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The Info List - Elgin Baylor


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As player:

11× NBA All-Star
NBA All-Star
(1959–1965, 1967–1970) NBA All-Star
NBA All-Star
Game MVP (1959) 10× All-NBA First Team
All-NBA First Team
(1959–1965, 1967–1969) NBA Rookie of the Year (1959) NBA 35th Anniversary Team NBA 50th Anniversary All-Time Team No. 22 retired by Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Lakers NCAA Final Four Most Outstanding Player (1958) Helms Foundation Player of the Year (1958) Consensus first-team All-American (1958) Consensus second-team All-American (1957) NCAA rebounding leader (1957) No. 22 retired by Seattle University

As executive:

NBA Executive of the Year (2006)

Career statistics

Points 23,149 (27.4 ppg)

Rebounds 11,463 (13.5 rpg)

Assists 3,650 (4.3 apg)

Stats at Basketball-Reference.com

Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame as player

College Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame Inducted in 2006

Elgin Gay Baylor (born September 16, 1934) is an American former basketball player, coach, and executive. He played 14 seasons as a small forward in the National Basketball
Basketball
Association (NBA) for the Minneapolis / Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Lakers, appearing in eight NBA Finals. Baylor was a gifted shooter, strong rebounder, and an accomplished passer. Renowned for his acrobatic maneuvers on the court, Baylor regularly dazzled Lakers fans with his trademark hanging jump shots. The No. 1 draft pick in 1958, NBA Rookie of the Year in 1959, 11-time NBA All-Star, and a 10-time member of the All-NBA
All-NBA
first team, he is regarded as one of the game's all-time greatest players.[1] In 1977, Baylor was inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame.[2] Baylor spent 22 years as general manager of the Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Clippers. He won the NBA Executive of the Year Award
NBA Executive of the Year Award
in 2006, before being relieved of his duties shortly before the 2008–09 season began.[3] His popularity led to appearances on major network television series such as Rowan and Martin's Laugh In
Rowan and Martin's Laugh In
in 1968, The Jackson Five's first TV special in 1971 and a Buck Rogers in the 25th Century episode, "Olympiad", as one of the athletes.

