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Fame
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In 2009, MGM and Lakeshore Entertainment produced a remake of Fame directed by Kevin Tancharoen, and written by Allison Burnett.[60] The remake followed the premise of the original film, depicting the lives of several students as they atten

In 1987, producer David De Silva announced he was developing a stage version of the film.[47] Fame – the Musical was the first professional production at the Coconut Grove Playhouse in Miami in 1988. The show then played at the Walnut Street Theatre in Philadelphia from March 25 through April 29, 1989.[48][49] The musical has since been produced in over 25 countries.[50]

In 1997, MGM Television produced a second series inspired by the film.[51] Fame L.A., created by Richard B. Lewis, focused on the lives of several students attending a drama and dance school in Los Angeles. The series featured Christian Kane, Roselyn Sánchez, William R. Moses, and Lesli Margherita in starring roles.[52] It aired in syndication from October 19, 1997 to March 21, 1998.[53]

In 2002, MGM and Touchstone Television planned to develop a two-hour television film that would serve as a direct sequel to Fame, followed by a spin-off television series. Both projects were to be produced for the ABC network.[54] The television film was to introduce several students applying for positions at the New York City of Performing Arts, while the spin-off series would focus on their lives during their four years of attending the school. The series would feature new cast members as the young students, as well as those from the 1980 film, as well as updated versions of the songs "Fame" and "Out Here on My Own". Michael Gore was to act as an executive producer for both projects with his producing partner Lawrence Cohen, through their production label White Cap Productions.[54] However, both television projects were never produced.[1]

In 2003, MGM Television produced a reality television series titled Fame, in an attempt to capitalize on the success of the largely popular American Idol.[55] The concept of the series involves discovering a "triple threat"—a person who can sing, act and dance and has a "bigger-than-life" personality. The show, co-hosted by Debbie Allen, and Joey Fatone, featured Carnie Wilson, Johnny Wright and JoJo Wright as the panel of judges. The series premiered on NBC on May 28, 2003, and a total of ten episode were produced.[56] The two competing finalists of the series were Shannon Bex and Harlemm Lee. Lee emerged as the winner of the competition, based on home-audience votes.[57]

In 2012, MGM Television announced it would produce a modern-day television series inspired by the film, with Nigel Lythgoe acting as an executive producer.[58] The project resurfaced in June 2015, when The Hollywood Reporter announced that MGM Television would be co-producing the series with A&E Networks for Lifetime, with Josh Safran attached as the show's writer and executive producer.[59]

In 2009, MGM and Lakeshore Entertainment produced a remake of Fame directed by Kevin Tancharoen, and written by Allison Burnett.[60] The remake followed the premise of the original film, depicting the lives of several students as they attend the New York City High School of Performing Arts. Debbie Allen was the only cast member from the 1980 film to have a supporting role, appearing as the school's principal. The film was notable for its lighter tone, in contrast to the earlier film's gritty subject matter.[61] Released on September 25, 2009, Fame received generally unfavorable reviews from mainstream film critics.[62][63][64] It was a modest box office success upon release in the United States, though it fared better internationally, grossing $54.7 million worldwide.[65] Parker voiced his disapproval of the remake and described it as an "awful" film.[3] Maureen Teefy also criticized the film, stating, "They're using the same formula, but it doesn't have the same substance. It's not staying true to the grittiness and authenticity of the original."[13]

Aftermath and legacy

Fame was the last musical film to be produced by MGM, before the studio merged with United Artists in 1981

Fame was the last musical film to be produced by MGM, before the studio merged with United Artists in 1981.[66] The film has been credited with revitalizing the teen musical subgenre by adding dramatic elements into its story, echoing 1950s melodramas. Its presentation of musical numbers in the style of a music video was a major influence on other 1980s films in the dance film genre, such as Flashdance (1983), Footloose (1984) and Dirty Dancing (1987).[67] It also inspired the creation of other similar performing arts schools around the world, including the Liverpool Institute for Performing Arts (LIPA),[3][4] and the BRIT School.[68]

The film and its title song helped launch Irene Cara's musical career. She recorded three solo albums and contributed to several film soundtracks, notably performing "Flashdance...What a Feeling", the title song for Flashdance, fo

The film and its title song helped launch Irene Cara's musical career. She recorded three solo albums and contributed to several film soundtracks, notably performing "Flashdance...What a Feeling", the title song for Flashdance, for which she won the Academy Award for Best Original Song.[9] Paul McCrane, Meg Tilly, and Barry Miller (who won the Tony Award in 1985 for Neil Simon's "Biloxi Blues") went on to successful acting careers,[12][69][70] while Gene Anthony Ray, Debbie Allen and Lee Curerri found success and popularity with the television series.[10][11]

Ray struggled with drug and alcohol addictions, and worked sporadically after the series ended in 1987. In 1996, he was diagnosed as HIV-positive and died after a stroke on November 14, 2003.[10][71]

The film was Christopher Gore's only original screenplay. He was also involved with the 1982 television series as its creator, and wrote several episodes before his death from AIDS on May 18, 1988.[72][73][74]

After Fame, Louis Falco continued to work as a commercial choreographer for several music videos and films.[75] He again collaborated with Parker on the 1987 film Angel Heart[76] before his death from AIDS on March 26, 1993.[77]

In 2004, the American Film Institute (AFI) ranked the song "Fame" at #51 on its "100 Years...100 Songs" list.[78] In 2006, AFI placed the film on its "100 Years...100 Cheers" list, where it was ranked #92.[79] That same year, the film was a nominee for AFI's Greatest Movie Musicals.[80] The film also ranked #42 on Entertainment Weekly's list of the "50 Best High School Movies".[81][82] In 2014, IndieWire added the song "Fame" to its list of "The 20 Greatest Movie Theme Songs of the 1980s".[83]

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