HOME
The Info List - Egyptian Pound


--- Advertisement ---



 Gaza Strip  Sudan

Issuance

Central bank Central Bank of Egypt

 Website www.cbe.org.eg

Valuation

Inflation 48% (November 2016)

The Egyptian pound
Egyptian pound
(Egyptian Arabic: جنيه مصرى‎ Genēh Maṣri [ɡeˈneː(h) ˈmɑsˤɾi]; sign: E£, ج.م; code: EGP) is the currency of Egypt. It is divided into 100 piastres, or ersh (Egyptian Arabic: قرش‎ [ʔeɾʃ]; plural قروش [ʔʊˈɾuːʃ]),[1] or 1,000 milliemes (Egyptian Arabic: مليم‎  [mælˈliːm]; French: millième). The Egyptian pound
Egyptian pound
is frequently abbreviated as LE or L.E., which stands for livre égyptienne (French for Egyptian pound). E£ and £E are commonly used on the internet. The name Genēh [ɡeˈneː(h)] is derived from the Guinea coin, which had almost the same value of 100 piastres at the end of the 19th century.

Contents

1 History 2 Popular denominations and nomenclature

2.1 Used for historical values or jocularly 2.2 Informal

3 Coins 4 Banknotes 5 Historical and current exchange rates

5.1 Pound sterling 5.2 US dollar

6 See also 7 References 8 Bibliography 9 External links

History[edit]

50 Egyptian pound
Egyptian pound
promissory note issued and hand-signed by Gen. Gordon during the Siege of Khartoum
Siege of Khartoum
(26 April 1884)[2]

