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Speaker Pantaleon Alvarez

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President of the Philippines

Rodrigo Duterte

Vice President of the Philippines

Leni Robredo

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Chief Justice Maria Lourdes Sereno

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Barangay
justice

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General: 2007 2010 2013 2016

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Philippine Elections are of several types. The president, vice-president, and the senators are elected for a six-year term, while the members of the House of Representatives, governors, vice-governors, members of the Sangguniang Panlalawigan (provincial board members), mayors, vice-mayors, members of the Sangguniang Panlungsod/members of the Sangguniang Bayan
Sangguniang Bayan
(city/municipal councilors), barangay officials, and the members of the Sangguniang Kabataan (youth councilors) are elected to serve for a three-year term. The Congress or Kongreso has two chambers. The House of Representatives or Kapulungan ng mga Kinatawan has 292 seats as of 2013[update], of which 80% are contested in single seat electoral districts and 20% are allotted to party-lists according to a modified Hare quota with remainders disregarded and a three-seat cap. These party list seats are only accessible to marginalized and under-represented groups and parties, local parties, and sectoral wings of major parties that represent the marginalized. The Constitution of the Philippines
Philippines
allows the House of Representatives to have more than 250 members by statute without a need for a constitutional amendment. The Senate or Senado has 24 members which are elected on a nationwide at-large basis; they do not represent any geographical district. Half of the Senate is renewed every three years. The Philippines
Philippines
has a multi-party system, with numerous parties in which no one party often has a chance of gaining power alone, and parties must work with each other to form a coalition government. The Commission on Elections (COMELEC) is responsible for running the elections. Under the Constitution, elections for the members of Congress and local positions (except barangay officials) occur every second Monday of May every third year after May 1992, and presidential and vice presidential elections occur every second Monday of May every sixth year after May 1992. All elected officials, except those at the barangay level, start (and end) their terms of office on June 30 of the election year.

Contents

1 Voting

1.1 Qualification 1.2 Absentee voters 1.3 Process 1.4 Election automation

2 Schedule

2.1 Election

2.1.1 Fixed-term elections

2.2 Inauguration

3 Elected offices

3.1 President and vice president 3.2 Congress

3.2.1 Senators 3.2.2 House of Representatives

3.3 Local positions

4 Other elections

4.1 Referendums and plebiscites 4.2 Recall 4.3 Initiatives 4.4 Special
Special
election 4.5 Primary elections 4.6 Constitutional Conventions

5 History

5.1 List of elections

6 Latest elections

6.1 2016 presidential election 6.2 2016 vice presidential election 6.3 2016 legislative election

6.3.1 2016 Senate election 6.3.2 2016 House of Representatives elections

6.4 2016 Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao
Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao
general election 6.5 2016 gubernatorial elections 6.6 2016 local elections 6.7 2018 barangay and SK elections

7 Future elections 8 See also 9 References 10 External links

Voting[edit] Qualification[edit] Every citizen 18 years old or above on Election Day who has been a resident of the Philippines
Philippines
for at least a year and for at least six months in the place he is registering, and is not otherwise disqualified by law, may vote. In order to actually vote, a citizen has to register. The COMELEC
COMELEC
has a registration period for several months prior to the election. Those who are not registered will not appear on the voters' list and are ineligible to vote despite being qualified to do so. People aged 15 to 18 may vote in Sangguniang Kabataan
Sangguniang Kabataan
elections. Same with their adult counterparts, the COMELEC
COMELEC
has a registration period a few months prior to the election. Absentee voters[edit] Absentee voters are divided into two types: the local absentee voters and the overseas absentee voters. Local absentee voters include people who are working during Election Day. These include soldiers, policemen, government employees and the like. Overseas absentee voters are Filipinos residing abroad. They are eligible to vote on national positions only (president, vice-president, senators and party-list representatives). Overseas absentee voters may vote in Philippine embassies and consulates, and voting begins as early as 4 months prior to the election. The voting can be as long as 6 months in a very few situations. Process[edit]

Ballot boxes
Ballot boxes
used for the 2007 Philippine Barangay
Barangay
Elections in Davao.

