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The satirical cleric Jonathan Swift refers to hyperparasitism in his 1733 poem "On Poetry: A Rhapsody", comparing poets to "vermin" who "teaze and pinch their foes":satirical cleric Jonathan Swift refers to hyperparasitism in his 1733 poem "On Poetry: A Rhapsody", comparing poets to "vermin" who "teaze and pinch their foes":[132]

ad infinitum.
Thus every poet, in his kind,
Is bit by him that comes behind:

FictionBram Stoker's 1897 Gothic horror novel Dracula, and its many film adaptations, the eponymous Count Dracula is a blood-drinking parasite. The critic Laura Otis argues that as a "thief, seducer, creator, and mimic, Dracula is the ultimate parasite. The whole point of vampirism is sucking other people's blood—living at other people's expense."[133]

Disgusting and terrifying parasitic alien species are widespread in science fiction,[134][135] as for instance in Ridley Scott's 1979 film Alien.[136][137] In one scene, a Xenomorph bursts out of the chest of a dead man, with blood squirting out under high pressure assisted by explosive squibs. Animal organs were used to reinforce the shock effect. The scene was filmed in a single take, and the startled reaction of the actors was genuine.parasitic alien species are widespread in science fiction,[134][135] as for instance in Ridley Scott's 1979 film Alien.[136][137] In one scene, a Xenomorph bursts out of the chest of a dead man, with blood squirting out under high pressure assisted by explosive squibs. Animal organs were used to reinforce the shock effect. The scene was filmed in a single take, and the startled reaction of the actors was genuine.[4][138]