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The Ford Piquette Avenue Plant
Ford Piquette Avenue Plant
is a former factory located within the Milwaukee Junction
Milwaukee Junction
area of Detroit, Michigan, in the United States. Built in 1904, it was the second center of automobile production for the Ford Motor Company, after the Ford Mack Avenue Plant
Ford Mack Avenue Plant
in Detroit. At the Piquette Avenue Plant, the company created and first produced the Ford Model T, the car credited with initiating the mass use of automobiles in the United States. Prior to the Model T, several other car models were assembled at the factory. Early experiments using a moving assembly line to make cars were also conducted there. It was also the first factory where more than 100 cars were assembled in one day. While it was headquartered at the Piquette Avenue Plant, Ford Motor Company became the biggest US-based automaker, and it would remain so until the mid-1920s. The factory was used by the company until 1910, when its car production activity was relocated to the new, bigger Highland Park Ford Plant
Highland Park Ford Plant
in Highland Park, Michigan. The Piquette Avenue Plant was sold in 1911 to Studebaker, which used the factory to assemble cars until 1933. Studebaker
Studebaker
sold the building in 1936, and the former car factory went through a series of owners for the rest of the 20th century before becoming a museum in 2001. The Piquette Avenue Plant is the oldest, purpose-built automotive factory building in the world open to the public. The museum, which was visited by 18,000 people in 2016, has exhibits that primarily focus on the beginning of the United States automotive industry. The building was added to the National Register of Historic Places
National Register of Historic Places
in 2002, became a Michigan
Michigan
State Historic Site in 2003, and designated a National Historic Landmark
National Historic Landmark
in 2006.

Contents

1 History

1.1 Ford period 1.2 After Ford in the 20th century

2 Model T Automotive Heritage Complex 3 See also 4 References 5 External links

History[edit] Ford period[edit]

The Piquette Avenue Plant's interior. Note the sliding fire doors at each firewall.