Main article: Electoral process in the Philippines Once a registered voter finds his/her name in the voters' list and locates the correct precinct, he may queue in line for the distribution of the ballot. Prior to the 2010 elections, voters have to write the names of the candidates next to the positions in which they are running. COMELEC-approved nicknames maybe used by the voters in writing the names. After the polling period ends, the Board of Election Inspectors (or the teachers manning the polling precinct) counts the ballots by hand. Once all the ballots are counted, the election returns will now be sent to the city or municipal Board of Canvassers, political parties and other groups. The city or municipal Board of Canvassers canvasses the votes from all polling precincts within their jurisdiction and prepares two documents: a Statement of Votes (SOV) in which all votes from all candidates in all positions per precinct is listed; and a Certificate of Canvass (COC), a document showing the vote totals of all candidates within the Board of Canvassers' jurisdiction. If the city or municipal Board of Canvassers' jurisdiction is an independent city with its own congressional district, they will send their SOV and COC to the national Board of Canvassers (the COMELEC
COMELEC
for senate and party-list elections, Congress for presidential and vice presidential elections). If it is otherwise, they will send their SOV and COC to the provincial Board of Canvassers where the votes as stated from the city or municipal COC will be canvassed. The provincial Board of Canvassers sends their SOV and COC to the national Board of Canvassers once canvassing is done. The national Board of Canvassers then canvasses all COCs and declares the winners for national positions. Election automation[edit] Main article: Vote counting in the Philippines Since the 2010 elections, the voters have to shade the oval that was indicated before the candidate's name, and a voting machine manufactured by Smartmatic
Smartmatic
automatically counts each ballot as it is fed into it. The results are then printed as the election return and sent electronically to the city or municipal Board of Canvassers. In 2016, for the third time in a row, the Philippines
Philippines
automated their elections using electronic vote counting machines. The deployment of 92,500 of these machines was the largest in the world. Brazil
Brazil
and India, countries which also use technology to process their votes, employ e-voting instead of an automated count.[1] The Philippines
Philippines
stands today with Brazil, Estonia, Belgium
Belgium
and Venezuela
Venezuela
at the forefront of election technology adoption. Schedule[edit] Election[edit] Fixed-term elections[edit] National and local elections are held on the second Monday of May every third year starting 1992. The presidential and vice presidential elections are held every six years. Election Days in which the president and vice president and barangay officials are not elected are called "midterm elections"; Election Days in which the president and vice president are elected are called "presidential elections." Barangay-level officials, although are currently elected in the same year as the other officials, are elected separately the succeeding months (see below). From 1949 to 1971, election days are held every second Tuesday of November of every odd-numbered year with the presidential and vice presidential election held the every fourth year starting from 1951. Barangay-level elections, starting from 2007, are to be held every three years during the last Monday of October, although these elections are frequently postponed (and incumbents' terms are extended) as a cost-saving measure. Elections for the positions in the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao
Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao
(ARMM), starting from 2011, are to be held every three years during the second Monday of May.

Position 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016

Type Presidential (May) Barangay
Barangay
(October) None Midterm (May) Barangay
Barangay
(October) None Presidential (May) Barangay
Barangay
(October)

President and vice president President and vice president None President and vice president

Senate Seats contested during even-numbered years (12 seats) None Seats contested during odd-numbered years (12 seats) None Seats contested during even-numbered years (12 seats)

House of Representatives All seats None All seats None All seats

ARMM None All positions None All positions

Provinces, cities and municipalities All positions None All positions None All positions

Barangays All positions None All positions except SK None All positions

Inauguration[edit]

Position 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016

Type Presidential (June) Barangay
Barangay
(November) None Midterm (June) Barangay
Barangay
(November) None Presidential (June) Barangay
Barangay
(November)

President and vice president June 30 None June 30

Senate June 30 None June 30 None June 30

House June 30 None June 30 None June 30

ARMM None June 30 None

Provinces, cities and municipalities June 30 None June 30 None June 30

Barangays November 30 None November 30 None November 30

Elected offices[edit]

Position Number

President 1

Vice president 1

Senators 12

House of Representatives (district) 1

House of Representatives (party-list) 1

Governor 1*

Vice governor 1*

Board members 1 to 7*

Mayor 1

Vice mayor 1

Councilors 4 to 12

Total presidential 22 to 39

Total midterm 20 to 37

Regional governor 1

Regional vice governor 1

Regional assemblymen 3

Total ARMM 5

Barangay
Barangay
captain 1

Barangay
Barangay
councilor (kagawad) 7

Total barangay 8

SK chairman 1

SK councilor (kagawad) 7

Total SK 8

*Some cities do not elect provincial officials.

