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Edward Regan "Eddie" Murphy (born April 3, 1961)[2] is an American comedian, actor, writer, singer, and producer. Murphy was a regular cast member on Saturday Night Live
Saturday Night Live
from 1980 to 1984. He has worked as a stand-up comedian and was ranked #10 on Comedy Central's list of the 100 Greatest Stand-ups of All Time.[3] In films, Murphy has received Golden Globe Award
Golden Globe Award
nominations for his performances in 48 Hrs., the Beverly Hills Cop
Beverly Hills Cop
series, Trading Places, and The Nutty Professor. In 2007, he won the Golden Globe
Golden Globe
for Best Supporting Actor and received a nomination for the Academy Award
Academy Award
for Best Supporting Actor for his portrayal of soul singer James "Thunder" Early in Dreamgirls.[4] Murphy's work as a voice actor in films includes Thurgood Stubbs in The PJs, Donkey in DreamWorks' Shrek
Shrek
series, and the Chinese dragon Mushu
Mushu
in Disney's Mulan. In some films, he plays multiple roles in addition to his main character, intended as a tribute to one of his idols Peter Sellers, who played multiple roles in Dr. Strangelove
Dr. Strangelove
and elsewhere. He has played multiple roles in Coming to America, Wes Craven's Vampire in Brooklyn, the Nutty Professor films (where he played the title role in two incarnations, plus his character's father, brother, mother, and grandmother), Bowfinger, The Adventures of Pluto Nash, Norbit, and Meet Dave. As of 2014, Murphy's films have grossed over $3.8 billion in the United States and Canada box office and $6.6 billion worldwide.[5] In 2015, his films made him the 6th-highest grossing actor in the United States.[6][7][8] Murphy was awarded the Mark Twain Prize for American Humor
Mark Twain Prize for American Humor
by the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts.[9]

Contents

1 Early life 2 Career

2.1 Stand-up comedy 2.2 1980s acting career 2.3 Singing career 2.4 1990s career 2.5 1998 to present

3 Personal life

3.1 Family 3.2 Lawsuit 3.3 Legal issues 3.4 Philanthropy

4 Discography 5 Filmography 6 Awards and nominations 7 References 8 External links

Early life Murphy was born in Brooklyn, New York City,[2] and raised in the borough's Bushwick neighborhood.[10] His mother, Lillian (Laney), was a telephone operator, and his father, Charles Edward Murphy, was a transit police officer and an amateur actor and comedian.[2][11][12][13][14] His father died in 1969 when he was eight.[15]

"My mother and father broke up when I was three, and he died when I was eight, so I have very dim memories… He was a victim of the Murphy charm (laughs). A woman stabbed my father. I never got all the logistics. It was supposed to be one of those crimes of passion: 'If I can't have you, no one else will'-kind of deal. Someone said to me one day, 'That's why you don't trust women.' Get the fuck outta here. What are you, a fucking psychiatrist?" – Eddie Murphy[16]

When Murphy's single mother became ill, the eight-year-old Murphy and his older brother Charlie lived in foster care for one year. In interviews, Murphy has said that his time in foster care was influential in developing his sense of humor. Later, he and his brother were raised in Roosevelt, New York
Roosevelt, New York
by his mother and stepfather Vernon Lynch, a foreman at an ice cream plant.[11] Around the age of 15, Murphy was writing and performing his own routines, which were heavily influenced by Bill Cosby
Bill Cosby
and Richard Pryor.[11] Career Stand-up comedy His early comedy was characterized by frequent swearing and sketches lampooning a diverse group of people (including White Anglo-Saxon Protestants (WASPs), African Americans, Italian Americans, overweight people, and gay people). Murphy released two stand-up specials. Eddie Murphy was his first album, released in 1982. Delirious was filmed in 1983 in Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C.
Due to the popularity of Delirious, his concert film Eddie Murphy Raw
Eddie Murphy Raw
(1987) received a wide theatrical release, grossing $50 million; the movie was filmed in the Felt Forum section of Madison Square Garden
Madison Square Garden
in New York City.[17][18] Murphy has said his comedic influences include Bill Cosby,[11] Richard Pryor,[11] Redd Foxx,[11] and Robin Williams.[11] Comedians who in turn cite Murphy has having influenced them include Russell Brand,[19] Dave Chappelle,[20] and Chris Rock.[21] 1980s acting career