Henry Ford, Detroit
Detroit
coal merchant Alexander Y. Malcomson, and a group of investors formed the Ford Motor Company
Ford Motor Company
on June 16, 1903, to assemble automobiles.[1]:10–11[2] The company's first car model, the original Ford Model A, began to be assembled that same month at the Ford Mack Avenue Plant, a rented wagon manufacturing shop in Detroit, Michigan.[1]:11–12 The company quickly outgrew this facility, and on April 10, 1904, the company bought a parcel of land off of Piquette Avenue in Detroit
Detroit
in order to have a larger factory built.[1]:12 The land was located in the Milwaukee Junction
Milwaukee Junction
area, whose name is derived from a railroad junction within it, where three railroad lines interconnect.[1]:4, 12 The Ford Piquette Avenue Plant's construction started on May 10, 1904.[1]:12 The company moved into its new factory the following October.[1]:13 The Detroit-based architectural firm Field, Hinchman & Smith designed the Piquette Avenue Plant.[1]:9, 12 It was modeled after New England textile mills, and is an example of late Victorian-style architecture.[1]:7[3] The building is three stories high, 56 feet (17.1 m) wide, and 402 feet (122.5 m) long.[4][5] Its load-bearing exterior brick walls contain 355 windows, and its maple floors, supported by square oak beams and posts, cover 67,000 square feet (6,224.5 m2) of floor space.[1]:7[6] The Piquette Avenue Plant contains two elevator-stairwell combinations, with one located on its northwest corner and the other located on its southwest side.[1]:5, 7 Recalling a fire in March 1901 that destroyed the Olds Motor Works factory in Detroit, Henry Ford
Henry Ford
and the architects included a fire sprinkler system in the building's design, a rare feature for industrial buildings of the period.[7] This and several other original safety features in the factory, such as its firewalls, fire doors, and fire escapes, are still present.[1]:7[7] Water for the sprinkler system was supplied by a wooden water tank located on the building's roof.[1]:5 A brick powerhouse, measuring 36 feet (11.0 m) wide by 57 feet (17.4 m) long, was the original electricity provider for the factory, and was located near its northwest corner.[1]:4, 12–13 The water tank and powerhouse no longer exist.[1]:4–5 From October 1904 to the end of 1909, Ford Motor Company
Ford Motor Company
assembled car models B, C, F, K, N, R, S, and T at the Piquette Avenue Plant.[1]:20[8] The Ford Model B and C were the first car models produced at the factory starting in late 1904, and production of the Ford Model F
Ford Model F
began the following February.[1]:14 The vast majority of factory tasks were done by men, except for magneto assembly, which was done by women.[1]:20 Hand tools were used for the assembly work at fixed stations, and the completed components would be brought by hand to the chassis for final assembly.[1]:17–18, 20 Completed cars would be shipped to the company's distributors and dealers by rail, using a spur line behind the building, which connected to a Michigan
Michigan
Central Railroad main line.[1]:5, 12 In 1905, Ford Motor Company
Ford Motor Company
was the fourth-largest car producer in the United States, behind Cadillac, Rambler, and Oldsmobile.[1]:14 In the company's early years, most major components in its cars were manufactured by outside companies, including the "running gear" (the chassis, engine, transmission, drive shaft, and axles), which was supplied by the Dodge
Dodge
Brothers Company.[1]:11 That began to change in early 1906, when the Ford Manufacturing Company, a new, separate company created by Henry Ford
Henry Ford
and some Ford Motor Company stockholders, started to make engines and transmissions for the upcoming Ford Model N.[1]:15 The Ford Manufacturing Company was located at the Bellevue Avenue Plant, a leased factory off of Bellevue Avenue in Detroit.[1]:15–16 The Bellevue Avenue Plant was utilized until 1908, by which time almost all manufacturing of major components for Ford Motor Company
Ford Motor Company
cars was taking place at the Piquette Avenue Plant.[1]:14–15 Model N production began at the Piquette Avenue Plant in July 1906.[1]:14 That same month, Henry Ford
Henry Ford
bought the Ford Motor Company shares owned by fellow company co-founder Alexander Malcomson.[1]:11, 15 While Malcomson was with the company, he and Henry Ford
Henry Ford
disagreed over the type of car that the company should produce.[1]:15 Malcomson preferred expensive cars, like the Ford Model K; while Henry Ford
Henry Ford
favored inexpensive cars, like the Model N.[1]:15 Once Malcomson was no longer part of the company, Henry Ford, now with uncontested control, began to focus the company's efforts towards making cheap cars exclusively.[1]:15 By the end of 1906, due to the success of the Model N, Ford Motor Company
Ford Motor Company
was the largest automaker in the United States, a distinction that it would hold for twenty years.[1]:14 Beginning in January 1907, in a room located on the Piquette Avenue Plant's third floor in the northwest corner, the Ford Model T, the car credited with starting the mass use of cars in the United States, was created.[1]:10, 18 Much of the design and experimental work for the new car was done by Henry Ford, draftsman Joseph Galamb, engineer Childe Harold Wills, and machinist C.J. Smith.[1]:18 Vanadium steel, an alloy lighter and stronger than standard steel, which was first used sparingly with the Ford Model N, R, and S, was used extensively with the Model T.[1]:17 Plans for the Model T were announced on March 19, 1908.[1]:19 During July 1908, a few month's prior to the Model T's introduction, a group of factory employees experimented with the concept of using a moving assembly line to make cars, where the chassis would be moved to the workers for components to be installed.[1]:18 This effort was led by Charles E. Sorensen, the assistant to Peter E. Martin, who was the factory's superintendent.[1]:18[6] Sorensen believed that a moving assembly line would make car assembly faster, simpler, and easier.[1]:18 The experiments consisted of tying a rope to a Model N chassis and pulling it across the factory's third floor on skids until its axles and wheels were added.[1]:18 The chassis would then be rolled across the floor in notches, where specific components would be attached.[1]:18 At least one Model N was completed at the Piquette Avenue Plant using this process.[1]:18 Although Henry Ford
Henry Ford
encouraged these experiments, he did not implement a formal moving assembly line at the Piquette Avenue Plant, as all of his attention was focused on getting Model T production started on time.[1]:18 Despite no moving assembly line, the Piquette Avenue Plant, aided by the usage of interchangeable parts and other production improvements, produced 101 completed cars in a single day on June 4, 1908, an auto industry record at the time.[1]:18[9] The first production Model T was completed at the Piquette Avenue Plant on September 27, 1908.[6] On May 1, 1909, due to overwhelming demand, Ford Motor Company
Ford Motor Company
stopped taking Model T orders for two months.[1]:19 In order to satisfy the unprecedented demand for the Model T, the company moved the majority of its car production activity to the new, larger Highland Park Ford Plant
Highland Park Ford Plant
in Highland Park, Michigan, by January 1910.[1]:14, 22 The company completely vacated the Piquette Avenue Plant by October 1910.[1]:14 The concept of using a moving assembly line to manufacture cars would be fully implemented at the Highland Park Ford Plant, starting on October 7, 1913.[10] Over 15 million Model Ts would eventually be built, and the first 14,000 made in the United States were assembled at the Piquette Avenue Plant.[2][6]

