Exeter College, Oxford
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(Let Exeter Flourish) , old_names = ''Stapeldon Hall'' , named_for =
Walter de Stapledon Walter de Stapledon (or Stapeldon) (1 February 126114 October 1326) was Bishop of Exeter 1308–1326 and twice Lord High Treasurer of England, in 1320 and 1322. He founded Exeter College, Oxford and contributed liberally to the rebuilding of Ex ...
, Bishop of Exeter , established = , sister_college =
Emmanuel College, Cambridge Emmanuel College is a constituent college A collegiate university is a university A university ( la, universitas, 'a whole') is an educational institution, institution of higher education, higher (or Tertiary education, tertiary) education ...

Emmanuel College, Cambridge
, rector = Sir Richard Trainor , undergraduates = 346 (2019/2020) , visiting_students = 26 , graduates = 227 , endowment = £74.5 million (2018) , location =
Turl Street Turl Street is a historic street in central Oxford Oxford () is a city in England. It is the county town In the United Kingdom The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom (UK) ...
, coordinates = , location_map = Oxford (central) , homepage = , boat_club =
Exeter College Boat Club Exeter College Boat Club (ECBC) is the boat club of Exeter College, Oxford, England. The club trains on the Thames on the The Isis, Isis stretch in Oxford and at Abingdon, Oxfordshire. The Boat Club competes primarily in Torpids and Summer Ei ...
, JCR
JCR
, shield = Exeter College Oxford Coat Of Arms (Motto).svg , shield_size = 150px , blazon = ''Argent, two bends nebuly sable'' (arms of Stapledon) ''within a bordure of the last charged with eight pairs of keys, addorsed and interlaced in the rings, the wards upwards, or''. Exeter College (in full: The Rector and Scholars of Exeter College in the University of Oxford) is one of the
constituent colleges A collegiate university is a university in which functions are divided between a central administration and a number of constituent colleges. Historically, the first collegiate university was the University of Paris and its first college was the C ...
of the
University of Oxford The University of Oxford is a collegiate university, collegiate research university in Oxford, England. There is evidence of teaching as early as 1096, making it the oldest university in the English-speaking world and the List of oldest universit ...
in England and the fourth-oldest college of the university. The college is located on
Turl Street Turl Street is a historic street in central Oxford Oxford () is a city in England. It is the county town In the United Kingdom The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom (UK) ...
, where it was founded in 1314 by Devon-born
Walter de Stapledon Walter de Stapledon (or Stapeldon) (1 February 126114 October 1326) was Bishop of Exeter 1308–1326 and twice Lord High Treasurer of England, in 1320 and 1322. He founded Exeter College, Oxford and contributed liberally to the rebuilding of Ex ...
,
Bishop of Exeter The Bishop of Exeter is the Ordinary Ordinary or The Ordinary often refer to: Music * Ordinary (EP), ''Ordinary'' (EP) (2015), by South Korean group Beast * Ordinary (Every Little Thing album), ''Ordinary'' (Every Little Thing album) (2011) * ...
, as a school to educate clergymen. At its foundation Exeter was popular with the sons of the Devonshire gentry, though has since become associated with a much broader range of notable alumni, including
William Morris William Morris (24 March 1834 – 3 October 1896) was a British textile designer, poet, artist, novelist, architectural conservationist, printer, translator and socialist activist associated with the British Arts and Crafts Movement ...

William Morris
,
J. R. R. Tolkien John Ronald Reuel Tolkien (; 3 January 1892 – 2 September 1973) was an English writer, poet, philologist Philology is the study of language in oral and writing, written historical sources; it is the intersection of textual criticism, l ...
,
Richard Burton Richard Burton, (; born Richard Walter Jenkins Jr.; 10 November 19255 August 1984) was a Welsh People, Welsh actor. Noted for his baritone voice, Burton established himself as a formidable Shakespearean actor in the 1950s, and he gave a Richa ...

