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Fareed Rafiq Zakaria
Rafiq Zakaria
(/fəˈriːd zəˈkɑːriə/; born January 20, 1964) is an American journalist and author. He is the host of CNN's Fareed Zakaria GPS
Fareed Zakaria GPS
and writes a weekly column for The Washington Post. He has been a columnist for Newsweek, editor of Newsweek International, and an editor at large of Time.[3]

Contents

1 Early life 2 Career 3 Political views 4 Honors and awards 5 Controversies

5.1 Role in the 2003 invasion of Iraq 5.2 Debate on the Park51
Park51
Islamic Center 5.3 Plagiarism allegations

6 Personal life 7 Bibliography 8 See also 9 References 10 External links

Early life[edit] Zakaria was born in Mumbai, India, to a Konkani Muslim family.[4] His father, Rafiq Zakaria, was a politician associated with the Indian National Congress and an Islamic theologian. His mother, Fatima Zakaria, was his father's second wife. She was for a time the editor of the Sunday Times of India. Zakaria attended the Cathedral and John Connon School
Cathedral and John Connon School
in Mumbai. He graduated with a Bachelor of Arts from Yale University
Yale University
in 1986,[3] where he was president of the Yale Political Union, editor in chief of the Yale Political Monthly, a member of the Scroll and Key
Scroll and Key
society, and a member of the Party of the Right. He later gained a doctor of philosophy degree in government from Harvard University
Harvard University
in 1993,[3] where he studied under Samuel P. Huntington
Samuel P. Huntington
and Stanley Hoffmann, as well as international relations theorist Robert Keohane.[5] Career[edit] After directing a research project on American foreign policy at Harvard, Zakaria became the managing editor of Foreign Affairs
Foreign Affairs
in 1992, at the age of 28. Under his guidance, the magazine was redesigned and moved from a quarterly to a bimonthly schedule. He served as an adjunct professor at Columbia University, where he taught a seminar on international relations. In October 2000, he was named editor of Newsweek
Newsweek
International,[3] and became a weekly columnist for Newsweek. In August 2010 he moved to Time to serve as editor at-large and columnist.[6] He writes a weekly column for The Washington Post and is a contributing editor for the Atlantic Media group, which includes The Atlantic Monthly. He has published on a variety of subjects for The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The New Yorker, The New Republic. For a brief period, he was a wine columnist for the web magazine Slate.[7][8] Zakaria is the author of From Wealth to Power: The Unusual Origins of America's World Role (Princeton, 1998), The Future of Freedom
The Future of Freedom
(Norton, 2003), The Post-American World
The Post-American World
(2008), and In Defense of a Liberal Education (Norton, 2015). He co-edited The American Encounter: The United States
United States
and the Making of the Modern World (Basic Books) with James F. Hoge Jr. His last two books have both been New York Times bestsellers and have been translated into more than 25 languages. In 2011 an updated and expanded edition of The Post-American World ("Release 2.0") was published. Zakaria was a news analyst with ABC's This Week with George Stephanopoulos (2002–2007) where he was a member of the Sunday morning roundtable. He hosted the weekly TV news show, Foreign Exchange with Fareed Zakaria
Fareed Zakaria
on PBS
PBS
(2005–08). His weekly show, Fareed Zakaria GPS
Fareed Zakaria GPS
(Global Public Square), premiered on CNN
CNN
in June 2008.[3] It airs twice weekly in the United States
United States
and four times weekly on CNN
CNN
International, reaching over 200 million homes. It celebrated its 8th anniversary on June 5, 2016, as announced on the weekly foreign affairs show on CNN. In 2013 he became one of the producers for the HBO
HBO
series Vice, for which he serves as a consultant. Zakaria, a member of the Berggruen Institute, additionally features as an interlocutor for the annual Berggruen Prize.[9][10][11] Political views[edit] Zakaria self-identifies as a "centrist",[12] though he has been described variously as a political liberal,[13] a conservative,[14] a moderate,[15] or a radical centrist.[16] George Stephanopoulos
George Stephanopoulos
said of him in 2003, "He's so well versed in politics, and he can't be pigeonholed. I can't be sure whenever I turn to him where he's going to be coming from or what he's going to say."[14] Zakaria wrote in February 2008 that "Conservatism grew powerful in the 1970s and 1980s because it proposed solutions appropriate to the problems of the age", adding that "a new world requires new thinking".[17] He supported Barack Obama
Barack Obama
during the 2008 Democratic primary campaign and also for president. In January 2009 Forbes
Forbes
referred to Zakaria as one of the 25 most influential liberals in the American media.[13] Zakaria has stated that he tries not to be devoted to any type of ideology, saying "I feel that's part of my job... which is not to pick sides but to explain what I think is happening on the ground. I can't say, 'This is my team and I'm going to root for them no matter what they do.'"[12]