In a presidential election year, a voter may vote for as much as 34 names and a party-list organization. In ARMM elections, a voter may vote for five names, and in barangay elections, a voter may vote for eight names. A voter for the Sangguniang Kabataan
Sangguniang Kabataan
(SK, youth council) may vote for eight names; currently, SK voters are aged 15 to 18 years old with only the SK voters aged 18 years old may vote for other barangay officials. President and vice president[edit] Main article: Philippine presidential election Each voter is entitled to one vote each for the duration of the election. The voter may split his or her ticket. The candidate with the most votes wins the position; there is no run-off election, and the president and vice president may come from different parties. If two or more candidates emerge with an equal and highest number of votes, one of them will be elected by the Senate and the House of Representatives, voting separately. Congress[edit] Senators[edit] Main article: Philippine senatorial elections The Senate has 24 members, and 12 members are elected every election; hence, each voter is entitled to twelve votes for the Senate in every election. The voter may not complete the twelve votes for the Senate, but s/he must not surpass the twelve votes or else his/her ballot for that position will be nullified. With the entire country as one at-large district, the twelve candidates with the most number of votes are elected. This is often not proportional to the results. From 1951 to 1971, instead of 12 senators elected every three years, the electorate voted for eight senators every two years in the same format. From 1941 to 1949, all elections to the senate were by block voting: the voters may write a name for every seat contested, or they can write the name of the party, which would then give all of the voters' votes to that party's ticket. Compounded with the Nacionalista Party's dominance, this caused a sweep of 24 seats for them in 1941.[2] From 1916 to 1934, voting was via senatorial districts; voters vote for one candidate every three years, except for the first election in 1916 where they'd vote for two candidates; the second-placed candidate would only serve for three years. House of Representatives[edit] Each voter has two votes in the House of Representatives. A voter may elect a representative from the congressional district of residence. The candidate with the highest number of votes in a district wins that district's seat. A voter may also elect a party-list organization. The voter votes for the party, not for the candidate, and the voter is restricted to one vote. All votes are tallied in an at-large basis, and parties with at least 2% of the vote wins at least one seat in the House. A further two more seats will be granted if there are still spare seats (the party-list representatives comprise 20% of the House), and if there are still unfilled seats, the parties with less than 2% of the vote will get one seat each in descending order until all seats are filled. A party-list organization is limited to representing marginalized sectors of society such as youth, laborers, women, and the like. Previously, the calculation for the winners in the party-list election was different: the winning parties should have 2% of the national vote and are awarded one seat; any additional 2% is given an additional seat until the maximum of three seats per party is filled up. Since only a few parties surpassed the 2% election threshold, the number of party-list representatives was always less than 20% of the House's membership. The party-list system was first used in 1998; from 1987 to 1995, the president with the concurrence of the Commission on Appointments, appointed the sectoral representatives. Sectoral representatives were first elected during 1978. Local positions[edit] Main article: Local government in the Philippines Synchronized with the national elections are the local elections. The voter may vote for any of the following:

Provincial-level:

One governor One vice governor One to seven Sangguniang Panlalawigan members (provincial board)

City- or municipal-level:

One mayor One vice mayor Four to twelve Sangguniang Panlungsod/ Sangguniang Bayan
Sangguniang Bayan
members (city or municipal council, respectively)

If the city the voter is residing in a highly urbanized city or independent component city, the voter can not vote for any of the provincial-level positions. The Sangguniang Panlalawigan (provincial board), Sangguniang Panlungsod (city council) and Sangguniang Bayan
Sangguniang Bayan
(municipal council)'s manner of election is identical with that of the Senate. In some cities and provinces, they are split into districts (not necessarily the same as the congressional district) in which separate board members/council members are elected. Barangay
Barangay
elections are held every three years, although usually not in the same time as elections for other positions. Terms of incumbent barangay officials are often extended when Congress suspend the barangay elections as a cost-saving measure. The barangay-level positions are:

One punong barangay (barangay captain) Seven barangay kagawads (councilors) One Sangguniang Kabataan
Sangguniang Kabataan
(SK) chairperson (youth council chairperson) Seven SK kagawads (councilors)

The manner of election of the Sangguniang Kabataan
Sangguniang Kabataan
in the barangay is identical to the one used in the Senate. Each barangay is entitled to one SK. The barangay SK chairpersons in a city or municipality elect amongst themselves a president that will sit as an ex officio member of the city or municipal council. The city (if applicable) and municipal SK presidents then elect amongst themselves a president that will sit in the provincial board as an ex officio member. Finally, provincial and city (which are not under the jurisdiction of a province) chairpersons elect amongst themselves the SK national federation president that will sit as an ex officio member of the National Youth Commission. The manner of representation of the different barangay chairmen in the municipal, city and provincial legislatures as ex officio members is identical with the way how the SK chairpersons are represented; the provincial and city (which are not under the jurisdiction of a province) chairpersons elect amongst themselves the president of the National League of the Barangays (Liga ng mga Barangay). Other elections[edit] Referendums and plebiscites[edit] Referendums and plebiscites are conducted in order to pass certain laws. Any amendments or revision to the constitution, merging, creation and abolition of local government units and autonomous regions and the like are validated via plebiscites. In order for a referendum and plebiscite to pass, the votes in favor must be greater in number than those which are opposed; there is no requirement for how high the voter turnout should be in such referendums or plebiscites. The terms "referendum" and "plebiscite" mean different things in the context of Philippine political discourse:

Referendum
Referendum
is the power of the electorate to approve or reject a legislation through an election called for the purpose. Plebiscite is the electoral process by which an initiative on the Constitution is approved or rejected by the people.

It is also the term used in determining the creation of a barangay (village), municipalities, cities, provinces and autonomous regions.

