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Dustin Aaron Moskovitz[3] (/ˈmɑːskəvɪts/; born May 22, 1984) is an American Internet entrepreneur who co-founded Facebook
Facebook
with Mark Zuckerberg, Eduardo Saverin, Andrew McCollum and Chris Hughes.[4] In 2008, he left Facebook
Facebook
to co-found Asana[5] with Justin Rosenstein. In March 2011, Forbes
Forbes
reported Moskovitz to be the youngest self-made billionaire in history, on the basis of his 2.34% share in Facebook.[6]

Contents

1 Background and education 2 Career 3 Philanthropy 4 Politics 5 Personal life 6 Media depictions 7 References 8 Further reading

Background and education[edit] Moskovitz was born in Gainesville, Florida
Gainesville, Florida
and grew up in Ocala, Florida. He is eight days younger than Zuckerberg.[7] Moskovitz is Jewish. His father was a psychiatrist and mother a teacher and an artist.[8][9] He attended Vanguard High School, graduating from the IB Diploma Program. Moskovitz attended Harvard University
Harvard University
as an economics major for two years before he moved with Mark Zuckerberg
Mark Zuckerberg
to Palo Alto. He went to work full-time on Facebook.[10] Career[edit] Four people, three of whom were roommates—Mark Zuckerberg, Eduardo Saverin, Chris Hughes, and Dustin Moskovitz—founded Facebook
Facebook
in their Harvard University
Harvard University
dorm room in February 2004. Originally called thefacebook.com,[11] it was intended as an online directory of all Harvard's students to help residential students identify members of other residences.[4][12] In June 2004, Zuckerberg, Hughes and Moskovitz took a year off from Harvard and moved Facebook's base of operations to Palo Alto, California, and hired eight employees.[13] They were later joined by Sean Parker. At Facebook, Moskovitz was the company's first chief technology officer and then vice president of engineering;[14] he led the technical staff and oversaw the major architecture of the site, as well as being responsible for the company’s mobile strategy and development.[10] On October 3, 2008, Moskovitz announced that he was leaving Facebook to form a new company called Asana with Justin Rosenstein, an engineering manager at Facebook. Moskovitz was also the biggest angel investor in the mobile photo-sharing site Path, run by another former member of Facebook, David Morin. It was reported[15] that Moskovitz's advice was important in persuading Morin to reject a $100 million offer for the company from Google, made in February 2011.[16] Philanthropy[edit]

Moskovitz speaking at Web Summit
Web Summit
2017

Moskovitz co-founded the philanthropic organization Good Ventures
Good Ventures
with his girlfriend (and now wife) Cari Tuna in 2011.[17] In June 2012, Good Ventures
Good Ventures
announced a close partnership with charity evaluator GiveWell. Both organizations "are aiming to do as much good as possible" and thereby align with the goals of effective altruism.[18][19] Good Ventures
Good Ventures
has donated approximately $100 million from 2011 onward to GiveWell top charities Against Malaria
Malaria
Foundation, GiveDirectly, Schistosomiasis Control Initiative, and Deworm the World Initiative, as well as standout charities (see Good Ventures
Good Ventures
for more) and other effective altruist organizations.[20] The joint collaboration with GiveWell led to a spinoff called the Open Philanthropy Project, whose goal is to figure out the best possible way to use large sums of money (starting with Moskovitz's multi-billion-dollar fortune) to do the most good.[21][22][23] As of 2016, the Open Philanthropy Project is in the process of becoming a separate organization,[24] but it has already made over $40 million in grants (see Open Philanthropy Project#Grants made for more). Moskovitz and Tuna are also the youngest couple to sign Bill Gates
Bill Gates
and Warren Buffett’s Giving Pledge, which commits billionaires to giving away most of their wealth in the form of philanthropy.[25] Politics[edit] Moskovitz has voted for the Democratic Party candidates in all elections where he has voted, but he has written: "Though we’ve voted for the Democratic nominee each of the times we’ve cast a ballot, we’ve considered ourselves independent thinkers who respect candidates and positions from both sides of the aisle."[26] Prior to their donation for the 2016 election cycle, Moskovitz and Tuna had donated roughly $10,000 over their lifetime to federal candidates, most of it to Sean Eldridge, the husband of Facebook
Facebook
co-founder Chris Hughes.[27] For the 2016 United States
United States
Presidential election, Moskovitz announced that he and his wife are donating $20 million to support Hillary Clinton, the Democratic Party nominee, arguing that the dangers of a Trump presidency are significant, and that they are making their donation despite being skeptical of allowing large donors to influence election cycles through money.[28] The New York Times
New York Times
quoted Moskovitz's blog post on the subject: "The Republican Party, and Donald Trump in particular, is running on a zero-sum vision, stressing a false contest between their constituency and the rest of the world."[27][26] This makes him the 3rd largest donor in the 2016 campaigns.[28] Personal life[edit] Moskovitz is married to Cari Tuna. Tuna currently works full time on Good Ventures, the couple's private foundation, as well as the Open Philanthropy Project, a spinoff of a collaboration between Good Ventures and GiveWell.[29][30][31] Tuna is a former Yale Daily News writer[32] and Wall Street Journal
Wall Street Journal
journalist.[33] Moskovitz and Tuna attend Burning Man
Burning Man
regularly, and Moskovitz has written about his reasons for doing so.[34] Moskovitz's attendance at Burning Man
Burning Man
has been the subject of some press coverage.[35][36] Media depictions[edit] Moskovitz is played in the film The Social Network
The Social Network
by actor Joseph Mazzello. Responding to a question on Quora, Moskovitz said that the film "emphasizes things that didn't matter (like the Winklevoss brothers, whom I've still never even met and had no part in the work we did to create the site over the past 6 years) and leaves out things that we really did (like the many other people in our lives at the time, who supported us in innumerable ways)."[37] References[edit]