Fareed Zakaria
Fareed Zakaria
at World Economic Forum
World Economic Forum
2006, Davos, Switzerland (second from the right)

As a student at Yale University
Yale University
in the mid 1980s, Zakaria opposed anti-apartheid divestment and argued that Yale should not divest from its holdings in South Africa.[18] Zakaria "may have more intellectual range and insights than any other public thinker in the West," wrote David Shribman in The Boston Globe.[19] In 2003, former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger
Henry Kissinger
told New York Magazine that Zakaria “has a first-class mind and likes to say things that run against conventional wisdom.”[14] However, in 2011, the editors of The New Republic
The New Republic
included him in a list of "over-rated thinkers" and commented, "There's something suspicious about a thinker always so perfectly in tune with the moment."[20] Zakaria's books include The Future of Freedom
The Future of Freedom
and The Post-American World. The Future of Freedom
The Future of Freedom
argues that what is defined as democracy in the Western world is actually "liberal democracy", a combination of constitutional liberalism and participatory politics. Zakaria points out that protection of liberty and the rule of law actually preceded popular elections by centuries in Western Europe, and that when countries only adopt elections without the protection of liberty, they create "illiberal democracy". The Post-American World, published in 2008 before the financial crisis, argued that the most important trend of modern times is the "rise of the rest," the economic emergence of China, India, Brazil, and other countries.[21] From 2006, Zakaria has also criticized what he views as "fear-based" American policies employed not only in combating terrorism, but also in enforcing immigration and drug smuggling laws, and has argued in favor of decriminalization of drugs and citizenship for presently illegal immigrants to the United States
United States
of all backgrounds.[22][23][24] Referring to his views on Iran, Leon Wieseltier described Zakaria as a "consummate spokesman for the shibboleths of the White House
White House
and for the smooth new worldliness, the at-the-highest-levels impatience with democracy and human rights as central objectives of our foreign policy, that now characterize advanced liberal thinking about America's role in the world."[25] Before the 2008 U.S. presidential election, Zakaria endorsed Barack Obama on his CNN
CNN
program.[26] In May 2011 The New York Times
The New York Times
reported that President Obama has "sounded out prominent journalists like Fareed Zakaria
Fareed Zakaria
... and Thomas L. Friedman" concerning Middle East issues.[27]

Fareed Zakaria
Fareed Zakaria
and Vladimir Putin
Vladimir Putin
at St. Petersburg International Economic Forum, 17 June 2016

