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Edwin Corley Moses (born August 31, 1955) is an American former track and field athlete who won gold medals in the 400 m hurdles at the 1976 and 1984 Olympics. Between 1977 and 1987, Moses won 107 consecutive finals (122 consecutive races) and set the world record in the event four times. In addition to his running, Moses was also an innovative reformer in the areas of Olympic eligibility and drug testing. In 2000, he was elected the first Chairman of the Laureus World Sports Academy, an international service organization of world-class athletes.[1]

Contents

1 Competition in 400m hurdles 2 Eligibility reforms 3 Awards 4 Drug testing 5 Other achievements 6 Personal life 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External links

Competition in 400m hurdles[edit] Moses was born in Dayton, Ohio. Having accepted an academic scholarship to Morehouse College
Morehouse College
in Atlanta, Georgia, he majored in physics and industrial engineering, while competing for the school track team. Morehouse did not have its own track, so he used public high school facilities around the city to train and run. Initially, Moses competed mostly in the 120-yard hurdles and 440-yard dash. Before March 1976, he ran only one 400 m hurdles race, but once he began focusing on the event he made remarkable progress. With his height of 6'2", Moses' trademark technique was to take a consistent 13 steps between each of the hurdles, pulling away in the second half of the race as his rivals often took 15 strides[4] or changed their stride pattern.[citation needed] That year, he qualified for the U.S. team for the 1976 Summer Olympics
Summer Olympics
in Montreal. In his first international meet, Moses won the gold medal ahead of teammate Mike Shine while setting a world record of 47.63 seconds in the process. After breaking his own world record the following year at the Drake Stadium with a time of 47.45 seconds, Moses lost to West Germany's Harald Schmid
Harald Schmid
on August 26, 1977 in Berlin; this was his fourth defeat in the 400 m hurdles. Beginning the next week, Moses beat Schmid by 15 metres (49 ft) in Düsseldorf, and he did not lose another race for nine years, nine months and nine days. Moses qualified for the 1980 U.S. Olympic team but was unable to compete due to the 1980 Summer Olympics
Summer Olympics
boycott. He did however receive one of 461 Congressional Gold Medals created especially for the spurned athletes.[5] In the 1984 Olympics held in Los Angeles, Moses was selected to recite the Olympic Oath, but forgot the text during his presentation. [4] He went on to win his second Olympic gold medal. By the time American Danny Harris
Danny Harris
beat Moses in Madrid
Madrid
on June 4, 1987, Moses had won 122 consecutive races, set the world record two more times, won three World Cup titles, a World Championship gold, as well as his two Olympic gold medals. After the lost to Harris, he went on to win 10 more races in a row, collecting his second world gold in Rome in August of the same year. Moses finished third in the final 400m hurdles race of his career at the 1988 Summer Olympics
Summer Olympics
in Seoul. Eligibility reforms[edit] In 1979 Moses took a leave of absence from his job with General Dynamics to devote himself to running full-time. In the next two years, he was instrumental in reforming international and Olympic eligibility rules. At his urging, an Athletes Trust Fund program was established to allow athletes to benefit from government- or privately supplied stipends, direct payments, and commercial endorsement money without jeopardizing their Olympic eligibility. Moses presented the plan to Juan Antonio Samaranch, President of the International Olympic Committee, and the concept was ratified in 1981. This fund is the basis of many Olympic athlete subsistence, stipend and corporate support programs, including the United States
United States
Olympic Committee's Direct Athlete Assistance Programs. Awards[edit] Despite the U.S. led boycott that kept him from competing at the summer games in Moscow, Moses was the 1980 Track & Field News Athlete of the Year. A year later, he became the first recipient of USA Track & Field's Jesse Owens Award
Jesse Owens Award
as outstanding U.S. track and field performer for 1981. He received the AAU's James E. Sullivan Award as outstanding amateur athlete in the United States
United States
in 1983. He was being named as ABC's Wide World of Sports Athlete of the Year in 1984. Moses also shared the Sports Illustrated
Sports Illustrated
Sportsman of the Year with American gymnast Mary Lou Retton
Mary Lou Retton
in 1984, the same year he took the Athlete's Oath for the 1984 Summer Olympics.[1] In 1984 his hometown of Dayton renamed Miami Boulevard West and Sunrise Avenue "Edwin C. Moses Boulevard". In 1999, Moses ranked #47 on ESPN's SportCentury 50 Greatest Athletes. Drug testing[edit] As a sports administrator, Moses participated in the development of a number of anti-drug policies and helped the track and field community develop one of sports' most stringent random in-competition drug testing systems. In December 1988 he designed and created amateur sports' first random out-of-competition drug testing program. Other achievements[edit] After his retirement from track, Moses competed in a 1990 World Cup bobsled race at Winterberg, Germany. He and long-time US Olympian Brian Shimer
Brian Shimer
won the two-man bronze medal. In 1994 Moses received an MBA from Pepperdine University
Pepperdine University
and was inducted into the National Track and Field Hall of Fame.[6] Since election in 2000, Moses has been chairman of the Laureus World Sports Academy, which seeks "to promote and increase participation in sport at every level, and also to promote the use of sport as a tool for social change around the world." [7] Several dozen Olympic and world champion athletes, through the Laureus Sports for Good Foundation, work to assist disadvantaged youths around the world. In 2008, Moses presented the Dayton Literary Peace Prize's Lifetime Achievement Award to Martin Luther King, Jr., biographer Taylor Branch. In May 2009, the University of Massachusetts Boston
University of Massachusetts Boston
awarded Moses an honorary doctorate for his efforts to maintain the integrity of Olympic sports and for his use of sports as a tool for positive social change. Personal life[edit] Moses is a vegetarian, humanitarian and advocate for peace.[8][9] Moses has one son, Julian, born on August 29, 1995, in southern California. He married Michelle Moses in February 2007. References[edit]