Ford car models assembled at the Piquette Avenue Plant[1]:14–15[2]

Car model Image Engine Transmission Wheelbase Lowest sale price Production period Notes

Model B

24 brake horsepower (17.9 kW) inline 4-cylinder 2-speed planetary 92 inches (233.7 cm) $2,000 (equivalent to $54,474 in 2017) Late 1904 – April 1906 First Ford Motor Company
Ford Motor Company
car model with the engine mounted in the front, which was intended to match European-style car designs.[11] Rarest of the company's pre-Model-T car models, with only seven known complete units that survive today.[12]

Model C

10 brake horsepower (7.5 kW) opposed 2-cylinder 2-speed planetary 78 inches (198.1 cm) $800 (equivalent to $21,790 in 2017) Late 1904 – December 1905 Like the Model A, this car model had its engine mounted under the seat (its European-style hood was a false hood).[13]

Model F

16 brake horsepower (11.9 kW) opposed 2-cylinder 2-speed planetary 84 inches (213.4 cm) $1,000 (equivalent to $27,237 in 2017) February 1905 – April 1906 Like the Model A, this car model had its engine mounted under the seat (its European-style hood was a false hood).[14]

Model K

40 brake horsepower (29.8 kW) inline 6-cylinder 2-speed planetary 114–120 inches (289.6–304.8 cm) $2,500 (equivalent to $68,093 in 2017) Late 1905 – 1908 (before October) Wheelbase
Wheelbase
increased from 114 inches (289.6 cm) to 120 inches (304.8 cm) by 1907.[15] Evidence suggests that this car model's assembly and component production was moved to the Bellevue Avenue Plant by 1908.[1]:17

Model N

18 brake horsepower (13.4 kW) inline 4-cylinder 2-speed planetary 84 inches (213.4 cm) $600 (equivalent to $16,342 in 2017) July 1906 – 1908 (before October) Best-selling car model in the United States at the time, with over 7,000 units produced.[12] Considered the predecessor of the Model T.[12]

Model R

18 brake horsepower (13.4 kW) inline 4-cylinder 2-speed planetary 84 inches (213.4 cm) $750 (equivalent to $19,698 in 2017) February 1907 – 1908 (before October) An upscale version of the Model N.[1]:15

Model S

18 brake horsepower (13.4 kW) inline 4-cylinder 2-speed planetary 84 inches (213.4 cm) $700 (equivalent to $18,385 in 2017) July 1907 – 1908 (before October) An upscale version of the Model N.[1]:15

Model T

22 brake horsepower (16.4 kW) L-head 4-cylinder 2-speed planetary 100 inches (254.0 cm) $825 (equivalent to $22,471 in 2017) September 27, 1908[6] – December 1909[1]:19 Declared the Car of the Century
Car of the Century
by an international jury of auto experts in December 1999.[16]

After Ford in the 20th century[edit]

Studebaker
Studebaker
assembled cars, like this one, in the Piquette Avenue Plant when it owned the building.

The Ford Piquette Avenue Plant
Ford Piquette Avenue Plant
was sold in January 1911 to Studebaker, a major maker of various horse-drawn road vehicles since the 1850s.[1]:22 That same year, when the railroad spur line serving the factory was raised above street level, the loading dock behind the building was replaced with an elevated platform, level with the second floor.[1]:5 Also in 1911, Studebaker
Studebaker
acquired the E-M-F Company, which owned a different car manufacturing complex on Piquette Avenue.[1]:22 Studebaker
Studebaker
began to put its name on the cars formerly produced by the E-M-F Company
E-M-F Company
in 1912.[1]:22 In 1920, Studebaker
Studebaker
built a four-story, reinforced concrete building, known as the Studebaker
Studebaker
Detroit
Detroit
Service Building, immediately west of the Piquette Avenue Plant.[1]:5, 22 The Detroit
Detroit
Service Building was connected to the Piquette Avenue Plant's southwest corner on the second and third floors, which created a ground-level, drive-through access point to the court between the two buildings.[1]:5, 22 In 1926, the elevator-stairwell combination on the Piquette Avenue Plant's southwest side was moved slightly northwards to create easier access between the two buildings on their second and third floors.[1]:7 Also in 1926, the equipment in both of the Piquette Avenue Plant's elevators was replaced.[1]:7 Studebaker
Studebaker
used the Piquette Avenue Plant for car production until 1933.[17] In 1936, Studebaker
Studebaker
sold the Piquette Avenue Plant to the Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Company.[1]:23 Around 1937, the powerhouse and several other small buildings previously built by Ford Motor Company west of the factory were demolished.[1]:7, 23 In 1968, the Cadillac
Cadillac
Overall Company purchased the building.[1]:23[8] The Heritage Investment Company bought the building in 1989 and owned it until 2000.[1]:23 Since the early 1990s, a company named General Linen & Uniform Service has occupied part of the Piquette Avenue Plant's first floor.[1]:23 The Detroit
Detroit
Service Building next door is now used by Henry Ford
Henry Ford
Health System to store medical records.[1]:23 The openings that previously allowed direct access on the second and third floors between the two buildings are now sealed.[1]:5