Richard Burton
,
Roger Bannister Sir Roger Gilbert Bannister (23 March 1929 – 3 March 2018) was an English middle-distance running, middle-distance athlete and neurologist who ran the first sub-Four-minute mile, 4-minute mile. At the 1952 Summer Olympics, 1952 Olympics in H ...

Roger Bannister
,
Alan Bennett Alan Bennett (born 9 May 1934) is an English actor, author, playwright, and screenwriter. He was born in Leeds Leeds is the largest city in the Ceremonial counties of England, county of West Yorkshire, England. Leeds is to the east of ...
, and
Philip Pullman Sir Philip Pullman, CBE The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is a British order of chivalry An order of chivalry, order of knighthood, chivalric order, or equestrian order is an order of knights typically founded during or ins ...
.


History

Still situated in its original location in
Turl Street Turl Street is a historic street in central Oxford Oxford () is a city in England. It is the county town In the United Kingdom The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom (UK) ...
, Exeter College was founded in 1314 by
Walter de Stapledon Walter de Stapledon (or Stapeldon) (1 February 126114 October 1326) was Bishop of Exeter 1308–1326 and twice Lord High Treasurer of England, in 1320 and 1322. He founded Exeter College, Oxford and contributed liberally to the rebuilding of Ex ...
of
Devon Devon (, archaically known as Devonshire) is a county A county is a geographical region of a country used for administrative or other purposesChambers Dictionary The ''Chambers Dictionary'' (''TCD'') was first published by William Ch ...

Devon
, Bishop of
Exeter Exeter () is a city in Devon Devon (, archaically known as Devonshire) is a county A county is a geographical region of a country used for administrative or other purposesChambers Dictionary The ''Chambers Dictionary'' (''TCD'') ...
and later treasurer to
Edward II Edward II (25 April 1284 – 21 September 1327), also called Edward of Caernarfon, was King of England This list of kings and queens of the begins with , who initially ruled , one of the which later made up modern England. A ...

Edward II
, as a school to educate clergy. During its first century, it was known as ''Stapeldon Hall'' and was significantly smaller, with just twelve to fourteen students. The college grew significantly from the 15th century onward, and began offering rooms to its students. The college motto is "Floreat Exon.", meaning "Let Exeter Flourish". In the 16th century, donations from Sir
William Petre Sir William Petre (c. 1505 – 1572) (pronounced ''Peter'') was Secretary of State (England), Secretary of State to three successive Tudor monarchs, namely Kings Henry VIII of England, Henry VIII, Edward VI of England, Edward VI and Queen Mary ...
, assumed to be an Exeter graduate, whose daughter
Dorothy Wadham Dorothy Wadham (; ''née'' Petre) (1534/1535 – 16 May 1618) was the wife of Nicholas Wadham (1531–1609), Nicholas Wadham (1531-1609) of Merryfield, Ilton, Merryfield in the parish of Ilton, Somerset and of Edge, Branscombe, Edge in the paris ...
(1534–1618) was a co-founder with her husband
Nicholas Wadham Nicholas Wadham may refer to: * Nicholas Wadham (1531–1609) * Nicholas Wadham (1472–1542) {{hndis, Wadham, Nicholas ...
(1531–1609) of
Wadham College Wadham College () is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford The University of Oxford is a collegiate university, collegiate research university in Oxford, England. There is evidence of teaching as early as 1096, making ...
, created the eight Petrean Fellowships, and further contributions from his son
John Petre, 1st Baron Petre John Petre, 1st Baron Petre (20 December 1549 – 11 October 1613) was an Kingdom of England, English Peerage, peer who lived during the Tudor period and early Stuart period. He and his family were recusants — people who adhered to the Roman ...
(1549–1613) helped to expand and transform the college. Sir John Acland (died 1620), a Devonshire gentleman, donated £800, which largely financed the building of a new dining hall, and also established two scholarships for poor students, the first to be created at the college. In a clever move by the bursar to fill the new buildings as they were completed, a significant number of noble Roman Catholic students were invited to enrol and take classes at the enlarged college; however, they were not allowed to
matriculate Matriculation is the formal process of entering a university, or of becoming eligible to enter by fulfilling certain academic requirements such as a matriculation examination. Australia In Australia, the term "matriculation" is seldom used now. ...

matriculate
. As a result, over time, Exeter College became one of the leading colleges in the university. In the 18th century the college experienced declining popularity, as did all of Oxford's other colleges. University reforms in the 1850s helped to end this period of stagnation.