The first E£1 banknote issued in 1899

In 1834, a khedival decree was issued, adopting an Egyptian currency based on a bimetallic standard (gold and silver) on the basis of the Maria Theresa thaler, a popular trade coin in the region.[3] The Egyptian pound, known as the geneih, was introduced, replacing the Egyptian piastre (ersh) as the chief unit of currency. The piastre continued to circulate as ​1⁄100 of a pound, with the piastre subdivided into 40 para. In 1885, the para ceased to be issued, and the piastre was divided into tenths (عشر القرش 'oshr el-ersh). These tenths were renamed milliemes (malleem) in 1916. The legal exchange rates were fixed by force of law for important foreign currencies which became acceptable in the settlement of internal transactions. Eventually this led to Egypt
Egypt
using a de facto gold standard between 1885 and 1914, with E£1 = 7.4375 grams pure gold. At the outbreak of World War I, the Egyptian pound
Egyptian pound
was pegged to the British pound sterling at EG£0.975 per GB£1. Egypt
Egypt
remained part of the Sterling Area until 1962, when Egypt devalued slightly and switched to a peg to the United States dollar, at a rate of EG£1 = US$2.3. This peg was changed to 1 pound = 2.55555 dollars in 1973 when the dollar was devalued. The pound was itself devalued in 1978 to a peg of 1 pound = 1.42857 dollars (1 dollar = 0.7 pound). The pound floated in 1989. However, until 2001, the float was tightly managed by the Central Bank of Egypt
Egypt
and foreign exchange controls were in effect. The Central Bank of Egypt
Egypt
voted to end the managed-float regime and allowed the pound to float freely on 3 November 2016;[4] the bank also announced an end to foreign exchange controls that day.[5] The official rate fell twofold. The Egyptian pound
Egyptian pound
was also used in Anglo-Egyptian Sudan
Sudan
between 1899 and 1956, and Cyrenaica
Cyrenaica
when it was under British occupation and later an independent emirate between 1942 and 1951. The National Bank of Egypt
Egypt
issued banknotes for the first time on 3 April 1899. The Central Bank of Egypt
Egypt
and the National Bank of Egypt
Egypt
were unified into the Central Bank of Egypt
Egypt
in 1961. Popular denominations and nomenclature[edit] Used for historical values or jocularly[edit] Several unofficial popular names are used to refer to different values of Egyptian currency. These include (from the word nickel) nekla (نكلة) [ˈneklæ] for 2 milliemes, ta'rifa (تعريفة) [tæʕˈɾiːfæ] for 5 milliemes, shelen (شلن) [ˈʃelen] (i.e. a shilling) for 5 piastres, bariza (بريزة) [bæˈɾiːzæ] for 10 piastres, and reyal (ريال) [ɾeˈjæːl] ("real") for 20 piastres. Since the piastre and millieme are no longer legal tender, the smallest denomination currently minted being the 25-piastre coin (functioning as one-quarter of one pound), these terms have mostly fallen into disuse and survive as curios. A few have survived to refer to pounds: bariza now refers to a ten-pound note and reyal can be used in reference to a 20-pound note. Informal[edit] Different sums of EGP have special nicknames, for example: 1,000 EGP baku (باكو) [ˈbæːku] "pack"; 1,000,000 EGP arnab (أرنب) [ˈʔæɾnæb] "rabbit"; 1,000,000,000 EGP feel (فيل) [fiːl] "elephant". Coins[edit] Between 1837 and 1900, copper 1 and 5 para, silver 10 and 20 para, 1, 5, 10 and 20 piastre, gold 5, 10 and 20 piastre and 1 pound coins were introduced, with gold 50 piastre coins following in 1839. (1para = ​1⁄40 Piastre). Copper
Copper
10 para coins were introduced in 1853, although the silver coin continued to be issued. Copper
Copper
10 para coins were again introduced in 1862, followed by copper 4 para and 2​1⁄2 piastre coins in 1863. Gold
Gold
25 piastre coins were introduced in 1867. In 1885, a new coinage was introduced consisting of bronze ​1⁄4, ​1⁄2, 1, 2 and 5 millieme, silver 1, 2, 5, 10 and 20 piastre coins. The gold coinage practically ceased, with only small numbers of 5 and 10 piastre coins issued. In 1916 and 1917, a new base metal coinage was introduced consisting of bronze ​1⁄2 millieme and holed, cupro-nickel 1, 2, 5 and 10 millieme coins. Silver
Silver
2, 5, 10 and 20 piastre coins continued to be issued, and a gold 1 pound coin was reintroduced. Between 1922 and 1923, the gold coinage was extended to include 20 and 50 piastre and 1 and 5 pound coins. In 1924, bronze replaced cupro-nickel in the 1 millieme coin and the holes were removed from the other cupro-nickel coins. In 1938, bronze 5 and 10 millieme coins were introduced, followed in 1944 by silver, hexagonal 2 piastre coins. Between 1954 and 1956, a new coinage was introduced, consisting of aluminium-bronze 1, 5 and 10 millieme and silver 5, 10 and 20 piastre coins, with the size of the silver coinage significantly reduced. An aluminium-bronze 2 millieme coin was introduced in 1962. In 1967 the silver coinage was abandoned and cupro-nickel 5 and 10 piastre coins were introduced. Aluminium replaced aluminium-bronze in the 1, 5 and 10 millieme coins in 1972, followed by brass in the 5 and 10 millieme coins in 1973. Aluminium-bronze 2 piastre and cupro-nickel 20 piastre coins were introduced in 1980, followed by aluminium-bronze 1 and 5 piastre coins in 1984. In 1992, brass 5 and 10 piastre coins were introduced, followed by holed, cupro-nickel 25 piastre coins in 1993. The size of 5 piastre coins was reduced in 2004, 10 and 25 piastre coins - in 2008. On June 1, 2006, 50 piastre and 1 pound coins dated 2005 were introduced, and the equivalent banknotes were phased out and completely disappeared from circulation in 2010. The coins bear the face of Cleopatra VII
Cleopatra VII
and Tutankhamun's mask, and the 1 pound coin is bimetallic. The size and composition of 50 piastre coins was reduced in 2007.

Coins in circulation[6]

Value Debut Image Specifications Description

Obverse Reverse Diameter (mm) Thickness (mm) Mass (g) Composition Obverse Reverse

5 pt * 1984

23 1.2 4.9 Copper
Copper
95% Aluminum
Aluminum
5% 3 pyramids of Giza

جمهورية مصر العربية ("Arab Republic of Egypt") Value in Arabic Hijri and Gregorian year
Gregorian year
in Arabic

1992

21 1.1 3.2 Copper
Copper
92% Aluminum
Aluminum
8% Islamic pottery

2004/2008 17 1.04 2.4 Steel
Steel
94% Nickel
Nickel
2% Copper
Copper
plating 4%

10 pt * 1984

25 1.35 5.2 Copper
Copper
75% Nickel
Nickel
25% Mosque of Muhammad Ali

1992

23 1.2 4.9 Copper
Copper
95% Aluminum
Aluminum
5%

2008

19 1.1 3.2 Steel
Steel
94% Copper
Copper
2% Nickel
Nickel
plating 4%

20 pt * 1984

27 1.4 6 Copper
Copper
75% Nickel
Nickel
25%

1992

25 1.35 5.2 Copper
Copper
95% Aluminum
Aluminum
5% Al-Azhar mosque

25 pt 1993 *

1.4

Islamic illustration Value in Arabic
Arabic
and in English

جمهورية مصر العربية ("Arab Republic of Egypt") Hijri and Gregorian year
Gregorian year
in Arabic

