HOME
The Info List - Edmund Gwenn





Edmund Gwenn
Edmund Gwenn
(born Edmund John Kellaway, 26 September 1877– 6 September 1959) was an English actor. On film, he is perhaps best remembered for his role as Kris Kringle in the Christmas film Miracle on 34th Street (1947), for which he won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor and the corresponding Golden Globe Award. He received a second Golden Globe and another Academy Award nomination for the comedy film Mister 880 (1950). He is also remembered for being in four films directed by Alfred Hitchcock. As a stage actor in the West End and on Broadway, he was associated with a wide range of works by modern playwrights, including Bernard Shaw, John Galsworthy
John Galsworthy
and J. B. Priestley. After the Second World War, he lived in the United States where he had a successful career in Hollywood
Hollywood
and on Broadway.

Contents

1 Life and career

1.1 Early years 1.2 Leading roles on stage and screen

2 Later years 3 Filmography 4 Radio appearances 5 See also 6 Notes 7 References 8 External links

Life and career[edit] Early years[edit] Gwenn was born in Wandsworth, London. His brother was the actor Arthur Chesney and his cousin, Cecil Kellaway. Gwenn was educated at St. Olave's School and later at King's College London.[1] He began his acting career in the theatre in 1895, and learnt his craft as a member of Willie Edouin's company, playing brash comic roles.[1] In 1901 he married Minnie Terry, niece of the famous actress Ellen Terry. In the same year he went to Australia
Australia
and acted there for three years with the J. C. Williamson
J. C. Williamson
company.[1] His wife accompanied him and when Gwenn was in a production of Ben Hur that was a disastrous failure, she restored the couple's fortunes by accepting an engagement from Williamson.[2] Later, the couple appeared on stage together in London in a farce called What the Butler Saw in 1905[3] and, in 1911, when Irene Vanbrugh
Irene Vanbrugh
made her debut in variety, she chose Terry and Gwenn to join her in a short play specially written by J. M. Barrie.[4] When he returned to London
London
Gwenn appeared not in low comedy, but in what The Times
The Times
called "a notably intellectual and even sophisticated setting" at the Court Theatre under the management of J. E. Vedrenne and Harley Granville-Barker.[1] There, in 1905 to 1907, in the words of The Times, "he was invaluable in smaller parts [giving] every part he played its full worth", including Straker, the proletarian chauffeur to John Tanner in Bernard Shaw's Man and Superman, and Drinkwater, the cockney gangster in Captain Brassbound's Conversion.[1] He also appeared in plays by Granville-Barker and John Galsworthy, in Elizabeth Robins’s suffragette drama Votes for Women [5] and in works by other contemporaries. In Barrie's What Every Woman Knows (1908) in the role of the over-enthusiastic James Wylie he impressed the producer Charles Frohman, who engaged him for his repertory company at the Duke of York's Theatre.[1] In 1912 Gwenn went into management in partnership with Hilda Trevelyan.[1] His career was interrupted by his military service during the First World War, serving as an officer in the British Army.[1] During the war Gwenn's marriage broke up and was dissolved. His ex-wife remarried but remained on affectionate terms with him.[6] Leading roles on stage and screen[edit] After peace returned, Gwenn's leading roles in the West End during the 1920s included Old Bill in Bruce Bairnsfather's Old Bill, M.P. (1922); Christian Veit in Lilac Time (1922–23); the title role in A. A. Milne's The Great Broxoff (1923); Leo Swinburne in Good Luck by Seymour Hicks