Women at Exeter

For over six centuries after its founding, women were not permitted to study at Exeter, but in 1979 it joined many other men's colleges in admitting its first female students. In 1993 Exeter College became the first of the former all-male colleges to elect a woman,
Marilyn Butler Marilyn Speers Butler, Lady Butler, FRSA Fellowship of the Royal Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce (FRSA) is an award An award, sometimes called a distinction, is something given to a recipient as a token of r ...
, as its
rector Rector (Latin for the member of a vessel's crew who steers) may refer to: Style or title *Rector (ecclesiastical), a cleric who functions as an administrative leader in some Christian denominations *Rector (academia), a senior official in an educ ...
. When Butler's tenure expired in October 2004, the college elected another woman—
Frances Cairncross Dame Frances Anne Cairncross, (born 30 August 1944 in Otley Otley is a market town A market town is a European settlement that obtained by custom or royal charter, in the Middle Ages In the history of Europe The histor ...
, former senior editor of ''
The Economist ''The Economist'' is an international weekly newspaper A weekly newspaper is a general-news or current affairsCurrent affairs may refer to: Media * Current Affairs (magazine), ''Current Affairs'' (magazine), a bimonthly magazine of cult ...
''—as rector. In 2014, the author
J. K. Rowling Joanne Rowling ( ;Rowling, J.K. (16 February 2007). Accio Quote (accio-quote.org). Retrieved 28 April 2008. born 31 July 1965), better known by her pen name A pen name, also called a ''nom de plume'' () or a literary double, is a pseudonym ...
was elected an honorary fellow of the college.


Adelphi Wine Club

Formed in the 1850s, the Adelphi Wine Club is reputed to be one of the oldest three wine clubs in Oxford. The club draws its membership from undergraduates studying at Exeter College. It has been forcibly closed down by college authorities several times throughout its tumultuous existence and is currently believed to be dormant. The club was renowned for its extravagant dinners, and for excessive gambling after each meeting. One black ball was sufficient to exclude an undergraduate from membership. Beginning in 1923, the college forbade any student holding an exhibition or
scholarship A scholarship is an award of financial aid Student financial aid in the United States is funding that is available exclusively to students attending a Higher education in the United States, post-secondary educational institution in the Unite ...

scholarship
to join the club. Notable members include Sir Martin Le Quesne, and J.P.V.D. Balsdon.


Buildings

Exeter College is the basis for the fictional Jordan College in
Philip Pullman Sir Philip Pullman, CBE The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is a British order of chivalry An order of chivalry, order of knighthood, chivalric order, or equestrian order is an order of knights typically founded during or ins ...
's novel trilogy ''
His Dark Materials ''His Dark Materials'' is a trilogy A trilogy is a set of three works of art that are connected and can be seen either as a single work or as three individual works. They are commonly found in literature Literature broadly is any coll ...
''. The 2007 film version of the first novel, ''
The Golden Compass ''Northern Lights'' (titled ''The Golden Compass'' in North America and some other countries) is a Young adult fiction, young-adult fantasy novel by Philip Pullman, published in 1995 by Scholastic UK. Set in a parallel universes in fiction, p ...
'' (originally '' Northern Lights)'', used the college for location filming. The final episode of ''
Inspector Morse Detective A detective is an investigator, usually a member of a law enforcement agency. They often collect information to solve crimes by talking to witnesses and informants, collecting physical evidence, or searching records in databases. ...
'', based on the novel ''
The Remorseful Day ''The Remorseful Day'' is a crime fiction, crime novel by Colin Dexter, the last novel in the Inspector Morse series. The novel was adapted as the final episode in the Inspector Morse television series. Title The title derives from a line in the ...
'', was filmed in the college chapel and Front Quadrangle, where Morse has a heart attack.