In order to initiate a referendum, a total of 10% of all registered voters, plus 3% from every affected legislative district, must sign a petition. If the affected locality only has one legislative district, the 3% requirement falls to every municipality for a province-wide referendum, and for every barangay for citywide referendum. For barangay-level referendums, the requirement is 10% of all registered voters. For a constitutional plebiscite, 12% of all registered voters is needed, with 3% for all legislative districts, and that it could be exercised five years after its ratification on February 2, 1987, and once every five years after each plebiscite. A referendum is passed if it is approved by a majority of the votes cast; a defeat means the law sought to be rejected or amended remains to be in full effect. There had been two "waves" of national referendums in the Philippines: the first was during the Commonwealth period, and the latter was during the martial law period. Locally, the most common plebiscites are on creating new provinces and the upgrading of a municipality into a city. The last provincial-level plebiscite was on 2013 for the creation of a new province of Davao Occidental that was passed; the last national plebiscite was in 1987 for the approval of the constitution endorsed by the 1986 Constitutional Commission. Recall[edit] Elected local government officials may be recalled. A recall election may be called if there is a petition of at least 25% of the registered voters in that LGU. An amendment to the law where a majority of all members of a preparatory recall assembly, composed of all elected local officials within a local government unit (LGU), endorse a recall, was repealed. The recalled official is not allowed to resign when facing a recall election, but may participate in it; the candidate with the highest number of votes wins the recall election. The president, vice president, members of Congress, and the elected officials of the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao
Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao
cannot be removed via recall. The last recall election above the barangay level was the 2015 Puerto Princesa mayoral recall election. Initiatives[edit] Main article: People's Initiative Initiatives (locally known as "people's initiative") to amend or revise the constitution, or propose new laws are allowed if there is a petition of at least 12% of all registered voters in the country, with at least 3% in every legislative district. A plebiscite will be called it meets such requirements. A people's initiative has never made it past the stage verification of signatures. Special
Special
election[edit] Main article: List of special elections to the Philippine Congress The term "special election" in the Philippines
Philippines
may mean either of the following:

An election that was supposedly held with the general election but was delayed; An election to elect a new official after the predecessor left office (known as "by-elections" elsewhere)

Members of the House of Representatives can be elected under the second type of special election whenever the predecessor leaves office, except when the next regularly scheduled election is less than a year away. A special election for president and vice president can only be called if both offices are vacant at the same time, and is outside the 18 months prior to the next regularly scheduled presidential election. The last special election to elect a vacancy to the House of Representatives was 2012 for Negros Occidental's 5th legislative district. The last special election for the presidency was on 1986. Primary elections[edit] Primary elections do not exist in the Philippines. The leaders of the various political parties select the candidates themselves, and party membership is liquid. In some cases, if a politician is not chosen to be a candidate, he can join another party (such as Ferdinand Marcos, a Liberal, jumped ship to the Nacionalistas in 1965 when the Liberals picked incumbent Diosdado Macapagal
Diosdado Macapagal
as their presidential candidate), or create their own party (such as Fidel Ramos, when he created the Lakas ng Tao (now Lakas Kampi CMD) after the Laban ng Demokratikong Pilipino chose Ramon Mitra
Ramon Mitra
as their presidential candidate in 1992). Constitutional Conventions[edit] Main article: Constitutional Convention (Philippines) Calling a Constitutional Convention is one of the ways to amend or revise the constitution of the Philippines. While voting is expected to be via the existing legislative districts, Congress decides on how many delegates would be elected, thus how many delegates would be distributed per district. The election is nonpartisan. During the 1970 Constitutional Convention election, each district had 2 to 16 delegates, elected via plurality-at-large voting. During the 1934 Constitutional Convention election, each district had 2 to 14 delegates, also elected via plurality-at-large-voting. The body that proposed the current constitution, the Philippine Constitutional Commission of 1986, was appointed by the President, Corazon Aquino. The Malolos Congress
Malolos Congress
was partly elected. History[edit] Beginning during the Spanish Colonial Period there were a few attempts nationally of electing local officials. Once the Spanish colonial government was replaced by the American colonial Insular Government. following the Spanish–American War, and the First Philippine Republic defeated in the Philippine–American War, there were multiple elections held throughout peaceful areas of the country for provincial and local officials. During the First Philippine Republic
First Philippine Republic
an attempt was made to elect a national congress but the Republic did not control the Philippines
Philippines
and so no nationwide election could be held. The first fully national election for a fully elected legislative body was in 1907 for the Philippine Assembly, the elected half of the bicameral Philippine Legislature during the American Colonial Period. List of elections[edit] Only elections national in scope are included.