Seymour Hicks
and Ian Hay
Ian Hay
(1923); and Hippolyte Gallipot in Lehár's Frasquita (1925).[7] Looking back at Gwenn's career, The Times considered, "Out of scores of other parts which he played in England and in America, the best remembered are probably Hornblower in Galsworthy's The Skin Game, the Viennese paterfamilias in Lilac Time and Samuel Pepys in Fagan's And So to Bed in 1926."[1] Gwenn began his film career in 1916. A notable early role was a recreation of his stage character Hornblower in the 1921 Anglo-Dutch silent-film of The Skin Game, which he reprised ten years later in Alfred Hitchcock's early sound version of The Skin Game. His debut in a talking picture was in an adaptation of Shaw's How He Lied to Her Husband, made at Elstree in 1931.[1] Of Gwenn's many British film roles, The Times
The Times
considered his best-known to be Jess Oakroyd in The Good Companions with John Gielgud
John Gielgud
and Jessie Matthews
Jessie Matthews
(1933) and Radfern in Carol Reed's Laburnum Grove
Laburnum Grove
with Cedric Hardwicke (1936).[1] His final British film role, as a capitalist trying to take over a family brewery in Cheer Boys Cheer (1939) is credited with being the first authentic Ealing comedy.[8] Gwenn appeared in more than eighty films, including Pride and Prejudice (1940), Cheers for Miss Bishop, Of Human Bondage and The Keys of the Kingdom. George Cukor's Sylvia Scarlett
Sylvia Scarlett
(1935) was his first appearance in a Hollywood
Hollywood
film, as Katharine Hepburn's father. He settled in Hollywood
Hollywood
in 1940 and became part of its British colony. He had a small role as a Cockney
Cockney
assassin in a Hitchcock film, Foreign Correspondent in 1940.[1] For his Father Christmas role in Miracle on 34th Street he won an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor. He received a second Oscar nomination for his role in Mister 880 (1950). Near the end of his career he played one of the main roles in Them! (1954) and in Hitchcock's The Trouble with Harry
The Trouble with Harry
(1955).[1] On Broadway Gwenn starred in a 1942 production of Chekhov's Three Sisters, with Judith Anderson
Judith Anderson
and Ruth Gordon; it was produced by and co-starred Katharine Cornell. Time proclaimed it "a dream production by anybody's reckoning – the most glittering cast the theatre has seen, commercially, in this generation."[9] Later years[edit] Gwenn remained a British subject all his life. When he first moved to Hollywood, he lived at the Beverly Wilshire Hotel in Beverly Hills. His home in London
London
had been reduced to rubble during the bombings by the German Luftwaffe
Luftwaffe
in the Second World War. Only the fireplace survived. What Gwenn regretted most was the loss of the memorabilia he had collected of the actor Henry Irving. Eventually Gwenn bought a house at 617 North Bedford Drive in Beverly Hills, which he later shared with the former Olympic athlete Rodney Soher.[10] At the age of 78 he travelled from his home in California for a reunion with his ex-wife in London.[6] He told a reporter, "I never married again because I was very happy with my wife. I simply stayed faithful to the memory of that happiness."[6] Gwenn died from pneumonia after suffering a stroke, in Woodland Hills, California, twenty days before his 82nd birthday. He was cremated and his ashes stored in the vault at the Chapel of the Pines Crematory in Los Angeles. Gwenn has a star on the Hollywood
Hollywood
Walk of Fame at 1751 Vine Street for his contribution to motion pictures. Filmography[edit]