^ a b c d e "Edwin Moses". sports-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved June 10, 2015.  ^ a b c "Edwin Moses". usatf.org. USA Track & Field. Retrieved June 10, 2015.  ^ Edwin Moses. trackfield.brinkster.net ^ a b He's Hurdled into History, New York Times, Dave Anderson, Aug. 6, 1984. ^ Caroccioli, Tom; Caroccioli, Jerry. Boycott: Stolen Dreams of the 1980 Moscow Olympic Games. Highland Park, IL: New Chapter Press. pp. 243–253. ISBN 978-0942257403.  ^ "Edwin Moses... The Icon: Biography & Stats". The Official Website of Edwin Moses.  ^ "Laureus". laureus.com.  ^ Finn, Adharanand (July 30, 2012). "Olympic vegetarians: the elite athletes who shun meat". The Guardian. London.  ^ "Top 10 Historic Vegetarian and Vegan Olympians". SikhNet. July 30, 2012. 

Further reading[edit]

"Edwin Moses: An Era Unto Himself" (1999). In ESPN
ESPN
SportsCentury. Michael MacCambridge, Editor. New York: Hyperion- ESPN
ESPN
Books. pp. 254–5. Edwin Moses
Edwin Moses
profile at IAAF IOC 1984 Summer Olympics Schwartz, Larry. Moses made winning look easy. ESPN.com. Edwin Moses
Edwin Moses
Biography. Major Taylor Association, Inc.