After the 9/11 attacks, in a Newsweek
Newsweek
cover essay, "Why They Hate Us," Zakaria argued that Islamic extremism was not fundamentally rooted in Islam, nor could it be claimed a reaction to American foreign policy. He located the problem in the political-social-economic stagnation of Arab societies, which then bred an extreme, religious opposition. He portrayed Osama bin Laden as one in a long line of extremists who used religion to justify mass murder. Zakaria argued for an intergenerational effort to create more open and dynamic societies in Arab countries, and thereby helping Islam enter the modern world.[28] Zakaria initially supported the 2003 invasion of Iraq.[14] He said at the time, "The place is so dysfunctional ... any stirring of the pot is good. America's involvement in the region is for the good."[14] He argued for a United Nations–sanctioned operation with a much larger force—approximately 400,000 troops—than was actually employed by the administration of President George W. Bush. However, he soon became a critic. In addition to objecting to the war plan, he frequently criticized the way the Bush administration was running the occupation of Iraq.[29] He argued against the disbanding of the army and bureaucracy yet supported the de-Baathification programs.[30] He continued to argue that a functioning democracy in Iraq would be a powerful new model for Arab politics but suggested that an honest accounting would have to say that the costs of the invasion had been much higher than the benefits. He opposed the Iraq surge in March 2007, writing that it would work militarily but not politically, still leaving Iraq divided among its three communities. Instead he advocated that Washington push hard for a political settlement between the Sunni Arabs, Shia Arabs, and Kurds, and begin a reduction in forces to only 60,000 troops.[29] He later wrote that the surge "succeeded" militarily but that it did not produce a political compact and that Iraq remains divided along sectarian lines, undermining its unity, democracy, and legacy.[31][32] Zakaria supported the April 2017 U.S. missile strike against a Syrian government–controlled airbase. Zakaria praised President Trump's strike and said it was the moment "[he] became president of the United States.”[33] Honors and awards[edit] Zakaria has been nominated five times for the National Magazine Award, and won it once, for his columns and commentary. His show has won a Peabody Award[34] and been nominated for several Emmys. He was conferred India
India
Abroad Person of the Year 2008 award on 20 March 2009, in New York.[35] Filmmaker Mira Nair, who won the award for year 2007, honored her successor. He has received honorary degrees from Harvard
Harvard
University, Brown University, Duke University, Johns Hopkins University, the University of Miami, Oberlin College, Bates College, and the University of Oklahoma among others.[36] He was the 2000 Annual Orator of the Philomathean Society
Philomathean Society
of the University of Pennsylvania. In January 2010, Zakaria was given the Padma Bhushan
Padma Bhushan
award by the Indian government for his contribution to the field of journalism.[37] He serves on the board of the Council on Foreign Relations, the New America Foundation, Columbia University's International House, City College of New York's Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership, and Shakespeare and Company.[citation needed] He was a trustee of Yale Corporation, the governing body of Yale University[38] and the Trilateral Commission.[citation needed] Controversies[edit] Role in the 2003 invasion of Iraq[edit] In his 2006 book State of Denial, Washington Post
Washington Post
journalist Bob Woodward described a 29 November 2001, meeting of Middle East analysts, including Zakaria, that was convened at the request of the then Deputy Secretary of Defense Paul Wolfowitz. According to a New York Times story on Woodward's book, the Wolfowitz meeting ultimately produced a report for President George W. Bush
George W. Bush
that supported the subsequent invasion of Iraq. Zakaria, however, later told The New York Times that he had briefly attended what he thought was "a brainstorming session".[39] He was not told that a report would be prepared for the President, and in fact, the report did not have his name on it. The Times issued a correction.[40] Debate on the Park51
Park51
Islamic Center[edit] In 2010, in protest at the Anti-Defamation League's opposition to the building of the Park51
Park51
mosque and Islamic cultural center two blocks from the World Trade Center site, Zakaria returned the Hubert H. Humphrey First Amendment Freedoms Prize awarded to him by the ADL in 2005. He declared that the ADL's opposition to the mosque meant that he could not "in good conscience keep [the award] anymore". In support of his decision, he stated that the larger issue in the controversy is freedom of religion in America, even while acknowledging that he is not a religious person. He also wrote that a "moderate, mainstream version of Islam" is essential to winning the war on terror, and that moves like the ADL's make it harder for such a moderate version of Islam to emerge and thrive.[41][42][43] On 8 August 2010, edition of Fareed Zakaria
Fareed Zakaria
GPS, Zakaria addressed the issue, stating that in returning his award, he had hoped that the ADL would reconsider their stance.[44] Plagiarism allegations[edit]