2008

21 1.26 4.5 Steel
Steel
94% Copper
Copper
2% Nickel
Nickel
plating 4%

50 pt 2005

25 1.58 6.5 Copper
Copper
75% Zinc
Zinc
20% Nickel
Nickel
5%

Cleopatra's head Hijri and Gregorian year
Gregorian year
in Arabic

جمهورية مصر العربية ("Arab Republic of Egypt") Value in Arabic
Arabic
and in English

2007 23 1.7 Steel
Steel
94% Nickel
Nickel
2% Copper
Copper
plating 4%

£1 ** 2005

25 1.89 8.5 Bimetal Tutankhamun's mask

جمهورية مصر العربية ("Arab Republic of Egypt") Value in Arabic
Arabic
and in English Hijri and Gregorian year
Gregorian year
in Arabic

Ring Centre

Copper
Copper
75% Nickel
Nickel
25% Copper
Copper
75% Zinc
Zinc
20% Nickel
Nickel
5%

2007/2008 1.96 Steel
Steel
94% Copper
Copper
2% Nickel
Nickel
plating 4% Steel
Steel
94% Nickel
Nickel
2% Copper
Copper
plating 4%

* Not in circulation as of 2008. ** As to commemorate the branching of the Suez canal, the obverse had the Arabic
Arabic
phrase, قناة السويس الجديدة "New Suez Canal". Banknotes[edit] In 1899, the National Bank of Egypt
Egypt
introduced notes in denominations of 50 piastres, £1, £5, £10, £50 and £100 were introduced. Between 1916 and 1917, 25 piastre notes were added, together with government currency notes for 5 and 10 piastres. Issued intermittently, the 5 and 10 piastres are today produced by the Ministry of Finance. In 1961, the Central Bank of Egypt
Egypt
took over from the National Bank and issued notes in denominations of 25 and 50 piastres, £1, £5, £10 and £20 notes were introduced in 1976, followed by £100 in 1978, £50 in 1993 and £200 in 2007.[7] All Egyptian banknotes are bilingual, with Arabic
Arabic
texts and Arabic-Indic numerals
Arabic-Indic numerals
on the obverse, and English texts and Arabic numerals on the reverse. Obverse designs tend to feature an Islamic building with reverse designs featuring Ancient Egyptian motifs (buildings, statues and inscriptions). During December 2006, it was mentioned in articles in Al Ahram and Al Akhbar newspapers that there were plans to introduce £200 and £500 notes. As of 2015, there are £200 notes circulating but there are still no plans for making £500 notes.[8] Starting from 2011 the 25, 50 piastres and £1 banknotes have been phased out and replaced by more extensive use of coins. As of June 2016 the National Bank of Egypt
Egypt
reintroduced the £1 banknote into circulation[9] as well as the 25 and 50 piastres notes.

Current series of the Egyptian pound

Image Value Dimensions (millimeters) Main color Description Year of first issue

Obverse Reverse Obverse Reverse

25pt 130 × 70 Blue Ayesha mosque Coat of arms of Egypt 1985

50pt 135 × 70 Brown Al-Azhar Mosque Ramesses II 1985

£1 140 × 70 Orange Mosque of Qaitbay Abu Simbel temples 1978

£5 145 × 70 Bluish-green Mosque of Ibn Tulun A Pharaonic engraving of Hapi (god of the annual flooding of the Nile) offering bounties. 1981

£10 150 × 70 Pink Al Rifa'i Mosque Khafra 2003

£20 155 × 70 Green Mosque of Muhammad Ali A Pharaonic war chariot and frieze from the chapel of Sesostris I 1978

£50 160 × 70 Brownish-red Abu Huraiba Mosque Temple of Edfu 1993

£100 165 × 70 Purple Sultan Hassan Mosque Sphinx 1994

£200 175 × 80 Olive Mosque of Qani-Bay The Seated Scribe 2007

Historical and current exchange rates[edit] Pound sterling[edit] This table shows the value of one British pound sterling in Egyptian pounds:

Date Official rate

1885 to 1949 E£0.975

2008 E£10.0775

2009 E£8.50

2012 E£9.68

2014 E£11.97 to E£12.03

2016 E£12.60 to E£21.21

US dollar[edit]

