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Fed Cup
Fed Cup
is the premier international team competition in women's tennis, launched in 1963 to celebrate the 50th Anniversary of the International Tennis
Tennis
Federation (ITF). The competition was known as the Federation Cup until 1995. The Fed Cup
Fed Cup
is the world's largest annual women's international team sports competition in terms of the number of nations that compete.[2][3] The current Fed Cup
Fed Cup
Chairperson is Katrina Adams.[4] The men's equivalent of the Fed Cup
Fed Cup
is the Davis Cup. Australia, Czech Republic and the United States
United States
are the only countries that have held both the Fed Cup
Fed Cup
and Davis Cup
Davis Cup
at the same time.

Contents

1 History 2 Format

2.1 Tournament 2.2 Current structure 2.3 Ties

3 Records and statistics

3.1 Performance by team 3.2 Team records 3.3 Individual records

4 Heart Award 5 Current rankings 6 See also 7 References 8 External links

History[edit] Dating back to 1919, Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman
Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman
came up with the idea for a women's team tennis competition. Although rejected, she went ahead and presented a trophy at the 1923 annual contest between the United States
United States
and Great Britain, named the Wightman Cup. Nell Hopman, wife of the legendary Australian Davis Cup
Davis Cup
Captain Harry Hopman, later took up Mrs. Wightman's original idea. however it was in 1962, when a British resident of the United States, Mary Hardwick Hare, presented a dossier proving that support for such an event was overwhelming, persuading the ITF that it was a 'good idea' to have a team championship played over one week in a different venue each year. 40 years after Wightman's idea of a women's Davis Cup, it become a reality. In 1963, the ITF launched the Federation Cup to celebrate its 35th anniversary. Open to all nations the competition became a resounding success. The inaugural event attracted 16 countries. The competition was supported by the top players right from the start. Held at the Queen's Club, in London, the first contest was between Australia
Australia
and the United States. Grand Slam champions Darlene Hard, Billie Jean King, Margaret Smith and Lesley Turner all proudly representing their country on court. The United States
United States
would emerged the champion nation in the opening year, however it was to be Australia
Australia
in the early years, winning seven of the next eleven championships. Around 1980 the United States
United States
was able to establish some significant mark on the competition setting in future years a very high standard for others to compete against.

Petra Kvitová
Petra Kvitová
with the trophy for the Fed Cup
Fed Cup
winners, 2011, Moscow

The first Federation Cup had attracted 16 entry teams, despite no prize money and teams having to meet their own expenses. When sponsorship became available, the number of teams expanded dramatically, first by the Colgate Group in 1976, and, from 1981 to 1994 by the Japanese communications and computer giant NEC. In 1994, there were 73 nations competing, with the host nation of a Federation Cup week was now being required to build a special tennis complex, giving rise to what became known as the Federation Cup "legacy." The additional costs of each event could be offset with the host nations viewing their involvement as providing an opportunity to boost their national game. Regional qualifying competitions emerged in time for the 1992 and, in 1995, the Federation Cup used a new format and shortened its name to the Fed Cup. The home-and-away format trialled by the Davis Cup
Davis Cup
was adopted for the Fed Cup
Fed Cup
so that women could play for their country in their own country. There have been a number of smaller changes to the format since 1995, the current format, introduced in 2005, incorporates an eight Nation World Group I and eight nation World Group II both playing home-and-away over three weekends throughout the year. Three regional groups compete and there are promotions and demotions based on results. Format[edit] Tournament[edit] While many nations enter the Fed Cup
Fed Cup
each year, only 16 countries qualify for the elite World Group and World Group II each year (eight in World Group and eight in World Group II).[5] They reach World Group and World Group II as follows:

(a) World Group - the four nations that win their World Group first round tie remain in the World Group for the following year. First round losers contest the World Group Play-offs against the four winning nations from World Group II to determine relegation/promotion for the following year's competition. (The four nations that win World Group Play-offs will be in the World Group the following year, while the four losers will start the following year in World Group II.)

(b) World Group II - the four nations that win their World Group II ties will compete in the World Group I Play-Offs to determine relegation/promotion for the following year, as described above. Similarly the four nations that lose their World Group II ties will face winning nations from Group I Zonal competitions, in the World Group II Play-offs, to determine relegation/promotion. (The four nations that win their World Group II Play-offs will be in World Group II the following year, while the four losers will begin the next year in Group I Zonal events.)

