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The Info List - Fort Harrison Hotel


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The Fort
Fort
Harrison Hotel serves as the flagship building of the Flag Land Base, the Church of Scientology's spiritual headquarters in Clearwater, Florida. It is owned and operated by the Church of Scientology
Scientology
Flag Service Organization, Inc., a subsidiary of the Church of Scientology
Scientology
International. The hotel has 11 stories and features 220 rooms, three restaurants, a swimming pool and a ballroom. The building is connected by a skywalk to the Flag Building.

Contents

1 History 2 Use in Scientology 3 Notable incidents 4 Trivia 5 See also 6 References 7 External links

History[edit] The hotel opened in 1926 as the "New Fort
Fort
Harrison Hotel", replacing the former Fort
Fort
Harrison Hotel. It was built by developer Ed Haley and was used as a community center for many years.[1] The hotel was operated by Ransom E. Olds, inventor of the Oldsmobile, from 1926 until his death in 1950.[2] The name comes from a Seminole War-era U.S. Army fort, built in the 1830s south of today's downtown Clearwater. The fort was named for William Henry Harrison
William Henry Harrison
and was the western counterpart of Fort
Fort
Brooke in what became Tampa. (See also the history of Clearwater.) In 1953 the hotel was bought by the Jack Tar Hotels and became known as the "New Fort
Fort
Harrison Hotel, a Jack Tar Hotel".[2] The company added a cabana area to the building. By the 1970s the hotel began to fall into disrepair. In 1975, the Church of Scientology
Scientology
purchased the building under the names "Southern Land Development and Leasing Corp"[2] and "United Churches of Florida Inc".[3] In 1976, the Church of Scientology's connection and the named purchasers was reported by the St. Petersburg Times, as was the Church's plan for a $2.8 million restoration and upgrade of the hotel.[4] In 2007, the Church announced that the hotel would undergo another $20 million restoration project, but not when the project would begin.[5] Use in Scientology[edit] The Fort
Fort
Harrison Hotel is used by the Church of Scientology
Scientology
as an area in which to feed, train and house visiting practitioners.[4] It provides both accommodation and "course & auditing" rooms, for Scientologists studying at high levels of Scientology. The Fort Harrison is joined by a walkway bridge over South Fort
Fort
Harrison Avenue to the Flag Building
Flag Building
on the other side of the street. The hotel was used for the Rehabilitation Project Force
Rehabilitation Project Force
(RPF), a program used to punish members of the Church of Scientology
Scientology
Sea Organization for "serious deviations." Members of the church in this institution are subject to prison-like conditions, forced labor and other human rights violations.[6][7] A former prisoner of the hotel, Hanna Whitefield, described the situation in an affidavit:[8]

“ Some of us slept on thin mattresses on the bare cement floor. Some had crude bunk beds. There was no place for clothes, so we lived out of suitcases and bags which were kept on bare floors. Some privacy was maintained by hanging sheets up between bunk beds and between floor mattresses. The women and men had separate bathrooms and toilets but they were small. We were not allowed to shower longer than 30 seconds. We had only to run through the shower and out the other end. There was no spare time for talk or relaxation. We awoke at 6:30 A.M. or earlier at times, did hard labor and heavy construction work and cleaning until late afternoon. After [a] quick shower and change of clothing, we had to audit each other and 'rehabilitate' ourselves until 10:30 P.M. or later each evening. There were no days off, four weeks a month. We ate our meals in the garage or at times in the dining rooms AFTER normal meals had ended. Our food consisted of leftovers from staff. On occasions which seemed like Christmas, we were able to prepare ourselves fresh meals if leftovers were insufficient. ”

— Hanna Whitefield, in her affidavit to the United States
United States
District Court for the Central District of California