Murphy in 1988

Murphy first earned national attention as a cast member on Saturday Night Live (SNL) and was credited with helping to revitalize the show during the early 1980s.[22] His notable characters included a grown-up version of the Little Rascals
Little Rascals
character Buckwheat;[23] a street-wise children's show host named Mr. Robinson (a spoof of Fred Rogers, who found it amusing[24]); and a morose, cynical Gumby, whose trademark slogan became an SNL catchphrase: "I'm Gumby, dammit!"[23] The Buckwheat character was retired in spectacular fashion—assassinated, on camera, in front of 30 Rockefeller Plaza—at Murphy's request, after he grew tired of constant demands from fans to "Do Buckwheat! Do Buckwheat!"[25][26] In Rolling Stone's February 2015 appraisal of all 141 SNL cast members to date, Murphy was ranked second (behind John Belushi). "It is customary (and accurate) to say that Eddie Murphy
Eddie Murphy
is the only reason SNL survived the five-year wilderness without Lorne Michaels," they noted.[27] In 1982, Murphy made his big screen debut in the film 48 Hrs.
48 Hrs.
with Nick Nolte.[11] 48 Hrs.
48 Hrs.
proved to be a hit when it was released in the Christmas season of 1982. Nolte was scheduled to host the December 11, 1982, Christmas episode of Saturday Night Live, but became too ill to host, so Murphy took over. He became the only cast member to host while still a regular. Murphy opened the show with the phrase, "Live from New York, It's the Eddie Murphy
Eddie Murphy
Show!" The following year, Murphy starred in Trading Places
Trading Places
with fellow SNL alumnus Dan Aykroyd.[11] The movie marked the first of Murphy's collaborations with director John Landis
John Landis
(who also directed Murphy in Coming to America
Coming to America
and Beverly Hills Cop III) and proved to be an even greater box office success than 48 Hrs.
48 Hrs.
In 1984, Murphy starred in the successful action comedy film Beverly Hills Cop.[11] The film was Murphy's first solo leading role.[11] Beverly Hills Cop
Beverly Hills Cop
grossed over $230 million at the box office and as of August 2012[update] was 41st in the list of all-time total U.S. box office grossers (4th-highest amongst "R" rated films), after adjusting for inflation.[28] In 1984, Murphy appeared in Best Defense, co-starring Dudley Moore. Murphy, who was credited as a "Strategic Guest Star", was added to the film after an original version was completed but tested poorly with audiences. Best Defense
Best Defense
was a major financial and critical disappointment. When he hosted SNL, Murphy joined the chorus of those bashing Best Defense, calling it "the worst movie in the history of everything". Aykroyd originally wrote the Winston Zeddemore
Winston Zeddemore
character in Ghostbusters
Ghostbusters
specifically for Murphy, but he was unable to commit at the time due to the Beverly Hills Cop
Beverly Hills Cop
shooting schedule.[citation needed] The part ultimately went to Ernie Hudson. Murphy was also offered a part in 1986's Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home, a role that, after being heavily re-written from comic relief to love interest, ultimately went to future 7th Heaven star Catherine Hicks. By this point[29] Murphy's near-exclusive contract with Paramount Pictures
Paramount Pictures
rivaled Star Trek as Paramount's most lucrative franchise. In 1986, Murphy starred in the supernatural comedy, The Golden Child.[11] Although The Golden Child
The Golden Child
performed well at the box office, the movie was not as critically acclaimed as 48 Hrs., Trading Places, and Beverly Hills Cop. The Golden Child
The Golden Child
was considered a change of pace for Murphy because of the supernatural setting as opposed to the more "street smart" settings of Murphy's previous efforts.[citation needed] A year later, Murphy reprised his role of Axel Foley
Axel Foley
in the Tony Scott-directed Beverly Hills Cop
Beverly Hills Cop
II. It was a box-office success, grossing almost $300 million worldwide.[30] Singing career Murphy is also a singer, having frequently provided background vocals to songs released by The Bus Boys; the song "(The Boys Are) Back in Town" was featured in 48 Hrs.
48 Hrs.
and Murphy's comedy special Eddie Murphy Delirious. As a solo artist, Murphy had two hit singles, "Party All the Time" (which was produced by Rick James) and "Put Your Mouth On Me" during the latter half of the 1980s. He had started singing earlier in his career, with the songs "Boogie in Your Butt" and "Enough Is Enough", the latter being a parody of Barbra Streisand
Barbra Streisand
and Donna Summer's 1979 song, "No More Tears" (They both appear on his 1982 self-titled comedy album.) "Party All the Time" was featured on Murphy's 1985 debut album How Could It Be, which included a minor follow-up R&B hit in the title track, a duet with vocalist Crystal Blake. This track was written by Rusty Hamilton and was produced by Stevie Wonder's cousin Aquil Fudge after a brief falling out with Rick James. In 2004, VH-1
VH-1
and Blender voted "Party All the Time" number seven among the "50 Worst Songs of All-Time." Sharam used a sample of the song for the UK #8 hit "PATT (Party All The Time)" in 2006. "Put Your Mouth on Me" appeared on Murphy's 1989 follow-up album, So Happy. Murphy recorded the album Love's Alright
Love's Alright
in the early 1990s. He performed in a music video of the single "Whatzupwitu", featuring Michael Jackson. He recorded a duet with Shabba Ranks called "I Was a King". In 1992, Murphy appeared in Michael Jackson's "Remember the Time" alongside Magic Johnson
Magic Johnson
and Iman. Though uncredited, Murphy provided vocal work on SNL castmate Joe Piscopo's comedy single, "The Honeymooners Rap."[citation needed] Piscopo impersonated Jackie Gleason
Jackie Gleason
on the single, while Murphy provided an imitation of Art Carney. In Coming to America, he imitated Jackie Wilson
Jackie Wilson
when he sang "To Be Loved", but because the character he was playing had a thick accent, he had to sing it in character. In later years, Murphy performed several songs in the Shrek
Shrek
film franchise. In the first film, he performed a version of "I'm a Believer" in the film's final scene; in Shrek
Shrek
2 he performed Ricky Martin's hit "Livin' La Vida Loca" along with co-star Antonio Banderas; Murphy performed Thank You (Falletin Me Be Mice Elf Again) for Shrek
Shrek