The historical value of one U.S. dollar in Egyptian pounds from 1885 to 2009

This table shows the historical value of 1.00 US dollar
US dollar
in Egyptian pounds:

Date Official rate

1789 to 1799 E£0.03

1800 to 1824 E£0.06

1825 to 1884 E£0.14

1885 to 1939 E£0.20

1940 to 1949 E£0.25

1950 to 1967 E£0.36

1968 to 1978 E£0.40

1979 to 1988 E£0.60

1989 E£0.83

1990 E£1.50

1991 E£3.00

1992 E£3.33

1993 to 1998 E£3.39

1999 E£3.40

2000 E£3.42 to E£3.75

2001 E£3.75 to E£4.50

2002 E£4.50 to E£4.62

2003 E£4.82 to E£6.25

2004 E£6.13 to E£6.28

2005 to 2006 E£5.75

2007 E£5.64 to E£5.5

2008 E£5.5 to E£5.29

2009 E£5.75

2010 E£5.80

2011 E£5.95

2012 E£6.36

2013 E£6.5 to E£6.96

2014 E£6.95 to E£7.15

2015 E£7.15 to E£11.00

2016 E£15.00 to E£18.00

2017 E£17.70 to E£17.83

See also[edit]

Economy of Egypt British currency in the Middle East

Current EGP exchange rates

From Google Finance: AUD CAD CHF EUR GBP HKD JPY USD ILS JOD TRY

From Yahoo! Finance: AUD CAD CHF EUR GBP HKD JPY USD ILS JOD TRY

From XE: AUD CAD CHF EUR GBP HKD JPY USD ILS JOD TRY

From OANDA: AUD CAD CHF EUR GBP HKD JPY USD ILS JOD TRY

From fxtop.com: AUD CAD CHF EUR GBP HKD JPY USD ILS JOD TRY

References[edit]

^ [1][dead link] ^ Cuhaj, George S., ed. (2009). Standard Catalog of World Paper Money Specialized Issues (11 ed.). Krause. p. 1070. ISBN 978-1-4402-0450-0.  ^ Markus A. Denzel (2010). Handbook of World Exchange Rates, 1590-1914. Ashgate Publishing. p. 599. ISBN 978-0-7546-0356-6. The piastre of 1839 contained 1.146 grammes of fine silver, the piastre of 1801 approximately 4.6 grammes of fine silver. The most important Egyptian coins, the bedidlik in gold (= 100 piastres; 7.487 grammes of fine gold) and the rial in silver (20 piastres; 23.294 grammes of fine silver)  ^ Feteha, Ahmed; Shahine, Alaa (3 November 2016). " Egypt
Egypt
Free Floats Pound, Raises Lending Rates to Spur Economy". Bloomberg. Retrieved 3 November 2016.  ^ "CBE not to impose restrictions on foreign currency exchange". Egypt Independent. 3 November 2016. Retrieved 3 November 2016.  ^ "Wayback Machine". Web.archive.org. 10 December 2004. Retrieved 15 October 2017.  ^ "Nach Thund". Nachthund.biz. Retrieved 15 October 2017.  ^ ""المركزى": تراجع قيمة الجنيه لن يدفعنا لطرح ورقة نقدية من فئة 500 - اليوم السابع". Youm7.com. 15 September 2012. Retrieved 15 October 2017.  ^ [2][dead link]

Bibliography[edit]

Krause, Chester L.; Clifford Mishler (1991). Standard Catalog of World Coins: 1801–1991 (18th ed.). Krause Publications. ISBN 0873411501.  Pick, Albert (1994). Standard Catalog of World Paper Money: General Issues. Colin R. Bruce II and Neil Shafer (editors) (7th ed.). Krause Publications. ISBN 0-87341-207-9. 

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Money of Egypt.

Central Bank of Egypt Historical and current banknotes of Egypt Information about Egyptian money

v t e

Economy of Egypt

Currency: Egyptian pound

Communications

Telecommunications Transportation

Industries:

Agriculture Tourism

v t e

Currencies of Africa

North

Algerian dinar Egyptian pound Euro

Plazas de soberanía

Libyan dinar Mauritanian ouguiya Moroccan dirham Sahrawi peseta
Sahrawi peseta
(unrecognized) Sudanese pound Tunisian dinar

Central

Angolan kwanza Burundian franc Central African CFA franc

Cameroon Central African Republic Chad Republic of the Congo Equatorial Guinea Gabon

Congolese franc Rwandan franc

East

Comorian franc Djiboutian franc Eritrean nakfa Ethiopian birr Kenyan shilling Seychellois rupee Somali shilling Somaliland shilling
Somaliland shilling
(unrecognized) South Sudanese pound Tanzanian shilling Ugandan shilling

