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Euramerica
Euramerica
(also known as Laurussia which is not to be confused with Laurasia, the Old Red Continent
Continent
or the Old Red Sandstone Continent) was a minor supercontinent created in the Devonian
Devonian
as the result of a collision between the Laurentian, Baltica, and Avalonia
Avalonia
cratons during the Caledonian orogeny, about 410 million years ago. In the Late Carboniferous, tropical rainforests lay over the equator of Euramerica. A major, abrupt change in vegetation occurred when the climate aridified. The forest fragmented and the lycopsids which dominated these wetlands thinned out, being replaced by opportunistic ferns. There was also a great loss of amphibian diversity and simultaneously the drier climate spurred the diversification of reptiles.[1]

Contents

1 Extent 2 Events by period 3 See also 4 References 5 External links

Extent[edit]

Euramerica
Euramerica
in the Devonian

Euramerica
Euramerica
became a part of the major supercontinent Pangaea
Pangaea
in the Permian. In the Jurassic, when Pangaea
Pangaea
rifted into two continents, Gondwana
Gondwana
and Laurasia, Euramerica
Euramerica
was a part of Laurasia. In the Cretaceous, Laurasia
Laurasia
split into the continents of North America and Eurasia. The Laurentian craton became a part of North America while Baltica
Baltica
became a part of Eurasia, and Avalonia
Avalonia
was split between the two. Events by period[edit]

Devonian: The first forests grew in the floodplain around the foothills of the Caledonian mountain range.[2] Carboniferous: Climate change devastated tropical rainforests, fragmenting the forests into isolated 'islands' and causing the extinction of many plant and animal species during the Carboniferous Rainforest Collapse (CRC). Permian: Euramerica
Euramerica
became a part of the supercontinent Pangaea. Jurassic: Pangaea
Pangaea
rifted into Gondwana
Gondwana
and Laurasia. Cretaceous: Laurasia
Laurasia
split into the continents of North America, Europe
Europe
and Asia.

See also[edit]

Continental drift Eurasia Main Uralian Fault

References[edit]

^ Sahney, Sarda; Benton, Michael J.; Falcon-Lang, Howard J. (2010). "Rainforest collapse triggered Pennsylvanian tetrapod diversification in Euramerica" (PDF). Geology. 38 (12): 1079–1082. doi:10.1130/G31182.1.  ^ "3. New Frontiers". Miracle Planet. National Board of Film (Canada) and NHK (Japan). 2006. Discovery Channel. 

External links[edit]

Palaeos Earth: Geography: Euramerica Paleogeographic globe of the Devonian
Devonian
Earth

v t e

Continents
Continents
of the world

   

Africa

Antarctica

Asia

Australia

Europe

North America

South America

   

Afro-Eurasia

America

Eurasia

Oceania

   

Former supercontinents Gondwana Laurasia Pangaea Pannotia Rodinia Columbia Kenorland Nena Sclavia Ur Vaalbara

Historical continents Amazonia Arctica Asiamerica Atlantica Avalonia Baltica Cimmeria Congo craton Euramerica Kalaharia Kazakhstania Laurentia North China Siberia South China East Antarctica India

   

Submerged continents Kerguelen Plateau Zealandia

Possible future supercontinents Pangaea
Pangaea
Ultima Amasia Novopangaea

Mythical and hypothesised continents Atlantis Kumari Kandam Lemuria Meropis Mu Hyperborea Terra Australis

See also Regions of the world Continental fragment

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