The Real Thing at Last (1916) as Rupert K. Thunder / Macbeth Unmarried (1920) as Simm Vandeleur The Skin Game (1921) as Hornblower How He Lied to Her Husband
How He Lied to Her Husband
(1931) as Teddu Bompas The Skin Game (1931) as Mr. Hornblower Hindle Wakes (1931) as Chris Hawthorne Frail Women (1932) as The Bookmaker - Jim Willis Money for Nothing (1932) as Sir Henry Blossom Condemned to Death
Condemned to Death
(1932) as Banting Love on Wheels
Love on Wheels
(1932) as Philpotts Tell Me Tonight (1932) as Mayor Pategg The Good Companions (1933) as Jess Oakroyd Cash (1933) as Edmund Gilbert I Was a Spy
I Was a Spy
(1933) as Burgomaster Smithy (1933) as John Smith Channel Crossing (1933) as Trotter Marooned (1933) as Tom Roberts Friday the Thirteenth (1933) as Mr Wakefield Early to Bed (1933) as Kruger Waltzes from Vienna
Waltzes from Vienna
(1934) as Johann Strauss, the Elder Warn London
London
(1934) as Dr. Herman Krauss Passing Shadows (1934) as David Lawrence Java Head (1934) as Jeremy Ammidon The Admiral's Secret (1934) as Adm. Fitzporter Father and Son (1934) as John Bolton Spring in the Air (1934) as Franz The Bishop Misbehaves (1935) as Bishop Sylvia Scarlett
Sylvia Scarlett
(1935) as Henry Scarlett The Walking Dead (1936) as Dr. Beaumont Laburnum Grove
Laburnum Grove
(1936) as Mr. Radfern Anthony Adverse
Anthony Adverse
(1936) as John Bonnyfeather All American Chump (1936) as Jeffrey Crane Mad Holiday (1936) as Williams Parnell (1937) as Campbell South Riding (1938) as Alfred Huggins A Yank at Oxford
A Yank at Oxford
(1938) as Dean of Cardinal Penny Paradise (1938) as Joe Higgins Cheer Boys Cheer (1939) as Edward Ironside The Earl of Chicago
The Earl of Chicago
(1940) as Munsey, the Butler An Englishman's Home
An Englishman's Home
(1940) as Tom Brown The Doctor Takes a Wife (1940) as Dr. Lionel Sterling Pride and Prejudice (1940) as Mr. Bennet Foreign Correspondent (1940) as Rowley Cheers for Miss Bishop
Cheers for Miss Bishop
(1941) as President Corcoran Scotland Yard (1941) as Insp. Cork The Devil and Miss Jones
The Devil and Miss Jones
(1941) as Hooper One Night in Lisbon (1941) as Lord Fitzleigh Charley's Aunt (1941) as Stephen Spettigue A Yank at Eton
A Yank at Eton
(1942) as Headmaster Justin Forever and a Day (1943) as Stubbs The Meanest Man in the World (1943) as Frederick P. Leggitt Lassie Come Home
Lassie Come Home
(1943) as Rowlie Between Two Worlds (1944) as Scrubby The Keys of the Kingdom (1944) as Father Hamish MacNabb Dangerous Partners
Dangerous Partners
(1945) as Albert Richard Kingby Bewitched (1945) as Dr. Bergson She Went to the Races (1945) as Dr. Homer Pecke Of Human Bondage (1946) as Athelny Undercurrent (1946) as Prof. 'Dink' Hamilton Miracle on 34th Street
Miracle on 34th Street
(1947) as Kris Kringle Life with Father (1947) as Rev. Dr. Lloyd Thunder in the Valley (1947) as Adam MacAdam Green Dolphin Street
Green Dolphin Street
(1947) as Octavius Patourel Apartment for Peggy (1948) as Prof. Henry Barnes Hills of Home (1948) as Dr. William MacLure Challenge to Lassie
Challenge to Lassie
(1949) as John Traill A Woman of Distinction
A Woman of Distinction
(1950) as Mark 'J.M.' Middlecott Louisa (1950) as Henry Hammond Pretty Baby (1950) as Cyrus Baxter Mister 880 (1950) as William 'Skipper' Miller For Heaven's Sake (1950) as Arthur Peking Express (1951) as Father Joseph Murray Sally and Saint Anne (1952) as Grandpa Pat Ryan Les Misérables (1952) as Bishop Courbet Bonzo Goes to College
Bonzo Goes to College
(1952) as Ted 'Pop' Drew Something for the Birds (1952) as 'Admiral' Johnnie Adams Mister Scoutmaster (1953) as Dr. Stone The Bigamist (1953) as Mr. Jordan The Student Prince (1954) as Prof. Juttner Them!
Them!
(1954) as Dr. Harold Medford The Trouble with Harry
The Trouble with Harry
(1955) as Capt. Albert Wiles It's a Dog's Life (1955) as Jeremiah Edward Emmett Augustus Nolan Calabuch
Calabuch
(1956, U.S. title The Rocket from Calabuch) as Prof. Jorge Serra Hamilton