Year General President Upper house Lower house Local Barangay Other Referendum

1895

Municipal

1898

1898 Congress

1899

Local

1902

Local

1904

Local

1905

Local

1907

Philippine Assembly

1909

Philippine Assembly Local

1912

Philippine Assembly Local

1916 Legislative

Senate House of Representatives Local

1919 Legislative

Senate House of Representatives Local

1922 Legislative

Senate House of Representatives Local

1925 Legislative

Senate House of Representatives Local

1928 Legislative

Senate House of Representatives Local

1931 Legislative

Senate House of Representatives Local

1934 Legislative

Senate House of Representatives Local

Constitutional convention

1935 General President & vice president National Assembly

Constitutional

1937

Local

Women's suffrage

1938

National Assembly

1940

Constitutional

1941 General President & vice president Senate House of Representatives Local

1943

National Assembly Local

1946 General President & vice president Senate House of Representatives

1947

Senate

Local

Parity rights

1949 General President & vice president Senate House of Representatives

1951

Senate

Local

1953 General President & vice president Senate House of Representatives

1955

Senate

Local

1957 General President & vice president Senate House of Representatives

1959

Senate

Local

1961 General President & vice president Senate House of Representatives

1963

Senate

Local

1965 General President & vice president Senate House of Representatives

1967

Senate

Local

1969 General President & vice president Senate House of Representatives

1970

Constitutional convention

1971

Senate

Local

1973

Constitutional (January) Martial law (July)

1975

Executive and legislative powers

1976

Constitutional

1977

Constitutional

1978

Parliament

1980

Local

1981

President

Constitutional (April) Barangay
Barangay
institutionalization (June)

1982

Barangay

1984

Parliament

Constitutional

1986

President & vice president

1987 Legislative

Senate House of Representatives

Constitutional

1988

Local

1989

Barangay

1992 General President & vice president Senate House of Representatives Local SK

1994

Barangay

1995 General

Senate House of Representatives Local

1996

SK

1997

Barangay

1998 General President & vice president Senate House of Representatives Local

2001 General

Senate House of Representatives Local

2002

Barangay
Barangay
& SK

2004 General President & vice president Senate House of Representatives Local

2007 General

Senate House of Representatives Local Barangay
Barangay
& SK

2010 General President & vice president Senate House of Representatives Local Barangay
Barangay
& SK

2013 General

Senate House of Representatives Local Barangay

2016 General President & vice president Senate House of Representatives Local

2018

Barangay
Barangay
& SK

Latest elections[edit] Main article: Philippine general election, 2016 The latest presidential and vice presidential elections were held in May 2016. The latest national and local elections are the May 2016 polls, followed in October by barangay elections. 2016 presidential election[edit] Main article: Philippine presidential election, 2016

e • d Summary of the May 9, 2016 Philippine presidential election results

Candidate Party Votes %

Rodrigo Duterte Partido Demokratiko Pilipino–Lakas ng Bayan (Philippine Democratic Party–People's Power) 16,601,997 39.01%

Mar Roxas Liberal Party 9,978,175 23.45%

Grace Poe Independent 9,100,991 21.39%

Jejomar Binay United Nationalist Alliance 5,416,140 12.73%

Miriam Defensor Santiago People's Reform Party 1,455,532 3.42%

Total 42,552,835 100%

Valid votes 42,552,835 94.61%

Roy Señeres[p 1] Partido ng Manggagawa at Magsasaka (Workers' and Peasants' Party) 25,779 0.06%

Total invalid votes 2,426,316 5.39%

Votes cast 44,979,151 81.5%

Registered voters 55,739,911 100%

^ Withdrew on February 5, 2016, and died three days later. All of his votes are to be considered as spoiled votes.

2016 vice presidential election[edit]

e • d Summary of the May 9, 2016 Philippine vice presidential election results

Candidate Party Votes %

Leni Robredo Liberal Party 14,418,817 35.11%

Bongbong Marcos Independent [v 1] 14,155,344 34.47%

Alan Peter Cayetano Independent [v 2] 5,903,379 14.38%

Francis Escudero Independent 4,931,962 12.01%

Antonio Trillanes Independent [v 3] 868,501 2.11%

Gregorio Honasan United Nationalist Alliance 788,881 1.92%

Total 41,066,884 100%

Valid votes 41,066,884 91.30%

Invalid votes 3,912,267 8.70%

Votes cast 44,979,151 81.5%

Registered voters 55,739,911 100%

^ Member of Nacionalista Party, which does not field an official candidate; Miriam Defensor Santiago's (PRP) guest candidate for vice president ^ Member of Nacionalista Party, which does not field an official candidate; Rodrigo Duterte's (PDP-Laban) guest candidate for vice president ^ Member of Nacionalista Party, which does not field an official candidate; supported by Magdalo and endorsed Grace Poe
Grace Poe
for President

2016 legislative election[edit] 2016 Senate election[edit] Main article: Philippine Senate election, 2016

e • d Summary of the May 9, 2016 Philippine Senate election results per party

Party Popular vote Breakdown Seats

Total % Swing Entered Up Not up Gains Holds Losses Won Current 16th 17th +/−

Start %

Liberal (Liberal Party) 100,512,795 31.30% 19.98% 8 3 1 3 2 1 5 4 6 25.0% 2

NPC (Nationalist People's Coalition) 32,154,139 10.07% 0.08% 2 1 1 1 1 0 2 2 3 12.5% 1

