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Electrum
Electrum
is a naturally occurring alloy of gold and silver, with trace amounts of copper and other metals. It has also been produced artificially, and is often known as green gold. The ancient Greeks called it 'gold' or 'white gold', as opposed to 'refined gold'. Its colour ranges from pale to bright yellow, depending on the proportions of gold and silver. The gold content of naturally occurring electrum in modern Western Anatolia
Anatolia
ranges from 70% to 90%, in contrast to the 45–55% of gold in electrum used in ancient Lydian coinage of the same geographical area. This suggests that one reason for the invention of coinage in that area was to increase the profits from seigniorage by issuing currency with a lower gold content than the commonly circulating metal. Electrum
Electrum
was used as early as the third millennium BCE
BCE
in Old Kingdom of Egypt, sometimes as an exterior coating to the pyramidions atop ancient Egyptian pyramids and obelisks. It was also used in the making of ancient drinking vessels. The first metal coins ever made were of electrum and date back to the end of the 7th century or the beginning of the 6th century BCE. For several decades, the medals awarded with the Nobel Prize
Nobel Prize
have been made of gold-plated green gold. The name electrum was also used to denote German 'silver', mainly for its use in making technical instruments.[1]

Contents

1 Etymology 2 Composition 3 History 4 See also 5 References 6 External links

Etymology[edit] The name "electrum" is the Latinized form of the Greek word ἤλεκτρον (èlektron), mentioned in the Odyssey
Odyssey
referring to a metallic substance consisting of gold alloyed with silver. The same word was also used for the substance amber, likely because of the pale yellow colour of certain varieties. It is from amber's electrostatic properties that the modern English words "electron" and "electricity" are derived. Electrum
Electrum
was often referred to as "white gold" in ancient times, but could be more accurately described as "pale gold", as it is usually pale yellow or yellowish-white in colour. The modern use of the term white gold usually concerns gold alloyed with any one or a combination of nickel, silver, platinum and palladium to produce a silver-coloured gold. Composition[edit] Electrum
Electrum
consists primarily of gold and silver but is sometimes found with traces of platinum, copper, and other metals. The name is mostly applied informally to compositions between about 20–80% gold and 20–80% silver atoms, but these are strictly called gold or silver depending on the dominant element. Analysis of the composition of electrum in ancient Greek coinage dating from about 600 BCE
BCE
shows that the gold content was about 55.5% in the coinage issued by Phocaea. In the early classical period, the gold content of electrum ranged from 46% in Phokaia to 43% in Mytilene. In later coinage from these areas, dating to 326 BCE, the gold content averaged 40% to 41%. In the Hellenistic period, electrum coins with a regularly decreasing proportion of gold were issued by the Carthaginians. In the later Eastern Roman Empire
Eastern Roman Empire
controlled from Constantinople, the purity of the gold coinage was reduced, and an alloy that can be called electrum began to be used. History[edit]

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Electrum
Electrum
is mentioned in an account of an expedition sent by Pharaoh Sahure
Sahure
of the Fifth dynasty of Egypt (see Sahure). It is also discussed by Pliny the Elder
Pliny the Elder
in his Naturalis Historia. Electrum
Electrum
is believed to have been used in coins circa 600 BCE
BCE
in Lydia under the reign of Alyattes II. Electrum
Electrum
was much better for coinage than gold, mostly because it was harder and more durable, but also because techniques for refining gold were not widespread at the time. The discrepancy between gold content of electrum from modern Western Anatolia
Anatolia
(70–90%) and ancient Lydian coinage (45–55%) suggests that the Lydians had already solved the refining technology for silver and were adding refined silver to the local native electrum some decades before introducing the pure silver coins cited below. In Lydia, electrum was minted into 4.7-gram coins, each valued at 1/3 stater (meaning "standard"). Three of these coins (with a weight of about 14.1 grams, almost half an ounce) totaled one stater, about one month's pay for a soldier. To complement the stater, fractions were made: the trite (third), the hekte (sixth), and so forth, including 1/24 of a stater, and even down to 1/48 and 1/96 of a stater. The 1/96 stater was only about 0.14 to 0.15 grams. Larger denominations, such as a one stater coin, were minted as well. Because of variation in the composition of electrum, it was difficult to determine the exact worth of each coin. Widespread trading was hampered by this problem, as cautious foreign merchants offered poor rates on local electrum coin.[citation needed]. These difficulties were eliminated in 570 BCE
BCE
when pure silver coins were introduced. However, electrum currency remained common until approximately 350 BCE. The simplest reason for this was that, because of the gold content, one 14.1 gram stater was worth as much as ten 14.1 gram silver pieces. See also[edit]

Tumbaga
Tumbaga
– a similar material, originating in Pre-Columbian
Pre-Columbian
America; typically with a higher copper content and not necessarily containing significant amounts of silver; Shakudō
Shakudō
– a Japanese billon of gold and copper with a dark blue-purple patina; Shibuichi
Shibuichi
– another Japanese alloy known for its patina; Orichalcum
Orichalcum
– another distinct metal or alloy mentioned in texts from classical antiquity, later used to refer to brass; Corinthian bronze – a highly prized alloy in antiquity, which may have contained electrum; Hepatizon; Panchaloha; Thokcha
Thokcha
– an alloy of meteoric iron or "thunderbolt iron" commonly used in Tibet; List of alloys

References[edit]

^ Discussion about the use of terms ‘Electrum’, ‘German silver’, and ‘ Nickel
Nickel
silver’ for drawing instruments.

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Electrum.

Electrum
Electrum
lion coins of the ancient Lydians (about 600 BC) An image of the obverse of a Lydian coin made of electrum

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