Radio appearances[edit]

Year Program Episode/source

1940 Forecast* The Lodger[11]

1943 Suspense The Fountain Plays

1944 Creeps By Night The Strange Burial of Alexander Jordan

1951 Stars Of Hollywood A Christmas Carol

1953 Stars over Hollywood A Christmas Carol[12]

Audition program for the Suspense radio program.

See also[edit]

Biography portal

List of actors with Academy Award nominations

Notes[edit]

^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q "Mr Edmund Gwenn
Edmund Gwenn
– Versatile Character Actor", The Times, 8 September 1959, p. 13 ^ "Miss Minnie Terry", Table Talk, 9 October 1902, p. 10 ^ "Wyndham's Theatre", The Times, 3 August 1905, p. 8 ^ "The Theatres", The Times, 30 October 1911, p. 11 ^ Hayman, Carole (1985). How the vote was won, and other suffragette plays. London
London
New York: Methuen. p. 38. ISBN 0413583805.  ^ a b c "Veteran Edmund Gwenn
Edmund Gwenn
Keeps a Tryst", The Daily Mail, 12 July 1956, p. 3 ^ Parker, pp. xxxvi–cxxii ^ "Screen Legends", The Observer Review, 20 December 2009 ^ Review, Time, details of issue and page number needed. ^ "Rodney Soher" Archived 3 November 2013 at the Wayback Machine., Sports Reference, retrieved 28 May 2014 ^ "Those Were the Days". Nostalgia Digest. 38 (3): 32–39. Summer 2012.  ^ "Those Were the Days". Nostalgia Digest. 41 (4): 38. Autumn 2016. 

References[edit]

Parker, John (1925). Who's Who in the Theatre (fifth ed.). London: Sir Isaac Pitman and Sons. OCLC 10013159. 

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Edmund Gwenn.

Edmund Gwenn
Edmund Gwenn
on IMDb Edmund Gwenn
Edmund Gwenn
at the Internet Broadway Database
Internet Broadway Database
Edmund Gwenn
Edmund Gwenn
in Screen Director's Playhouse: Miracle on 34th Street (1949) (Downloadable mp3 and streaming audio) Edmund Gwenn
Edmund Gwenn
in Lux Radio Theater: Miracle on 34th Street
Miracle on 34th Street
(1948) (Downloadable mp3 and streaming audio) Edmund Gwenn
Edmund Gwenn
at Find a Grave Regarding Edmund Gwenn
Edmund Gwenn
(TCM Movie Morlocks)[permanent dead link]

v t e

Terry family
Terry family
tree

Benjamin Terry[i] (1817–96)[1]

Sarah Ballard (1819–92)[1]

Kate Terry (1844–1924)[1]

Arthur Lewis (1824–1901)

George Terry (1852–1928)

Marion Terry (1853–1930)[1]

Charles Terry (1857–1933)[2]

Margaret Pratt (1862–1941)

Fred Terry (1863–1933)[1]

Julia Neilson (1868–1957)[3]

Dame Ellen Terry (1847–1928)[1]

Edward Godwin (1833–86)[4]

William Morris (1856–19??)

Florence Terry (1856–96)

Frank Gielgud (1860–1949)

Kate Terry-Lewis (1868–1958)

Mabel Terry-Lewis (1872–1957)

Edmund Gwenn (1877–1959)

Minnie Terry (1882–1964)

Horace Terry (1887–1957)

Beatrice Terry (1890–1970)

Phyllis Neilson-Terry (1892–1977)

Edith Craig (1869–1947)[4]

Helen Gibson (1872–1949)

Gordon Craig (1872–1966)[4]

Elena Meo (1879–1957)

Jack Morris (1887–19??)

Olive Terry (1884–1969)

Sir Charles Hawtrey (1858–1923)

Dennis Neilson-Terry (1895–1932)

Mary Glynne (1895–1954)

Val Gielgud (1900–81)

Sir John Gielgud (1904–2000)

Rosemary Gordon Craig (1894–19??)

Robin Craig (1895–1992)

Anthony Hawtrey (1909–54)

Geoffrey Keen (1916–2005)

Hazel Terry (1918–74)

Lewis Gielgud (1894–1953)

Zita Gordon (1911–2006)

Eleanor Gielgud (1907–98)

Edward Carrick (1905–98)

Helen Godfrey (1899–1960)

Maina Gielgud (born 1945)

Helen Craig (born 1934)

Jemma Hyde (born 1939)

Notes:

^ The family members who were actors, or associated with the theatre, are highlighted in amber