External links[edit]

The Official Edwin Moses
Edwin Moses
Website Georgia Sports Hall of Fame

Awards and achievements

Preceded by Sebastian Coe Men's Track & Field Athlete of the Year 1980 Succeeded by Sebastian Coe

Sporting positions

Preceded by Jim Bolding Men's 400 m Hurdles Best Year Performance 1976–1981 Succeeded by Harald Schmid

Preceded by Harald Schmid Men's 400 m Hurdles Best Year Performance 1983–1984 Succeeded by Danny Harris

Preceded by Danny Harris Men's 400 m Hurdles Best Year Performance 1986–1987 Succeeded by Andre Phillips

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Sports Illustrated
Sports Illustrated
Sportsperson of the Year

1954: Roger Bannister 1955: Johnny Podres 1956: Bobby Morrow 1957: Stan Musial 1958: Rafer Johnson 1959: Ingemar Johansson 1960: Arnold Palmer 1961: Jerry Lucas 1962: Terry Baker 1963: Pete Rozelle 1964: Ken Venturi 1965: Sandy Koufax 1966: Jim Ryun 1967: Carl Yastrzemski 1968: Bill Russell 1969: Tom Seaver 1970: Bobby Orr 1971: Lee Trevino 1972: Billie Jean King
Billie Jean King
& John Wooden 1973: Jackie Stewart 1974: Muhammad Ali 1975: Pete Rose 1976: Chris Evert 1977: Steve Cauthen 1978: Jack Nicklaus 1979: Terry Bradshaw
Terry Bradshaw
& Willie Stargell 1980: U.S. Olympic Hockey Team 1981: Sugar Ray Leonard 1982: Wayne Gretzky 1983: Mary Decker 1984: Edwin Moses
Edwin Moses
& Mary Lou Retton 1985: Kareem Abdul-Jabbar 1986: Joe Paterno 1987: Bob Bourne, Judi Brown King, Kipchoge Keino, Dale Murphy, Chip Rives, Patty Sheehan, Rory Sparrow, & Reggie Williams 1988: Orel Hershiser 1989: Greg LeMond 1990: Joe Montana 1991: Michael Jordan 1992: Arthur Ashe 1993: Don Shula 1994: Bonnie Blair
Bonnie Blair
& Johann Olav Koss 1995: Cal Ripken Jr. 1996: Tiger Woods 1997: Dean Smith 1998: Mark McGwire
Mark McGwire
& Sammy Sosa 1999: U.S. Women's Soccer Team 2000: Tiger Woods 2001: Curt Schilling
Curt Schilling
& Randy Johnson 2002: Lance Armstrong 2003: David Robinson & Tim Duncan 2004: Boston Red Sox 2005: Tom Brady 2006: Dwyane Wade 2007: Brett Favre 2008: Michael Phelps 2009: Derek Jeter 2010: Drew Brees 2011: Mike Krzyzewski
Mike Krzyzewski
& Pat Summitt 2012: LeBron James 2013: Peyton Manning 2014: Madison Bumgarner 2015: Serena Williams 2016: LeBron James 2017: José Altuve
José Altuve
& J. J. Watt

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Laureus Lifetime Achievement Award

2000: Pelé 2001: Steve Redgrave 2002: Peter Blake 2003: Gary Player 2004: Arne Næss Jr. 2005: No award 2006: Johan Cruyff 2007: Franz Beckenbauer 2008: Sergey Bubka 2009: No award 2010: Nawal El Moutawakel 2011: Zinedine Zidane 2012: Bobby Charlton 2013: Sebastian Coe 2014: No award 2015: No award 2016: Niki Lauda 2017: No award 2018: Edwin Moses

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Olympic champions in men's 400 metres hurdles

1900  Walter Tewksbury (USA) 1904  Harry Hillman (USA) 1908  Charles Bacon (USA) 1920  Frank Loomis (USA) 1924  Morgan Taylor (USA) 1928  David Burghley (GBR) 1932  Bob Tisdall (IRL) 1936  Glenn Hardin (USA) 1948  Roy Cochran (USA) 1952  Charles Moore (USA) 1956  Glenn Davis (USA) 1960  Glenn Davis (USA) 1964  Rex Cawley (USA) 1968  David Hemery (GBR) 1972  John Akii-Bua (UGA) 1976  Edwin Moses (USA) 1980  Volker Beck (GDR) 1984  Edwin Moses (USA) 1988  Andre Phillips (USA) 1992  Kevin Young (USA) 1996  Derrick Adkins (USA) 2000  Angelo Taylor (USA) 2004  Félix Sánchez (DOM) 2008  Angelo Taylor (USA) 2012  Félix Sánchez (DOM) 2016  Kerron Clement (USA)