the Third, once again with Banderas. In 2013 he released his first single in years titled "Red Light", a reggae song featuring Snoop Lion. He is also working on a new album titled 9.[31] 1990s career From 1989 and through most of the early 1990s, box office results and reviews for Murphy's films were strong, but by 1992 both declined, hitting a low point with the critically panned Beverly Hills Cop
Beverly Hills Cop
III (1994),[32] a movie Murphy would ultimately denounce during an appearance on Inside the Actors Studio,[11] although he did find box office success with Boomerang and Another 48 Hrs.
48 Hrs.
Harlem Nights featured Murphy, who had previously been known only as a performer, as director, producer, star, and co-writer, with his brother, Charlie Murphy, as well as supporting roles for Murphy's comic idols Redd Foxx and Richard Pryor.[11] During this period, Murphy was criticized by filmmaker Spike Lee
Spike Lee
for not using his show business stature to help black actors break into film,[33] despite Murphy's films (especially those he produced) often being populated with predominantly black casts (Coming to America, Harlem Nights, Boomerang, Vampire in Brooklyn, Life). Many black actors who would later gain wider recognition make early appearances in Murphy films, such as Damon Wayans
Damon Wayans
in Beverly Hills Cop, Halle Berry and Martin Lawrence
Martin Lawrence
in Boomerang, Samuel L. Jackson
Samuel L. Jackson
and Cuba Gooding Jr. in Coming to America, Dave Chappelle
Dave Chappelle
in The Nutty Professor, and Chris Rock
Chris Rock
in Beverly Hills Cop
Beverly Hills Cop
II. Although Murphy has enjoyed commercial success since Saturday Night Live, he did not participate in the making of the Live From New York: An Uncensored History of Saturday Night Live
Saturday Night Live
retrospective book by Tom Shales and James Andrew Miller (2002), nor did he ever attend cast reunions or anniversary specials until his appearance on the SNL 40th anniversary special. Murphy's box office results began to recover in 1996, starting with The Nutty Professor. 1998 to present He followed with a series of very successful family-friendly movies like Mulan, Dr. Dolittle, and its sequel, the Shrek
Shrek
series, Daddy Day Care, and The Haunted Mansion, along with Nutty Professor II: The Klumps. However, most of his movies meant for more adult audiences performed moderately; Metro, I Spy, and Showtime all grossed less than $40 million domestically, Holy Man
Holy Man
performed poorly, grossing less than $13 million, and The Adventures of Pluto Nash
The Adventures of Pluto Nash
is on record as one of the biggest theatrical money-losers of all time, grossing just $7 million worldwide on a reported $110 million budget. A notable exception to this run of poorly received adult-themed films was the Frank Oz
Frank Oz
comedy Bowfinger, also starring Steve Martin. The film garnered generally positive critical reviews and grossed $98 million at the box office.[34] In 2006, he starred in the motion picture version of the Broadway musical Dreamgirls as soul singer James "Thunder" Early. Murphy won a Golden Globe
Golden Globe
for Best Supporting Actor, as well as a Screen Actors Guild Award and a Broadcast Film
Film
Critics Association Award in that category. Several reviews for the film highlighted Murphy's performance while he received some pre-release Academy Awards buzz.[35] Murphy was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor
Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor
on January 23, 2007, but lost to Alan Arkin
Alan Arkin
for his performance in Little Miss Sunshine – there was a suggestion that one of the reasons Murphy lost out on winning the Academy Award
Academy Award
were the negative reviews of his subsequent film Norbit, released in early February 2007.[36] As a result, Murphy notoriously exited the 79th Academy Awards
Academy Awards
as soon as Arkin was announced the winner.[37][38] Dreamgirls was the first film distributed by Paramount Pictures
Paramount Pictures
to star Murphy (who once was on an exclusive contract with the studio) since Vampire in Brooklyn
Brooklyn
in 1995. In 2007, Murphy was invited to join the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.[39] As a result of Viacom's acquisition of DreamWorks, Paramount distributed his other 2007 releases: Norbit
Norbit
and Shrek
Shrek
the Third. He starred in the 2008 film Meet Dave, and the 2009 film Imagine That for Paramount Pictures. Murphy co-starred in Tower Heist, directed by Brett Ratner. Murphy played a thief who joins a group of hardworking men who find out they have fallen victim to a wealthy businessman's Ponzi scheme, and conspire to rob his high-rise residence. Ben Stiller, Matthew Broderick, and Casey Affleck
Casey Affleck
also starred in the film, released on November 4, 2011.[11][40] It was reported in 2011 that Murphy would host the 84th Academy Awards
Academy Awards
in 2012.[41] However, he dropped out of his hosting duties on November 9, 2011, in the wake of the Brett Ratner scandal.[42] On December 6, 2013, it was announced that Murphy would star in the fourth film of the Beverly Hills Cop
Beverly Hills Cop
series. Brett Ratner
Brett Ratner
will direct the film, Jerry Bruckheimer
Jerry Bruckheimer
is confirmed to produce the film, and Josh Appelbaum and Andre Nemec will write.[43] In a June 2014 interview, Murphy discussed the plot of the film stating that it would take place in Detroit and they would actually film in Detroit bringing in an estimated $56.6 million to the state of Michigan.[44] On June 14, 2016, it was confirmed that Murphy was still set to reprise his role as Axel Foley
Axel Foley
in a fourth film of the Beverly Hills Cop franchise.[45][46] On March 8, 2014, it was announced that Murphy would team up with Boomerang co-star Halle Berry
Halle Berry
in a new film titled Miles And Me. The film was also set to star Laurence Fishburne
Laurence Fishburne
and was set to begin pre-production in 2014 from Paramount Pictures. No other word was released about or who else was attached.[47] On March 15, 2015, it was announced that Murphy will play comedian Richard Pryor's father, LeRoy Pryor, in the upcoming biopic directed by Lee Daniels
Lee Daniels
with Mike Epps
Mike Epps
playing Pryor.[48] Murphy co-starred with actress Britt Robertson
Britt Robertson
in the drama Mr. Church.[49] Personal life Family As of 2008, Murphy resides in Long Island, New York.[50]