Contents

1 Early life in Washington, D.C. 2 College career 3 NBA career

3.1 Rookie of the Year 3.2 Middle years 3.3 Retirement 3.4 Career achievements and legacy

4 NBA coach and executive

4.1 Head coaching record

5 NBA career statistics

5.1 Regular season 5.2 Playoffs

6 NBA highlights

6.1 Career highs

6.1.1 Regular season 6.1.2 Playoffs

7 See also

7.1 NBA 7.2 College

8 References 9 External links

Early life in Washington, D.C.[edit] Elgin "Rabbit" Baylor had two basketball-playing brothers, Sal and Kermit. After stints at Southwest Boys Club and Brown Jr. High, Baylor was a 3 time All City player in High School. Elgin played his first 2 years at Phelps Vocational High School in the 1951 and 1952 basketball seasons where he set his first area scoring record of 44 points vs Cardozo. During his 2 All City years at Phelps he averaged 18.5 and 27.6 points per season. He did not perform well academically and dropped out of school (1952–53) to work in a furniture store and to play basketball in the local recreational leagues. Baylor reappeared for the 1954 season playing for the newly opened Spingarn High School and the 6'5, 190 lb senior was named 1st team All Met and won the SSA's Livingstone Trophy as the Area's Best Basketball
Basketball
player for 1954. He finished with a 36.1 average for his 8 Interhigh Division II league games. On February 3, 1954 in a game against his old Phelps team, he scored 31 in the first half. Playing with 4 fouls the entire second half, Baylor scored 32 more points to establish a new DC area record with 63 points. This broke the point record of 52 that Western's Jim Wexler had set the year before when he broke Rabbit's record of 44 . College career[edit] An inadequate scholastic record kept him out of college until a friend arranged a scholarship at the College of Idaho, where he was expected to play basketball and football. After one season, the school dismissed the head basketball coach and restricted the scholarships. A Seattle car dealer interested Baylor in Seattle University, and Baylor sat out a year to play for Westside Ford, an AAU team in Seattle, while establishing eligibility at Seattle.[4] The Minneapolis Lakers drafted him in the 14th round of the 1956 NBA Draft
1956 NBA Draft
but Baylor opted to stay in school instead. Baylor led the Seattle University
Seattle University
Chieftains (now known as the Redhawks) to the NCAA championship game in 1958, falling to the Kentucky Wildcats, Seattle's last trip to the Final Four. Following his junior season, Baylor was drafted again by the Minneapolis Lakers with the #1 pick in the 1958 NBA Draft, and this time he opted to leave school to join them for the 1958–59 NBA season. In his three collegiate seasons, one at College of Idaho
College of Idaho
and two at Seattle, Baylor averaged 31.3 points per game. He led the NCAA in rebounds during the 1956–57 season.[5] Fifty-one years after Baylor left Seattle University, Seattle U named its basketball court in honor of him on November 19, 2009. The Redhawks now play on the Elgin Baylor
Elgin Baylor
Court in Seattle's KeyArena. College of Idaho
College of Idaho
has announced that Baylor will be one of the inaugural inductees into the school's Hall of Fame in June 2017. NBA career[edit] The Minneapolis Lakers
Minneapolis Lakers
used the No. 1 overall pick in the 1958 NBA draft to select Baylor, then convinced him to skip his senior year at SU and instead join the pro ranks. The team, several years removed from its glory days of George Mikan, was in trouble on the court and at the gate. The year prior to Baylor's arrival the Lakers finished 19–53 with a squad that was slow, bulky and aging. Baylor, whom the Lakers signed to play for $20,000 per year (a great amount of money at the time), was the franchise's last shot at survival. With his superb athletic talents and all-round game, Baylor was seen as the kind of player who could save a franchise, and he did. According to Minneapolis Lakers
Minneapolis Lakers
owner Bob Short in a 1971 interview with the Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Times: "If he had turned me down then, I would have been out of business. The club would have gone bankrupt." Rookie of the Year[edit] As a rookie in 1958–59, Baylor finished fourth in the league in scoring (24.9 points per game), third in rebounding (15.0 rebounds per game), and eighth in assists (4.1 assists per game). He registered 55 points in a single game, then the third-highest mark in league history behind Joe Fulks' 63 and Mikan's 61. Baylor won the NBA Rookie of the Year Award and led the Lakers from last place the previous year to the NBA finals, where they lost to the Boston Celtics in the first four-game sweep in finals history. Thus began the greatest rivalry in the history of the NBA. During his career, Baylor helped lead the Lakers to the NBA Finals
NBA Finals
seven more times. Middle years[edit] From the 1960–61 to the 1962–63 seasons, Baylor averaged 34.8, 38.3 and 34.0 points per game, respectively. On November 15 of the 1960–61 season, Baylor set a new NBA scoring record when he scored 71 points in a victory against the New York Knicks while grabbing 25 rebounds.[6] In doing so, Baylor had broken his own NBA record of 64 points that he had set in the previous season. Baylor, a United States Army Reservist, was called to active duty during the 1961–62 season, and being stationed in Washington state, he could play for the Lakers only when on a weekend pass. Despite playing only 48 games during the 1961–62 season, he still managed to score over 1,800 points. Later that season, in a game five NBA Finals
NBA Finals
victory against the Boston Celtics, Baylor grabbed 22 rebounds and set the still-standing NBA record for points in an NBA Finals
NBA Finals
game with 61. Baylor began to be hampered with knee problems during the 1963–64 season. The problems culminated in a severe knee injury, suffered during the 1965 Western Division playoffs. Baylor, while still a very powerful force, was never quite the same, never again averaging above 30 points per game. Retirement[edit] Baylor finally retired nine games into the 1971–72 season because of his nagging knee problems. The timing of his retirement could not have been worse as this caused him to coincidentally miss two great achievements. First, the Lakers' next game after his retirement was the first of an NBA record of 33 consecutive wins.[7] Second, the Lakers went on to win the NBA championship that season. The Lakers did give Baylor a championship ring, even though he had not been an active player.[8] Career achievements and legacy[edit] Baylor was the last of the great undersized forwards in a league where many guards are now his size or bigger. He finished his playing days with 23,149 points, 3,650 assists and 11,463 rebounds over 846 games. His signature running bank shot, which he was able to release quickly and effectively over taller players, led him to numerous NBA scoring records, several of which still stand. The 71 points Baylor scored on November 15, 1960 was a record at the time. The 61 points he scored in game 5 of the NBA Finals
NBA Finals
in 1962 is still an NBA Finals
NBA Finals
record. An underrated rebounder, Baylor averaged 13.5 rebounds per game during his career, including a remarkable 19.8 rebounds per game during the 1960–61 season – a season average exceeded by only five other players in NBA history, all of whom were 6'8" or taller. A 10-time All-NBA First Team
All-NBA First Team
selection and 11-time NBA All-Star, Baylor was elected to the Naismith Memorial Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame in 1977. He was named to the NBA 35th Anniversary All-Time Team in 1980 and the NBA 50th Anniversary All-Time Team in 1996. in 2009, SLAM Magazine ranked him number 11 among its Top 50 NBA players of all time. He is often listed as the greatest NBA player never to win a championship.[9][10][11] The first biography of Elgin Baylor
Elgin Baylor
was written by SLAM Online contributor Bijan C. Bayne, and published by Rowman and Littlefield. On April 6, 2018, Baylor appeared at Staples Center
Staples Center
as a VIP guest during the Lakers vs. Timberwolves game. A statue was unveiled in his honor prior to the event. NBA coach and executive[edit] In 1974, Baylor was hired to be an assistant coach and later the head coach for the New Orleans Jazz, but had a lackluster 86–135 record and retired following the 1978–79 season. In 1986, Baylor was hired by the Los Angeles Clippers
Los Angeles Clippers
as the team's vice president of basketball operations. He stayed in that capacity for 22 years before resigning in October 2008 at the age of 74. During his tenure, the Clippers managed only two winning seasons and amassed a win-loss record of 607 and 1153. They also won only one playoff series during this time. Baylor was selected as the NBA Executive of the Year in 2006. That year the Clippers won their first playoff series since 1976, when the franchise was located in Buffalo, New York, and named the Buffalo Braves. In February 2009, Baylor filed an employment discrimination lawsuit against the Clippers, team owner Donald Sterling, team president Andy Roeser, and the NBA. He alleged that he was underpaid during his tenure with the team and then fired because of his age and race.[12] Baylor later dropped the racial discrimination claims in the suit.[13] Baylor's remaining claims were rejected by a Los Angeles
Los Angeles
state court jury on March 30, 2011, by a unanimous 12–0 vote.[14] Head coaching record[edit]

Legend

Regular season G Games coached W Games won L Games lost W–L % Win–loss %

Post season PG Playoff games PW Playoff wins PL Playoff losses PW–L % Playoff win–loss %