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IAAF World Championships in Athletics
IAAF World Championships in Athletics
champions in men's 400 metres hurdles

1983: Edwin Moses
Edwin Moses
(USA) 1987: Edwin Moses
Edwin Moses
(USA) 1991: Samuel Matete (ZAM) 1993: Kevin Young (USA) 1995: Derrick Adkins
Derrick Adkins
(USA) 1997: Stéphane Diagana
Stéphane Diagana
(FRA) 1999: Fabrizio Mori (ITA) 2001: Félix Sánchez
Félix Sánchez
(DOM) 2003: Félix Sánchez
Félix Sánchez
(DOM) 2005: Bershawn Jackson
Bershawn Jackson
(USA) 2007: Kerron Clement
Kerron Clement
(USA) 2009: Kerron Clement
Kerron Clement
(USA) 2011: Dai Greene
Dai Greene
(GBR) 2013: Jehue Gordon
Jehue Gordon
(TRI) 2015: Nicholas Bett
Nicholas Bett
(KEN) 2017: Karsten Warholm
Karsten Warholm
(NOR)

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IAAF World / Continental Cup champions in men's 400 metres hurdles

1977–1981: Edwin Moses
Edwin Moses
(USA) 1985: Andre Phillips (USA) 1989: Dave Patrick (USA) 1992–1998: Samuel Matete (ZAM) 2002: James Carter (USA) 2006: Kerron Clement
Kerron Clement
(USA) 2010: Dai Greene
Dai Greene
(GBR) 2014: Cornel Fredericks
Cornel Fredericks
(RSA)

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US National Championship winners in men's 400 m/440 yd hurdles

1914–1979 Amateur Athletic Union

1914–15: Bill Meanix 1916: Walter Hummel 1917: Floyd Smart 1918: Donald Hause 1919: Floyd Smart 1920: Frank Loomis 1921: August Desch 1922: Joseph Hall 1923: Ivan Riley 1924–26: Morgan Taylor 1927: Johnny Gibson 1928: Morgan Taylor 1929: Gordon Allott 1930: Dick Pomeroy 1931: Victor Burke 1932: Joe Healey 1933–34: Glenn Hardin 1935: Tom Moore 1936: Glenn Hardin 1937–38: Jack Patterson 1939: Roy Cochran 1940: Carl McBain 1941: Arky Erwin 1942: Walter Smith 1943–46: Arky Erwin 1947: Walter Smith 1948: Roy Cochran 1949–52: Charles Moore 1953–55: Josh Culbreath 1956–58: Glenn Davis 1959: Dick Howard 1960: Glenn Davis 1961: Cliff Cushman 1962: Willie Atterberry 1963: Rex Cawley 1964: Billy Hardin 1965: Rex Cawley 1966: Jim Miller 1967–68: Ron Whitney 1969–71: Ralph Mann 1972: Dick Bruggeman 1973–74: Jim Bolding 1975: Ralph Mann 1976: Tom Andrews 1977: Edwin Moses 1978: James Walker 1979: Edwin Moses

1980–1992 The Athletics Congress

1980: David Lee 1981: Edwin Moses 1982: David Patrick 1983: Edwin Moses 1984: David Patrick 1985: Andre Phillips 1986: Danny Harris 1987: Edwin Moses 1988: Kevin Henderson 1989–90: David Patrick 1991: Danny Harris 1992: Kevin Young

1993–present USA Track & Field

1993: Kevin Young 1994–95: Derrick Adkins 1996–98: Bryan Bronson 1999–2001: Angelo Taylor 2002: James Carter 2003: Eric Thomas 2004: James Carter 2005–06: Kerron Clement 2007: James Carter 2008–10: Bershawn Jackson 2011: Jeshua Anderson 2012–13: Michael Tinsley 2014: Johnny Dutch 2015: Bershawn Jackson 2016: Kerron Clement 2017: Eric Futch

Notes

440 yd hurdles 1914–27, 1929–31, 1953–55, 1957–58, 1961–63, 1965–67, 1969–71 and 1973; 400 m hurdles otherwise.