Front Quadrangle

The Front Quadrangle sits on roughly the site of the medieval college, although of the earliest buildings, only Palmer's Tower in the north-eastern corner remains. Constructed in 1432, the tower, which was once the primary entrance to the college, now houses various offices and lodgings for fellows, and at its base is a memorial to members who were killed in the Second World War. The quadrangle is dominated by the chapel, designed by Sir
George Gilbert Scott Sir George Gilbert Scott (13 July 1811 – 27 March 1878), known as Sir Gilbert Scott, was a prolific English Gothic revival Gothic Revival (also referred to as Victorian Gothic, neo-Gothic, or Gothick) is an Architectural style, architect ...

George Gilbert Scott
and constructed in 1854–1860, which was heavily inspired by the
Sainte-Chapelle The Sainte-Chapelle (; en, Holy Chapel) is a royal chapel in the Gothic Gothic or Gothics may refer to: People and languages *Goths or Gothic people, the ethnonym of a group of East Germanic tribes **Gothic language, an extinct East Germanic ...

Sainte-Chapelle
in Paris. On the opposite side stands the hall, constructed in 1618, notable for its vaulted ceilings and numerous fine portraits, underneath which is the college bar. Building work over the following century resulted in the quadrangle taking on its current appearance in 1710. The Front Quadrangle also houses the Junior, Middle and Senior Common Rooms, as well as lodgings for fellows and undergraduates.


Margary quadrangle

The Margary quadrangle was completed in 1964 with the construction of the Thomas Wood building to commemorate the 650th anniversary of the college and named for
Ivan Margary Ivan Donald Margary, (1896–1976) was a British historian who, during his lifetime, became the leading authority on Roman roads in Britannia, Roman roads in Great Britain. He wrote numerous works on Roman roads of which his most influential an ...
, who paid for its restoration. The quadrangle also incorporates the rector's lodgings, designed by Gilbert Scott and constructed in 1864, and staircases nine, ten and eleven, also erected during the 19th century.


Fellows' Garden

A passageway from the Front Quadrangle leads through to the college's Fellows' Garden, in which stands the library, designed by Gilbert Scott in the 13th-century style. The area is also bounded on the left hand side by Convocation House, the Divinity School and the Bodleian Library, and on the right by Brasenose Lane. The Mound, situated at the end of the Garden, offers views over Radcliffe Square, including All Souls College and the Radcliffe Camera.


Cohen Quad

In 2007–2008, the college purchased the main site of
Ruskin College Ruskin College, originally known as Ruskin Hall, Oxford, is an independent educational institution in Oxford Oxford () is a city in England. It is the county town In the United Kingdom The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Nor ...
on
Walton Street Walton Street may refer to: * Walton Street, Oxford Walton Street is on the eastern edge of the Jericho, Oxford, Jericho district of central Oxford, England. Overview The street runs north from the western end of Beaumont Street and the nort ...
for £7 million. The buildings were redeveloped to designs by
Alison Brooks Architects Alison Brooks Royal Designer for Industry, RDI (born 1962)Rising Stars Profil ...
to provide a range of student bedrooms, teaching rooms, and study space. In 2017 Cohen Quad was formally opened, named for the parents of
Sir Ronald Cohen Sir Ronald Mourad Cohen (born 1 August 1945) is an Egyptian-born British businessman and political figure. He is the chairman of The Portland Trust and Bridges Ventures.Klion Forum with Sir Ronald Cohen: "Why Do We Need Social Capital Markets? ...
. The premises represent the college's largest physical expansion since the 14th century.