Model T Automotive Heritage Complex[edit]

The restored office of Henry Ford
Henry Ford
in the Piquette Avenue Plant. Note the birdwatching telescope on the right.

The Ford Piquette Avenue Plant
Ford Piquette Avenue Plant
was sold in April 2000 to the Model T Automotive Heritage Complex, an organization that has been operating the building as a museum since July 27, 2001.[18][19] It is the oldest, purpose-built automotive factory building in the world open to the public.[6][20][21] The museum, located north of Midtown Detroit
Detroit
at 461 Piquette Street, attracted 18,000 visitors from over 50 countries in 2016.[22][23] It contains over 40 early automobiles built by Ford Motor Company and other Detroit-area car makers, as well as recreations of Henry Ford's office and the room where the Ford Model T was designed.[22][24] One of the cars on display is Model T Serial No. 220, which was built at the factory in December 1908, and is one of the oldest-surviving examples of that car model.[25] Although the museum's regular operating days are Wednesdays through Sundays from April through November, it has been open on select days in January in the past.[22][26] These January open days coincide with the annual North American International Auto Show, which takes place at Cobo Center in Downtown Detroit.[26][27] The Piquette Avenue Plant was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 2002, designated as a Michigan
Michigan
State Historic Site in 2003, and became a National Historic Landmark
National Historic Landmark
in 2006.[28] In addition, the building has been a contributing property for the surrounding Piquette Avenue Industrial Historic District
Piquette Avenue Industrial Historic District
since 2004.[29] The factory's front façade was fully restored to its 1904 appearance and revealed to the public on September 27, 2008, the 100th anniversary of the completion of the first production Model T.[30] On August 11, 2011, Model T Automotive Heritage Complex membership chairman Tom Genova was honored with a ROSE Award from the Detroit Metro Convention & Visitors Bureau in the Volunteers category.[31][32] On May 18, 2012, the Model T Automotive Heritage Complex won a NAAMY Award from the National Association of Automobile Museums in the Films and Videos category for Division I (museums with budgets less than $300,000).[33] On November 10, 2015, the Window Restoration Team at the Piquette Avenue Plant received a MotorCities National Heritage Area Award of Excellence in the Preservation category.[34] Around 2016, the National Park Service
National Park Service
considered adding the Piquette Avenue Plant to a list of places in the United States eligible for UNESCO World Heritage Site
World Heritage Site
status.[35] It was ultimately not added, because it did not have enough of its original factory equipment, and because of recommendations that its nomination be expanded to include other Detroit-area Ford Motor Company
Ford Motor Company
sites, such as the Highland Park Ford Plant
Highland Park Ford Plant
and the Ford River Rouge Complex.[35] See also[edit]

Durant-Dort Carriage Company Office The Henry Ford List of Ford factories

National Register of Historic Places
National Register of Historic Places
portal History portal Architecture portal Cars portal Metro Detroit
Detroit
portal

References[edit]