South

Botswana pula British pound sterling

Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Zimbabwe

Euro

French Southern and Antarctic Lands Mayotte Réunion Zimbabwe

Lesotho
Lesotho
loti Malagasy ariary Malawian kwacha Mauritian rupee Mozambican metical Namibian dollar Saint Helena pound South African rand

Lesotho Namibia Swaziland Zimbabwe

Swazi lilangeni U.S. dollar

Zimbabwe

Zambian kwacha Zimbabwean dollar
Zimbabwean dollar
(defunct due to hyperinflation since April 2009) Zimbabwean bond coins
Zimbabwean bond coins
(since 18 December 2014 - denominated in U.S. Cents) Zimbabwean bond notes
Zimbabwean bond notes
(since 28 November 2016 - denominated in U.S. Dollars)

West

Cape Verdean escudo Euro

Canary Islands Madeira

Gambian dalasi Ghanaian cedi Guinean franc Liberian dollar Nigerian naira São Tomé and Príncipe dobra Sierra Leonean leone West African CFA franc

Benin Burkina Faso Guinea-Bissau Ivory Coast Mali Niger Senegal Togo

v t e

Currencies of Asia

Central

Kazakhstani tenge Kyrgyzstani som Tajikistani somoni Turkmenistan manat Uzbekistani soʻm

East

Chinese yuan Hong Kong dollar Japanese yen North Korean won South Korean won Macanese pataca Mongolian tögrög New Taiwan dollar

unrecognized

North

Russian ruble

South

Afghan afghani Bangladeshi taka Bhutanese ngultrum Indian rupee Maldivian rufiyaa Nepalese rupee Pakistani rupee Sri Lankan rupee Pound sterling

British Indian Ocean Territory

U.S. dollar

British Indian Ocean Territory

Southeast

Brunei dollar Burmese kyat Cambodian riel East Timorese centavo Indonesian rupiah Lao kip Malaysian ringgit Philippine peso
Philippine peso
(piso) Singapore dollar Thai baht U.S. dollar

East Timor

Vietnamese đồng

West

Abkhazian apsar

unrecognized

Armenian dram Artsakh dram

unrecognized

Azerbaijani manat Bahraini dinar Egyptian pound

Gaza Strip

Euro

Cyprus

Georgian lari Iranian rial Iraqi dinar Israeli new shekel Jordanian dinar Kuwaiti dinar Lebanese pound Omani rial Russian ruble
Russian ruble
( Abkhazia
Abkhazia
(unrecognized) and South Ossetia (unrecognized)) Qatari riyal Saudi riyal Syrian pound Turkish lira UAE dirham Yemeni rial

v t e

Currencies named pound or similar

Current

Pound sterling: (Alderney pound • Falkland Islands pound • Gibraltar pound • Guernsey pound • Jersey pound • Manx pound • Saint Helena pound) Egyptian pound Lebanese pound South Sudanese pound Sudanese pound Syrian pound Turkish lira

Local alternative currency

Bristol Pound Brixton Pound Lewes Pound Stroud Pound Totnes Pound

Defunct

Anglo-Saxon pound Australian pound Bahamian pound Bermudian pound Biafran pound British West African pound Canadian pound Connecticut pound Cypriot pound Delaware pound Fijian pound French livre:(Livre parisis • Livre tournois) French colonial livre: ( Guadeloupe livre  • Haitian livre • New France livre • Saint Lucia livre) Gambian pound Georgia pound Ghanaian pound Irish pound Israeli pound Jamaican pound Japanese government-issued Oceanian Pound Libyan pound Lombardo-Venetian pound Luccan pound Luxembourgish livre Malawian pound Maltese pound Maltese lira Maryland pound Massachusetts pound New Brunswick pound New Guinean pound New Hampshire pound New Jersey pound New York pound New Zealand pound Newfoundland pound Nigerian pound North Carolina pound Nova Scotian pound Oceanian pound Ottoman lira Palestine pound Papal lira Parman lira Pennsylvania pound Pound Scots Prince Edward Island pound Rhode Island pound Rhodesian pound Rhodesia and Nyasaland pound Sammarinese lira Sardinian lira Solomon Islands pound South Carolina pound Southern Rhodesian pound South African pound South African Republic pound South West African pound Tongan pound Tuscan pound Vatican lira Virginia pound West Indian pound Western Samoan pound Zambian pound

See also

Dinar Pou

.