Team Year G W L W–L% Finish PG PW PL PW–L% Result

New Orleans 1974–75 1 0 1 .000 (interim) – – – – –

New Orleans 1976–77 56 21 35 .375 5th in central – – – – Missed Playoffs

New Orleans 1977–78 82 39 43 .476 5th in central – – – – Missed Playoffs

New Orleans 1978–79 82 26 56 .317 6th in central – – – – Missed Playoffs

Career

221 86 135 .389

– – – –

NBA career statistics[edit]

Legend

  GP Games played   GS  Games started  MPG  Minutes per game

 FG%  Field goal percentage  3P%  3-point field goal percentage  FT%  Free throw
Free throw
percentage

 RPG  Rebounds per game  APG  Assists per game  SPG  Steals per game

 BPG  Blocks per game  PPG  Points per game  Bold  Career high

* Led the league

Regular season[edit]

Year Team GP MPG FG% FT% RPG APG PPG

1958–59 Minneapolis 70 40.8 .408 .777 15.0 4.1 24.9

1959–60 Minneapolis 70 41.0 .424 .732 16.4 3.5 29.6

1960–61 L.A. Lakers 73 42.9 .430 .783 19.8 5.1 34.8

1961–62 L.A. Lakers 48 44.4 .428 .754 18.6 4.6 38.3

1962–63 L.A. Lakers 80 42.1 .453 .837 14.3 4.8 34.0

1963–64 L.A. Lakers 78 40.6 .425 .804 12.0 4.4 25.4

1964–65 L.A. Lakers 74 41.3 .401 .792 12.8 3.8 27.1

1965–66 L.A. Lakers 65 30.4 .401 .739 9.6 3.4 16.6

1966–67 L.A. Lakers 70 38.7 .429 .813 12.8 3.1 26.6

1967–68 L.A. Lakers 77 39.3 .443 .786 12.2 4.6 26.0

1968–69 L.A. Lakers 76 40.3 .447 .743 10.6 5.4 24.8

1969–70 L.A. Lakers 54 41.0 .486 .773 10.4 5.4 24.0

1970–71 L.A. Lakers 2 28.5 .421 .667 5.5 1.0 10.0

1971–72 L.A. Lakers 9 26.6 .433 .815 6.3 2.0 11.8

Career 846 40.0 .431 .780 13.5 4.3 27.4

All-Star 11 29.2 .427 .796 9.0 3.5 19.8

Playoffs[edit]

Year Team GP MPG FG% FT% RPG APG PPG

1959 Minneapolis 13 42.8 .403 .770 12.0 3.3 25.5

1960 Minneapolis 9 45.3 .474 .840 14.1 3.4 33.4*

1961 L.A. Lakers 12 45.0 .470 .824 15.3 4.6 38.1*

1962 L.A. Lakers 13 43.9 .438 .774 17.7 3.6 38.6*

1963 L.A. Lakers 13 43.2 .442 .825 13.6 4.5 32.6*

1964 L.A. Lakers 5 44.2 .378 .775 11.6 5.6 24.2

1965 L.A. Lakers 1 5.0 .000 – 0.0 1.0 0.0

1966 L.A. Lakers 14 41.9 .442 .810 14.1 3.7 26.8

1967 L.A. Lakers 3 40.3 .368 .750 13.0 3.0 23.7

1968 L.A. Lakers 15 42.2 .468 .679 14.5 4.0 28.5

1969 L.A. Lakers 18 35.6 .385 .630 9.2 4.1 15.4

1970 L.A. Lakers 18 37.1 .466 .741 9.6 4.6 18.7

Career 134 41.1 .439 .769 12.9 4.0 27.0

NBA highlights[edit]

NBA Rookie of the Year (1959) All-NBA First Team
All-NBA First Team
10 times (1959–65, 1967–69) Eleven-time NBA All-Star
NBA All-Star
(1959–65, 1967–70) NBA All-Star
NBA All-Star
Game Co-MVP (1959) Holds NBA Finals
NBA Finals
single-game record for most points (61) on April 14, 1962 against the Boston Celtics Scored 71 points (8th highest in history) against the New York Knicks (November 15, 1960) No. 4 all-time with 87 regular season 40-point games[15] Scored 23,149 points in only 846 games (27.4 points per game, fourth best all-time) and averaged 30 points or more three times (1961–63) Retired as NBA's third all-time leading scorer Retired as fifth leading scorer in All-Star Game history (19.8 points per game) Ranked sixth in NBA Finals
NBA Finals
all-time scoring (26.4 in 44 games) Ranked seventh in NBA playoffs all-time scoring (27.0 in 134 games) NBA 35th Anniversary Team
NBA 35th Anniversary Team
(1980) NBA 50th Anniversary Teams (1996) NBA Executive of the Year (2006)

Career highs[edit] Regular season[edit]

Stat High Opponent Date

Points 71 at New York Knicks 000000001960-11-15-0000November 15, 1960

Points 64 vs. Boston Celtics 000000001959-11-08-0000November 8, 1959

Points 63 (3 OT) at Philadelphia Warriors 000000001961-12-08-0000December 8, 1961

Points, quarter 24

Field goal percentage

Field goals made 28 at New York Knicks 000000001960-11-15-0000November 15, 1960

Field goals attempted 55 (3 OT) at Philadelphia Warriors 000000001961-12-08-0000December 8, 1961

Free throws made, none missed 16–16 vs. Syracuse Nationals 000000001960-11-05-0000November 5, 1960