^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba bb bc bd be bf bg bh bi bj bk bl bm Hyde, Charles K. (June 2005). " National Historic Landmark
National Historic Landmark
Nomination – Ford Piquette Avenue Plant" (PDF). National Park Service. Archived from the original (PDF) on February 22, 2017. Retrieved August 18, 2017.  ^ a b c Kimes, Beverly Rae; Clark, Jr., Henry Austin (1989). Standard Catalog of America Cars: 1805–1942 (2nd ed.). Krause Publications. pp. 547–552. ISBN 0-87341-111-0.  ^ Kurtzman, Joel (2014). Unleashing the Second American Century: Four Forces for Economic Dominance (1st ed.). PublicAffairs. p. 215. ISBN 978-1-61039-310-2.  ^ Rubenstein, James M. (2001). Making and Selling Cars: Innovation and Change in the US Automotive Industry (1st ed.). Johns Hopkins University Press. p. 14. ISBN 0-8018-6714-2.  ^ "Our History". Model T Automotive Heritage Complex. Archived from the original on March 20, 2017. Retrieved August 20, 2017.  ^ a b c d e f Weber, Austin (August 28, 2008). "The Model T Turns 100". Assembly Magazine. Archived from the original on March 5, 2016. Retrieved August 26, 2017.  ^ a b Mulcahy, Marty (August 12, 2011). "Modern Fire Sprinklers Now Guard Ford's Historic Piquette Ave. Plant". The Building Tradesman Newspaper. Archived from the original on August 31, 2017. Retrieved August 31, 2017.  ^ a b Runyan, Robin (March 3, 2016). "Inside the Ford Piquette Avenue Plant". Curbed. Archived from the original on May 5, 2017. Retrieved August 27, 2017.  ^ Nevins, Allan (July 1963). "The Untold Story of the Model T". Popular Science. Popular Science
Popular Science
Publishing Company. p. 71. Archived from the original on April 7, 2018. Retrieved April 7, 2018.  ^ "Ford's Assembly Line Turns 100: How It Changed Manufacturing and Society". Daily News. New York. October 7, 2013. Archived from the original on November 30, 2013. Retrieved August 27, 2017.  ^ "1905 Ford Model B Touring Car". The Henry Ford. Archived from the original on August 28, 2017. Retrieved August 28, 2017.  ^ a b c "Before the Model T: Henry Ford's Letter Cars". The Henry Ford. September 4, 2013. Archived from the original on August 25, 2016. Retrieved August 28, 2017.  ^ "1904 Ford Model C
Ford Model C
Tonneau". The Henry Ford. Archived from the original on August 28, 2017. Retrieved August 28, 2017.  ^ "1905 Ford Model F
Ford Model F
Phaeton". The Henry Ford. Archived from the original on August 28, 2017. Retrieved August 28, 2017.  ^ "1907 Ford Model K
Ford Model K
Five-Passenger Touring". RM Sotheby's. August 2010. Archived from the original on May 16, 2016. Retrieved August 31, 2017.  ^ Cobb, James G. (December 24, 1999). "This Just In: Model T Gets Award". The New York Times. Archived from the original on July 1, 2017. Retrieved August 28, 2017.  ^ Tompor, Susan (July 23, 2017). "Volunteers Toil to Save Home of Ford's Model T in Detroit". USA Today. Archived from the original on August 1, 2017. Retrieved August 26, 2017.  ^ "Model T Automotive Heritage Complex (T-Plex)". Detroit
Detroit
Historical Society. Archived from the original on September 30, 2016. Retrieved August 18, 2017.  ^ "Out of This World - Model T Revisited". Central City Alliance. September 22, 2001. Archived from the original on June 1, 2017. Retrieved August 18, 2017.  ^ "Experience the Original Model T Factory". Model T Automotive Heritage Complex. April 4, 2014. Archived from the original on August 17, 2017. Retrieved August 17, 2017.  ^ "Ghost Tours Set for Historic Ford Piquette Plant". Detroit
Detroit
Free Press. October 6, 2016. Archived from the original on December 5, 2016. Retrieved August 16, 2017.  ^ a b c " Ford Piquette Avenue Plant
Ford Piquette Avenue Plant
– Media Information" (PDF). Model T Automotive Heritage Complex. Archived from the original (PDF) on January 18, 2017. Retrieved August 22, 2017.  ^ "LTU Students Demonstrate Museum Docent Robot". Lawrence Technological University. April 24, 2017. Archived from the original on August 31, 2017. Retrieved August 31, 2017.  ^ "Henry Ford's 'Secret' Workplace Birthed Model T". The Detroit
Detroit
News. September 24, 2017. Archived from the original on September 25, 2017. Retrieved September 25, 2017.  ^ "Rare Model T Returns to the Ford Piquette Avenue Plant" (PDF). Model T Talk. Model T Automotive Heritage Complex. Winter 2015. Archived from the original (PDF) on January 14, 2017. Retrieved September 1, 2017.  ^ a b Moutzalias, Tanya (January 15, 2016). "Ford Piquette Ave. Plant, Birthplace of Model T, to Reopen for Detroit
Detroit
Auto Show". MLive.com. Archived from the original on September 3, 2017. Retrieved September 3, 2017.  ^ "Event Overview". North American International Auto Show. Archived from the original on January 7, 2016. Retrieved September 3, 2017.  ^ "Ford Piquette Avenue Plant". Michigan
Michigan
State Housing Development Authority. Archived from the original on June 27, 2016. Retrieved August 17, 2017.  ^ "Piquette Avenue Industrial Historic District". National Park Service. June 15, 2004. Archived from the original on August 25, 2017. Retrieved August 25, 2017.  ^ " Ford Model T
Ford Model T
Plant Gets Makeover". MotorCities National Heritage Area. September 27, 2008. Archived from the original on March 6, 2016. Retrieved August 18, 2017 – via PR Newswire.  ^ "2011 ROSE Award Honorees". Detroit
Detroit
Metro Convention & Visitors Bureau. Archived from the original on August 18, 2017. Retrieved August 18, 2017.  ^ "Hospitality Rock Stars Honored at Detroit
Detroit
Metro CVB Annual Recognition of Service Excellence (ROSE) Awards" (PDF). Detroit
Detroit
Metro Convention & Visitors Bureau. Archived from the original (PDF) on August 18, 2017. Retrieved August 18, 2017.  ^ "NAAMY Awards 2012". National Association of Automobile Museums. Archived from the original on June 3, 2017. Retrieved August 18, 2017.  ^ "Awards of Excellence Recipients Announced at Special
Special
Ceremony". MotorCities National Heritage Area. Archived from the original on August 18, 2017. Retrieved August 18, 2017.  ^ a b Morin, Bode (2017). "U.S.A.: World Heritage Tentative List" (PDF). TICCIH Bulletin. The International Committee for the Conservation of the Industrial Heritage. Archived from the original (PDF) on September 5, 2017. Retrieved September 5, 2017. 

