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The Lockheed SR-71 Blackbird is the current record-holder for a manned airbreathing jet engine aircraft.

An air speed record is the highest airspeed attained by an aircraft of a particular class. The rules for all official aviation records are defined by Fédération Aéronautique Internationale (FAI),[1] which also ratifies any claims. Speed records are divided into multiple classes with sub-divisions. There are three classes of aircraft: landplanes, seaplanes, and amphibians; then within these classes, there are records for aircraft in a number of weight categories. There are still further subdivisions for piston-engined, turbojet, turboprop, and rocket-engined aircraft. Within each of these groups, records are defined for speed over a straight course and for closed circuits of various sizes carrying various payloads.

Timeline

Flight speed records over time, taken from the table below.

Records in "gray" font color are unofficial, including unconfirmed or unpublicized (wartime) secrets.

Flying between any two airports allow a large number of combinations, so setting a speed record ("speed over a recognised course") is fairly easy with an ordinary aircraft; but it does require some paperwork.[74][75][76]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h "FAI portal". Retrieved 24 April 2015.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak Cooper Flight 25 May 1951, p. 619.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al Munson, Kenneth (1978). Jane's Pocket Book of Record-breaking Aircraft (First Collier Books Edition 1981 ed.). New York, New York, US: Macmillan. ISBN 0-02-080630-2.
  4. ^ a b c d e f Bowers 1979
  5. ^ The Royal Aero Club of the U.K.: Official Notices to Members". Flight, No. 625 Volume XII 16 December 1920. p. 1274.
  6. ^ "Speed Records in France". Flight, 4 March 1920.
  7. ^ "Meeting at Buc". Flight, 14 October 1920, pp. 1090–1091.
  8. ^ "De Romanet Breaks Records". Flight, 11 November 1920, p. 1166.
  9. ^ "Some Records Homologated". Flight, 3 November 1921, p. 710.
  10. ^ a b Flight 7 February 1924, p. 75.
  11. ^ "American World's Speed Record Homologated". Flight, 11 January 1923, p. 26.
  12. ^ "Records Homologated". Flight, 28 June 1923, p. 356.
  13. ^ Flight. 27 December 1923, p.776.
  14. ^ Robertson, F.A. de V. "The Attempt on the World's Speed Record". Flight, 8 November 1928, pp. 965–967.
  15. ^ James 1971, p.188.
  16. ^ Andrews and Morgan 1987, p.194.
  17. ^ Andrews and Morgan 1987, p. 201.
  18. ^ [1] Archived 14 March 2016 at the Wayback Machine FAI record No.8748
  19. ^ [2] Archived 14 March 2016 at the Wayback Machine FAI Record No.8747
  20. ^ [3] Archived 14 March 2016 at the Wayback Machine FAI Record No.8744
  21. ^ [4] Archived 14 March 2016 at the Wayback Machine FAI Record No.8743
  22. ^ a b c Käsmann, Ferdinand C.W., Die schnellsten Jets der Welt, ISBN 3-925505-26-1, 1994
  23. ^ Heini Dittmar Archived 18 February 2008 at the Wayback Machine
  24. ^ Wolfgang Späte, Der streng geheime Vogel Me 163 p.32,33 ISBN 3-89555-142-2, 1983
  25. ^ a b Mason 1992, p. 340.
  26. ^ Young, James O. (2007). "Milestones in Aerospace History at Edwards AFB" (PDF). Air Force Flight Test Center History Office. Retrieved 14 July 2008.
  27. ^ a b Francillon 1979, p.438.
  28. ^ Jackson, Robert (1994). F-86 Sabre: The Operational Record. Smithsonian Institution Press.
  29. ^ Allward 1978, p. 24.
  30. ^ Allward 1978, pp. 24–25.
  31. ^ Mason 1992, p. 370.
  32. ^ Mason 1992, p. 366.
  33. ^ Francillon 1979, p.476.
  34. ^ Taylor 1974, p. 432.
  35. ^ Francillon 1979, p. 544.
  36. ^ "FAI Record No.9063".
  37. ^ Page, Ron, Richard Organ, Don Watson and Les Wilkinson (the "Arrowheads"). Avro Arrow: The Story of the Avro Arrow from its Evolution to its Extinction. Erin, Ontario: Boston Mills Press, 1979, reprinted Stoddart, 2004. ISBN 1-55046-047-1
  38. ^ Belyakov and Marmain 1994, pp. 298, 300.
  39. ^ Taylor, Michael. "Obituary Colonel Joseph 'Joe' W. Rogers, USF (Ret) Record-breaking Famed Aviator Dies at Age 81". F-106 Delta Dart – The Ultimate Interceptor. Retrieved 28 June 2016.
  40. ^ Grazier, Dan. "POGO Remembers Chuck Myers, "Fighter Mafia" Veteran". www.POGO.org. Retrieved 28 June 2016.
  41. ^ Samuel, Wolfgang (2015). In Defense of Freedom: Stories of Courage and Sacrifice of World War II Army Air Forces Flyers. University Press of Mississippi. ISBN 978-1-62846-217-3.
  42. ^ Francillon 1979, p. 572.
  43. ^ Taylor 1965, p. 346.
  44. ^ Belyakov and Marmain 1994, pp. 274–275.
  45. ^ Pace 1990, pp. 76–82.
  46. ^ Taylor 1976, p. 72.
  47. ^ Taylor 1988, p. [51].
  48. ^ "Current air speed record". Archived from the original on 27 September 2007. Retrieved 18 October 2006.
  49. ^ Shul, Brian (1994). The Untouchables. Mach One. p. 173. ISBN 0929823125.
  50. ^ "Agello Airspeed record, Air Force portal". Archived from the original on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 31 August 2015.
  51. ^ "Human-powered aeroplane speed record over a closed circuit". FAI. Retrieved 23 June 2020.Grumman F8F Bearcat, the Rare Bear, with a speed of 850.23 km/h (528.31 mph), the unofficial record for fastest piston-engined aeroplane in level flight is held by a British Hawker Sea Fury at 880 km/h (547 mph). Both were demilitarised and modified fighters, while the fastest stock (original, factory-built) piston-engined aeroplane was unofficially the German Dornier Do 335 Pfeil, with a maximum speed of 765 km/h (475 mph) in level flight. The unofficial record for fastest piston-engined aeroplane (not in level flight) is held by a Supermarine Spitfire Mk.XIX, which was calculated to have achieved a speed of 1,110 km/h (690 mph) in a dive on 5 February 1952.