UNA (United Nationalist Alliance) 24,660,722 7.64% 19.33% 6 2 3 1 0 2 1 5 3 12.5% 2

Akbayan
Akbayan
(Citizens' Action Party) 15,915,213 4.97% 1.29% 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 4.2% 1

Lakas (People Power-Christian Muslim Democrats) 13,056,845 4.08% 4.08% 2 2 0 0 0 2 0 2 0 0.0% 2

PMP (Force of the Philippine Masses) 11,932,700 3.73% 3.73% 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0%

Aksyon (Democratic Action) 8,433,168 2.62% 2.62% 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0%

Makabayan
Makabayan
(Patriotic Coalition of the People) 6,484,985 2.02% 0.58% 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0%

Nacionalista (Nationalist Party) 2,775,191 0.85% 14.45% 1 2 3 0 0 2 0 5 3 4.2% 2

PMM (Workers' and Farmers' Party) 2,470,660 0.76% 0.76% 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0%

KBL (New Society Movement) 1,971,327 0.61% 0.61% 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0%

LDP (Struggle of Democratic Filipinos) Not participating 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 4.2%

PDP-Laban
PDP-Laban
(Philippine Democratic Party – People's Power) Not participating 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 2 8.3% 1

PRP (People's Reform Party) Not participating 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0.0% 1

Independent 100,939,528 31.36% 15.12% 22 1 2 3 0 1 3 3 5 29.2% 2

Total 319,308,507 N/A

50 12 12 9 3 9 12 24 24 100%

Turnout 44,979,151 80.69% 4.92%

Registered voters 55,739,911 100%

2016 House of Representatives elections[edit] Main article: Philippine House of Representatives elections, 2016 See also: Philippine House of Representatives elections, 2016 (party-list)

e • d Summary of the May 9, 2016 Philippine House of Representatives election results for representatives from congressional districts

Party/coalition Popular vote Breakdown Seats

Total % Swing Entered Up Gains Holds Losses Wins Elected % +/−

Liberal (Liberal Party) 15 552 401 41.72% 3.41% 164 111 15 96 15 4 115 38.7% 4

NPC (Nationalist People's Coalition) 6 350 310 17.04% 0.32% 77 42 8 33 9 0 42 14.1%

NUP (National Unity Party) 3 604 266 9.67% 0.98% 39 26 1 22 4 0 23 7.7% 3

Nacionalista (Nationalist Party) 3 512 975 9.42% 0.87% 46 27 3 21 6 0 24 8.1% 3

UNA (United Nationalist Alliance) 2 468 335 6.62% 2.69% 47 8 4 7 1 0 11 3.7% 3

PDP-Laban
PDP-Laban
(Philippine Democratic Party–People's Power) 706 407 1.90% 0.88% 26 0 3 0 0 0 3 1.0% 3

Lakas (People Power–Christian Muslim Democrats) 573 843 1.54% 3.79% 5 7 0 4 3 0 4 1.3% 1

Aksyon (Democratic Action) 514 612 1.38% 1.03% 8 1 1 0 1 0 1 0.3%

KBL (New Society Movement) 198 754 0.53% 0.19% 11 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0%

Asenso Manileño
Asenso Manileño
(Progress for Manilans) 184 602 0.50% 0.50% 4 0 2 0 0 0 2 0.7% 2

Kusog Baryohanon (Force of the Villagers) 172 601 0.46% 0.46% 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0.3%

PTM (Voice of the Masses Party) 145 417 0.39% 0.39% 2 1 0 1 0 0 1 0.3%

PCM (People's Champ Movement) 142 307 0.38% 0.38% 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0.3% 1

Bukidnon Paglaum (Hope for Bukidnon) 129 678 0.35% 0.01% 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0.3%

Lingap Lugud (Caring Love) 127 762 0.34% 0.34% 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0.3% 1

Padayon Pilipino (Onward Filipinos) 127 759 0.34% 0.34% 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0%

1-Cebu (One Cebu) 114 732 0.31% 0.23% 3 1 0 0 1 0 0 0.0% 1

LDP (Struggle of Democratic Filipinos) 111 086 0.30% 0.03% 2 2 0 2 0 0 2 0.7%

Arangkada San Joseño (Forward San Joseans) 83 945 0.23% 0.23% 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 0.3% 1

PMP (Force of the Filipino Masses) 78 020 0.21% 0.31% 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0%

KABAKA (Partner of the Nation for Progress) 72 130 0.19% 0.15% 2 1 0 1 0 0 1 0.3%

Hugpong (Party of the People of the City) 53 186 0.14% 0.10% 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0%

SZP (Forward Zambales Party) 52 415 0.14% 0.08% 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0%