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Ford Piquette Avenue Plant.

Official website Ford Piquette Avenue Plant
Ford Piquette Avenue Plant
Online Exhibits

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State Fair Riding Coliseum, Dairy Cattle Building, and Agricultural Building Moross House Mulford T. Hunter House Nellie Leland School North Woodward Congregational Church Orchestra Hall Orrin and Roxanne Fairman Kinyon House Orson Everitt House Ossian H. Sweet House Park Avenue House Parke-Davis and Company Pharmaceutical Company Plant Parke Lane Road–Thorofare Canal Bridge Pasadena Apartments Paul Harvey Deming House Penn Central Station Pere Gabriel Richard Elementary School Perry McAdow House Philetus W. Norris House Phillip and Maria Hasselbach Dingledey House Ponchartrain Apartments Redford Theatre
Redford Theatre
Building Redford Township District No. 5 School River Terrace Apartments Robert M. and Matilda (Kitch) Grindley House Sacred Heart Major Seminary Sacred Heart Roman Catholic Church, Convent and Rectory St. Albertus Roman Catholic Church Saint Andrew's Memorial Episcopal Church Ste. Anne Roman Catholic Church Complex St. Bonaventure Monastery St. Boniface Roman Catholic Church St. Catherine of Siena Roman Catholic Church St. James Episcopal Church St. John's Episcopal Church St. John's–St. Luke's Evangelical Church St. Josaphat's Roman Catholic Church St. Joseph's Episcopal Church (1883) St. Joseph's Episcopal Church (1926) St. Joseph Roman Catholic Church Saint Paul Catholic Church Complex Saint Paul Manor Apartments Saints Peter and Paul Academy Saints Peter and Paul Church St. Stanislaus Bishop and Martyr Roman Catholic Church St. Theresa of Avila Roman Catholic Church St. Thomas the Apostle Catholic Church Samuel L. Smith House Santa Fe Apartments Scarab Club Second Baptist Church of Detroit Sheldon Inn Sibley House Somerset Apartments South Pointe Drive–Frenchman's Creek Bridge S. S. Kresge World Headquarters State Savings Bank Stuber–Stone Building Sweetest Heart Of Mary Roman Catholic Church Temple Beth-El (Bonstelle Theatre) Temple Beth-El (Bethel Community Transformation Center) The Clay School The Harmonie Club The Kean The Palms The Players The Wardell Third Precinct Police Station Thomas and Isabella Moore Clyde House Thomas and Maria Blackman Bartlett House Thomas A. Parker House Thomas S. Sprague House Thompson Home Tiger Stadium Trinity Episcopal Church Trinity Evangelical Lutheran Church Complex Trinity United Methodist Church US 12 Bridges Vanity Ballroom Building Verona Apartments Vinton Building Waltz Road–Huron River Bridge Wayne County Building West Jefferson Avenue–Rouge River Bridge West Side Dom Polski Whittier Hotel William B. and Mary Chase Stratton House William C. Boydell House William H. Wells House Wilson Barn Wilson Theatre Women's City Club Woodward Avenue Presbyterian Church Wyandotte Odd Fellows Temple