Free throws made, one miss 20–21 at St. Louis Hawks 000000001962-12-21-0000December 21, 1962

Free throws made 20 at St. Louis Hawks 000000001962-12-21-0000December 21, 1962

Free throws attempted 24 (3 OT) at Philadelphia Warriors 000000001961-12-08-0000December 8, 1961

Rebounds 31 vs. Philadelphia Warriors 000000001958-11-06-0000November 6, 1958

Rebounds 31 (3 OT) at Philadelphia Warriors 000000001961-12-08-0000December 8, 1961

Rebounds 30 vs. Cincinnati Royals 000000001961-01-14-0000January 14, 1961

Assists 16 vs. Phoenix Suns 000000001969-02-09-0000February 9, 1969

Minutes played

Playoffs[edit]

Stat High Opponent Date

Points 61 at Boston Celtics 000000001962-04-14-0000April 14, 1962

Points 49 vs. Detroit Pistons 000000001961-03-15-0000March 15, 1961

Field goal percentage

Field goals made 22 at Boston Celtics 000000001962-04-14-0000April 14, 1962

Field goals attempted 46 at Boston Celtics 000000001962-04-14-0000April 14, 1962

Field goals attempted 45 at St. Louis Hawks 000000001961-03-27-0000March 27, 1961

Free throws made, none missed 15–15 at St. Louis Hawks 000000001960-03-26-0000March 26, 1960

Free throws made 18 at St. Louis Hawks 000000001960-03-17-0000March 17, 1960

Free throws attempted 23 at St. Louis Hawks 000000001960-03-17-0000March 17, 1960

Rebounds 23 vs. Boston Celtics 000000001962-04-10-0000April 10, 1962

Rebounds 23 vs. Boston Celtics 000000001963-04-17-0000April 17, 1963

Rebounds 23 vs. Chicago Bulls 000000001968-03-24-0000March 24, 1968

Assists 12 vs. Atlanta Hawks 000000001969-04-20-0000April 20, 1969

Minutes played 53 (OT)

See also[edit] NBA[edit]

List of National Basketball
Basketball
Association career scoring leaders List of National Basketball
Basketball
Association career rebounding leaders List of National Basketball
Basketball
Association career free throw scoring leaders List of National Basketball
Basketball
Association career playoff scoring leaders List of National Basketball
Basketball
Association career playoff rebounding leaders List of National Basketball
Basketball
Association career playoff free throw scoring leaders List of National Basketball
Basketball
Association players with most points in a game List of National Basketball
Basketball
Association players with 50 or more points in a playoff game

College[edit]

List of NCAA Division I men's basketball season rebounding leaders List of NCAA Division I men's basketball career rebounding leaders List of NCAA Division I men's basketball players with 30 or more rebounds in a game List of NCAA Division I men's basketball players with 2000 points and 1000 rebounds List of NCAA Division I men's basketball players with 60 or more points in a game

References[edit]

^ "Elgin Baylor: Complete Bio". nba.com. Retrieved 2008-02-03.  ^ "Hall of Famers". Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame. Archived from the original on 2011-02-15. Retrieved 2009-08-02.  ^ "Clippers players shocked Baylor is out". Ocregister.com. Retrieved 2017-03-11.  ^ NBA Register: 1986–87 Edition. The Sporting News Publishing Company. 1986. p. 287. ISBN 9780892042272.  ^ NBA Register: 1986–87 Edition. The Sporting News Publishing Company. 1986. p. 289. ISBN 9780892042272.  ^ "Elgin Baylor". nba.com. Retrieved August 10, 2010.  ^ "Top 10 Teams In NBA History: 1971–72 Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Lakers". nba.com. Retrieved 2008-02-03.  ^ Dave McKenna (May 30, 2013). "An Unfamiliar Ring". Grantland. Retrieved May 31, 2013.  ^ "The 10 Greatest NBA Players With No Championship Jewelry". Dimemag.com. Retrieved 2017-03-11.  ^ Barry Petchesky. "The Greatest NBA Player To Never Win A Title Is Auctioning Off His Championship Ring. (What?)". Deadspin.com. Retrieved 2017-03-11.  ^ "Wisch: Top 5 Players To Never Win An NBA Title « CBS Chicago". Chicago.cbslocal.com. 2012-06-14. Retrieved 2017-03-11.  ^ Elgin Baylor
Elgin Baylor
Sues Los Angeles Clippers
Los Angeles Clippers
for Employment Discrimination ESPN.com, February 11, 2009. ^ Lance Pugmire (2011-03-04). " Elgin Baylor
Elgin Baylor
drops racial discrimination claim in suit against L.A. Clippers". Articles.latimes.com. Retrieved 2017-03-11.  ^ Lance Pugmire, "Elgin Baylor's lawsuit rejected by Los Angeles County jury", Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Times, March 30, 2011. ^ The Official NBA Basketball
Basketball
Encyclopedia. Villard Books. 1994. p. 382. ISBN 0-679-43293-0. 