Eddie Murphy's star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame

Murphy has a son, Eric (born circa 1989), with then girlfriend Paulette McNeely, and a son, Christian (born circa 1990) with then girlfriend Tamara Hood.[51][52] Murphy began a longtime romantic relationship with Nicole Mitchell after meeting her in 1988 at an NAACP Image Awards show. They lived together for almost two years before getting married at the Grand Ballroom of The Plaza Hotel
The Plaza Hotel
in New York City
New York City
on March 18, 1993.[53] Murphy and Mitchell had five children together: Bria, Myles, Shayne, Zola, and Bella.[51][52] In August 2005, Mitchell filed for divorce, citing "irreconcilable differences". The divorce was finalized on April 17, 2006.[54] Following his divorce from Mitchell, in 2006, Murphy began dating former Spice Girl Melanie Brown, who became pregnant and stated that the child was Murphy's. When questioned about the pregnancy in December 2006, by RTL Boulevard, Murphy told Dutch reporter Matthijs Kleyn, "I don't know whose child that is until it comes out and has a blood test. You shouldn't jump to conclusions, sir". Brown gave birth to a baby girl, Angel Iris Murphy Brown, on Murphy's 46th birthday, April 3, 2007. On June 22, 2007, representatives for Brown announced in People that a DNA
DNA
test had confirmed that Murphy was the father.[55] Brown had stated in an interview that Murphy has not sought a relationship with Angel,[56][57] although it was later reported in 2010 that Murphy was getting to know her.[58] Murphy exchanged marriage vows with film producer Tracey Edmonds, former wife of Kenneth "Babyface" Edmonds, on January 1, 2008, in a private ceremony on an island off Bora Bora.[59] On January 16, 2008, the couple released a statement saying, "After much consideration and discussion, we have jointly decided that we will forgo having a legal ceremony as it is not necessary to define our relationship further," and called the Bora Bora
Bora Bora
wedding a "symbolic union". The two had planned on having a legal ceremony upon their return to the U.S. but did not, and their wedding was never official.[60] Murphy began dating model Paige Butcher
Paige Butcher
in 2012.[61] Their daughter Izzy was born May 3, 2016.[62] Lawsuit In 1988, Art Buchwald
Art Buchwald
sued Murphy and Paramount Pictures, alleging that they had used ideas from a screenplay he had submitted to Paramount as the basis for Murphy's film Coming to America. In 1992, Buchwald was awarded $150,000 in a summary judgment; Buchwald's producing partner, Alan Bernheim, was awarded $750,000. Both sides described the outcome as a "victory".[63] Legal issues On May 2, 1997, Murphy was stopped by police after having been observed picking up a transgender prostitute. The prostitute, Shalimar Seiuli, was arrested on an outstanding warrant for prostitution. Murphy was not arrested or charged and claimed he was just giving Seiuli a ride.[64][65] Philanthropy Murphy has donated money to the AIDS Foundation, and cancer, education, creative arts, family/parent support, health and homeless charities. He has donated to the Martin Luther King, Jr. Center, various cancer charities and $100,000 to the Screen Actors' Guild's strike relief fund.[66] Discography Main article: Eddie Murphy
Eddie Murphy
discography

How Could It Be
How Could It Be
(1985) So Happy
So Happy
(1989) Love's Alright
Love's Alright
(1993)

Filmography Main article: Eddie Murphy
Eddie Murphy
filmography Awards and nominations

Award Year Category Work Outcome

Academy Awards 2007 Best Supporting Actor Dreamgirls Nominated

Annie Awards 1999 Outstanding Individual Achievement for Voice Acting in an Animated Television
Television
Production The PJs Nominated

2001 Outstanding Individual Achievement for Voice Acting by a Male Performer in an Animated Feature Production Shrek Won

2008 Best Voice Acting in an Animated Television
Television
Production Shrek
Shrek
the Halls Nominated

BAFTA Awards 2002 Actor in a Supporting Role Shrek Nominated

Black Reel Awards 2000 Best Actor in a Motion Picture Bowfinger Nominated

2002 Actor in a Supporting Role Shrek Nominated

2007 Dreamgirls Nominated

Broadcast Film
Film
Critics Association Awards 2007 Best Supporting Actor Dreamgirls Won

Central Ohio Film
Film
Critics Association 2007 Best Supporting Actor Dreamgirls Won

Chicago Film
Film
Critics Association Awards 2007 Best Supporting Actor Dreamgirls Nominated

Emmy Awards 1983 Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy, Variety or Music
Music
Series Saturday Night Live Nominated

1984 Outstanding Individual Performance in a Variety or Music
Music
Program Saturday Night Live Nominated

Outstanding Writing for a Variety or Music
Music
Program Saturday Night Live Nominated

1999 Outstanding Animated Program – Less Than One Hour The PJs "He's Gotta Have It" Nominated

Golden Globe
Golden Globe
Awards 1983 New Star of the Year (Actor) 48 Hrs. Nominated

1984 Actor in a Leading Role (Musical or Comedy) Trading Places Nominated

1985 Actor in a Leading Role (Musical or Comedy) Beverly Hills Cop Nominated

1997 Actor in a Leading Role (Musical or Comedy) The Nutty Professor Nominated

2007 Best Supporting Actor – Motion Picture Dreamgirls Won

Golden Raspberry Awards[67] 1990 Worst Director Harlem Nights Nominated

Worst Screenplay Won

2003 Worst Actor The Adventures of Pluto Nash Nominated

Worst Screen Combo The Adventures of Pluto Nash; Showtime; I Spy Nominated

2008 Worst Picture Norbit Nominated

Worst Actor Won

Worst Supporting Actor Won

Worst Supporting Actress Won

Worst Screen Combo Nominated

Worst Screenplay Nominated

2009 Worst Actor Meet Dave Nominated

Worst Screen Combo Nominated

2010 Worst Actor Imagine That Nominated

Worst Actor of the Decade N/A Won

2013 Worst Actor A Thousand Words Nominated

Grammy Awards 1984 Best Comedy Album Eddie Murphy: Comedian Won

Kids Choice Awards 1988 Favorite Movie Actor Beverly Hills Cop
Beverly Hills Cop
II Won