CDP (Centrist Democratic Party of the Philippines) 13 662 0.21% 0.21% 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0.0% 1

PMM (Workers' and Peasants' Party) 7 239 0.02% 0.02% 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0%

PGRP (Philippine Green Republican Party) 4 426 0.01% 0.01% 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0%

Independent 2 172 562 5.83% 0.19% 178 3 3 1 2 0 4 1.3% 1

Vacancy — — — — 3 0 0 3 — 0 0.0% 3

Total 37 275 432 100% N/A 634 234 45 189 45 4 238 80.1% 4

Valid votes 37 275 432 83.97%

Invalid votes 7 077 692 15.94%

Turnout 44 392 375 81.66% 5.89%

Registered voters (without overseas voters) 54 363 844 100% 4.52%

e • d Summary of the May 9, 2016 Philippine House of Representatives election results for party-list representatives

Party Popular vote Seats

Total % Swing Up Won +/−

Ako Bicol 1,664,975 5.14% 2.38% 2 3 1

GABRIELA 1,367,795 4.22% 1.64% 2 2

1-PACMAN 1,310,197 4.05% 4.05% 0 2 2

ACT Teachers 1,180,752 3.65% 2.00% 1 2 1

Senior Citizens 988,876 3.05% 0.60% 2 2

Kabayan 840,393 2.60% 2.60% 0 2 2

AGRI 833,821 2.58% 1.25% 1 2 1

PBA 780,309 2.41% 1.64% 0 2 2

Buhay 760,912 2.35% 2.25% 3 2 1

Abono 732,060 2.26% 0.52% 2 2

AMIN 706,689 2.18% 0.80% 1 2 1

Coop-NATCCO 671,699 2.07% 0.25% 2 2

Akbayan 608,449 1.88% 1.12% 2 1 1

Bayan Muna 606,566 1.87% 1.58% 2 1 1

AGAP 593,748 1.83% 0.31% 2 1 1

An Waray 590,895 1.82% 0.13% 2 1 1

CIBAC 555,760 1.72% 0.40% 2 1 1

AAMBIS-Owa 495,483 1.53% 0.40% 1 1

Kalinga 494,725 1.53% 0.18% 1 1

A TEACHER 475,488 1.47% 2.31% 2 1 1

YACAP 471,173 1.46% 0.13% 1 1

DIWA 467,794 1.44% 0.21% 1 1

TUCP 467,275 1.44% 0.11% 1 1

Abang Lingkod 466,701 1.44% 0.50% 1 1

LPGMA 466,103 1.44% 0.10% 1 1

Alona 434,856 1.34% 1.34% 0 1 1

1-SAGIP 397,064 1.23% 0.18% 1 1

Butil 395,011 1.22% 0.37% 1 1

ACTS-OFW 374,601 1.16% 1.16% 0 1 1

Anakpawis 367,376 1.13% 0.03% 1 1

Ang Kabuhayan 348,533 1.08% 1.08% 0 1 1

ANGKLA 337,245 1.04% 0.26% 1 1

Mata 331,285 1.02% 0.14% 0 1 1

1-CARE 329,627 1.02% 2.37% 2 1 1

ANAC-IP 318,257 0.98% 0.11% 1 1

ABS 301,457 0.93% 0.37% 1 1

Kabataan 300,420 0.93% 0.31% 1 1

BH 299,381 0.92% 0.24% 0 1 1

AASENSO 294,281 0.91% 0.67% 0 1 1

SBP 280,465 0.87% 0.87% 0 1 1

Magdalo 279,356 0.86% 1.19% 2 1 1

1-ang Edukasyon 278,393 0.86% 0.86% 0 1 1

Manila Teachers 268,613 0.83% 0.83% 0 1 1

Kusug Tausug 247,487 0.76% 0.76% 0 1 1

Aangat Tayo 243,266 0.75% 0.00% 0 1 1

Agbiag! 240,723 0.74% 0.13% 1 1

Ating Guro 237,566 0.73% 0.04% 0 0

ADDA 226,751 0.70% 0.70% 0 0

A.I. 223,880 0.69% 0.69% 0 0

All-Fish 220,599 0.68% 0.68% 0 0

Append 219,218 0.68% 0.18% 1 0 1

Ang Nars 218,593 0.68% 0.21% 1 0 1

ABAKADA 216,405 0.67% 0.22% 1 0 1

CONSLA 213,814 0.66% 0.66% 0 0

Tingog Sinirangan 210,552 0.65% 0.65% 0 0

ABAMIN 209,276 0.65% 1.04% 1 0 1

OFW Family 203,767 0.63% 2.09% 2 0 2

Anakalusugan 191,362 0.59% 0.59% 0 0

Alay Buhay 186,712 0.58% 0.57% 1 0 1

Abante Retirees 166,138 0.51% 0.07% 0 0

AAB 162,547 0.50% 0.50% 0 0

AVE 157,792 0.49% 0.49% 1 0 1

RAM 153,743 0.47% 0.47% 0 0

KGB 148,869 0.46% 0.46% 0 0

AGHAM 140,661 0.43% 0.04% 0 0

AWAT Mindanao 138,040 0.43% 0.28% 0 0

Tama 136,555 0.42% 0.42% 0 0

Asean, Inc. 125,069 0.39% 0.39% 0 0

Amepa Ofw 121,086 0.37% 0.37% 0 0