Fareed Zakaria
Fareed Zakaria
in 2013

Zakaria was suspended for a week in August 2012 while Time and CNN investigated an allegation of plagiarism[45] involving an August 20 column on gun control with similarities to a New Yorker article by Jill Lepore. In a statement Zakaria apologized, saying that he had made "a terrible mistake."[46][47][48] Six days later, after a review of his research notes and years of prior commentary, Time and CNN reinstated Zakaria. Time described the incident as "isolated" and "unintentional"; and CNN
CNN
"... found nothing that merited continuing the suspension...."[49][50][51] The controversy was reignited in September 2014, when Esquire and The Week magazines reported on allegations made in pseudonymous blogs.[52][53][54] Newsweek
Newsweek
initially added a blanket warning to its archive of articles penned by Zakaria, but after an investigation of his several hundred columns for the magazine, found improper citation in only seven.[55][56] Similarly, after allegations surfaced on Twitter
Twitter
regarding the originality of one of Zakaria's columns for Slate, the online magazine appended a notice to the article indicating that, "This piece does not meet Slate’s editorial standards, having failed to properly attribute quotations and information...".[57] However, Slate Editor-in-Chief Jacob Weisberg, who had, months before, exchanged barbs with one of the aforementioned anonymous bloggers on Twitter
Twitter
in defense of Zakaria,[58] maintained his original position that what Zakaria did was not plagiarism.[59] Corrections to selected Zakaria columns were also issued by The Washington Post, which had responded to the initial allegations by telling the Poynter media industry news site that it would investigate.[60] Later on the same day, November 10, the Post said that it had found "problematic" sourcing in five Zakaria columns, "and will likely note the lack of attribution in archived editions of the articles."[61] However, editors at The Washington Post
The Washington Post
and Newsweek denied that Zakaria's errors constituted plagiarism.[59] Personal life[edit] Zakaria is a naturalized American citizen.[1] He currently resides in New York City
New York City
with his wife, the jewelry designer Paula Throckmorton Zakaria, son Omar, and daughters Lila and Sofia.[3] Zakaria is a self-described secular and nonpracticing Muslim. He added: "My views on faith are complicated—somewhere between deism and agnosticism. I am completely secular in my outlook."[62][63] Bibliography[edit]

In Defense of a Liberal Education, Fareed Zakaria, (W.W. Norton & Company; 2015) ISBN 978-0-393-24768-8 The Post-American World, Release 2.0, Fareed Zakaria, (W.W. Norton & Company; 2011) ISBN 0-393-08180-X The Post-American World, Fareed Zakaria, (W.W. Norton & Company; 2008) ISBN 0-393-06235-X The Future of Freedom: Illiberal Democracy at Home and Abroad, Fareed Zakaria, (W.W. Norton & Company; 2003) ISBN 0-393-04764-4 From Wealth to Power, Fareed Zakaria, (Princeton University Press; 1998) ISBN 0-691-04496-1 The American Encounter: The United States
United States
and the Making of the Modern World Essays from 75 Years of Foreign Affairs, edited by James F. Hoge and Fareed Zakaria, (Basic Books; 1997) ISBN 0-465-00170-X

See also[edit]

Asian Indians in the New York City
New York City
metropolitan region List of Yale University
Yale University
people List of Harvard University
Harvard University
people

References[edit]