National Historic Landmarks

Detroit
Detroit
Industry Murals Fair Lane Fisher Building Ford Piquette Avenue Plant Ford River Rouge Complex Fox Theatre Building Highland Park Ford Plant General Motors Building Guardian Building Parke-Davis Research Laboratory Pewabic Pottery SS Columbia The Henry Ford

Former listings

Lincoln Motor Company Plant SS Ste. Claire

See also: National Register of Historic Places
National Register of Historic Places
listings in Wayne County, Michigan
Michigan
and List of National Historic Landmarks in Michigan

v t e

Architecture of metropolitan Detroit

Skyscrapers

10 tallest

Renaissance Center One Detroit
Detroit
Center Penobscot RenCen Towers 100-400 Guardian Book Tower 150 West Jefferson

20 tallest

Fisher Cadillac
Cadillac
Tower Stott One Woodward Avenue McNamara Federal DTE Energy Broderick 211 West Fort Buhl Westin Book Cadillac
Cadillac
Hotel Greektown Casino Hotel

30 tallest

First National Cadillac
Cadillac
Centre RenCen Towers 500-600 1001 Woodward Millender Center AT&T Chrysler House Jeffersonian Blue Cross Blue Shield Coleman A. Young Municipal Center

40 tallest

Penobscot Annex Lafayette East Riverfront Tower 300 Riverfront Tower 200 Whitney Washington Square Riverfront Tower 100 Water Board Washington Boulevard

50 tallest

Riverside Hotel Fort Shelby Hotel Industrial-Stevens Ford Leland Fyfe Grand Park Centre Compuware United Artists Theatre Michigan
Michigan
Central Station Cadillac
Cadillac
Place

60 tallest

MGM Grand Detroit MotorCity Casino Hotel The Qube Maccabees Fort Washington Plaza One Kennedy Square Detroit
Detroit
Free Press Metropolitan Wardell

70 – 195 tallest

Kales Masonic Temple Town Apartments Michigan
Michigan
Building Park Avenue House Penobscot Building
Penobscot Building
(1905) 1212 Griswold Belcrest Griswold Building Harvard Square Professional Plaza Tower Vinton Detroit
Detroit
Building Fox Theatre Lawyers Building Levin United States Courthouse Marquette

New Center

Fisher Cadillac
Cadillac
Place Argonaut Building Henry Ford
Henry Ford
Hospital New Center Building

East side

Lafayette Park Jeffersonian Detroit
Detroit
Towers The Kean The Whittier Harbortown Apartments

Suburban

Southfield Town Center American Center Top of Troy Tower Plaza Adoba Hotel Parklane Towers Chrysler Headquarters Southgate Tower

Low rise under 10 stories selected

Downtown

411 Bankers Trust Cass Building Detroit
Detroit
Athletic Club Detroit
Detroit
Club Detroit
Detroit
Cornice and Slate Fillmore Harmonie Centre Harmonie Club L. B. King Opera House Music Hall Merchants Wayne County Building Wright-Kay Savoyard Centre

Midtown

Orchestra Hall Metropolitan Center Phoenix Group Old Main Rackham Building McGregor Memorial Conference Center Verona Wayne State University Buildings Clay Office

North

University of Detroit
Detroit
Mercy Detroit
Detroit
Golf Club

East side

Alden Park Towers Brewery Park Coronado El Tovar Garden Court Milner Arms Riverwalk Hotel Pasadena

Suburban

Country Club of Detroit The Dearborn Inn GM Technical Center Royal Park Hotel Inn at St. John's Townsend Hotel

Parks and gardens

Belle Isle Cranbrook Campus Martius Grand Circus Metroparks Matthaei Botanical Gardens Riverfront parks Detroit
Detroit
Zoo