2005 Favorite Voice from an Animated Film Shrek
Shrek
2 Nominated

2008 Favorite Voice from an Animated Film Shrek
Shrek
the Third Won

2011 Best Voice from an Animated Film Shrek
Shrek
Forever After Won

NAACP Image Awards 1997 Outstanding Lead Actor in a Motion Picture The Nutty Professor Nominated

2007 Actor in a Supporting Role Dreamgirls Nominated

National Society of Film
Film
Critics Awards 1997 Best Actor The Nutty Professor Won

Online Film
Film
Critics Society Awards 2007 Best Supporting Actor Dreamgirls Nominated

Satellite Awards 1996 Best Actor – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy The Nutty Professor Nominated

2001 Nutty Professor II: The Klumps Nominated

Saturn Awards 1997 Best Actor The Nutty Professor Won

2002 Best Supporting Actor Shrek Nominated

Screen Actors Guild Awards 2007 Actor in a Supporting Role Dreamgirls Won

Cast in a Motion Picture Nominated

References

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Live: The razor-edged king of late night comedy". New York. Retrieved June 27, 2011.  ^ [2] Archived November 9, 2011, at the Wayback Machine. ^ " Charlie Murphy
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Eddie Murphy
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Eddie Murphy
confirmed as Oscars 2012 host". theguardian.com. Retrieved 13 October 2017.  ^ " Eddie Murphy
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Jerry Bruckheimer
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4'". Rolling Stone. Retrieved August 24, 2014.  ^ McNary, Dave (June 14, 2016). "Eddie Murphy's ' Beverly Hills Cop
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writes song about Eddie Murphy". Digital Spy. June 17, 2008. Retrieved August 29, 2010.  ^ " Eddie Murphy
Eddie Murphy
hasn't had a drink in 18 years". AZCentral.com. November 3, 2011. Retrieved November 11, 2011.  ^ "Source says Eddie Murphy
Eddie Murphy
making effort to get to know daughter he had with ex-flame Melanie Brown". NY Daily News. May 10, 2010. Retrieved August 24, 2014.  ^ Wihlborg, Ulrica (January 19, 2015). " Eddie Murphy
Eddie Murphy
and Tracey Edmonds Marry - Weddings, Eddie Murphy". People.com. Retrieved March 8, 2015.  ^ "Murphy, Edmonds splitting up". UPI. January 16, 2008. Retrieved June 5, 2013.  ^ " Eddie Murphy
Eddie Murphy
with Paige Butcher". Huffington Post. April 5, 2014. Retrieved July 25, 2014.  ^ Leon, Anya (May 3, 2016). " Eddie Murphy
Eddie Murphy
Welcomes Daughter Izzy Oona". People. Retrieved May 12, 2016.  ^ Art Buchwald
Art Buchwald
Awarded $150,000 in Suit Over Film
Film
(March 17, 1992). NY Times archive. Retrieved March 18, 2015. ^ "Transsexual prostitute arrested in Eddie Murphy's car". CNN. May 2, 1997. Retrieved March 26, 2017.  ^ Smith, Kyle (May 19, 1997). "Double Trouble". People. 47 (19). Retrieved March 26, 2017.  ^ "Eddie Murphy's Charity Work". Looktothestars.org. Retrieved August 29, 2010.  ^ "Eddie Murphy's Golden Raspberry Nominations". razzie.com. Retrieved August 29, 2010. 

External links

Wikiquote has quotations related to: Eddie Murphy

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Eddie Murphy.

Eddie Murphy
Eddie Murphy
at Encyclopædia Britannica Eddie Murphy
Eddie Murphy
on IMDb Eddie Murphy
Eddie Murphy
at Box Office Mojo Eddie Murphy
Eddie Murphy
on Discogs " Eddie Murphy
Eddie Murphy
collected news and commentary". The New York Times.  " Eddie Murphy
Eddie Murphy
collected news and commentary". The Guardian. 

Preceded by Dennis Miller MTV Movie Awards
MTV Movie Awards
host 1993 Succeeded by Will Smith

Preceded by Dan Aykroyd
Dan Aykroyd
and Bette Midler MTV Video Music
Music
Awards host 1985 Succeeded by MTV VJs

v t e

Eddie Murphy

Filmography Discography

Stand-up comedy films

Delirious Raw

Comedy albums

Eddie Murphy Comedian Greatest Comedy Hits All I Fuckin' Know

Music
Music
albums

How Could It Be So Happy Love's Alright

Songs

"Party All the Time" "Whatzupwitu"

Related

Axel Foley Charlie Murphy
Charlie Murphy
(brother) Sherman Klump

Awards for Eddie Murphy

v t e

Annie Award for Voice Acting in a Feature Production

Hank Azaria/Ming-Na (1998) Eli Marienthal
Eli Marienthal
(1999) Tim Allen/ Joan Cusack
Joan Cusack
(2000) Eddie Murphy/ Eartha Kitt
Eartha Kitt
(2001) Daveigh Chase
Daveigh Chase
(2002) Ellen DeGeneres
Ellen DeGeneres
(2003) Brad Bird
Brad Bird
(2004) Peter Sallis
Peter Sallis
(2005) Ian McKellen
Ian McKellen
(2006) Ian Holm
Ian Holm
(2007) Dustin Hoffman
Dustin Hoffman
(2008) Jennifer Cody (2009) Jay Baruchel
Jay Baruchel
(2010) Bill Nighy
Bill Nighy
(2011) Alan Tudyk
Alan Tudyk
(2012) Josh Gad
Josh Gad
(2013) Ben Kingsley
Ben Kingsley
(2014) Phyllis Smith
Phyllis Smith
(2015) Jason Bateman/ Auliʻi Cravalho
Auliʻi Cravalho
(2016) Anthony Gonzalez (2017)