External links[edit]

Find more aboutElgin Baylorat's sister projects

Media from Wikimedia Commons Quotations from Wikiquote Data from Wikidata

Career statistics and player information from Basketball-Reference.com NBA.com bio Elgin Baylor
Elgin Baylor
at the Naismith Memorial Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame

Elgin Baylor—coaching tenures, awards and honors

v t e

Utah Jazz head coaches

Scotty Robertson (1974) Elgin Baylor
Elgin Baylor
(1974) Butch van Breda Kolff (1974–1976) Elgin Baylor
Elgin Baylor
(1976–1979) Tom Nissalke (1979–1981) Frank Layden (1981–1988) Jerry Sloan
Jerry Sloan
(1988–2011) Tyrone Corbin
Tyrone Corbin
(2011–2014) Quin Snyder
Quin Snyder
(2014– )

v t e

NBA on CBS

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Basketball
on CBS

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Ratings

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Commentators

All-Star Game NBA Finals

Key figures

Gary Bender Tim Brant Bob Costas Don Criqui Eddie Doucette Frank Glieber Greg Gumbel Jim Kelly Verne Lundquist Brent Musburger Andy Musser Jim Nantz Don Robertson Dick Stockton Pat Summerall

Color commentators

John Andariese Rick Barry Hubie Brown Elgin Baylor James Brown Quinn Buckner Doug Collins Billy Cunningham Terry Dischinger Len Elmore Keith Erickson John Havlicek Tom Heinsohn Rod Hundley Gus Johnson Steve Jones Sonny Jurgensen Stu Lantz Kevin Loughery Pete Maravich Jon McGlocklin Dick Motta Jeff Mullins Billy Packer Bill Raftery Cal Ramsey Oscar Robertson Mendy Rudolph Bill Russell Cazzie Russell Larry Steele Lenny Wilkens

Sideline reporters

Charlsie Cantey Jane Chastain Irv Cross Jim Gray Sonny Hill Andrea Joyce Pat O'Brien Lesley Visser

NBA Finals

1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990

All-Star Game

1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990

Lore

Music "The Bad Boys" Christmas Day "The Greatest Game Ever Played" "The Shot"

Rivalries

Celtics–Lakers Lakers–Pistons

v t e

NCAA Division I men's basketball season rebounding leaders

1951: Beck 1952: Hannon 1953: Conlin 1954: Quimby 1955: Slack 1956: Holup 1957: Baylor 1958: Ellis 1959: Wright 1960: Wright 1961: Lucas 1962: Lucas 1963: Silas 1964: Pelkington 1965: Kimball 1966: Ware 1967: Cunningham 1968: Walk 1969: Haywood 1970: Gilmore 1971: Gilmore 1972: Washington 1973: Washington 1974: Barnes 1975: Irving 1976: Pellom 1977: Mosley 1978: K. Williams 1979: Davis 1980: Smith 1981: Watson 1982: Thompson 1983: McDaniel 1984: Olajuwon 1985: McDaniel 1986: Robinson 1987: Lane 1988: Miller 1989: Gathers 1990: Bonner 1991: O'Neal 1992: Jones 1993: Kidd 1994: Lambert 1995: Thomas 1996: Mann 1997: Duncan 1998: Perryman 1999: McGinnis 2000: Phillip 2001: Marcus 2002: Bishop 2003: Hunter 2004: Millsap 2005: Millsap 2006: Millsap 2007: Jones-Jennings 2008: Beasley 2009: Griffin 2010: Parakhouski 2011: Faried 2012: Anosike 2013: Anosike 2014: A. Williams 2015: A. Williams 2016: Mockevičius 2017: Delgado 2018: Cacok

v t e

Helms Foundation College Basketball
Basketball
Player of the Year

1905: Steinmetz 1906: Grebenstein 1907: Kinney 1908: Keinath 1909: Schommer 1910: Page 1911: Kiendl 1912: Stangel 1913: Calder 1914: Halstead 1915: Houghton 1916: Levis 1917: Woods 1918: Chandler 1919: Platou 1920: Cann 1921: Williams 1922: Carney 1923: Endacott 1924: Black 1925: Mueller 1926: Cobb 1927: Hanson 1928: Holt 1929: C. Thompson 1930: Hyatt 1931: Carlton 1932: Wooden 1933: Sale 1934: Bennett 1935: Edwards 1936: Moir 1937: Luisetti 1938: Luisetti 1939: Jaworski 1940: Glamack 1941: Glamack 1942: Modzelewski 1943: Senesky 1944: Mikan 1945: Mikan 1946: Kurland 1947: Tucker 1948: Macauley 1949: Lavelli 1950: Arizin 1951: Groat 1952: Lovellette 1953: Houbregs 1954: Gola 1955: B. Russell 1956: B. Russell 1957: Rosenbluth 1958: Baylor 1959: Robertson 1960: Robertson 1961: Lucas 1962: Hogue 1963: Heyman 1964: Hazzard 1965: Bradley & Goodrich 1966: C. Russell 1967: Alcindor 1968: Alcindor 1969: Alcindor 1970: Maravich & Wicks 1971: Carr & Wicks 1972: Walton 1973: Walton 1974: D. Thompson 1975: D. Thompson 1976: Benson & May 1977: Johnson 1978: Givens 1979: Bird