Once in the World Group or World Group II, four nations will be seeded in each. The decision as to which nations will be seeded is made by the Fed Cup
Fed Cup
Committee, according to the ITF Fed Cup
Fed Cup
Nations Ranking. At the levels below the World Group and World Group II, the Fed Cup nations compete in Zonal Competition events, which are split into three zones: The Americas Zone, the Asia/Oceania Zone and the Europe/Africa Zone. In each zone there are two groups, Group I being the higher and Group II the lower, except for the Europe/Africa Zone, which also has a Group III. Within the Group zonal regions, teams are split into pools and play against each other in a round robin format. The exact format of each Group event, and promotion and relegation between them, varies according to the number of participating teams. Two teams are always promoted from Europe/Africa Group I to that year's World Group II Play-Offs, while one team each go to the World Group II Play-Offs from Americas Group I and Asia/Oceania Zone Group I. Current structure[edit] This structure has been implemented since 2016.[5][6]

Level Group(s)

1 World Group I 8 countries

World Group I Playoff 4 countries from World Group I + 4 countries from World Group II

2 World Group II 8 countries

World Group II Playoff 4 countries from World Group II + 2 countries from Group One Euro/African Zone + 1 country from Group One Americas Zone + 1 country from Group One Asia/Oceania Zone

3 Group One American Zone 8 countries

Group One Euro/African Zone 14 countries

Group One Asia/Oceania Zone 8 countries

4 Group Two American Zone 10 countries

Group Two Euro/African Zone 8 countries

Group Two Asia/Oceania Zone 13 countries

5

Group Three Euro/African Zone 22 countries

Ties[edit] In World Group and World Group II, and World Group and World Group II Play-Off ties, each tie is contested in a best of five matches format, and is played across two days. On the first day there are two singles matches, and then the reverse singles matches take place on the following day. The final match is a doubles. In Zonal Groups I, II and III, ties are played over the best of three matches (two singles and a doubles). The First Round Ties in the World Group and World Group II are played on a home and away knock-out basis, and take place over a weekend in the early part of the year. World Group Semifinals and Final are played over on a home and away knock-out basis, and take place over a weekend in July (Semifinals) and September (Final). Play-Off ties for World Group and World Group II will also be played on a home and away knock-out basis taking place in July. The choice of ground for First Round, Semifinals and Play-Off ties is decided by lot or goes automatically to one of the competing nations. As Groups I, II and III are played in a round robin format in all three zones, each event takes place at a single venue over one week. These are held in the first half of the year (to allow promotion of teams to the World Group II Play-Off ties in second half of the year), and dates and venues are decided by the Fed Cup
Fed Cup
Committee. Records and statistics[edit] Further information: List of Fed Cup
Fed Cup
champions Performance by team[edit] + - also has Junior Fed Cup
Fed Cup
title

Country Years won[7] Runners-up[7]

  United States
United States
+ 1963, 1966, 1967, 1969, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1986, 1989, 1990, 1996, 1999, 2000, 2017 (18) 1964, 1965, 1974, 1985, 1987, 1991, 1994, 1995, 2003, 2009, 2010 (11)

 Czechoslovakia +   Czech Republic
Czech Republic
+ 1975, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1988, 2011, 2012, 2014, 2015, 2016 (10) 1986 (1)

  Australia
Australia
+ 1964, 1965, 1968, 1970, 1971, 1973, 1974 (7) 1963, 1969, 1975, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1984, 1993 (10)

 Spain 1991, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1998 (5) 1989, 1992, 1996, 2000, 2002, 2008 (6)

 Soviet Union  Russia + 2004, 2005, 2007, 2008 (4) 1988, 1990, 1999, 2001, 2011, 2013, 2015 (7)

  Italy
Italy
+ 2006, 2009, 2010, 2013 (4) 2007 (1)

 West Germany
Germany
+   Germany
Germany
+ 1987, 1992 (2) 1966, 1970, 1982, 1983, 2014 (5)

  France
France
+ 1997, 2003 (2) 2004, 2005, 2016 (3)

 South Africa + 1972 (1) 1973 (1)

  Belgium
Belgium
+ 2001 (1) 2006 (1)

 Slovakia 2002 (1) (0)

 Great Britain (0) 1967, 1971, 1972, 1981 (4)

 Netherlands + (0) 1968, 1997 (2)

  Switzerland (0) 1998 (1)

 Serbia (0) 2012 (1)

  Belarus
Belarus
+ (0) 2017 (1)

Fed Cup
Fed Cup
Champions

Team records[edit]