v t e

Critics' Choice Movie Award for Best Supporting Actor

Kevin Spacey
Kevin Spacey
/ Ed Harris
Ed Harris
(1995) Cuba Gooding Jr.
Cuba Gooding Jr.
(1996) Anthony Hopkins
Anthony Hopkins
(1997) Billy Bob Thornton
Billy Bob Thornton
(1998) Michael Clarke Duncan
Michael Clarke Duncan
(1999) Joaquin Phoenix
Joaquin Phoenix
(2000) Ben Kingsley
Ben Kingsley
(2001) Chris Cooper
Chris Cooper
(2002) Tim Robbins
Tim Robbins
(2003) Thomas Haden Church
Thomas Haden Church
(2004) Paul Giamatti
Paul Giamatti
(2005) Eddie Murphy
Eddie Murphy
(2006) Javier Bardem
Javier Bardem
(2007) Heath Ledger
Heath Ledger
(2008) Christoph Waltz
Christoph Waltz
(2009) Christian Bale
Christian Bale
(2010) Christopher Plummer
Christopher Plummer
(2011) Philip Seymour Hoffman
Philip Seymour Hoffman
(2012) Jared Leto
Jared Leto
(2013) J. K. Simmons
J. K. Simmons
(2014) Sylvester Stallone
Sylvester Stallone
(2015) Mahershala Ali
Mahershala Ali
(2016) Sam Rockwell
Sam Rockwell
(2017)

v t e

Golden Globe Award
Golden Globe Award
for Best Supporting Actor – Motion Picture

Akim Tamiroff
Akim Tamiroff
(1943) Barry Fitzgerald
Barry Fitzgerald
(1944) J. Carrol Naish
J. Carrol Naish
(1945) Clifton Webb
Clifton Webb
(1946) Edmund Gwenn
Edmund Gwenn
(1947) Walter Huston
Walter Huston
(1948) James Whitmore
James Whitmore
(1949) Edmund Gwenn
Edmund Gwenn
(1950) Peter Ustinov
Peter Ustinov
(1951) Millard Mitchell
Millard Mitchell
(1952) Frank Sinatra
Frank Sinatra
(1953) Edmond O'Brien
Edmond O'Brien
(1954) Arthur Kennedy
Arthur Kennedy
(1955) Earl Holliman
Earl Holliman
(1956) Red Buttons
Red Buttons
(1957) Burl Ives
Burl Ives
(1958) Stephen Boyd
Stephen Boyd
(1959) Sal Mineo
Sal Mineo
(1960) George Chakiris
George Chakiris
(1961) Omar Sharif
Omar Sharif
(1962) John Huston
John Huston
(1963) Edmond O'Brien
Edmond O'Brien
(1964) Oskar Werner
Oskar Werner
(1965) Richard Attenborough
Richard Attenborough
(1966) Richard Attenborough
Richard Attenborough
(1967) Daniel Massey (1968) Gig Young
Gig Young
(1969) John Mills
John Mills
(1970) Ben Johnson (1971) Joel Grey
Joel Grey
(1972) John Houseman
John Houseman
(1973) Fred Astaire
Fred Astaire
(1974) Richard Benjamin
Richard Benjamin
(1975) Laurence Olivier
Laurence Olivier
(1976) Peter Firth
Peter Firth
(1977) John Hurt
John Hurt
(1978) Melvyn Douglas/ Robert Duvall
Robert Duvall
(1979) Timothy Hutton
Timothy Hutton
(1980) John Gielgud
John Gielgud
(1981) Louis Gossett Jr.
Louis Gossett Jr.
(1982) Jack Nicholson
Jack Nicholson
(1983) Haing S. Ngor
Haing S. Ngor
(1984) Klaus Maria Brandauer
Klaus Maria Brandauer
(1985) Tom Berenger
Tom Berenger
(1986) Sean Connery
Sean Connery
(1987) Martin Landau
Martin Landau
(1988) Denzel Washington
Denzel Washington
(1989) Bruce Davison
Bruce Davison
(1990) Jack Palance
Jack Palance
(1991) Gene Hackman
Gene Hackman
(1992) Tommy Lee Jones
Tommy Lee Jones
(1993) Martin Landau
Martin Landau
(1994) Brad Pitt
Brad Pitt
(1995) Edward Norton
Edward Norton
(1996) Burt Reynolds
Burt Reynolds
(1997) Ed Harris
Ed Harris
(1998) Tom Cruise
Tom Cruise
(1999) Benicio del Toro
Benicio del Toro
(2000) Jim Broadbent
Jim Broadbent
(2001) Chris Cooper
Chris Cooper
(2002) Tim Robbins
Tim Robbins
(2003) Clive Owen
Clive Owen
(2004) George Clooney
George Clooney
(2005) Eddie Murphy
Eddie Murphy
(2006) Javier Bardem
Javier Bardem
(2007) Heath Ledger
Heath Ledger
(2008) Christoph Waltz
Christoph Waltz
(2009) Christian Bale
Christian Bale
(2010) Christopher Plummer
Christopher Plummer
(2011) Christoph Waltz
Christoph Waltz
(2012) Jared Leto
Jared Leto
(2013) J. K. Simmons
J. K. Simmons
(2014) Sylvester Stallone
Sylvester Stallone
(2015) Aaron Taylor-Johnson
Aaron Taylor-Johnson
(2016) Sam Rockwell
Sam Rockwell
(2017)