v t e

1957 NCAA Men's Basketball
Basketball
Consensus All-Americans

First Team

Wilt Chamberlain Chet Forte Rod Hundley Jim Krebs Lennie Rosenbluth Charlie Tyra

Second Team

Elgin Baylor Frank Howard Guy Rodgers Gary Thompson Grady Wallace

v t e

1958 NCAA Men's Basketball
Basketball
Consensus All-Americans

First Team

Elgin Baylor Bob Boozer Wilt Chamberlain Don Hennon Oscar Robertson Guy Rodgers

Second Team

Pete Brennan Archie Dees Mike Farmer Dave Gambee Bailey Howell

v t e

NCAA Men's Division I Basketball
Basketball
Tournament Most Outstanding Player

1939: Hull 1940: Huffman 1941: Kotz 1942: Dallmar 1943: Sailors 1944: Ferrin 1945: Kurland 1946: Kurland 1947: Kaftan 1948: Groza 1949: Groza 1950: Dambrot 1951: Spivey 1952: Lovellette 1953: Born 1954: Gola 1955: Russell 1956: Lear 1957: Chamberlain 1958: Baylor 1959: West 1960: Lucas 1961: Lucas 1962: Hogue 1963: Heyman 1964: Hazzard 1965: Bradley 1966: Chambers 1967: Alcindor 1968: Alcindor 1969: Alcindor 1970: Wicks 1971: Porter * 1972: Walton 1973: Walton 1974: Thompson 1975: Washington 1976: Benson 1977: Lee 1978: Givens 1979: Johnson 1980: Griffith 1981: Thomas 1982: Worthy 1983: Olajuwon 1984: Ewing 1985: Pinckney 1986: Ellison 1987: Smart 1988: Manning 1989: Rice 1990: Hunt 1991: Laettner 1992: Hurley 1993: Williams 1994: Williamson 1995: O'Bannon 1996: Delk 1997: Simon 1998: Sheppard 1999: Hamilton 2000: Cleaves 2001: Battier 2002: Dixon 2003: Anthony 2004: Okafor 2005: May 2006: Noah 2007: Brewer 2008: Chalmers 2009: Ellington 2010: Singler 2011: Walker 2012: Davis 2013: Hancock 2014: Napier 2015: Jones 2016: Arcidiacono 2017: Berry II 2018: DiVincenzo

*Ruled ineligible after tournament

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1958 NBA Draft

Territorial pick

Guy Rodgers

First round

Elgin Baylor Archie Dees Mike Farmer Pete Brennan Connie Dierking Dave Gambee Bennie Swain

Second round

Steve Hamilton Vernon Hatton Barney Cable Joe Quigg Lloyd Sharrar Hal Greer Hub Reed Jimmy Smith

v t e

NBA first overall draft picks

1947: McNeely 1948: Tonkovich 1949: Shannon 1950: Share 1951: Melchiorre 1952: Workman 1953: Felix 1954: Selvy 1955: Ricketts 1956: Green 1957: Hundley 1958: Baylor 1959: Boozer 1960: Robertson 1961: Bellamy 1962: McGill 1963: Heyman 1964: Barnes 1965: Hetzel 1966: Russell 1967: Walker 1968: Hayes 1969: Alcindor 1970: Lanier 1971: Carr 1972: L. Martin 1973: Collins 1974: Walton 1975: D. Thompson 1976: Lucas 1977: Benson 1978: M. Thompson 1979: E. Johnson 1980: Carroll 1981: Aguirre 1982: Worthy 1983: Sampson 1984: Olajuwon 1985: Ewing 1986: Daugherty 1987: D. Robinson 1988: Manning 1989: Ellison 1990: Coleman 1991: L. Johnson 1992: O'Neal 1993: Webber 1994: G. Robinson 1995: Smith 1996: Iverson 1997: Duncan 1998: Olowokandi 1999: Brand 2000: K. Martin 2001: Brown 2002: Yao 2003: James 2004: Howard 2005: Bogut 2006: Bargnani 2007: Oden 2008: Rose 2009: Griffin 2010: Wall 2011: Irving 2012: Davis 2013: Bennett 2014: Wiggins 2015: Towns 2016: Simmons 2017: Fultz

v t e

NBA Rookie of the Year Award

1953: Meineke 1954: Felix 1955: Pettit 1956: Stokes 1957: Heinsohn 1958: Sauldsberry 1959: Baylor 1960: Chamberlain 1961: Robertson 1962: Bellamy 1963: Dischinger 1964: Lucas 1965: Reed 1966: Barry 1967: Bing 1968: Monroe 1969: Unseld 1970: Alcindor 1971: Cowens & Petrie 1972: Wicks 1973: McAdoo 1974: DiGregorio 1975: Wilkes 1976: Adams 1977: Dantley 1978: Davis 1979: Ford 1980: Bird 1981: Griffith 1982: Williams 1983: Cummings 1984: Sampson 1985: Jordan 1986: Ewing 1987: Person 1988: Jackson 1989: Richmond 1990: Robinson 1991: Coleman 1992: Johnson 1993: O'Neal 1994: Webber 1995: Hill & Kidd 1996: Stoudamire 1997: Iverson 1998: Duncan 1999: Carter 2000: Brand & Francis 2001: Miller 2002: Gasol 2003: Stoudemire 2004: James 2005: Okafor 2006: Paul 2007: Roy 2008: Durant 2009: Rose 2010: Evans 2011: Griffin 2012: Irving 2013: Lillard 2014: Carter-Williams 2015: Wiggins 2016: Towns 2017: Brogdon