Student life

As one of the smaller Oxford colleges, Exeter has a reputation for having a close-knit student body. First-year undergraduates are housed on the college's Turl Street site, and there is dedicated graduate accommodation for the college on Iffley Road. As the university's fourth oldest college, a certain emphasis is placed on tradition, especially during special occasions such as the annual
Burns Night A Burns supper is a celebration of the life and poetry of the poet Robert Burns Robert Burns (25 January 175921 July 1796), also known familiarly as Rabbie Burns, the National Bard, Bard of Ayrshire, the Ploughman Poet and various othe ...
, a dinner in honour of the Scottish poet
Robert Burns Robert Burns (25 January 175921 July 1796), also known familiarly as Rabbie Burns, the National Bard, Bard of Ayrshire, the Ploughman Poet and various other names and epithet An epithet (, ) is a byname, or a descriptive term (word or phr ...

Robert Burns
, when a traditional meal of
haggis Haggis is a high-level reference programming language A programming language is a formal language In mathematics Mathematics (from Ancient Greek, Greek: ) includes the study of such topics as quantity (number theory), mathematical st ...

haggis
is served. The college's ties with
Williams College Williams College is a private Private or privates may refer to: Music * "In Private "In Private" was the third single in a row to be a charting success for United Kingdom, British singer Dusty Springfield, after an absence of nearly two ...
in the United States, as well as the generally international composition of the MCR makes the annual
Thanksgiving Thanksgiving is a national holiday A holiday is a day set aside by custom Custom may refer to: Sense: Customary * Convention (norm), a set of agreed, stipulated or generally accepted rules, norms, standards or criteria, often taking th ...

Thanksgiving
dinner a popular occasion.


Choir

Exeter has a mixed-voice choir, made up of 24 singers, which is administered, conducted and accompanied solely by the Organ Scholars. It is the only college in either Oxford or Cambridge where a choir, run entirely by the Organ Scholar, sings three services a week, and has been heard recently on a number of broadcasts for BBC Radio 4's ''
The Daily Service ''The Daily Service'' is a short Christianity, Christian service broadcast every weekday morning between 9.45 and 10.00 on BBC Radio 4 (long wave and Digital Audio Broadcasting, DAB). It was also broadcast on Radio 4's FM frequencies until 13th Sep ...
''. The college offers Choral and
Parry PARRY was an early example of a chatbot A chatbot or chatterbot is a software Software is a collection of instructions that tell a computer A computer is a machine that can be programmed to carry out sequences of arithmetic or lo ...

Parry
–Wood Organ Scholarships, and former Organ Scholars include Robert Sharpe (Director of Music,
York Minster The Cathedral and Metropolitical Church of Saint Peter in York, commonly known as York Minster, is the cathedral of York York is a cathedral city and unitary authority, unitary authority area, at the confluence of the rivers River Ouse, York ...

York Minster
),
Christopher Herrick Christopher George Herrick is an English pipe organ, organist. Early life Born in Bletchley, Buckinghamshire, Herrick was a boy chorister at St Paul's Cathedral and attended its choir school; he sang at the Coronation of the British monarch, c ...

Christopher Herrick
(International Concert Organist and former Organist,
Westminster Abbey Westminster Abbey, formally titled the Collegiate Church of Saint Peter at Westminster, is a large, mainly Gothic Gothic or Gothics may refer to: People and languages *Goths or Gothic people, the ethnonym of a group of East Germanic tribes ...

Westminster Abbey
), and
David Trendell David Robin Charles Trendell (17 August 1964, in Tavistock, Devon, England – 28 October 2014) was the English organist, lecturer and Director of Music at King's College London. He specialised in the music of William Byrd. Education Trendell was ...
(Director of Music,
King's College London King's College London (informally King's or KCL) is a public In public relations Public relations (PR) is the practice of managing and disseminating information from an individual or an organization An organization, or ...
), as well as Directors of Music at
Rugby Rugby may refer to: Sport * Rugby football in many forms: ** Rugby league: 13 players per side *** Masters Rugby League *** Mod league *** Rugby league nines *** Rugby league sevens *** Touch (sport) *** Wheelchair rugby league ** Rugby union: 1 ...
,
Charterhouse Charterhouse may refer to: * Charterhouse (monastery), of the Carthusian religious order Charterhouse may also refer to: Places * The Charterhouse, Coventry, a former monastery * Charterhouse School, an English public school in Surrey London ...
,
Sherborne Sherborne is a market town A market town is a European that obtained by custom or royal charter, in the , a market right, which allowed it to host a regular ; this distinguished it from a or . In Britain, small rural towns with a hin ...
, and Latymer Upper Schools.