^ a b Zakaria, Fareed (July 15, 2001). "America Doesn't Need Crusades". Newsweek. Retrieved July 17, 2017.  ^ "Padma award recipients Zakaria, Parikh say they are humbled". The Indian Express. 2010-01-26. Retrieved 2014-03-14.  ^ a b c d e f "Fareed Zakaria's Website". Retrieved 10 May 2010.  ^ Press, Joy (9 August 2005). "The Interpreter". The Village Voice. Village Voice, LLC. Retrieved 10 May 2010.  ^ " Harvard
Harvard
Graduate School Honors Daniel Aaron, Nancy Hopkins, and Others". Harvard
Harvard
Magazine. 23 May 2012. Retrieved 2012-05-29.  ^ Carr, David (18 August 2010). " Newsweek
Newsweek
Notable Moves to a Rival". The New York Times. Retrieved 19 August 2010.  ^ Zakaria, Fareed (1 July 1998). "Sweet Justice". Slate. Retrieved 2008-05-20.  ^ " Fareed Zakaria
Fareed Zakaria
to Deliver Lecture on World Issues at Puget Sound Campus". College News. Archived from the original on 15 October 2014. Retrieved 10 October 2014.  ^ Binlot, Ann. "Pondering Humanity, Technology, and Net Neutrality at the Berggruen Institute
Berggruen Institute
Gala". Vanity Fair. Retrieved 2017-12-17.  ^ "Nicolas Berggruen's $1 Million Philosophy Prize - artnet News". artnet News. 2015-09-17. Retrieved 2017-12-17.  ^ "Charles Taylor accepts million-dollar prize". Montreal. 2016-12-02. Retrieved 2017-12-17.  ^ a b Press, Joy (9 August 2005). "The Interpreter". The Village Voice.  ^ a b In Depth: The 25 Most Influential Liberals In The U.S. Media. Forbes. Published 22 January 2009. ^ a b c d e Maneker, Marion (21 April 2003). "Man of the World". New York. Retrieved 16 July 2017.  ^ Fareed Zakaria
Fareed Zakaria
as US secretary of state? The Economic Times. Published 6 November 2008.[dead link] ^ Olson, Robert (January–February 2005). "The Rise of 'Radical Middle' Politics Archived 16 July 2012 at the Wayback Machine.". The Futurist, vol. 39, no. 1, pp. 45–47. Publication of the World Future Society. Retrieved 26 February 2013. ^ The End of Conservatism. ^ https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DBAQuxbXYAAkEus.jpg ^ Shribman, David M. (1 June 2008). "Globalization, its discontents, and its upside". The Boston Globe. Retrieved 16 July 2017.  ^ "Over-Rated Thinkers". The New Republic. 3 November 2011. Retrieved 16 July 2017.  ^ Khanna, Parag (18 May 2008). "The Rise of Non-Americanism". The Washington Post. Retrieved 13 May 2012.  ^ Intelligence 2 Ltd., America is to blame for Mexico's drug war, 1 December 2009, retrieved 24 April 2011 ^ Zakaria, Fareed (3 May 2008). "Excerpt: Zakaria's 'The Post-American World'". Newsweek. Retrieved 16 July 2017.  ^ Interview with Fareed Zakaria, Part 1, The Daily Show
The Daily Show
with Jon Stewart, 28 March 2006: "We are not going to deport them (illegal immigrants)—no democracy would..."Most of these [illegal immigrants], almost all of them, couldn't do anything...that would break the law. The minute they do that, they would be deported." ^ Wieseltier, Leon (25 June 2010). "The realism of seeking democracy in Iran". The Washington Post. Retrieved 16 July 2017.  ^ Zakaria, Fareed (19 October 2008). "FAREED ZAKARIA GPS". CNN. Archived from the original on 15 August 2011. Retrieved 22 May 2011.  ^ Landler, Mark (11 May 2011). "Obama Seeks Reset in Arab World". The New York Times. Retrieved 22 May 2011.  ^ Zakaria, Fareed (2001-10-14). "The Politics of Rage: Why Do They Hate Us?". Newsweek. Retrieved 25 February 2012.  ^ a b Zakaria, Fareed (3 April 2007). "The Surge That Might Work". Newsweek. Retrieved 25 February 2012.  ^ Fareed Zakaria
Fareed Zakaria
(1 June 2003). "Giving Peace a Real Chance". Newsweek. Retrieved 10 Nov 2014.  ^ "McCain's Downfall: Republican Foreign Policy". The Washington Post. Retrieved 2010-05-03.  ^ Fareed Zakaria
Fareed Zakaria
(6 June 2009). "Zakaria: How to End in Iraq". Newsweek. Retrieved 2010-10-01.  ^ "CNN's Fareed Zakaria: 'Donald Trump became president' last night". The Washington Times. Retrieved 2017-05-02.  ^ 71st Annual Peabody Awards, May 2012 ^ "rediff.com: Fareed Zakaria