The 1920, 1928, 1932, 1992, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2008, 2012 and 2016 championships incorporated the Olympic Trials, otherwise held as a discrete event.

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James E. Sullivan Award
James E. Sullivan Award
winners

1930: Jones 1931: Berlinger 1932: Bausch 1933: Cunningham 1934: Bonthron 1935: Little 1936: Morris 1937: Budge 1938: Lash 1939: Burk 1940: Rice 1941: MacMitchell 1942: Warmerdam 1943: Dodds 1944: Curtis 1945: Blanchard 1946: Tucker 1947: Kelly Jr. 1948: Mathias 1949: Button 1950: Wilt 1951: Richards 1952: Ashenfelter 1953: Lee 1954: Whitfield 1955: Dillard 1956: McCormick 1957: Morrow 1958: Davis 1959: O'Brien 1960: R. Johnson 1961: Rudolph 1962: Beatty 1963: Pennel 1964: Schollander 1965: Bradley 1966: Ryun 1967: Matson 1968: Meyer 1969: Toomey 1970: Kinsella 1971: Spitz 1972: Shorter 1973: Walton 1974: Wohlhuter 1975: Shaw 1976: Jenner 1977: Naber 1978: Caulkins 1979: Thomas 1980: Heiden 1981: Lewis 1982: Decker 1983: Moses 1984: Louganis 1985: Benoit 1986: Joyner-Kersee 1987: Abbott 1988: Griffith Joyner 1989: Evans 1990: Smith 1991: Powell 1992: Blair 1993: Ward 1994: Jansen 1995: Baumgartner 1996: M. Johnson 1997: Manning 1998: Holdsclaw 1999: C. Miller & K. Miller 2000: Gardner 2001: Kwan 2002: Hughes 2003: Phelps 2004: Hamm 2005: Redick 2006: Long 2007: Tebow 2008: S. Johnson 2009: Palmeiro-Winters 2010: Lysacek 2011: Rodriguez 2012: Franklin 2013: Urschel 2014: Elliott 2015: Stewart & Reynolds 2016: Carlini

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IAAF Hall of Fame

Jesse Owens Abebe Bikila Paavo Nurmi Sergey Bubka Sebastian Coe Carl Lewis Emil Zátopek Al Oerter Adhemar da Silva Edwin Moses Fanny Blankers-Koen Betty Cuthbert Jackie Joyner-Kersee Wang Junxia Irena Szewińska1 Michael Johnson2 Dan O'Brien2 Babe Zaharias2 Alberto Juantorena3 Kip Keino4 Peter Snell5 Vladimir Golubnichiy6 Iolanda Balaș7 Stefka Kostadinova7 Harrison Dillard8 Marjorie Jackson8 Hannes Kolehmainen8 Natalya Lisovskaya8 Svetlana Masterkova8 Noureddine Morceli8 Parry O'Brien8 Marie-José Pérec8 Viktor Saneyev8 Yuriy Sedykh8 Daley Thompson8 Grete Waitz8 Valeriy Brumel9 Glenn Davis9 Heike Drechsler9 Hicham El Guerrouj9 Marita Koch9 Robert Korzeniowski9 Jānis Lūsis9 Bob Mathias9 Wilma Rudolph9 Shirley Strickland de la Hunty9 Lasse Virén9 Cornelius Warmerdam9