v t e

NBA All-Star
NBA All-Star
Game Most Valuable Player Award

1951: Macauley 1952: Arizin 1953: Mikan 1954: Cousy 1955: Sharman 1956: Pettit 1957: Cousy 1958: Pettit 1959: Baylor & Pettit 1960: Chamberlain 1961: Robertson 1962: Pettit 1963: Russell 1964: Robertson 1965: Lucas 1966: A. Smith 1967: Barry 1968: Greer 1969: Robertson 1970: Reed 1971: Wilkens 1972: West 1973: Cowens 1974: Lanier 1975: Frazier 1976: Bing 1977: Erving 1978: R. Smith 1979: Thompson 1980: Gervin 1981: Archibald 1982: Bird 1983: Erving 1984: Thomas 1985: Sampson 1986: Thomas 1987: Chambers 1988: Jordan 1989: Malone 1990: Johnson 1991: Barkley 1992: Johnson 1993: Stockton & Malone 1994: Pippen 1995: Richmond 1996: Jordan 1997: Rice 1998: Jordan 1999: No game played 2000: O'Neal & Duncan 2001: Iverson 2002: Bryant 2003: Garnett 2004: O'Neal 2005: Iverson 2006: James 2007: Bryant 2008: James 2009: Bryant & O'Neal 2010: Wade 2011: Bryant 2012: Durant 2013: Paul 2014: Irving 2015: Westbrook 2016: Westbrook 2017: Davis

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NBA Executive of the Year Award

1973: Axelson 1974: Donovan 1975: Vertlieb 1976: J. Colangelo 1977: Patterson 1978: Drossos 1979: Ferry 1980: Auerbach 1981: J. Colangelo 1982: Ferry 1983: Volchok 1984: Layden 1985: Boryla 1986: Kasten 1987: Kasten 1988: Krause 1989: J. Colangelo 1990: Bass 1991: Buckwalter 1992: Embry 1993: J. Colangelo 1994: Whitsitt 1995: West 1996: Krause 1997: Bass 1998: Embry 1999: Petrie 2000: Gabriel 2001: Petrie 2002: Thorn 2003: Dumars 2004: West 2005: B. Colangelo 2006: Baylor 2007: B. Colangelo 2008: Ainge 2009: Warkentien 2010: Hammond 2011: Forman & Riley 2012: Bird 2013: Ujiri 2014: Buford 2015: Myers 2016: Buford 2017: Myers

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NBA 35th Anniversary Team

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar Elgin Baylor Wilt Chamberlain Bob Cousy Julius Erving John Havlicek George Mikan Bob Pettit Oscar Robertson Bill Russell Jerry West

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National Basketball
Basketball
Association's 50 Greatest Players in NBA History

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar Nate Archibald Paul Arizin Charles Barkley Rick Barry Elgin Baylor Dave Bing Larry Bird Wilt Chamberlain Bob Cousy Dave Cowens Billy Cunningham Dave DeBusschere Clyde Drexler Julius Erving Patrick Ewing Walt Frazier George Gervin Hal Greer John Havlicek Elvin Hayes Magic Johnson Sam Jones Michael Jordan Jerry Lucas Karl Malone Moses Malone Pete Maravich Kevin McHale George Mikan Earl Monroe Hakeem Olajuwon Shaquille O'Neal Robert Parish Bob Pettit Scottie Pippen Willis Reed Oscar Robertson David Robinson Bill Russell Dolph Schayes Bill Sharman John Stockton Isiah Thomas Nate Thurmond Wes Unseld Bill Walton Jerry West Lenny Wilkens James Worthy

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Naismith Memorial Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame Class of 1977

Players

Elgin Baylor Laddie Gale Skinny Johnson

Coaches

Frank McGuire

Contributors

Tarzan Cooper

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Members of the Naismith Memorial Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame

Players

Guards

R. Allen Archibald Beckman Belov Bing Blazejowski Borgmann Brennan Cervi Cheeks Clayton Cooper-Dyke Cousy Dampier Davies Drexler Dumars Edwards Frazier Friedman Galis Gervin Goodrich Greer Guerin Hanson Haynes Holman Hyatt Isaacs Iverson Jeannette D. Johnson E. Johnson K. Jones S. Jones Jordan Kidd Lieberman Maravich Marcari Marčiulionis Martin McDermott McGrady D. McGuire Meyers R. Miller Monroe C. Murphy Nash Page Payton Petrović Phillip Posey Richmond Robertson Rodgers Roosma J. Russell Schommer Scott Sedran Sharman K. Smith Staley Steinmetz Stockton Swoopes Thomas Thompson Vandivier Wanzer West J. White Wilkens Woodard Wooden

Forwards

Arizin Barkley Barry Baylor Bird Bradley R. Brown Cunningham Curry Dalipagić Dantley DeBusschere Dehnert Endacott English Erving Foster Fulks Gale Gates Gola Hagan Havlicek Hawkins Hayes Haywood Heinsohn Hill Howell G. Johnson King Lucas Luisetti K. Malone McClain B. McCracken J. McCracken McGinnis McHale Mikkelsen C. Miller Mullin Pettit Pippen Pollard Radja Ramsey Rodman Schayes E. Schmidt O. Schmidt Stokes C. Thompson T. Thompson Twyman Walker Washington N. White Wilkes Wilkins Worthy Yardley

Centers

Abdul-Jabbar Barlow Beaty Bellamy Chamberlain Ćosić Cowens Crawford Daniels DeBernardi Donovan Ewing Gallatin Gilmore Gruenig Harris-Stewart Houbregs Issel W. Johnson Johnston M. Krause Kurland Lanier Leslie Lovellette Lapchick Macauley M. Malone McAdoo Meneghin Mikan Mourning S. Murphy Mutombo Olajuwon O'Neal Parish Pereira Reed Risen Robinson B. Russell Sabonis Sampson Semjonova Thurmond Unseld Wachter Walton Yao