Fareed Zakaria
is India
India
Abroad Person of the Year". Specials.rediff.com. 21 March 2009. Retrieved 2010-10-01.  ^ Koch, Katie; Corydon Ireland; Alvin Powell; Colleen Walsh (24 May 2012). "Eight receive honorary degrees". Harvard
Harvard
Gazette. Retrieved 26 May 2012.  ^ "List of Padma awardees". IBNLive. 3 February 2010. Retrieved 2010-10-01.  ^ DeMatteo, Ann (August 20, 2012). " Journalist
Journalist
Fareed Zakaria
Fareed Zakaria
resigns from Yale Corporation". New Haven Register. Retrieved August 23, 2017.  ^ Bosman, Julie (9 October 2006). "Secret Iraq Meeting Included Journalists". The New York Times. Retrieved 2007-01-16.  ^ Quote: "An article in Business Day on Oct. 9 about journalists who attended a secret meeting in November 2001 called by Paul D. Wolfowitz, then the deputy secretary of defense, referred incorrectly to the participation of Fareed Zakaria, the editor of Newsweek International and a Newsweek
Newsweek
columnist. Mr. Zakaria was not told that the meeting would produce a report for the Bush administration, nor did his name appear on the report." ^ Zakaria, Fareed (6 August 2010). "Build the Ground Zero Mosque". Newsweek. Retrieved 7 August 2010.  ^ Zakaria, Fareed (6 August 2010). "Fareed Zakaria's Letter to the ADL". Newsweek. Retrieved 7 August 2010.  ^ " Fareed Zakaria
Fareed Zakaria
returns ADL award in protest". The Spy Report. Media Spy. 7 August 2010. Archived from the original on 13 January 2013. Retrieved 7 August 2010.  ^ "Fareed: Don't demonize Islamic centre". CNN. 8 August 2010. Retrieved 9 August 2010.  ^ Amira, Dan (10 August 2012). " Fareed Zakaria
Fareed Zakaria
sure looks like he stole from The New Yorker". New York.  ^ "Statement from Fareed". CNN. 10 August 2012. Retrieved 2012-08-18.  ^ "Time, CNN
CNN
suspend Fareed Zakaria
Fareed Zakaria
for plagiarism". USA Today. 8 October 2012. Retrieved 2012-08-18.  ^ Haughney, Christine (19 August 2012). "A Media Personality, Suffering a Blow to His Image, Ponders a Lesson". The New York Times. Retrieved 2012-08-19.  ^ Haughney, Christine (16 August 2012). "Time and CNN
CNN
Reinstate Journalist
Journalist
After Review". The New York Times.  ^ Byers, Dylan (16 August 2012). " Fareed Zakaria
Fareed Zakaria
to stay at Time, CNN". Politico.  ^ Hax, Carolyn (16 August 2012). " Fareed Zakaria
Fareed Zakaria
reinstated at CNN
CNN
and Time". The Washington Post. Retrieved 2012-08-18.  ^ " CNN
CNN
Does Not Get to Cherrypick the Rules of Journalism". Esquire. 22 September 2014.  ^ Cooper, Ryan (22 September 2014). "Why does Fareed Zakaria
Fareed Zakaria
still have a job?". The Week.  ^ "Fareed Zakaria's statement responding to the charges by two anonymous bloggers". Fareed Zakaria.com. 19 August 2014. Retrieved 20 August 2014.  ^ Dylan Byers (29 September 2014). " Newsweek
Newsweek
adds plagiarism warning to Fareed Zakaria
Fareed Zakaria
articles". Politico.  ^ Taylor Wofford and Zach Schonfeld (7 November 2014). "An Interview With the Anonymous Media Watchdogs Who Accused Fareed Zakaria
Fareed Zakaria
of Plagiarism". Newsweek.  ^ "Editor's note". Slate. 10 November 2014.  ^ " Newsweek
Newsweek
Warns Readers About Fareed Zakaria's Plagiarism". Gawker. 29 September 2014. Archived from the original on 1 November 2014.  ^ a b Grove, Lloyd (12 November 2014). "Can Fareed Zakaria
Fareed Zakaria
Survive A Plagiarism Firestorm?". The Daily Beast. Retrieved 13 November 2014.  ^ "6 of Zakaria's Washington Post
Washington Post
pieces have originality issues, critics say". Poynter.org. 10 November 2014. Archived from the original on 11 November 2014.  ^ "Post finds problematic sourcing in some Zakaria columns". The Washington Post. 10 November 2014.  ^ Zakaria, Fareed (December 10, 2015). "I am a Muslim. But Trump's views appall me because I am an American". The Washington Post. Retrieved December 13, 2015.  ^ Zakaria, Fareed (December 12, 2015). "Fareed's Take: Why Trump's rhetoric is dangerous". Fareed Zakaria
Fareed Zakaria
GPS. CNN. Retrieved December 13, 2015. 