Sports

Exeter students compete at a university level on the varsity teams and the college itself fields several teams on an intra-university college level, particularly in rowing, rugby, hockey, netball and cricket. In March 2014 Exeter College Association Football Club defeated St Catherine's College 2–1 in the final of the Cuppers tournament to lift the trophy for the first time in over 40 years. In December 2010 Exeter College Hockey Club won the men's intra-university premier division and competed on 8 March 2011 in the college
Varsity Match A varsity match is a fixture (especially of a sporting event or team) between two university teams, particularly University of Oxford, Oxford and University of Cambridge, Cambridge. The Scottish Varsity rugby union, rugby match between the Univers ...
against
St Catharine's College, Cambridge St Catharine's College is a Colleges of the University of Cambridge, constituent college of the University of Cambridge. Founded in 1473 as Katharine Hall, it adopted its current name in 1860. The college is nicknamed "Catz". The college is loc ...
at
Southgate Hockey Club Southgate Hockey Club is a field hockey Field hockey is a team sport A team sport includes any sport Sport pertains to any form of Competition, competitive physical activity or game that aims to use, maintain or improve physical ...
, London.


People associated with Exeter


Former students

Amongst Exeter's alumni are many writers, including
J. R. R. Tolkien John Ronald Reuel Tolkien (; 3 January 1892 – 2 September 1973) was an English writer, poet, philologist Philology is the study of language in oral and writing, written historical sources; it is the intersection of textual criticism, l ...
,
Martin Amis Martin Louis Amis (born 25 August 1949) is a British novelist, essayist, memoirist, and screenwriter. He is best known for his novels ''Money (novel), Money'' (1984) and ''London Fields (novel), London Fields'' (1989). He received the James Tait ...
and
Philip Pullman Sir Philip Pullman, CBE The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is a British order of chivalry An order of chivalry, order of knighthood, chivalric order, or equestrian order is an order of knights typically founded during or ins ...
;
Roger Bannister Sir Roger Gilbert Bannister (23 March 1929 – 3 March 2018) was an English middle-distance running, middle-distance athlete and neurologist who ran the first sub-Four-minute mile, 4-minute mile. At the 1952 Summer Olympics, 1952 Olympics in H ...

Roger Bannister
, the first man to run a mile in under four minutes; the actors
Richard Burton Richard Burton, (; born Richard Walter Jenkins Jr.; 10 November 19255 August 1984) was a Welsh People, Welsh actor. Noted for his baritone voice, Burton established himself as a formidable Shakespearean actor in the 1950s, and he gave a Richa ...

Richard Burton
and
Imogen Stubbs Imogen Stubbs, Lady Nunn (born 20 February 1961) is an English actress and writer. Her first leading part was in ''Privileged (1982 film), Privileged'' (1982), followed by ''A Summer Story'' (1988). Her first play, ''We Happy Few (play), We H ...
;
Liaquat Ali Khan Nawab#Nawabzada, Nawabzada Liaquat Ali Khan (''Navābzādā Liāqat Alī Khān'' , ur, ; October 1895 – 16 October 1951), widely known as Quaid-e-Millat (Leader of the Nation) and ''Shaheed-e-Millat'' ( ur, links=no, Martyr of the Natio ...

Liaquat Ali Khan
, the first prime minister of Pakistan,
John Kufuor John Kofi Agyekum Kufuor Order of the Bath, GCB (born 8 December 1938) is a Ghanaian politician who served as the President of Ghana from 7 January 2001 to 7 January 2009. He was also Chairperson of the African Union from 2007 to 2008. Kufuo ...

