor health of his co-workers – Stangl sought a new career. He moved to Innsbruck
Innsbruck
in 1930 and applied for an appointment in the Austrian federal police. Stangl later suggested that he liked the security and cleanliness that the police uniforms represented to him. He was accepted in early 1931 and trained for two years at the federal police academy in Linz.[5] Stangl became a member of the NSDAP
NSDAP
(commonly referred to in English as the Nazi Party) in 1931, an illegal association for an Austrian police officer at that time.[2] Post-war, he denied having been a Nazi since 1931 and claimed that he had enrolled as member of the party only to avoid arrest following the Anschluss
Anschluss
of Austria
Austria
into Nazi Germany in May 1938. Records suggest that Stangl contributed to a Nazi aid fund but he disavowed knowing about the intended party purpose of the fund. Stangl had Nazi Party
Nazi Party
number 6,370,447 and SS number 296,569.[citation needed] In 1935, Stangl was accepted into the Kriminalpolizei
Kriminalpolizei
as a detective in the Austrian town of Wels.[4] After Austria's Anschluss, Stangl was assigned to the Schutzpolizei (which was taken over by the Gestapo) in Linz, where he was posted to the Jewish Bureau (German: Judenreferat).[6] Stangl joined the SS in May 1938.[5] He would ultimately reach the rank of SS- Hauptsturmführer
Hauptsturmführer
(Captain).[7] T-4 Euthanasia program, 1940-3/1943-[edit] After the onset of World War II, in early 1940, Stangl was instructed to report for work at the Public Service Foundation for Institutional Care (Gemeinnützige Stiftung für Anstaltspflege), a front organization of the T-4 Euthanasia Program.[6] Stangl purposely solicited for a job in the newly created T-4 program in order to escape difficulties with his boss in the Linz
Linz
Gestapo. He traveled to the RSHA
RSHA
in Berlin, where he was received by Paul Werner, who offered Stangl a job as supervisor in charge of security at a T4 killing facility, and in the language commonly used during recruitment, described Action T4
Action T4
as a "humanitarian" effort that was "essential, legal, and secret". Next Stangl met with Viktor Brack, who offered him a choice of work between Hartheim and Sonnenstein Euthanasia Centres; naturally, Stangl picked Hartheim, which was near Linz.[5] Through a direct order from Reichsführer-SS
Reichsführer-SS
Heinrich Himmler
Heinrich Himmler
issued in November 1940, Stangl became the deputy office manager (Police Superintendent) of the T-4 Euthanasia Program at Hartheim Euthanasia Centre, and in late summer 1941 at Bernburg Euthanasia Centre, where people with mental and physical disabilities, as well as political prisoners, were sent to be killed.[4][8] At Hartheim, Stangl served under Christian Wirth
Christian Wirth
as assistant supervisor in charge of security. When Wirth was succeeded by Franz Reichleitner, Stangl stayed on as Reichleitner's deputy. During his brief posting to Bernburg Euthanasia Centre
Bernburg Euthanasia Centre
Stangl reorganized the office at that killing facility.[5] In March 1942, Stangl was given a choice to either return to the Linz
Linz
Gestapo
Gestapo
or be transferred to Lublin for work in Operation Reinhard. Stangl accepted the posting to Lublin in the General Government, where he would manage Operation Reinhard under Odilo Globocnik.[4] Extermination camps[edit] Sobibór, 4-8/1942[edit] Stangl was appointed by Reichsführer-SS
Reichsführer-SS
Heinrich Himmler
Heinrich Himmler
to be the first commandant of Sobibór
Sobibór
extermination camp. Stangl was Sobibór's commandant from 28 April until the end of August 1942, at the rank of SS-Obersturmführer. He claimed that Odilo Globocnik
Odilo Globocnik
initially suggested that Sobibór
Sobibór
was merely a supply camp for the army, and that the true nature of the camp became known to him only when he himself discovered a gas chamber hidden in the woods. Globocnik told him that if the Jews "were not working hard enough" he was fully permitted to kill them and that Globocnik would send "new ones". Stangl studied the camp operations and management of Bełżec, which had already commenced extermination activity. He then accelerated the completion of Sobibór.[9] Around that time Stangl also had further dealings with Wirth, who was running extermination camps at Bełżec and Chelmno. Between 16–18 May 1942, Sobibór
Sobibór
became fully operational. Around 100,000 Jews are believed to have been killed there while Stangl was the administrator until the furnaces broke down in October, by which time Stangl had left.[4] Stangl was succeeded as Sobibór
Sobibór
commandant by his Hartheim Euthanasia Center colleague, Franz Reichleitner. Treblinka, 9/1942-8/1943[edit]

KZ Treblinka
Treblinka
sketch plan produced during Franz Stangl's 1967 trial in West Germany