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Fareed Zakaria.

Wikiquote has quotations related to: Fareed Zakaria

FareedZakaria.com Official site Fareed Zakaria
Fareed Zakaria
on Facebook Global Public Square (GPS) at CNN https://www.arcamax.com/politics/fromtheleft/fareedzakaria/ Column archive at The Daily Star Column archive (through 2010) at Newsweek Fareed Zakaria
Fareed Zakaria
on IMDb Works by or about Fareed Zakaria
Fareed Zakaria
in libraries ( WorldCat
WorldCat
catalog) Appearances on C-SPAN

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Padma Bhushan
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award recipients (2010–19)

2010

Satya Paul Agarwal Mohammad Amin Sailesh Kumar Bandopadhyay M. S. Banga Anil Bordia Bipan Chandra B. K. Chaturvedi Sant Singh Chatwal G. P. Chopra Tan Chung Madhusudan Dhaky P. R. Dubhashi Puttaraj Gawai Belle Monappa Hegde Ilaiyaraaja Jagdish Chandra Kapur Shrinivas Khale Aamir Khan Sultan Khan Ram Kumar Kumudini Lakhia Kuzhur Narayana Marar Chhannulal Mishra Eledath Thaikkattu Narayanan Mooss C. P. Krishnan Nair S. P. Oswal Akbar Padamsee Ramakanta Panda Balasaheb Vikhe Patil Arogyaswami Paulraj A. R. Rahman Moosa Raza Mallika Sarabhai Nookala Chinna Satyanarayana Abhijit Sen Satya Vrat Shastri Noshir M. Shroff Kushal Pal Singh Bikash Sinha Balagangadharanatha Swamiji Narayanan Vaghul P. K. Warrier Fareed Zakaria

2011

S. P. Balasubrahmanyam Rajashree Birla M. N. Buch C. V. Chandrasekhar Ajai Chowdhry Yogesh Chander Deveshwar Satyadev Dubey T. J. S. George Shankha Ghosh Kris Gopalakrishnan Keki Byramjee Grant Shashi Kapoor Krishen Khanna Khayyam Chanda Kochhar Dwijen Mukhopadhyay Madavoor Vasudevan Nair Ramdas Pai Dashrath Patel Rajendra Singh Pawar Suryanarayanan Ramachandran Shobhana Ranade Gunupati Venkata Krishna Reddy Kallam Anji Reddy Waheeda Rehman Shyam Saran Analjit Singh Arpita Singh Surendra Singh R. K. Srikantan Raghavan Thirumulpad