Family tree of the Terry family

Awards for Edmund Gwenn

v t e

Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor

1936–1950

Walter Brennan
Walter Brennan
(1936) Joseph Schildkraut
Joseph Schildkraut
(1937) Walter Brennan
Walter Brennan
(1938) Thomas Mitchell (1939) Walter Brennan
Walter Brennan
(1940) Donald Crisp
Donald Crisp
(1941) Van Heflin
Van Heflin
(1942) Charles Coburn
Charles Coburn
(1943) Barry Fitzgerald
Barry Fitzgerald
(1944) James Dunn (1945) Harold Russell
Harold Russell
(1946) Edmund Gwenn
Edmund Gwenn
(1947) Walter Huston
Walter Huston
(1948) Dean Jagger
Dean Jagger
(1949) George Sanders
George Sanders
(1950)

1951–1975

Karl Malden
Karl Malden
(1951) Anthony Quinn
Anthony Quinn
(1952) Frank Sinatra
Frank Sinatra
(1953) Edmond O'Brien
Edmond O'Brien
(1954) Jack Lemmon
Jack Lemmon
(1955) Anthony Quinn
Anthony Quinn
(1956) Red Buttons
Red Buttons
(1957) Burl Ives
Burl Ives
(1958) Hugh Griffith
Hugh Griffith
(1959) Peter Ustinov
Peter Ustinov
(1960) George Chakiris
George Chakiris
(1961) Ed Begley
Ed Begley
(1962) Melvyn Douglas
Melvyn Douglas
(1963) Peter Ustinov
Peter Ustinov
(1964) Martin Balsam
Martin Balsam
(1965) Walter Matthau
Walter Matthau
(1966) George Kennedy
George Kennedy
(1967) Jack Albertson
Jack Albertson
(1968) Gig Young
Gig Young
(1969) John Mills
John Mills
(1970) Ben Johnson (1971) Joel Grey
Joel Grey
(1972) John Houseman
John Houseman
(1973) Robert De Niro
Robert De Niro
(1974) George Burns
George Burns
(1975)

1976–2000

Jason Robards
Jason Robards
(1976) Jason Robards
Jason Robards
(1977) Christopher Walken
Christopher Walken
(1978) Melvyn Douglas
Melvyn Douglas
(1979) Timothy Hutton
Timothy Hutton
(1980) John Gielgud
John Gielgud
(1981) Louis Gossett Jr.
Louis Gossett Jr.
(1982) Jack Nicholson
Jack Nicholson
(1983) Haing S. Ngor
Haing S. Ngor
(1984) Don Ameche
Don Ameche
(1985) Michael Caine
Michael Caine
(1986) Sean Connery
Sean Connery
(1987) Kevin Kline
Kevin Kline
(1988) Denzel Washington
Denzel Washington
(1989) Joe Pesci
Joe Pesci
(1990) Jack Palance
Jack Palance
(1991) Gene Hackman
Gene Hackman
(1992) Tommy Lee Jones
Tommy Lee Jones
(1993) Martin Landau
Martin Landau
(1994) Kevin Spacey
Kevin Spacey
(1995) Cuba Gooding Jr.
Cuba Gooding Jr.
(1996) Robin Williams
Robin Williams
(1997) James Coburn
James Coburn
(1998) Michael Caine
Michael Caine
(1999) Benicio del Toro
Benicio del Toro
(2000)

2001–present

Jim Broadbent
Jim Broadbent
(2001) Chris Cooper
Chris Cooper
(2002) Tim Robbins
Tim Robbins
(2003) Morgan Freeman
Morgan Freeman
(2004) George Clooney
George Clooney
(2005) Alan Arkin
Alan Arkin
(2006) Javier Bardem
Javier Bardem
(2007) Heath Ledger
Heath Ledger
(2008) Christoph Waltz
Christoph Waltz
(2009) Christian Bale
Christian Bale
(2010) Christopher Plummer
Christopher Plummer
(2011) Christoph Waltz
Christoph Waltz
(2012) Jared Leto
Jared Leto
(2013) J. K. Simmons
J. K. Simmons
(2014) Mark Rylance
Mark Rylance
(2015) Mahershala Ali
Mahershala Ali
(2016) Sam Rockwell
Sam Rockwell
(2017)