Main article: Treblinka
Treblinka
extermination camp On 28 August 1942, Odilo Globocnik
Odilo Globocnik
ordered Stangl to become Kommandant at the newly opened but disorganized death camp, Treblinka, then under the incompetent[further explanation needed] command of Irmfried Eberl. Globocnik trusted that Stangl could restore order at Treblinka, since Stangl had a reputation as a highly competent administrator and people manager with an excellent grasp of detail.[1] Stangl assumed command of Treblinka
Treblinka
on 1 September 1942. Stangl wanted his camp to look attractive, so he ordered the paths paved and flowers planted along the sides of Seidel Street, near camp headquarters and SS living quarters. Despite being directly responsible for the camp's operations, Stangl said he limited his contact with Jewish prisoners as much as possible. Stangl rarely intervened with unusually cruel acts (other than gassing) perpetrated by his subordinate officers at the camp. He usually wore a white uniform and carried a whip, which caused prisoners to nickname him the "White Death".[1] He claimed while in prison that his dedication had nothing to do with ideology or hatred of Jews.[4] He said he matter-of-factly viewed the prisoners as material objects rather than people, including their extermination: "That was my profession. I enjoyed it. It fulfilled me. And yes, I was ambitious about that, I won't deny it."[10] Stangl accepted and grew accustomed to the killings, perceiving prisoners not as humans but merely as "cargo" that must be destroyed. Stangl accepted the extermination of the Jews as a fact. At about this time, Stangl began drinking heavily.[11] He is quoted as saying:

To tell the truth, one did become used to it... they were cargo. I think it started the day I first saw the Totenlager [extermination area] in Treblinka. I remember Wirth standing there, next to the pits full of black-blue corpses. It had nothing to do with humanity — it could not have. It was a mass — a mass of rotting flesh. Wirth said 'What shall we do with this garbage?' I think unconsciously that started me thinking of them as cargo... I rarely saw them as individuals. It was always a huge mass. I sometimes stood on the wall and saw them in the "tube" — they were naked, packed together, running, being driven with whips...[10]

In September 1942, Stangl supervised the building of new, larger gas chambers to augment the existing gas chambers. The new gas chambers became operational in early autumn 1942. It is believed that these death chambers were capable of killing 3,000 people in two hours, and 12,000 to 15,000 victims easily every day,[1] with a maximum capacity of 22,000 deaths in 24 hours.[12] According to Jankiel Wiernik: "When the new gas chambers were completed, the Hauptsturmführer
Hauptsturmführer
[Stangl] came and remarked to the SS men who were with him: 'Finally the Jewish city is ready' (German: Endlich ist die Judenstadt fertig)".[10] Erich Bauer
Erich Bauer
would later remark:

I estimate that the number of Jews gassed at Sobibor was about 350,000. In the canteen at Sobibor I once overheard a conversation between Karl Frenzel, Franz Stangl
Franz Stangl
and Gustav Wagner. They were discussing the number of victims in the extermination camps of Belzec, Treblinka
Treblinka
and Sobibor and expressed their regret that Sobibor "came last" in the competition.[8]

Trieste, 8/1943-1945[edit] In August 1943, along with Globocnik, Stangl was transferred to Trieste, where he helped organize the campaign against Yugoslav partisans and local Jews. Due to illness, he returned to Vienna
Vienna
in early 1945, where he served in the "Alpine Fortress" (Alpenfestung).[6] Post-war escape, 1945-1961[edit] At the end of the war, Stangl fled without concealing his name. He was detained by the American Army in 1945 and was briefly imprisoned pending investigation in Linz, Austria
Austria
in 1947. Stangl was suspected of complicity in the T-4 euthanasia programme. On 30 May 1948, he escaped to Italy with his colleague from Sobibór, SS sergeant Gustav Wagner. Austrian Roman Catholic Bishop Alois Hudal, a Nazi sympathizer, forced in 1952 to resign by the Vatican, helped him to escape through a "ratline" and to reach Syria
Syria
using a Red Cross passport.[13] Stangl was joined by his wife and family and lived in Syria
Syria
for three years. In 1951, they moved to Brazil. After years of other jobs, he found work at the Volkswagen do Brasil
Volkswagen do Brasil
plant in São Bernardo do Campo with the help of friends, still using his own name.[14] Arrest, trial, and death[edit] Although Stangl's role in the mass murder of men, women, and children was known to the Austrian authorities, a warrant for his arrest was not issued until 1961. Despite being registered under his real name at the Austrian consulate in São Paulo,[15] it took another six years before he was tracked down by Nazi hunter Simon Wiesenthal
Simon Wiesenthal
and arrested by Brazilian federal police on 28 February 1967. He never used an assumed name during his escape, and it is not clear why it took so long to apprehend him. After his extradition to West Germany by Brazilian authorities, he was tried for the deaths of around 900,000 people. He admitted to these killings but argued: "My conscience is clear. I was simply doing my duty..."[16] Stangl's own attempt to justify his murderous actions as non-criminal in the face of German law (or so he thought) was subsequently quoted by Arad:

What I had to do while I continued my efforts to get out was to limit my own actions to what I — in my own conscience — could answer for. At police training school they taught us that the definition of a crime must meet four requirements: there has to be a subject, an object, an action and intent. If any of these four elements is missing, then we are not dealing with a punishable offence... I could apply this to my own situation — if the subject was the government, the "object" the Jews, and the action the gassing, I could tell myself that for me, the fourth element, "intent", (I called it free will) was missing.[10]

Philosopher John Kekes discussed Stangl and the degree of his responsibility for war crimes in chapter 4 of his book, The Roots of Evil.[17] The Schwurgericht Düsseldorf
Düsseldorf
court found Stangl guilty on 22 December 1970 and sentenced him to the maximum penalty, life imprisonment.[8] While in prison, Stangl was interviewed extensively by Gitta Sereny for a study of him which was published under the title Into that Darkness.[18] She wrote, quoting him:

"My conscience is clear about what I did, myself", he said, in the same stiffly tone he had used countless times at his trial, and in the past weeks, when we had always come back to this subject, over and over again. But this time I said nothing. He paused and waited, but the room remained silent. "I have never intentionally hurt anyone, myself," he said, with a different, less incisive emphasis, and waited again - for a long time. For the first time, in all these many days, I had given him no help. There was no more time. He gripped the table with both hands as if he was holding on to it. "But I was there", he said then, in a curiously dry and tired tone of resignation. These few sentences had taken almost half an hour to pronounce. "So yes," he said finally, very quietly, "in reality I share the guilt... Because my guilt... my guilt... only now in these talks... now that I have talked about it all for the first time..." He stopped.

In his prison interview with Sereny – she later wrote – Stangl "had pronounced the words 'my guilt': but more than the words, the finality of it was in the sagging of his body, and on his face. After more than a minute he started again, a half-hearted attempt, in a dull voice. 'My guilt,' he said, 'is that I am still here. That is my guilt.'"[19] He died of heart failure nineteen hours after the conclusion of that interview, in Düsseldorf
Düsseldorf
prison on 28 June 1971.[4] See also[edit]

Glossary of Nazi Germany List of Nazi Party
Nazi Party
leaders and officials List of SS personnel

Notes[edit]

^ a b c d Treblinka
Treblinka
Death Camp, with photographs Archived 2012-03-22 at the Wayback Machine., Ounsdale, PDF (2.2 MB) ^ a b "SOME SIGNIFICANT CASE - Franz Stangl". Simon Wiesenthal
Simon Wiesenthal
Archiv. Simon Wiesenthal
Simon Wiesenthal
Center. Retrieved 30 November 2009.  ^ Sobibor - The Forgotten Revolt Archived 24 January 2012 at the Wayback Machine. ^ a b c d e f g Robert S. Wistrich
Robert S. Wistrich
(1982). Who's Who in Nazi Germany, pp. 295-96. ^ a b c d e Henry Friedlander (1995). The Origins of Nazi Genocide: From Euthanasia to the Final Solution, Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, pp. 204-05; ISBN 0-8078-2208-6 ^ a b c Christian Zentner, Friedemann Bedürftig (1991). The Encyclopedia of the Third Reich, pp. 910-11. Macmillan, New York; ISBN 0-02-897502-2 ^ Klee, Ernst: Das Personenlexikon zum Dritten Reich. Wer war was vor und nach 1945?. Fischer Taschenbuch Verlag, Zweite aktualisierte Auflage, Frankfurt am Main 2003; ISBN 3-10-039309-0 ^ a b c Klee, Ernst, Dressen, Willi, Riess, Volker The Good Old Days: The Holocaust
The Holocaust
as Seen by Its Perpetrators and Bystanders; ISBN 1-56852-133-2. ^ Christian Zentner, Friedemann Bedürftig. The Encyclopedia of the Third Reich, p. 878. Macmillan, New York (1991); ISBN 0-02-897502-2 ^ a b c d Yitzhak Arad
Yitzhak Arad
(1987). Belzec, Sobibor, Treblinka: The Operation Reinhard
Operation Reinhard
Death Camps, Bloomington: Indiana University Press, pp. 184-86. ^ Sereny, Gitta (1995). Into That Darkness. Pimlico. p. 200. ISBN 978-0712674478.  ^ David E. Sumler, A history of Europe in the twentieth century, Dorsey Press; ISBN 0-256-01421-3. ^ Michael Phayer, The Catholic Church and the Holocaust ^ Komplizen? - VW und die brasilianische Militärdiktatur. DasErste, ARD, 24.07.2017 ^ Sereny, Gitta Into That Darkness: from Mercy Killing to Mass Murder, a study of Franz Stangl, the commandant of Treblinka
Treblinka
(1974) ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 5 August 2012. Retrieved 30 June 2012.  ^ Kekes, John. Roots of Evil excerpt via Google.com; accessed 5 March 2017. ^ Sereny, Gitta (1974). Into That Darkness: From Mercy Killing to Mass Murder (1995 paperback ed.). London: Pimlico. ISBN 978-0-7126-7447-8.  ^ Sereny (1974), p. 364