Notable incidents[edit] In December 1926, daredevil Henry Roland scaled the building blindfolded.[9] The Fort
Fort
Harrison Hotel has been the site of at least three suspicious deaths since 1975, most notably the death of Lisa McPherson, who died on December 5, 1995, after spending 17 days in room 174[10] of the building.[6][11] The officially reported cause of death was a blood clot caused by dehydration and bedrest. The Church later challenged the findings of the autopsy in court.[12][13] In 1997, a church spokesman acknowledged that McPherson died at the Fort
Fort
Harrison, rather than on the way to the hospital. The church later retracted its spokesman's statement.[14] In February 1980, prior to McPherson's death, a Scientologist named Josephus A. Havenith was found dead at the Fort
Fort
Harrison Hotel. He was discovered in a bathtub filled with water hot enough to have burned his skin off. The officially reported cause of death was drowning, although the coroner noted that, when he was found, Havenith's head was not submerged.[15] In August 1988, Scientologist Heribert Pfaff died of a seizure in the Fort
Fort
Harrison Hotel. He had recently stopped taking his seizure medication in favor of a vitamin program.[15] In 1997, Clearwater police received over 160 emergency calls from the Fort
Fort
Harrison Hotel, but they were denied entry into the hotel by Scientology
Scientology
security.[15][16] Trivia[edit] In 1965, the Rolling Stones
Rolling Stones
wrote their hit song "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction" at the hotel.[17] The hotel was once the spring training home of the Philadelphia Phillies.[18] See also[edit]

Florida portal Scientology
Scientology
portal

Church of Spiritual Technology Dianetics Religious Technology Center Scientology Scientology
Scientology
controversies

References[edit]

^ DEBORAH O'NEIL (January 26, 2002). "Public to get rare view of hotel". St. Petersburg Times. Retrieved April 18, 2010. The Fort Harrison Hotel was built by developer Ed Haley and for years served as a center for community events. Proms and cotillions, luncheons and fashion shows, club meetings and wedding receptions all were staged there.  ^ a b c AMELIA DAVIS (May 24, 1990). "Historic sites dot land along harbor". St. Petersburg Times. Retrieved April 18, 2010. Fort
Fort
Harrison Hotel. Built in 1925 by Ed Haley, the hotel was operated by R.E. Olds of Lansing, Mich., until 1953. Olds, the founder of Oldsmar and the inventor of the Oldsmobile, traded his nearly finished Oldsmar Race Track for the Fort
Fort
Harrison. In 1953, the hotel was sold to the Jack Tar hotel chain. It was operated as a winter resort for most of its first three decades. The 11-story building was the city's first skyscraper. In 1975, the hotel was sold to the Church of Scientology, under the alias Southern Land Development and Leasing Corp. The building serves as Scientology's international spiritual headquarters.  ^ CURTIS KRUEGER (August 5, 1989). "Scientologists don't plan to buy buildings". St. Petersburg Times. Retrieved April 18, 2010. The Scientologists' land holdings in Clearwater have increased steadily in the years since they bought the historic Fort
Fort
Harrison Hotel in 1975.  ^ a b CURTIS KRUEGER (February 13, 1989). "Scientologists upgrading hotel // $ 2.8-million spent on headquarters". St. Petersburg Times. Retrieved April 18, 2010. The Church of Scientology
Scientology
says it is pouring $ 2.8-million into a renovation of the Fort
Fort
Harrison Hotel, where the organization houses, trains and feeds its students.  ^ Jacob H Fries (September 29, 2007). "SCIENTOLOGY HAS BIG PLANS FOR LANDMARK". St. Petersburg Times. Retrieved April 18, 2010. The Church of Scientology
Scientology
is in announcement mode again, this time saying it will spend $20-million on a major upgrade of its iconic Fort
Fort
Harrison Hotel. But what church officials aren't saying is exactly when the work will start.  ^ a b "The Life & Death of a Scientologist". ISSN 0190-8286. Retrieved 2018-01-05.  ^ " Scientology
Scientology
— Is This a Religion?" Scientology—Is This a Religion? N.p., n.d. Web. 04 Feb. 2015. <http://www.solitarytrees.net/pubs/skent/isthis.htm#rpf>. ^ Whitfield, Hana. 1989. "Affidavit." (August 8): 11pp, downloaded from <alt.religion.scientology>. ^ "'Human fly' to scale Fort
Fort
Harrison Hotel". St. Petersburgh Times. Dec 3, 1926. Retrieved April 18, 2010.  ^ Tobin, Thomas C. (December 6, 1998). "McPherson Relatives Lead Protest". St. Petersburg Times. Florida.  ^ Ellison, Michael (November 23, 1998). "Death in the sunshine state; Three years ago, a minor car crash left Lisa McPherson
Lisa McPherson
dead. Now Scientology
Scientology
is in the dock". The Guardian.  ^ Wilson, Mike (August 16, 1997). " Scientology
Scientology
deserves all the bad PR". St. Petersburg Times.  ^ Tobin, Thomas C. (June 7, 1998). "'Unique' case of Scientologist's death is still under investigation". St. Petersburg Times.  ^ Tobin, Thomas C. (May 9, 1997). "When did she die?". St. Petersburg Times.  ^ a b c Lucy Morgan (December 7, 1997). "For some Scientologists, pilgrimage has been fatal". St. Petersburg Times. Retrieved April 18, 2010. Josephus A. Havenith, 45, who died in February 1980 at the Fort Harrison Hotel in a bathtub filled with water so hot it burned his skin off. Heribert Pfaff, 31, who died of an apparent seizure in the Fort Harrison Hotel in August 1988 after he quit taking medication that controlled his seizures and was placed instead on a program of vitamins and minerals. Clearwater police are suspicious about the number of 911 calls that come from rooms at the Fort
Fort
Harrison Hotel. Police respond to each call only to be told most of the time by Scientology
Scientology
security guards that the call was a mistake. Police are not allowed to check individual rooms where the calls originated. In the past 11 months, 161 calls to 911 were made from rooms in the hotel, but each time Scientology
Scientology
security guards said there was no emergency. 