New entry 1May 17, 2012 2June 6, 2012 3June 11, 2012 4July 2, 2012 5August 4, 2012 6September 15, 2012 7October 13, 2012 8November 16, 2013 9November 21, 2014

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1976 USA Olympic Track & Field Team

Qualification

1976 United States
United States
Olympic Trials (track and field)

Men's track & road athletes

Garry Bjorklund Benny Brown (r) Doug Brown Dick Buerkle Matt Centrowitz Willie Davenport Mike Durkin Mark Enyeart Dwayne Evans Charles Foster Herman Frazier Paul Geis Harvey Glance Millard Hampton Johnny "Lam" Jones Don Kardong Ron Laird Mark Lutz Duncan MacDonald Henry Marsh Ed Mendoza Edwin Moses Fred Newhouse James Owens Maxie Parks Steve Riddick James Robinson Mike Roche Bill Rodgers Todd Scully Mike Shine Frank Shorter Craig Virgin Larry Walker Quentin Wheeler Rick Wohlhuter

Men's field athletes

James Barrineau Earl Bell James Butts Sam Colson Fred Dixon Rayfield Dupree Al Feuerbach Richard George Anthony Hall Larry Hart Tommy Haynes Bill Jankunis Bruce Jenner Larry Myricks Terry Porter John Powell Dave Roberts Arnie Robinson Fred Samara Pete Shmock Jay Silvester Dwight Stones Mac Wilkins Randy Williams George Woods

Women's track athletes

Debra Armstrong Evelyn Ashford Rhonda Brady Rosalyn Bryant Chandra Cheeseborough Pat Donnelly Sheila Ingram Madeline Manning
Madeline Manning
Jackson Pam Jiles (r) Wendy Knudson Francie Larrieu Jan Merrill Brenda Morehead Deby LaPlante Cynthia Poor Debra Sapenter Martha Watson (r) Kathy Weston

Women's field athletes

Sherry Calvert Gale Fitzgerald Jane Frederick Paula Girven Joni Huntley Marilyn King Kathy McMillan Kate Schmidt Maren Seidler Karin Smith Pam Spencer Sherron Walker Martha Watson Lynne Winbigler

Coaches

LeRoy Walker (men's head coach) Sam Bell (men's assistant coach) Lee Calhoun (men's assistant coach) Jimmy Carnes (men's assistant coach) Stan Huntsman (men's assistant coach) Berny Wagner (men's assistant coach) Alex Ferenczy (women's head coach) C. Harmon Brown (women's assistant coach) Jack Griffin (women's assistant coach) Brooks Johnson (women's assistant coach)

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1984 USA Olympic Track & Field Team

Qualification

1984 United States
United States
Olympic Trials (track and field)

Men's track & road athletes

Ray Armstead Alonzo Babers Kirk Baptiste Ron Brown Tonie Campbell Don Clary Paul Cummings Brian Diemer Marco Evoniuk Greg Foster Sam Graddy Johnny Gray John Gregorek Danny Harris Tranel Hawkins Jim Heiring Thomas Jefferson Earl Jones Roger Kingdom Steve Lacy Carl Lewis Henry Marsh John Marshall Antonio McKay Walter McCoy Edwin Moses Sunder Nix Daniel O'Connor Vince O'Sullivan Doug Padilla Pete Pfitzinger Pat Porter Alberto Salazar Carl Schueler Steve Scott Calvin Smith Willie Smith Jim Spivey John Tuttle Craig Virgin

Men's field athletes

Duncan Atwood Willie Banks Earl Bell Tim Bright Edward Burke Art Burns Michael Carter Mike Conley, Sr. John Crist Milton Goode Bill Green Al Joyner Dave Laut Carl Lewis Jud Logan Doug Lytle Mike McRae Larry Myricks Doug Nordquist Tom Petranoff John Powell Steve Roller Dwight Stones Mike Tully Mac Wilkins Augie Wolf Jim Wooding