    The last new speed record ratified before the outbreak of World War II was set on 26 April 1939 with a Me 209 V1, at 755 km/h (469 mph). The chaos and secrecy of World War II meant that new speed breakthroughs were neither publicized nor ratified. In October 1941, an unofficial speed record of 1,004 km/h (624 mph) was secretly set by a Messerschmitt Me 163A "V4" rocket aircraft. Continued research during the war extended the secret, unofficial speed record to 1,130 km/h (700 mph) by July 1944, achieved by a Messerschmitt Me 163B "V18". The first new official record in the post-war period was achieved by a Gloster Meteor F Mk.4 in November 1945, at 975 km/h (606 mph). The first aircraft to exceed the unofficial October 1941 record of the Me 163A V4 was the Douglas D-558-1 Skystreak, which achieved 1,032 km/h (641 mph) in August 1947. The July 1944 unofficial record of the Me 163B V18 was officially surpassed in November 1947, when Chuck Yeager flew the Bell X-1 to 1,434 km/h (891 mph).

    The official speed record for a seaplane moved by piston engine is 709.209 km/h (440.682 mph), which attained on 23 October 1934, by Francesco Agello in the Macchi-Castoldi M.C.72 seaplane ("idrocorsa") and it remains the current record.[50] It was equipped with the Fiat AS.6 engine (version 1934) developing a power of 2,300 kW (3,100 hp) at 3300 rpm, with coaxial counter-rotating propellers. The original record holding Macchi-Castoldi M.C.72 MM.181 seaplane is at the Air Force Museum at Vigna di Valle in Italy.

    Flying between any two airports allow a large number of combinations, so setting a speed record ("speed over a recognised course") is fairly easy with an ordinary aircraft; but it does require some paperwork.[74][75][76]

    See also

    References

    1. ^ a b c d e f g h "FAI portal". Retrieved 24 April 2015.
    2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak Cooper Flight 25 May 1951, p. 619.
    3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k