v t e

Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actor – Motion Picture

Akim Tamiroff
Akim Tamiroff
(1943) Barry Fitzgerald
Barry Fitzgerald
(1944) J. Carrol Naish
J. Carrol Naish
(1945) Clifton Webb
Clifton Webb
(1946) Edmund Gwenn
Edmund Gwenn
(1947) Walter Huston
Walter Huston
(1948) James Whitmore
James Whitmore
(1949) Edmund Gwenn
Edmund Gwenn
(1950) Peter Ustinov
Peter Ustinov
(1951) Millard Mitchell
Millard Mitchell
(1952) Frank Sinatra
Frank Sinatra
(1953) Edmond O'Brien
Edmond O'Brien
(1954) Arthur Kennedy
Arthur Kennedy
(1955) Earl Holliman
Earl Holliman
(1956) Red Buttons
Red Buttons
(1957) Burl Ives
Burl Ives
(1958) Stephen Boyd
Stephen Boyd
(1959) Sal Mineo
Sal Mineo
(1960) George Chakiris
George Chakiris
(1961) Omar Sharif
Omar Sharif
(1962) John Huston
John Huston
(1963) Edmond O'Brien
Edmond O'Brien
(1964) Oskar Werner
Oskar Werner
(1965) Richard Attenborough
Richard Attenborough
(1966) Richard Attenborough
Richard Attenborough
(1967) Daniel Massey (1968) Gig Young
Gig Young
(1969) John Mills
John Mills
(1970) Ben Johnson (1971) Joel Grey
Joel Grey
(1972) John Houseman
John Houseman
(1973) Fred Astaire
Fred Astaire
(1974) Richard Benjamin
Richard Benjamin
(1975) Laurence Olivier
Laurence Olivier
(1976) Peter Firth
Peter Firth
(1977) John Hurt
John Hurt
(1978) Melvyn Douglas/ Robert Duvall
Robert Duvall
(1979) Timothy Hutton
Timothy Hutton
(1980) John Gielgud
John Gielgud
(1981) Louis Gossett Jr.
Louis Gossett Jr.
(1982) Jack Nicholson
Jack Nicholson
(1983) Haing S. Ngor
Haing S. Ngor
(1984) Klaus Maria Brandauer
Klaus Maria Brandauer
(1985) Tom Berenger
Tom Berenger
(1986) Sean Connery
Sean Connery
(1987) Martin Landau
Martin Landau
(1988) Denzel Washington
Denzel Washington
(1989) Bruce Davison
Bruce Davison
(1990) Jack Palance
Jack Palance
(1991) Gene Hackman
Gene Hackman
(1992) Tommy Lee Jones
Tommy Lee Jones
(1993) Martin Landau
Martin Landau
(1994) Brad Pitt
Brad Pitt
(1995) Edward Norton
Edward Norton
(1996) Burt Reynolds
Burt Reynolds
(1997) Ed Harris
Ed Harris
(1998) Tom Cruise
Tom Cruise
(1999) Benicio del Toro
Benicio del Toro
(2000) Jim Broadbent
Jim Broadbent
(2001) Chris Cooper
Chris Cooper
(2002) Tim Robbins
Tim Robbins
(2003) Clive Owen
Clive Owen
(2004) George Clooney
George Clooney
(2005) Eddie Murphy
Eddie Murphy
(2006) Javier Bardem
Javier Bardem
(2007) Heath Ledger
Heath Ledger
(2008) Christoph Waltz
Christoph Waltz
(2009) Christian Bale
Christian Bale
(2010) Christopher Plummer
Christopher Plummer
(2011) Christoph Waltz
Christoph Waltz
(2012) Jared Leto
Jared Leto
(2013) J. K. Simmons
J. K. Simmons
(2014) Sylvester Stallone
Sylvester Stallone
(2015) Aaron Taylor-Johnson
Aaron Taylor-Johnson
(2016) Sam Rockwell
Sam Rockwell
(2017)

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 66666744 LCCN: n86138586 ISNI: 0000 0000 6310 9389 GND: 138520917 SUDOC: 052194868 BNF: cb140418093 (data) BNE: XX1536915 SNAC: w67m3wkq

^ a b c d e f Law, Jonathan (2013). The Methuen Drama Dictionary of the Theatre. A&C Black. ISBN 9781408145913.  ^ "Charles Terry". Ancestry. Retrieved 21 February 2016.  ^ Roy, Donald. "Neilson, Julia Emilie (1868–1957)", Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004, accessed 7 January 2010 ^ a b c "Edward William Godwin". The Elmbridge Hundred. Retrieved 21 February

.