Women's track & road athletes

Evelyn Ashford Sharrieffa Barksdale Joan Benoit Jeanette Bolden Cindy Bremser Valerie Brisco-Hooks Alice Brown Judi Brown Julie Brown Robin Campbell Chandra Cheeseborough Mary Decker Diane Dixon Benita Fitzgerald-Brown Kim Gallagher Randy Givens Florence Griffith Joyner Joan Hansen Denean Howard Sherri Howard Julie Isphording Missy Kane Lillie Leatherwood Pam Page Diana Richburg Kim Turner Angela Wright-Scott Ruth Wysocki

Women's field athletes

Jodi Anderson Carol Cady Laura De Snoo Leslie Deniz Cindy Greiner Lorna Griffin Joni Huntley Jackie Joyner Carol Lewis Ramona Pagel Louise Ritter Karin Smith Pam Spencer Lynda Sutfin Cathy Sulinski Angela Thacker

Coaches

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1988 USA Olympic Track & Field Team

Qualification

1988 United States
United States
Olympic Trials (track and field)

Men's track & road athletes

Brian Abshire Jeff Atkinson Tracy Baskin Bruce Bickford Arthur Blake Terry Brahm Tonie Campbell Mark Conover Mark Deady Joe DeLoach Brian Diemer Danny Everett Mark Everett Marco Evoniuk Ed Eyestone Johnny Gray Jim Heiring Andy Kaestner Roger Kingdom Carl Lewis Steve Lewis Tim Lewis Sydney Maree Henry Marsh Roy Martin Antonio McKay (r) Lee McNeill (r) Dennis Mitchell Gary Morgan Edwin Moses Doug Padilla Pete Pfitzinger Andre Phillips Steve Plasencia Pat Porter Butch Reynolds Albert Robinson (r) Kevin Robinzine (r) Carl Schueler Steve Scott Calvin Smith Andrew Valmon (r) Kevin Young

Men's field athletes

Willie Banks Randy Barnes Earl Bell Tim Bright Mike Buncic Robert Cannon Hollis Conway Brian Crouser Lance Deal Jim Doehring Ken Flax Randy Heisler Jim Howard Dave Johnson Gary Kinder Carl Lewis Jud Logan Larry Myricks Billy Olson Tom Petranoff Mike Powell Charles Simpkins Brian Stanton Dave Stephens Gregg Tafralis Kory Tarpenning Mac Wilkins

Women's track & road athletes

Evelyn Ashford Valerie Brisco Alice Brown (r) Joetta Clark Gail Devers-Roberts Nancy Ditz Diane Dixon Sheila Echols (r) Kim Gallagher Margaret Groos Denean Howard-Hill Sherri Howard (r) Vicki Huber Jacqueline Humphrey Regina Jacobs Lynn Jennings Florence Griffith Joyner Francie Larrieu-Smith Lillie Leatherwood (r) Pam Marshall LaVonna Martin Leslie Maxie Lynn Nelson Cathy O'Brien PattiSue Plumer LaTanya Sheffield Mary Decker
Mary Decker
Slaney Gwen Torrence Delisa Walton-Floyd Schowonda Williams Dannette Young (r)

Women's field athletes

Wendy Brown Carol Cady Bonnie Dasse Sheila Echols Cindy Greiner Jackie Joyner-Kersee Trish King Carol Lewis Donna Mayhew Ramona Pagel Connie Price Louise Ritter Karin Smith Coleen Sommer Lynda Sutfin

Coaches

Stan Huntsman (men's head coach) Dean Hayes (men's assistant coach) Irving "Moon" Mondschein (men's assistant coach) Tom Pagani (men's assistant coach) Russ Rogers (men's assistant coach) Joe Vigil (men's assistant coach) Terry Crawford (women's head coach) Ken Foreman (women's assistant coach) Dave Rodda (women's assistant coach) Fred Thompson (women's assistant coach)

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 24287045 LCCN: no2003037575 BNF:

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