2012

Suresh H. Advani Shabana Azmi Homi K. Bhabha Shashikumar Chitre Khaled Choudhury Jatin Das Vidya Dehejia Dharmendra S. N. Goenka M. S. Gopalakrishnan T. V. Gopalakrishnan Buddhadev Das Gupta Sunil Janah Anish Kapoor S. B. Mujumdar B. Muthuraman Mira Nair Arvind Panagariya José Pereira Mata Prasad M. S. Raghunathan P. Chandrasekhara Rao Ronen Sen Devi Shetty M. V. Subbiah N. Vittal N. H. Wadia George Yeo

2013

Satya N. Atluri Maharaj Kishan Bhan Jaspal Bhatti Rahul Dravid Adi Godrej Abdul Rashid Khan Rajesh Khanna Mary Kom Nandkishore Shamrao Laud Mangesh Padgaonkar Hemendra Singh Panwar Jogesh Pati Shivajirao Girdhar Patil A. Sivathanu Pillai D. Ramanaidu Kanak Rele V. K. Saraswat Ashoke Sen Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak B. N. Suresh Sharmila Tagore Ramamurthy Thyagarajan Saroja Vaidyanathan

2014

Anisuzzaman Mrityunjay Athreya Padmanabhan Balaram Dalveer Bhandari Ruskin Bond Anita Desai Pullela Gopichand Kamal Haasan Jyeshtharaj Joshi V. N. Kaul Neelam Kler M. Mahadevappa Leander Paes K. Radhakrishnan Anumolu Ramakrishna Thirumalachari Ramasami Lloyd Rudolph Susanne Hoeber Rudolph Vinod Prakash Sharma Ghulam Mohammed Sheikh Parveen Sultana Dhirubhai Thaker Vairamuthu J. S. Verma T. H. Vinayakram

2015

Jahnu Barua Manjul Bhargava Vijay P. Bhatkar Swapan Dasgupta David Frawley Bill Gates Melinda Gates Swami Satyamitranand N. Gopalaswami Subhash C. Kashyap Gokulotsavji Maharaj Saichiro Misumi Ambrish Mithal Sudha Ragunathan Harish Salve Ashok Seth Rajat Sharma Satpal Singh Shivakumara Swami Khadg Singh Valdiya

2016

Ravindra Chandra Bhargava Robert Blackwill Hafeez Contractor Indu Jain Heisnam Kanhailal Anupam Kher Sania Mirza Pallonji Mistry Udit Narayan Saina Nehwal Yarlagadda Lakshmi Prasad Vinod Rai N. S. Ramanuja Tatacharya A. V. Rama Rao D. Nageshwar Reddy Dayananda Saraswati Barjinder Singh Hamdard Ram V. Sutar Tejomayananda

2017

Vishwa Mohan Bhatt Deviprasad Dwivedi Ratnasundarsuri Niranjanananda Saraswati Cho Ramaswamy Maha Chakri Sirindhorn Tehemton Erach Udwadia

2018

Pankaj Advani Philipose Mar Chrysostom Mahendra Singh Dhoni Alexander Kadakin Ramachandran Nagaswamy Laxman Pai Arvind Parikh Sharda Sinha

# Posthumous conferral

1954–1959 1960–1969 1970–1979 1980–1989 1990–1999 2000–2009 2010–2019

Authority control

WorldCat
WorldCat
Identities VIAF: 79186052 LCCN: n97047622 ISNI: 0000 0001 2141 1608 GND: 129997536 SUDOC: 056258860 BNF: cb144917609 (data) BIBSYS: 98048128 NDL: 00975944 NKC: mzk2002160

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