^ "Scientologists' deaths raise questions among families, officials". Ocala Star-Banner. Associated Press. December 8, 1997. Retrieved November 19, 2015.  ^ "Know Your Stones". The Irish Times. September 6, 2003. Retrieved April 18, 2010. Keith Richards woke up in the Fort
Fort
Harrison Hotel, Clearwater, Florida, having dreamt the riff, chorus and title of (I Can't Get No) Satisfaction.  ^ Ned Seaton (March 29, 1996). "Among Phillies fans, sisters hit cleanup". St. Petersburg Times. Retrieved April 18, 2010. They worked hard on their tans and they went to all the games, but there wasn't much else going on, they said. The town closed down about 9 p.m. In those early days, they stayed in the Fort
Fort
Harrison Hotel, where the team stayed. 

External links[edit]

Flag Service Organization – International Religious Retreat

The Fort
Fort
Harrison

Flag.org Scientology
Scientology
in Clearwater

QuickTime VR tour of the Fort
Fort
Harrison (be sure to enable "Hot Spots")

Property ownership record of the Fort
Fort
Harrison Hotel Corporate filing of the FSO www.whyaretheydead.info Web site investigating the various suspicious deaths that occurred in the hotel

Coordinates: 27°57′49″N 82°48′01″W / 27.9635°N 82.8004°W / 27.9635; -82.8004

v t e

Scientology

Beliefs and practices

Assists Body thetan The Bridge Comm Evs Dead File Disconnection Doctrine of Exchange Emotional tone scale E-meter Ethics Holidays Implant Incident Jesus in Scientology Keeping Scientology
Scientology
Working Marriage MEST Operating Thetan OT VIII Other religions Reincarnation Rundowns Sec Check Sexual orientation Silent birth Space opera Study Tech Supernatural abilities Thetan Training routines Xenu

Dianetics

History of Dianetics Auditing Black Dianetics Clear Dianetics: MSMH Engram Reactive mind

History and controversies

Abortion Alaska Mental Health Enabling Act Church of Scientology
Scientology
editing on Clearwater Hearings Death of Lisa McPherson Death of Elli Perkins Death of Kaja Ballo Fair Game The Fishman Affidavit Keith Henson The Internet List of Guardian's Office operations Operation Clambake Operation Freakout Operation Snow White Project Chanology Project Normandy R2-45 Psychiatry Scientology
Scientology
and Me Scientology
Scientology
as a business The Secrets of Scientology Suppressive Person Tax status in the US "The Thriving Cult of Greed and Power" "We Stand Tall" Lawrence Wollersheim

Litigation

Arenz, Röder and Dagmar v. Germany Church of Scientology
Scientology
of California v. Armstrong Church of Scientology
Scientology
International v. Fishman and Geertz Church of Scientology
Scientology
International v. Time Warner, Inc., et al. Church of Scientology
Scientology
Moscow v. Russia Church of Scientology
Scientology
v. Sweden Hernandez v. Commissioner Hill v. Church of Scientology
Scientology
of Toronto Religious Technology Center
Religious Technology Center
v. Netcom On-Line Communication Services, Inc. R. v. Church of Scientology
Scientology
of Toronto United States
United States
v. Hubbard X. and Church of Scientology
Scientology
v. Sweden