Consecutive titles

All-time: 7, United States, 1976–1982

Consecutive finals appearances

All-time: 8, Australia, 1973–1980

Most number of games in a tie

All-time: 172, France
France
4–1 Japan, 1997 World Group first round

Years present in World Group

France
France
51 United States
United States
50 Italy
Italy
49 Germany
Germany
46 Belgium
Belgium
42 Australia
Australia
41 Spain 40 Czech Republic
Czech Republic
39 Switzerland 37 Japan
Japan
34 Netherlands 34 Russia 34 Argentina
Argentina
33 Austria 32 Canada
Canada
32 Great Britain
Great Britain
31 Sweden
Sweden
29 Denmark 26 New Zealand 23 Indonesia 22 South Africa 20 Brazil
Brazil
19 Israel 19 South Korea 19 Hungary 18 Mexico 18 Bulgaria 17 Norway 17 Yugoslavia 17 China
China
16 Greece 16 Poland
Poland
14 Romania
Romania
13 Ireland 12 Finland 10 Luxembourg 10 Slovakia
Slovakia
10 Chile 9 Chinese Taipei
Chinese Taipei
9 Croatia 8 Uruguay 8 Philippines 6 Portugal 6 Colombia
Colombia
5 Hong Kong 5 Peru
Peru
5 Thailand
Thailand
4 Paraguay
Paraguay
3 Serbia
Serbia
3 Latvia 2 Slovenia
Slovenia
2 Ukraine
Ukraine
2 Belarus
Belarus
1 Dominican Republic 1 Ecuador 1 Egypt 1 Iran 1 Malta 1 Morocco 1 Venezuela 1

Individual records[edit]

Youngest player

Denise Panagopoulou; Greece; 12 years, 360 days1

Oldest player

Gill Butterfield; Bermuda; 52 years, 162 days

Most rubbers played

100, Arantxa Sánchez Vicario, Spain

Most ties played

74, Anne Kremer, Luxembourg

Most rubbers won

Total: 72, Arantxa Sánchez Vicario, Spain Singles: 50, Arantxa Sánchez Vicario, Spain Doubles: 38, Larisa Neiland, Soviet Union/Latvia

Longest rubber

2016 World Group: Richel Hogenkamp
Richel Hogenkamp
defeated Svetlana Kuznetsova
Svetlana Kuznetsova
in 4 hours, 7-6(7-4), 5-7, 10-8.[8]

Most successful captain

Petr Pála; 5 titles[9]

1Players must now be aged 14 and over Heart Award[edit] The Heart Award is ITF's annual "MVP" award related to Fed Cup, which aims to recognise players who have represented their country with distinction, shown exceptional courage on court and demonstrated outstanding commitment to the team. [10] The award was inaugurated in 2009.

Year Winner

2009 Melanie Oudin

World Group SF WG / WG II play-offs WG / WG II R1 Americas ZG I Asia/Oceania ZG I Europe/Africa ZG I

2010 Francesca Schiavone Yanina Wickmayer Jelena Janković Maria Fernanda Alves Kimiko Date-Krumm Katarina Srebotnik

2011 Petra Kvitová Andrea Petkovic Bojana Jovanovski Bianca Botto Ayumi Morita Victoria Azarenka

2012 Jelena Janković

Daniela Hantuchová Catalina Castaño Li Na Sofia Arvidsson

2013 Sara Errani

Daniela Hantuchová Paula Cristina Gonçalves Galina Voskoboeva Agnieszka Radwańska

2014 Andrea Petkovic

Agnieszka Radwańska Teliana Pereira Sabina Sharipova Simona Halep

2015 Lucie Šafářová Flavia Pennetta Irina-Camelia Begu Verónica Cepede Royg Tamarine Tanasugarn Çağla Büyükakçay

2016 Caroline Garcia Hsu Ching-Wen Aliaksandra Sasnovich Nadia Podoroska Hsieh Su-wei Kateryna Bondarenko

2017 Aliaksandra Sasnovich Julia Görges Aryna Sabalenka Bianca Andreescu Galina Voskoboeva Heather Watson

Current rankings[edit] For more information, see ITF Rankings

ITF Fed Cup
Fed Cup
Nations Ranking, as of 12 February 2018[update][11]

# Nation Points Move†

1  Czech Republic 29,882.50

2  United States 24,477.50

3  France 14,585.00 1

4  Belarus 12,612.50 1

5  Germany 10,482.50 1

6   Switzerland 6,975.00 1

7  Netherlands 5,952.50

8  Russia 5,865.00

9  Belgium 4,960.00

10  Romania 4,462.50 1

11  Slovakia 4,262.50 5

12  Italy 3,755.00 3

13  Australia 3,550.00

14  Spain 3,010.00 2

15  Ukraine 2,797.50 5

16  Great Britain 2,647.50 2

17  Serbia 2,542.50

18  Canada 2,540.00 4

19  Paraguay 2,527.50

20  Japan 2,520.00 3

†Change since previous ranking update See also[edit]