Museums and libraries

Cranbrook Educational Community Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History Detroit
Detroit
Historical Museum Detroit
Detroit
Institute of Arts Detroit
Detroit
Public Library Detroit
Detroit
Science Center Edsel and Eleanor Ford House Fair Lane Ford Piquette Avenue Plant The Henry Ford Meadowbrook Hall Pewabic Pottery Southfield Public Library University of Michigan
Michigan
Museum of Art

Religious landmarks

Religious landmarks

Performance centers

Theatres and performing arts venues

Neighborhood Historic Districts

Residential

Arden Park-East Boston Atkinson Avenue Beverly Road Boston-Edison Brush Park Canton Township MPS Corktown East Ferry East Grand Boulevard East Jefferson Avenue Grosse Pointe Highland Heights-Stevens' Sub. Indian Village Layafette Park Northville Palmer Park Apartments Palmer Park Blvd. Palmer Woods Park Avenue Rosedale Gardens Rosedale Park Sherwood Forest Virginia Park Warren-Prentis West Canfield West Village Willis-Selden Woodbridge Woodward East (See also: Historic homes)

Mixed-use

Adams Street Broadway Avenue Capitol Park Cass Park Cass-Davenport Congress Street Cultural Center Eastern Market Eastside Cemetery Financial District Grand Boulevard Grand Circus Grand River Avenue Gratiot Avenue Griswold Street Greektown West Jefferson Avenue Jefferson Chalmers Larned Street Michigan
Michigan
Avenue Monroe Avenue New Amsterdam New Center Piquette Avenue Randolph Street Shelby Street State Street Sugar Hill University-Cultural Center Washington Boulevard Wayne State University West Vernor-Junction West Vernor-Lawndale West Vernor-Springwells Lower Woodward Midtown Woodward Woodward Avenue

See also: List of tallest buildings in Detroit

v t e

Industrial landmarks in metropolitan Detroit

City

Antietam Avenue Bridge Cass Motor Sales Chestnut Street Bridge Crescent Brass and Pin Company Building Detroit
Detroit
Edison Company Willis Avenue Station Dry Dock Complex Edwin S. George Building Ford Piquette Avenue Plant Globe Tobacco Building Graybar Electric Company Building Michigan
Michigan
Bell and Western Electric Warehouse Milwaukee Junction New Amsterdam Historic District Stroh River Place (Parke-Davis Plant) Riverwalk Hotel (Parke-Davis Laboratory) Piquette Avenue Industrial Historic District Frederic M. Sibley Lumber Company Office Building Frederick Stearns Building The Russell Stuber-Stone Building West Jefferson Avenue–Rouge River Bridge

Suburban

Ford River Rouge Complex Ford Valve Plant The Henry Ford Willow Run

See also List of Registered Historic Places in Michigan

v t e

Ford Motor Company
Ford Motor Company
assembly plants

Ford Motor Company

Europe

Current

Cologne Body & Assembly Craiova Plant Saarlouis Body & Assembly Valencia Plant

Former

Cork Assembly Dagenham Assembly1 Halewood Body & Assembly Southampton Body & Assembly Trafford Park Factory Genk Body & Assembly

North America

Current

Chicago Assembly Cuautitlán Assembly Dearborn Truck Ford Pilot Plant Ford River Rouge Complex Flat Rock Assembly Hermosillo Stamping & Assembly Kansas City Assembly Kentucky Truck Assembly Louisville Assembly Plant Michigan
Michigan
Assembly Plant Oakville Assembly Ohio Assembly Wayne Stamping & Assembly

Former

Atlanta Assembly Blue Diamond Truck Vintage Atlanta Plant Cambridge Assembly Chester Assembly Cincinnati Plant Columbus Assembly Plant Commodore Point
Commodore Point
Assembly Edgewater Assembly Lincoln Assembly Edison Assembly Highland Park Plant Long Beach Assembly Lorain Assembly Los Angeles Assembly Mack Avenue Plant Mahwah Assembly Maywood Assembly Norfolk Assembly Omaha Assembly Ontario Truck Piquette Avenue Plant Richmond Plant San Jose Assembly Plant Somerville Assembly St. Louis Assembly Plant St. Thomas Assembly Twin Cities Assembly Plant Walkerville Plant Wixom Assembly Plant

Other plants worldwide

Otosan Assembly (Turkey) Valencia Assembly
Valencia Assembly
(Venezuela)

Former plants worldwide

Broadmeadows Assembly
Broadmeadows Assembly
(Australia) (closed 2016) Ford Motor Company
Ford Motor Company
Philippines (closed 2012) Ford Singa

.