Organizations

Cadet Org Celebrity Centre Church of Scientology Church of Scientology
Scientology
International Church of Spiritual Technology Free Zone Gold Base

The Hole

Hubbard Association of Scientologists International International Association of Scientologists L. Ron Hubbard
L. Ron Hubbard
House Narconon Office of Special
Special
Affairs Religious Technology Center RPF Scientology
Scientology
Missions International Sea Org Trementina Base

Countries

Status by country Australia Belgium Canada Egypt France Germany New Zealand Pakistan Russia Taiwan United Kingdom United States

Officials

L. Ron Hubbard Mary Sue Hubbard David Miscavige Michele Miscavige Bob Adams John Carmichael Tommy Davis Jessica Feshbach David Gaiman Leisa Goodman Heber Jentzsch Kendrick Moxon Karin Pouw Mark Rathbun Mike Rinder Michelle Stith Kurt Weiland

Popular culture

Ali's Smile: Naked Scientology Being Tom Cruise Bowfinger The Bridge Going Clear

film

Leah Remini: Scientology
Scientology
and the Aftermath My Scientology
Scientology
Movie The Master The Profit South Park "A Token of My Extreme" A Very Merry Unauthorized Children's Scientology
Scientology
Pageant

Affiliated organizations and recruitment

Association for Better Living and Education Celebrities

List of members

Citizens Commission on Human Rights Concerned Businessmen's Association of America Criminon Cult Awareness Network Freewinds Moxon & Kobrin Narconon New York Rescue Workers Detoxification Project Oxford Capacity Analysis Safe Environment Fund Second Chance Program Trademarks Volunteer Ministers The Way to Happiness World Institute of Scientology
Scientology
Enterprises Youth for Human Rights International

Portal Wikibooks Wikimedia Commons Wikinews Wikiquote Wikisource Wiki

.
l> Fort Harrison Hotel
HOME
The Info List - Fort Harrison Hotel


--- Advertisement ---



The Fort
Fort
Harrison Hotel serves as the flagship building of the Flag Land Base, the Church of Scientology's spiritual headquarters in Clearwater, Florida. It is owned and operated by the Church of Scientology
Scientology
Flag Service Organization, Inc., a subsidiary of the Church of Scientology
Scientology
International. The hotel has 11 stories and features 220 rooms, three restaurants, a swimming pool and a ballroom. The building is connected by a skywalk to the Flag Building.

Contents

1 History 2 Use in Scientology 3 Notable incidents 4 Trivia 5 See also 6 References 7 External links

History[edit] The hotel opened in 1926 as the "New Fort
Fort
Harrison Hotel", replacing the former Fort
Fort
Harrison Hotel. It was built by developer Ed Haley and was used as a community center for many years.[1] The hotel was operated by Ransom E. Olds, inventor of the Oldsmobile, from 1926 until his death in 1950.[2] The name comes from a Seminole War-era U.S. Army fort, built in the 1830s south of today's downtown Clearwater. The fort was named for William Henry Harrison
William Henry Harrison
and was the western counterpart of Fort
Fort
Brooke in what became Tampa. (See also the history of Clearwater.) In 1953 the hotel was bought by the Jack Tar Hotels and became known as the "New Fort
Fort
Harrison Hotel, a Jack Tar Hotel".[2] The company added a cabana area to the building. By the 1970s the hotel began to fall into disrepair. In 1975, the Church of Scientology
Scientology
purchased the building under the names "Southern Land Development and Leasing Corp"[2] and "United Churches of Florida Inc".[3] In 1976, the Church of Scientology's connection and the named purchasers was reported by the St. Petersburg Times, as was the Church's plan for a $2.8 million restoration and upgrade of the hotel.[4] In 2007, the Church announced that the hotel would undergo another $20 million restoration project, but not when the project would begin.[5] Use in Scientology[edit] The Fort
Fort
Harrison Hotel is used by the Church of Scientology
Scientology
as an area in which to feed, train and house visiting practitioners.[4] It provides both accommodation and "course & auditing" rooms, for Scientologists studying at high levels of Scientology. The Fort Harrison is joined by a walkway bridge over South Fort
Fort
Harrison Avenue to the Flag Building
Flag Building
on the other side of the street. The hotel was used for the Rehabilitation Project Force
Rehabilitation Project Force
(RPF), a program used to punish members of the Church of Scientology
Scientology
Sea Organization for "serious deviations." Members of the church in this institution are subject to prison-like conditions, forced labor and other human rights violations.[6][7] A former prisoner of the hotel, Hanna Whitefield, described the situation in an affidavit:[8]