John Kufuor
, the former President of Ghana and
Pedro Pablo Kuczynski Pedro Pablo Kuczynski Godard (; born 3 October 1938), also known simply as PPK (), is a Peruvian economist, politician and public administrator who served as President of Peru The president of Peru ( es, link=no, Presidente del Perú), form ...

Pedro Pablo Kuczynski
, former president of Peru.


Academics and tutors

*
C.T. AtkinsonChristopher Thomas Atkinson (born on 6 September 1874 - died 18 February 1964) was the preeminent tutor for British military history at the University of Oxford in the first half of the twentieth century. Early life, education, and family Atkinson a ...
, Fellow and tutor in military history, 1898–1955. *
Frank Close Francis Edwin Close, (born 24 July 1945) is a particle physicist who is Emeritus Professor of Physics at the University of Oxford and a Fellow of Exeter College, Oxford. Education Close was a pupil at King's School, Peterborough (then a gram ...
* Cornelia Druțu *
Raymond Dwek Raymond Allen Dwek Order of the British Empire, CBE Fellow of the Royal Society, FRS Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry, FRSC (born 10 November 1941) is a scientist at the University of Oxford and co-founder of the biotechnology company Oxfo ...
*
Sandra Fredman Sandra Fredman British Academy#Fellowship, FBA, Queen's Counsel, QC (hon) is a professor of law in the Faculty of Law at the University of Oxford and a fellow of Pembroke College, Oxford. Early life and education Fredman was born in Johannesbu ...

Sandra Fredman
* William Gould * Michael Hart *
Elizabeth Jeffreys Elizabeth Jeffreys (born 22 July 1941) was Bywater and Sotheby Professor of Byzantine and Modern Greek Language and Literature, University of Oxford, and Fellow of Exeter College, Oxford, 1996–2006. She is now Emeritus Professor, and Emeritus F ...
* Eric Waldram Kemp – Fellow, tutor, and chaplain 1946–1969, later bishop of Chichester * Jacob Klein *
George Alfred Kolkhorst George Alfred Magee ('Colonel') Kolkhorst (1897–1958) was an Oxford Oxford () is a city in England. It is the county town In the United Kingdom The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United ...
– Reader in Spanish 1931–1958 *
John Maddicott John Robert Lewendon Maddicott, (born 22 July 1943) is an English historian who has published works on the political and social history of England English society comprises the group behaviour of the English people, and of collective soci ...
History History (from Greek#REDIRECT Greek Greek may refer to: Greece Anything of, from, or related to Greece Greece ( el, Ελλάδα, , ), officially the Hellenic Republic, is a country located in Southeast Europe. Its population is approxima ...

History
fellow *
George Rawlinson George Rawlinson (23 November 1812 – 6 October 1902) was a British scholar, historian, and Christian theologian #REDIRECT Christian theology #REDIRECT Christian theology Christian theology is the theology of Christianity, Christian belief ...
*
Andrew Steane Andrew Martin Steane is Professor of physics Physics is the natural science that studies matter, its Elementary particle, fundamental constituents, its Motion (physics), motion and behavior through Spacetime, space and time, and the rel ...
*
Magdi Wahba Magdi Wahba (1925–1991) was an Egyptian university professor, Johnsonian Samuel Johnson (18 September 1709  – 13 December 1784), often called Dr Johnson, was an English writer who made lasting contributions as a poet, playwright, ess ...
– Egyptian academic and lexicographer * Helen Watanabe-O'Kelly – Official fellow and tutor in
German German(s) may refer to: * Germany (of or related to) **Germania (historical use) * Germans, citizens of Germany, people of German ancestry, or native speakers of the German language ** For citizens of Germany, see also German nationality law **Ger ...


Rectors


References


External links


College website

JCR website

MCR website

Virtual Tour of Exeter College
{{Authority control 1314 establishments in England Buildings and structures of the University of Oxford Colleges of the University of Oxford Educational institutions established in the 14th century George Gilbert Scott buildings Grade I listed buildings in Oxford Grade I listed educational buildings