ATING Koop 120,361 0.37% 0.60% 1 0 1

Ang Kasangga 120,042 0.37% 0.36% 0 0

UMALAB KA 118,149 0.36% 0.20% 0 0

Disabled/PWD 118,043 0.36% 0.36% 0 0

Global 117,552 0.36% 0.36% 0 0

ALE 112,052 0.35% 0.21% 0 0

Cancer 109,965 0.34% 0.34% 0 0

ACT-CIS 109,300 0.34% 1.03% 1 0 1

AMA 102,583 0.32% 0.57% 1 0 1

Marino 102,430 0.32% 0.32% 0 0

1-PABAHAY 100,746 0.31% 0.11% 0 0

Metro 94,515 0.29% 0.29% 0 0

PISTON 89,384 0.28% 0.36% 0 0

Sanlakas 87,351 0.27% 0.04% 0 0

TGP 87,009 0.27% 0.27% 0 0

KAP/KAKASA-KA 79,178 0.24% 0.24% 0 0

Migrante 76,523 0.24% 0.05% 0 0

Amor-seaman 68,226 0.21% 0.21% 0 0

1-AALALAY 65,459 0.20% 0.39% 0 0

Sinag 61,393 0.19% 0.19% 0 0

Akin 56,809 0.18% 0.18% 0 0

1-AHAPO 54,550 0.17% 0.17% 0 0

Ang Prolife 53,078 0.16% 0.31% 0 0

Samako 52,251 0.16% 0.16% 0 0

Tricap 50,401 0.16% 0.16% 0 0

Unido 49,742 0.15% 0.15% 0 0

Clase 49,212 0.15% 0.15% 0 0

Tinderong Pinoy 46,942 0.14% 0.14% 0 0

Pbb 46,853 0.14% 0.14% 0 0

Kamais Pilipinas 46,521 0.14% 0.14% 0 0

1-GB 46,182 0.14% 0.14% 0 0

KMM 42,935 0.13% 0.13% 0 0

PM 42,742 0.13% 0.13% 0 0

KM Ngayon Na 39,777 0.12% 0.12% 0 0

FICTAP 36,619 0.11% 0.11% 0 0

ACP 35,270 0.11% 0.11% 0 0

Banat 31,185 0.10% 0.10% 0 0

A Tambay 30,147 0.09% 0.09% 0 0

Awake 28,727 0.09% 0.09% 0 0

Nactodap 24,407 0.08% 0.08% 0 0

Anupa 18,793 0.06% 0.06% 0 0

Melchora 17,040 0.05% 0.05% 0 0

1-ABILIDAD 16,805 0.05% 0.02% 0 0

MTM PHILS 9,200 0.03% 0.12% 0 0

CWS 9,121 0.03% 0.03% 0 0

Dumper PTDA 6,941 0.02% 0.02% 0 0

Total 32,377,841 100.00% N/A 58 59 1

Valid votes 32,377,841 71.98% 3.15%

Invalid votes 12,601,310 28.02% 3.15%

Total turnout 44,980,362* 80.70% 4.93%

Registered voters 55,739,911 100.00% 5.21%

*1,211 votes are unaccounted for.

2016 Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao
Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao
general election[edit] Main article: Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao
Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao
general election, 2016 2016 gubernatorial elections[edit] Main article: Philippine gubernatorial elections, 2016 2016 local elections[edit] Main article: Philippine local elections, 2016 2018 barangay and SK elections[edit] Main article: Philippine barangay and Sangguniang Kabataan
Sangguniang Kabataan
elections, 2018 Future elections[edit]

Philippine presidential election, 2022 Philippine Senate election, 2019 Philippine House of Representatives elections, 2019 Philippine local election, 2019 Philippine barangay and Sangguniang Kabataan
Sangguniang Kabataan
elections, 2018

See also[edit]

Timeline of Philippine elections Electoral calendar Electoral system President of the Philippines Vice President of the Philippines Congress of the Philippines Senate of the Philippines House of Representatives of the Philippines Commission on Elections

References[edit]

^ Inquirer, News (2016-05-10). "Smartmatic: PH now world reference point for automated elections". Philippine Daily Inquirer. Retrieved 10 May 2016.  ^ Quezon, Manuel III (2006-11-20). "Block voting". Philippine Daily Inquirer. Retrieved 2010-12-10. 

External links[edit]

Official website of the Commission on Elections

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