“ Some of us slept on thin mattresses on the bare cement floor. Some had crude bunk beds. There was no place for clothes, so we lived out of suitcases and bags which were kept on bare floors. Some privacy was maintained by hanging sheets up between bunk beds and between floor mattresses. The women and men had separate bathrooms and toilets but they were small. We were not allowed to shower longer than 30 seconds. We had only to run through the shower and out the other end. There was no spare time for talk or relaxation. We awoke at 6:30 A.M. or earlier at times, did hard labor and heavy construction work and cleaning until late afternoon. After [a] quick shower and change of clothing, we had to audit each other and 'rehabilitate' ourselves until 10:30 P.M. or later each evening. There were no days off, four weeks a month. We ate our meals in the garage or at times in the dining rooms AFTER normal meals had ended. Our food consisted of leftovers from staff. On occasions which seemed like Christmas, we were able to prepare ourselves fresh meals if leftovers were insufficient. ”

— Hanna Whitefield, in her affidavit to the United States
United States
District Court for the Central District of California

Notable incidents[edit] In December 1926, daredevil Henry Roland scaled the building blindfolded.[9] The Fort
Fort
Harrison Hotel has been the site of at least three suspicious deaths since 1975, most notably the death of Lisa McPherson, who died on December 5, 1995, after spending 17 days in room 174[10] of the building.[6][11] The officially reported cause of death was a blood clot caused by dehydration and bedrest. The Church later challenged the findings of the autopsy in court.[12][13] In 1997, a church spokesman acknowledged that McPherson died at the Fort
Fort
Harrison, rather than on the way to the hospital. The church later retracted its spokesman's statement.[14] In February 1980, prior to McPherson's death, a Scientologist named Josephus A. Havenith was found dead at the Fort
Fort
Harrison Hotel. He was discovered in a bathtub filled with water hot enough to have burned his skin off. The officially reported cause of death was drowning, although the coroner noted that, when he was found, Havenith's head was not submerged.[15] In August 1988, Scientologist Heribert Pfaff died of a seizure in the Fort
Fort
Harrison Hotel. He had recently stopped taking his seizure medication in favor of a vitamin program.[15] In 1997, Clearwater police received over 160 emergency calls from the Fort
Fort
Harrison Hotel, but they were denied entry into the hotel by Scientology
Scientology
security.[15][16] Trivia[edit] In 1965, the Rolling Stones
Rolling Stones
wrote their hit song "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction" at the hotel.[17] The hotel was once the spring training home of the Philadelphia Phillies.[18] See also[edit]

Florida portal Scientology
Scientology
portal

Church of Spiritual Technology Dianetics Religious Technology Center Scientology Scientology
Scientology
controversies

References[edit]