v t e

Mark Twain Prize winners

Richard Pryor
Richard Pryor
(1998) Jonathan Winters
Jonathan Winters
(1999) Carl Reiner
Carl Reiner
(2000) Whoopi Goldberg
Whoopi Goldberg
(2001) Bob Newhart
Bob Newhart
(2002) Lily Tomlin
Lily Tomlin
(2003) Lorne Michaels
Lorne Michaels
(2004) Steve Martin
Steve Martin
(2005) Neil Simon
Neil Simon
(2006) Billy Crystal
Billy Crystal
(2007) George Carlin
George Carlin
(2008) Bill Cosby
Bill Cosby
(2009) Tina Fey
Tina Fey
(2010) Will Ferrell
Will Ferrell
(2011) Ellen DeGeneres
Ellen DeGeneres
(2012) Carol Burnett
Carol Burnett
(2013) Jay Leno
Jay Leno
(2014) Eddie Murphy
Eddie Murphy
(2015) Bill Murray
Bill Murray
(2016) David Letterman
David Letterman
(2017)

v t e

National Society of Film
Film
Critics Award for Best Actor

Michael Caine
Michael Caine
(1966) Rod Steiger
Rod Steiger
(1967) Per Oscarsson
Per Oscarsson
(1968) Jon Voight
Jon Voight
(1969) George C. Scott
George C. Scott
(1970) Peter Finch
Peter Finch
(1971) Al Pacino
Al Pacino
(1972) Marlon Brando
Marlon Brando
(1973) Jack Nicholson
Jack Nicholson
(1974) Jack Nicholson
Jack Nicholson
(1975) Robert De Niro
Robert De Niro
(1976) Art Carney
Art Carney
(1977) Gary Busey
Gary Busey
(1978) Dustin Hoffman
Dustin Hoffman
(1979) Peter O'Toole
Peter O'Toole
(1980) Burt Lancaster
Burt Lancaster
(1981) Dustin Hoffman
Dustin Hoffman
(1982) Gérard Depardieu
Gérard Depardieu
(1983) Steve Martin
Steve Martin
(1984) Jack Nicholson
Jack Nicholson
(1985) Bob Hoskins
Bob Hoskins
(1986) Steve Martin
Steve Martin
(1987) Michael Keaton
Michael Keaton
(1988) Daniel Day-Lewis
Daniel Day-Lewis
(1989) Jeremy Irons
Jeremy Irons
(1990) River Phoenix
River Phoenix
(1991) Stephen Rea
Stephen Rea
(1992) David Thewlis
David Thewlis
(1993) Paul Newman
Paul Newman
(1994) Nicolas Cage
Nicolas Cage
(1995) Eddie Murphy
Eddie Murphy
(1996) Robert Duvall
Robert Duvall
(1997) Nick Nolte
Nick Nolte
(1998) Russell Crowe
Russell Crowe
(1999) Javier Bardem
Javier Bardem
(2000) Gene Hackman
Gene Hackman
(2001) Adrien Brody
Adrien Brody
(2002) Bill Murray
Bill Murray
(2003) Jamie Foxx
Jamie Foxx
(2004) Philip Seymour Hoffman
Philip Seymour Hoffman
(2005) Forest Whitaker
Forest Whitaker
(2006) Daniel Day-Lewis
Daniel Day-Lewis
(2007) Sean Penn
Sean Penn
(2008) Jeremy Renner
Jeremy Renner
(2009) Jesse Eisenberg
Jesse Eisenberg
(2010) Brad Pitt
Brad Pitt
(2011) Daniel Day-Lewis
Daniel Day-Lewis
(2012) Oscar Isaac
Oscar Isaac
(2013) Timothy Spall
Timothy Spall
(2014) Michael B. Jordan
Michael B. Jordan
(2015) Casey Affleck
Casey Affleck
(2016) Daniel Kaluuya
Daniel Kaluuya
(2017)

v t e

Golden Raspberry Award for Worst Screenplay

1980–2000

Can't Stop the Music
Music
Bronte Woodard and Allan Carr
Allan Carr
(1980) Mommie Dearest – Frank Yablans, Frank Perry, Tracy Hotchner and Robert Getchell (1981) Inchon – Robin Moore and Laird Koenig (1982) The Lonely Lady
The Lonely Lady
– John Kershaw, Shawn Randall and Ellen Shephard (1983) Bolero – John Derek
John Derek
(1984) Rambo: First Blood Part II – Sylvester Stallone, James Cameron
James Cameron
and Kevin Jarre (1985) Howard the Duck – Willard Huyck and Gloria Katz (1986) Leonard Part 6
Leonard Part 6
– Jonathan Reynolds and Bill Cosby
Bill Cosby
(1987) Cocktail – Heywood Gould (1988) Harlem Nights
Harlem Nights
Eddie Murphy
Eddie Murphy
(1989) The Adventures of Ford Fairlane
The Adventures of Ford Fairlane
– Daniel Waters, James Cappe & David Arnott (1990) Hudson Hawk
Hudson Hawk
– Steven E. de Souza, Daniel Waters, Bruce Willis
Bruce Willis
and Robert Kraft (1991) Stop! Or My Mom Will Shoot
Stop! Or My Mom Will Shoot
– Blake Snyder, William Osborne and William Davies – (1992) Indecent Proposal
Indecent Proposal
Amy Holden Jones (1993) The Flintstones – Jim Jennewein, Steven E. de Souza, Tom S. Parker and various others (1994) Showgirls
Showgirls
Joe Eszterhas (1995) Striptease – Andrew Bergman (1996) The Postman – Eric Roth and Brian Helgeland (1997) An Alan Smithee Film: Burn Hollywood Burn – Joe Eszterhas (1998) Wild Wild West
Wild Wild West
– Jim Thomas, John Thomas, S. S. Wilson, Brent Maddock, Jeffrey Price and Peter S. Seaman (1999) Battlefield Earth – Corey Mandell and J. David Shapiro
J. David Shapiro
(2000)