Wikiquote has quotations related to: Franz Stangl

External links[edit]

Franz Paul Stangl, Holocaust Education & Archive Research Team

Military offices

Preceded by none Commandant of Sobibór
Sobibór
extermination camp 28 April 1942 – 30 August 1942 Succeeded by SS- Obersturmführer
Obersturmführer
Franz Reichleitner

Preceded by SS- Obersturmführer
Obersturmführer
Irmfried Eberl Commandant of Treblinka
Treblinka
extermination camp 1 September 1942 – August 1943 Succeeded by SS-Untersturmführer Kurt Franz

v t e

Treblinka
Treblinka
extermination camp

Timeline and List of individuals responsible

Camp organizers

Odilo Lotario Globocnik Hermann Julius Höfle Erwin Hermann Lambert Richard Wolfgang Thomalla Christian Wirth

Commandant

Irmfried Eberl

11 July to 26 August 1942

Franz Paul Stangl

1 September 1942 to August 1943

Kurt Hubert Franz

August to November 1943

Deputies

Theodor van Eupen Heinrich Arthur Matthes Karl Pötzinger

Gas chamber executioners

Gustav Münzberger Fritz Schmidt

Other officers

Max Biala Paul Bredow Herbert Floss Erich Fritz Erhard Fuchs Lorenz Hackenholt Hans Hingst Josef Hirtreiter Otto Richard Horn Kurt Küttner Karl Emil Ludwig Willy Mätzig Willi Mentz August Wilhelm Miete Max Möller Willi Post Albert Franz Rum Karl Schiffer Otto Stadie Ernst Stengelin Franz Suchomel

Guards

"Ivan the Terrible" John Demjanjuk a Feodor Fedorenko Nikolay Yegorovich Shalayev "Trawnikis" a

Prominent victims

Ernst Arndt Yitzchok Breiter Amalia Carneri Julian Chorążycki Samuel Finkelstein Artur Gold Ludwik Holcman Janusz Korczak Berek Lajcher Henryka Łazowertówna Yechiel Lerer Yitzchak Lowy Simon Pullman Natan Spigel Symche Trachter Zygmunt Zalcwasser Lidia Zamenhof

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Sobibór
Sobibór
extermination camp

Camp organizers

Odilo Lotario Globocnik Hermann Julius Höfle Richard Wolfgang Thomalla Erwin Hermann Lambert Karl Steubl Christian Wirth

Commandant

Franz Paul Stangl a Franz Karl Reichleitner b

Deputies

Karl August Wilhelm Frenzel Hermann Michel Johann Niemann Gustav Franz Wagner

Gas chamber executioners

Hermann Erich Bauer Heinz Kurt Bolender

Other officers

Rudolf Beckmann Paul Bredow Herbert Floss Erich Fritz Erhard Fuchs Siegfried Graetschus Lorenz Hackenholt Josef "Sepp" Hirtreiter Jakob Alfred Ittner Erich Gustav Willie Lachmann Willi Mentz Paul Rost Ernst Stengelin Ernst Zierke Heinrich Barbl

Guards

Ukrainians

Ivan Demjanjuk "Trawnikis" c Volksdeutsche

Prominent victims

Helga Deen Anna Dresden-Polak Emanuel Lodewijk Elte Else Feldmann Isidore Goudeket Jakob van Hoddis Han Hollander Gerrit Kleerekoper Pati Kremer Kurt Lilien Juan Luria Messaoud El Mediouni Helena Nordheim Abraham de Oliveira Emanuel Querido Jud Simons Philip Slier Leo Smit Max van Dam Michel Velleman

Resistance Survivors

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a 28 April to 30 August 1942 b 1 September 1942 to 17 October 1943 c Up to 200

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Jewish ghettos in German-occupied Poland
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Croatian

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Belgian

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Ukrainian

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Assistance

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Robert Leiber
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Hunters

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Disputed / dubious

Krunoslav Draganović ODESSA Stille Hilfe

See also

List of Most Wanted Nazi War Criminals

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 27866909 LCCN: n82073950 ISNI: 0000 0001 1469 7142 GND: 118752693 SUDOC: 027147207 BNF: cb119254206 (d

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