^ DEBORAH O'NEIL (January 26, 2002). "Public to get rare view of hotel". St. Petersburg Times. Retrieved April 18, 2010. The Fort Harrison Hotel was built by developer Ed Haley and for years served as a center for community events. Proms and cotillions, luncheons and fashion shows, club meetings and wedding receptions all were staged there.  ^ a b c AMELIA DAVIS (May 24, 1990). "Historic sites dot land along harbor". St. Petersburg Times. Retrieved April 18, 2010. Fort
Fort
Harrison Hotel. Built in 1925 by Ed Haley, the hotel was operated by R.E. Olds of Lansing, Mich., until 1953. Olds, the founder of Oldsmar and the inventor of the Oldsmobile, traded his nearly finished Oldsmar Race Track for the Fort
Fort
Harrison. In 1953, the hotel was sold to the Jack Tar hotel chain. It was operated as a winter resort for most of its first three decades. The 11-story building was the city's first skyscraper. In 1975, the hotel was sold to the Church of Scientology, under the alias Southern Land Development and Leasing Corp. The building serves as Scientology's international spiritual headquarters.  ^ CURTIS KRUEGER (August 5, 1989). "Scientologists don't plan to buy buildings". St. Petersburg Times. Retrieved April 18, 2010. The Scientologists' land holdings in Clearwater have increased steadily in the years since they bought the historic Fort
Fort
Harrison Hotel in 1975.  ^ a b CURTIS KRUEGER (February 13, 1989). "Scientologists upgrading hotel // $ 2.8-million spent on headquarters". St. Petersburg Times. Retrieved April 18, 2010. The Church of Scientology
Scientology
says it is pouring $ 2.8-million into a renovation of the Fort
Fort
Harrison Hotel, where the organization houses, trains and feeds its students.  ^ Jacob H Fries (September 29, 2007). "SCIENTOLOGY HAS BIG PLANS FOR LANDMARK". St. Petersburg Times. Retrieved April 18, 2010. The Church of Scientology
Scientology
is in announcement mode again, this time saying it will spend $20-million on a major upgrade of its iconic Fort
Fort
Harrison Hotel. But what church officials aren't saying is exactly when the work will start.  ^ a b "The Life & Death of a Scientologist". ISSN 0190-8286. Retrieved 2018-01-05.  ^ " Scientology
Scientology
— Is This a Religion?" Scientology—Is This a Religion? N.p., n.d. Web. 04 Feb. 2015. <http://www.solitarytrees.net/pubs/skent/isthis.htm#rpf>. ^ Whitfield, Hana. 1989. "Affidavit." (August 8): 11pp, downloaded from <alt.religion.scientology>. ^ "'Human fly' to scale Fort
Fort
Harrison Hotel". St. Petersburgh Times. Dec 3, 1926. Retrieved April 18, 2010.  ^ Tobin, Thomas C. (December 6, 1998). "McPherson Relatives Lead Protest". St. Petersburg Times. Florida.  ^ Ellison, Michael (November 23, 1998). "Death in the sunshine state; Three years ago, a minor car crash left Lisa McPherson
Lisa McPherson
dead. Now Scientology
Scientology
is in the dock". The Guardian.  ^ Wilson, Mike (August 16, 1997). " Scientology
Scientology
deserves all the bad PR". St. Petersburg Times.  ^ Tobin, Thomas C. (June 7, 1998). "'Unique' case of Scientologist's death is still under investigation". St. Petersburg Times.  ^ Tobin, Thomas C. (May 9, 1997). "When did she die?". St. Petersburg Times.  ^ a b c Lucy Morgan (December 7, 1997). "For some Scientologists, pilgrimage has been fatal". St. Petersburg Times. Retrieved April 18, 2010. Josephus A. Havenith, 45, who died in February 1980 at the Fort Harrison Hotel in a bathtub filled with water so hot it burned his skin off. Heribert Pfaff, 31, who died of an apparent seizure in the Fort Harrison Hotel in August 1988 after he quit taking medication that controlled his seizures and was placed instead on a program of vitamins and minerals. Clearwater police are suspicious about the number of 911 calls that come from rooms at the Fort
Fort
Harrison Hotel. Police respond to each call only to be told most of the time by Scientology
Scientology
security guards that the call was a mistake. Police are not allowed to check individual rooms where the calls originated. In the past 11 months, 161 calls to 911 were made from rooms in the hotel, but each time Scientology
Scientology
security guards said there was no emergency. 

^ "Scientologists' deaths raise questions among families, officials". Ocala Star-Banner. Associated Press. December 8, 1997. Retrieved November 19, 2015.  ^ "Know Your Stones". The Irish Times. September 6, 2003. Retrieved April 18, 2010. Keith Richards woke up in the Fort
Fort
Harrison Hotel, Clearwater, Florida, having dreamt the riff, chorus and title of (I Can't Get No) Satisfaction.  ^ Ned Seaton (March 29, 1996). "Among Phillies fans, sisters hit cleanup". St. Petersburg Times. Retrieved April 18, 2010. They worked hard on their tans and they went to all the games, but there wasn't much else going on, they said. The town closed down about 9 p.m. In those early days, they stayed in the Fort
Fort
Harrison Hotel, where the team stayed. 