2001–present

Freddy Got Fingered
Freddy Got Fingered
Tom Green
Tom Green
& Derek Harvie
Derek Harvie
(2001) Star Wars: Episode II – Attack of the Clones – George Lucas
George Lucas
and Jonathan Hales (2002) Gigli
Gigli
Martin Brest (2003) Catwoman – Theresa Rebeck, John Brancato, Michael Ferris and John Rogers (2004) Dirty Love – Jenny McCarthy
Jenny McCarthy
(2005) Basic Instinct 2
Basic Instinct 2
– Leora Barish and Henry Bean (2006) I Know Who Killed Me
I Know Who Killed Me
– Jeffrey Hammond (2007) The Love Guru
The Love Guru
Mike Myers
Mike Myers
& Graham Gordy (2008) Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen – Ehren Kruger, Alex Kurtzman and Roberto Orci
Roberto Orci
(2009) The Last Airbender
The Last Airbender
M. Night Shyamalan
M. Night Shyamalan
(2010) Jack and Jill – Steve Koren and Adam Sandler, story by Ben Zook (2011) That's My Boy - David Caspe
David Caspe
(2012) Movie 43
Movie 43
- Steve Baker, Ricky Blitt, Will Carlough, Tobias Carlson, Jacob Fleisher, Patrik Forsberg, Will Graham, James Gunn, Claes Kjellstrom, Jack Kukoda, Bob Odenkirk, Bill O'Malley, Matthew Alec Portenoy, Greg Pritikin, Rocky Russo, Olle Sarri, Elizabeth Wright Shapiro, Jeremy Sosenko, Jonathan van Tulleken and Jonas Wittenmark (2013) Saving Christmas
Saving Christmas
- Darren Doane and Cheston Hervey (2014) Fifty Shades of Grey - Kelly Marcel (2015) Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice - Chris Terrio and David S. Goyer (2016) The Emoji Movie
The Emoji Movie
- Tony Leondis, Eric Siegel and Mike White (2017)

v t e

Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Supporting Role

Martin Landau
Martin Landau
(1994) Ed Harris
Ed Harris
(1995) Cuba Gooding Jr.
Cuba Gooding Jr.
(1996) Robin Williams
Robin Williams
(1997) Robert Duvall
Robert Duvall
(1998) Michael Caine
Michael Caine
(1999) Albert Finney
Albert Finney
(2000) Ian McKellen
Ian McKellen
(2001) Christopher Walken
Christopher Walken
(2002) Tim Robbins
Tim Robbins
(2003) Morgan Freeman
Morgan Freeman
(2004) Paul Giamatti
Paul Giamatti
(2005) Eddie Murphy
Eddie Murphy
(2006) Javier Bardem
Javier Bardem
(2007) Heath Ledger
Heath Ledger
(2008) Christoph Waltz
Christoph Waltz
(2009) Christian Bale
Christian Bale
(2010) Christopher Plummer
Christopher Plummer
(2011) Tommy Lee Jones
Tommy Lee Jones
(2012) Jared Leto
Jared Leto
(2013) J. K. Simmons
J. K. Simmons
(2014) Idris Elba
Idris Elba
(2015) Mahershala Ali
Mahershala Ali
(2016) Sam Rockwell
Sam Rockwell
(2017)

v t e

Saturn Award for Best Actor

James Caan/ Don Johnson
Don Johnson
(1974/75) David Bowie/ Gregory Peck
Gregory Peck
(1976) George Burns
George Burns
(1977) Warren Beatty
Warren Beatty
(1978) George Hamilton (1979) Mark Hamill
Mark Hamill
(1980) Harrison Ford
Harrison Ford
(1981) William Shatner
William Shatner
(1982) Mark Hamill
Mark Hamill
(1983) Jeff Bridges
Jeff Bridges
(1984) Michael J. Fox
Michael J. Fox
(1985) Jeff Goldblum
Jeff Goldblum
(1986) Jack Nicholson
Jack Nicholson
(1987) Tom Hanks
Tom Hanks
(1988) Jeff Daniels
Jeff Daniels
(1989/90) Anthony Hopkins
Anthony Hopkins
(1991) Gary Oldman
Gary Oldman
(1992) Robert Downey Jr.
Robert Downey Jr.
(1993) Martin Landau
Martin Landau
(1994) George Clooney
George Clooney
(1995) Eddie Murphy
Eddie Murphy
(1996) Pierce Brosnan
Pierce Brosnan
(1997) James Woods
James Woods
(1998) Tim Allen
Tim Allen
(1999) Hugh Jackman
Hugh Jackman
(2000) Tom Cruise
Tom Cruise
(2001) Robin Williams
Robin Williams
(2002) Elijah Wood
Elijah Wood
(2003) Tobey Maguire
Tobey Maguire
(2004) Christian Bale
Christian Bale
(2005) Brandon Routh
Brandon Routh
(2006) Will Smith
Will Smith
(2007) Robert Downey Jr.
Robert Downey Jr.
(2008) Sam Worthington
Sam Worthington
(2009) Jeff Bridges
Jeff Bridges
(2010) Michael Shannon
Michael Shannon
(2011) Matthew McConaughey
Matthew McConaughey
(2012) Robert Downey Jr.
Robert Downey Jr.
(2013) Chris Pratt
Chris Pratt
(2014) Harrison Ford
Harrison Ford
(2015) Ryan Reynolds
Ryan Reynolds
(2016)

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 85574224 LCCN: n84151471 ISNI: 0000 0001 1476 6355 GND: 118928554 SUDOC: 075915642 BNF: cb13935855f (data) MusicBrainz: 98744f0b-20fc-4bb2-9ac4-e2041058911f NLA: 35809738 NKC: xx0043298 BNE: XX1109324 SN

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