Tennis
Tennis
portal

List of Fed Cup
Fed Cup
champions International Tennis
Tennis
Federation Davis Cup Hopman Cup Wightman Cup

References[edit]

^ " Fed Cup
Fed Cup
Number of Nations Participating per Year". www.fedcup.com. ITF. Retrieved 15 January 2016.  ^ Glenday, Craig, ed. (2008). Guinness World Records 2008. Bantam Books. p. 497. ISBN 9780553589955.  ^ "About Fed Cup
Fed Cup
by BNP Paribas". itftennis.com. ITF. Retrieved 13 January 2016.  ^ "FED CUP COMMITTEE". Fed Cup. Retrieved 26 Jan 2018.  ^ a b " Fed Cup
Fed Cup
Format". www.fedcup.com. ITF. Retrieved 13 January 2016.  ^ " Fed Cup
Fed Cup
Rules & Regulations". www.fedcup.com. ITF. 13 January 2016. Retrieved 13 January 2016.  ^ a b " Fed Cup
Fed Cup
Champions". www.fedcup.com. ITF. Retrieved 13 January 2016.  ^ Erik Gudris (6 February 2016). "Hogenkamp Wins Longest Ever Fed Cup Match Over Kuznetsova". Tennisnow.com. Retrieved 6 February 2016.  ^ Strength in Depth the Key for Five-Star Czech Republic, WTA official website, 14 November 2016 ^ " Fed Cup
Fed Cup
Heart Award". www.fedcup.com. ITF. Retrieved 13 January 2016.  ^ "Nations Ranking". fedcup.com. International Tennis Federation. 

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Fed Cup.

Official Fed Cup
Fed Cup
website

v t e

Fed Cup

Current champions (2017):  United States

Editions by year

1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

World Group

1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

World Group II

1991–1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000–2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

2018 World Group teams

 Belarus  Belgium  Czech Republic  France  Germany  Netherlands  Switzerland  United States

2018 World Group II teams

 Australia  Canada  Italy  Romania  Russia  Slovakia  Spain  Ukraine

Former World Group teams (in the current format, since 1995)

 Argentina  Austria  Bulgaria  China  Colombia  Croatia  Hungary  Israel  Japan  Poland  Serbia  Slovenia  South Africa  Sweden

List of champions

v t e

Fed Cup
Fed Cup
Americas Zone

2018 Americas Zone Group I teams

 Argentina  Brazil  Chile  Colombia  Guatemala  Paraguay  Venezuela

2018 Americas Zone Group II teams

 Antigua and Barbuda  Bahamas  Barbados  Bermuda  Bolivia  Costa Rica  Cuba  Dominican Republic  Ecuador  El Salvador  Honduras  Jamaica  Mexico  Panama  Peru  Trinidad and Tobago  Uruguay

Editions of the Fed Cup
Fed Cup
Americas Zone

1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

v t e

Fed Cup
Fed Cup
Asia/Oceania Zone

2018 Asia/Oceania Zone Group I teams

 China  Chinese Taipei  Hong Kong  India  Japan  Kazakhstan  South Korea  Thailand

2018 Asia/Oceania Zone Group II teams

 Bahrain  Indonesia  Iran  Kyrgyzstan  Lebanon  Malaysia  New Zealand  Oman  Pacific Oceania  Pakistan  Philippines  Singapore  Sri Lanka  Uzbekistan

Editions of the Fed Cup
Fed Cup
Asia/Oceania Zone

1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

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Fed Cup
Fed Cup
Europe/Africa Zone

2018 Europe/Africa Zone Group I teams

 Austria  Bulgaria  Croatia  Estonia  Georgia  Great Britain  Hungary  Latvia  Poland  Portugal  Serbia  Slovenia  Sweden  Turkey

2018 Europe/Africa Zone Group II teams

 Bosnia and Herzegovina  Denmark  Egypt  Greece  Israel  Luxembourg  Moldova  Norway

2018 Europe/Africa Zone Group III teams

 Algeria  Andorra  Armenia  Botswana  Cameroon  Cyprus  Finland  Iceland  Ireland  Kenya  Kosovo  Lithuania  Macedonia  Madagascar  Malta  Montenegro  Morocco  Mozambique  Namibia  South Africa  Tunisia  Uganda

Editions of the Fed Cup
Fed Cup
Europe/Africa Zone

1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

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