External links[edit]

Flag Service Organization – International Religious Retreat

The Fort
Fort
Harrison

Flag.org Scientology
Scientology
in Clearwater

QuickTime VR tour of the Fort
Fort
Harrison (be sure to enable "Hot Spots")

Property ownership record of the Fort
Fort
Harrison Hotel Corporate filing of the FSO www.whyaretheydead.info Web site investigating the various suspicious deaths that occurred in the hotel

Coordinates: 27°57′49″N 82°48′01″W / 27.9635°N 82.8004°W / 27.9635; -82.8004

v t e

Scientology

Beliefs and practices

Assists Body thetan The Bridge Comm Evs Dead File Disconnection Doctrine of Exchange Emotional tone scale E-meter Ethics Holidays Implant Incident Jesus in Scientology Keeping Scientology
Scientology
Working Marriage MEST Operating Thetan OT VIII Other religions Reincarnation Rundowns Sec Check Sexual orientation Silent birth Space opera Study Tech Supernatural abilities Thetan Training routines Xenu

Dianetics

History of Dianetics Auditing Black Dianetics Clear Dianetics: MSMH Engram Reactive mind

History and controversies

Abortion Alaska Mental Health Enabling Act Church of Scientology
Scientology
editing on Clearwater Hearings Death of Lisa McPherson Death of Elli Perkins Death of Kaja Ballo Fair Game The Fishman Affidavit Keith Henson The Internet List of Guardian's Office operations Operation Clambake Operation Freakout Operation Snow White Project Chanology Project Normandy R2-45 Psychiatry Scientology
Scientology
and Me Scientology
Scientology
as a business The Secrets of Scientology Suppressive Person Tax status in the US "The Thriving Cult of Greed and Power" "We Stand Tall" Lawrence Wollersheim

Litigation

Arenz, Röder and Dagmar v. Germany Church of Scientology
Scientology
of California v. Armstrong Church of Scientology
Scientology
International v. Fishman and Geertz Church of Scientology
Scientology
International v. Time Warner, Inc., et al. Church of Scientology
Scientology
Moscow v. Russia Church of Scientology
Scientology
v. Sweden Hernandez v. Commissioner Hill v. Church of Scientology
Scientology
of Toronto Religious Technology Center
Religious Technology Center
v. Netcom On-Line Communication Services, Inc. R. v. Church of Scientology
Scientology
of Toronto United States
United States
v. Hubbard X. and Church of Scientology
Scientology
v. Sweden

Organizations

Cadet Org Celebrity Centre Church of Scientology Church of Scientology
Scientology
International Church of Spiritual Technology Free Zone Gold Base

The Hole

Hubbard Association of Scientologists International International Association of Scientologists L. Ron Hubbard
L. Ron Hubbard
House Narconon Office of Special
Special
Affairs Religious Technology Center RPF Scientology
Scientology
Missions International Sea Org Trementina Base

Countries

Status by country Australia Belgium Canada Egypt France Germany New Zealand Pakistan Russia Taiwan United Kingdom United States

Officials

L. Ron Hubbard Mary Sue Hubbard David Miscavige Michele Miscavige Bob Adams John Carmichael Tommy Davis Jessica Feshbach David Gaiman Leisa Goodman Heber Jentzsch Kendrick Moxon Karin Pouw Mark Rathbun Mike Rinder Michelle Stith Kurt Weiland

Popular culture

Ali's Smile: Naked Scientology Being Tom Cruise Bowfinger The Bridge Going Clear

film

Leah Remini: Scientology
Scientology
and the Aftermath My Scientology
Scientology
Movie The Master The Profit South Park "A Token of My Extreme" A Very Merry Unauthorized Children's Scientology
Scientology
Pageant

Affiliated organizations and recruitment

Association for Better Living and Education Celebrities

List of members

Citizens Commission on Human Rights Concerned Businessmen's Association of America Criminon Cult Awareness Network Freewinds Moxon & Kobrin Narconon New York Rescue Workers Detoxification Project Oxford Capacity Analysis Safe Environment Fund Second Chance Program Trademarks Volunteer Ministers The Way to Happiness World Institute of Scientology
Scientology
Enterprises Youth for Human Rights International

Portal Wikibooks Wikimedia Commons Wikinews Wikiquote Wikisource Wiki

.

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