Coaches

Alexeeva P. Allen Anderson Auerbach Auriemma Barmore Barry Blood Boeheim L. Brown Calhoun Calipari Cann Carlson Carnesecca Carnevale Carril Case Chancellor Chaney Conradt Crum Daly Dean Díaz-Miguel Diddle Drake Driesell Ferrándiz Gaines Gamba Gardner Gaze Gill Gomelsky Gunter Hannum Harshman Haskins Hatchell Heinsohn Hickey Hobson Holzman Hughes Hurley Iba Izzo P. Jackson Julian Keaney Keogan Knight Krzyzewski Kundla Lambert Leonard Lewis Litwack Loeffler Lonborg Magee McCutchan McGraw A. McGuire F. McGuire McLendon Meanwell Meyer Miller Moore Nelson Nikolić Novosel Olson Pitino Ramsay Richardson Riley Rubini Rupp Rush Sachs Self Sharman Shelton Sloan D. Smith Stringer Summitt Tarkanian Taylor Teague J. Thompson VanDerveer Wade Watts Wilkens G. Williams R. Williams Wooden Woolpert Wootten Yow

Contributors

Abbott Barksdale Bee Biasone H. Brown W. Brown Bunn Buss Clifton Colangelo Cooper Davidson Douglas Duer Embry Fagan Fisher Fleisher Gavitt Gottlieb Granik Gulick Harrison Hearn Henderson Hepp Hickox Hinkle Irish M. Jackson Jernstedt Jones Kennedy Knight J. Krause Lemon Liston Lloyd McLendon Lobo Mokray Morgan Morgenweck Naismith Newell Newton J. O'Brien L. O'Brien Olsen Podoloff Porter Raveling Reid Reinsdorf Ripley Sanders Saperstein Schabinger St. John Stagg Stanković Steitz Stern Taylor Thorn Tower Trester Vitale Wells Welts Wilke Winter Zollner

Referees

Bavetta Enright Garretson Hepbron Hoyt Kennedy Leith Mihalik Nichols Nucatola Quigley Rudolph Shirley Strom Tobey Walsh

Teams

1960 United States Olympic Team 1992 United States Olympic Team All-American Red Heads Buffalo Germans The First Team Harlem Globetrotters Immaculata College New York Renaissance Original Celtics Texas Western

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Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Lakers

Founded in 1947 Played in Minneapolis (1947–1960) Based in Los Angeles, California

Franchise

Franchise Team history All-time roster Draft history Seasons Records Head coaches Current season

Arenas

Minneapolis Auditorium Minneapolis Armory Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Memorial Sports Arena The Forum Staples Center

G League affiliate

South Bay Lakers

Administration

Jeanie, Jim, and Johnny Buss (majority owners) Anschutz Entertainment Group
Anschutz Entertainment Group
(minority owner) Ed Roski Jr. (minority owner) Patrick Soon-Shiong (minority owner) Magic Johnson
Magic Johnson
(President of Basketball
Basketball
Operations) Rob Pelinka
Rob Pelinka
(General manager) Luke Walton
Luke Walton
(Head coach)

Retired numbers

8 13 22 24 25 32 33 34 42 44 52 Chick Hearn
Chick Hearn
(Microphone)

Minneapolis Lakers
Minneapolis Lakers
Hall of Famers Mikan Mikkelsen Martin Lovellette Pollard Coach Kundla

NBA Championships (16)

1949 1950 1952 1953 1954 1972 1980 1982 1985 1987 1988 2000 2001 2002 2009 2010

Western Conference Championships (31)

1949 1950 1952 1953 1954 1959 1962 1963 1965 1966 1968 1969 1970 1972 1973 1980 1982 1983 1984 1985 1987 1988 1989 1991 2000 2001 2002 2004 2008 2009 2010

Rivalries

Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Clippers San Antonio Spurs Boston Celtics Detroit Pistons

Culture and lore

Jack Kent Cooke Jerry Buss Showtime Chick Hearn Shaq–Kobe feud Lawrence Tanter Jack Nicholson "I Love L.A." Laker Girls Laker Band Dancing Barry Celtics/Lakers: Best of Enemies

Media

TV Spectrum SportsNet (Los Angeles) Radio 710 ESPN Radio 1330 ESPN Deportes Announcers Bill Macdonald Stu Lantz John Ireland Mychal Thompson

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Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Clippers

Founded in 1970 Formerly the Buffalo Braves
Buffalo Braves
(1970–1978) and played in San Diego (1978–1984) Based in Los Angeles, California

Franchise

Franchise Expansion Draft Seasons All-time roster Draft history Head coaches Broadcasters Training Center Current season

Arenas

Buffalo Memorial Auditorium Maple Leaf Gardens San Diego Sports Arena Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Memorial Sports Arena Arrowhead Pond of Anaheim Staples Center

General Managers

Donovan Sonju Scheer Baylor Dunleavy Olshey Sacks Wohl Winger

G League affiliate

Agua Caliente Clippers

Administration

Steve Ballmer
Steve Ballmer
(owner) Gillian Zucker (president of business operations) Lawrence Frank (president of basketball operations) Doc Rivers
Doc Rivers
(head coach) Jerry West
Jerry West
(basketball consultant/executive board member) Michael Winger (general manager)

Division Championships (2)

2013 2014

Culture and lore

Buffalo Braves Clipper Darrell Lob City Billy Crystal Donald Sterling L.A. Clippers Dance Squad

Rivals

Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Lakers

Media

TV KCOP-TV Prime Ticket Radio KLAC/KEIB KWKW
KWKW
(Spanish) Announcers Ralph Lawler Bruce Bowen Brian Sieman Cels

.