^ Pilkington, Ed (March 10, 2011). " Forbes
Forbes
rich list: Facebook
Facebook
six stake their claims". The Guardian. UK. Retrieved March 30, 2011.  ^ "Billionaires: #202 Dustin Moskovitz". Forbes. Retrieved March 4, 2014.  ^ Alba, Alejandro (August 25, 2015). " Facebook
Facebook
CEO tops list of the 20 wealthiest people under 35". NY Daily News. Retrieved 10 December 2016.  ^ a b "Company Timeline". Facebook. Retrieved 2008-10-03.  ^ Rosenstein, Justin."Reply on Quora
Quora
to: Who is the CEO of Asana?", Quora, February 8, 2011. Retrieved 2011-02-15. ^ Zoe Fox (March 10, 2011). "Forbes's Youngest Billionaire: Facebook Co-Founder Dustin Moskovitz
Dustin Moskovitz
Edges Out Mark Zuckerberg". TIME.  ^ "America's Youngest Billionaires", Forbes, 6 October 2010. Retrieved 2011-02-15. ^ "From Social Media To Killing Emails By Dustin Moskovitz". Eyerys. Retrieved 10 February 2016.  ^ Jacob Berkman (December 10, 2010). "Zuckerberg among nine new Jewish individuals and families to take the Giving Pledge". Jewish Telegraphic Agency. Retrieved 19 September 2013.  ^ a b "Dustin Moskovitz: Crunchbase Profile", Techcrunch. Retrieved 2011-02-15. ^ Phillips, Sarah (2007-07-25). "A brief history of Facebook". the Guardian. Retrieved 2018-03-20.  ^ Rosen, Ellen (2005-05-27). "Student's Start-Up Draws Attention and $13 Million". The New York Times. Retrieved 2018-03-01.  ^ "Finding Friends with Facebook", Wired, July 3, 2005. Retrieved 2011-02-15. ^ "Dustin Moskovitz: Forbes
Forbes
Profile", September 2010. Retrieved 2011-02-15. ^ Lacy, Sarah."Inside the DNA of the Facebook
Facebook
Mafia", Techcrunch, February 13, 2011. Retrieved 2011-02-15. ^ Arrington, Mike. " Google
Google
Tried To Buy Path For $100+ Million. Path Said No.", Techcrunch, February 2, 2011. Retrieved 2011-02-15. ^ Tuna, Cari; Moskovitz, Dustin (2012). "Vision & Values Good Ventures". Good Ventures. Retrieved 2017-08-24.  ^ Holden (2012-06-28). " GiveWell and Good Ventures".  ^ "They made a fortune in Silicon Valley. Now they're giving most of it away". Washington Post. 2014-12-26. Retrieved 2017-06-01.  ^ Ventures, Good. "Grants Database Good Ventures". Good Ventures. Retrieved 2017-04-04.  ^ Matthews, Dylan (April 24, 2015). "You have $8 billion. You want to do as much good as possible. What do you do?". Vox. Retrieved March 19, 2016.  ^ David Callahan (December 14, 2015). "How Does an Emerging "Army" of Tech Donors Think? Ask This Guy". Inside Philanthropy. Retrieved March 20, 2016.  ^ Nicole Bennett; Ashley Carter; Romney Resney & Wendy Woods (February 10, 2016). "bcg.perspectives - How Tech Entrepreneurs Are Disrupting Philanthropy". The Boston Consulting Group. Retrieved March 20, 2016.  ^ Hassenfeld, Elie. "Comment on December 2015 Open Thread".  ^ "Silicon Valley Billionaire Dustin Moskovitz
Dustin Moskovitz
and Cari Tuna on the Reasoned Art of Giving". Jewish
Jewish
Business News. 2015-01-02.  ^ a b "Compelled to Act. We're committing $20M to help Democrats in the 2016 election". Medium. September 8, 2016. Retrieved September 22, 2016.  ^ a b Confessore, Nicholas (September 9, 2016). "Dustin Moskovitz, Facebook
Facebook
Co-Founder, Pledges $20 Million to Aid Democrats". New York Times. Retrieved September 22, 2016.  ^ a b " Facebook
Facebook
co-founder Dustin Moskovitz
Dustin Moskovitz
commits $20M to help beat Trump". CNN. September 9, 2016. Retrieved September 22, 2016.  ^ Ariana Eunjung Cha (December 26, 2014). "Cari Tuna and Dustin Moskovitz: Young Silicon Valley billionaires pioneer new approach to philanthropy". Washington Post. Retrieved December 29, 2014.  ^ Lee, Vincent (September 12, 2013). "Meet Cari Tuna, the Woman Giving Away Dustin Moskovitz's Facebook
Facebook
Fortune". Inside Philanthropy. Retrieved September 22, 2016.  ^ Rice, Issa (June 29, 2016). "Cari Tuna". Retrieved September 22, 2016.  ^ "Cari Tuna". Yale Daily News. Retrieved September 22, 2016.  ^ "Cari Tuna". Wall Street Journal. Retrieved September 22, 2016.  ^ Moskovitz, Dustin (September 5, 2013). "Radical Inclusion vs. Radical Self-Reliance at Burning Man". Retrieved September 22, 2016.  ^ Allen, Nick (September 6, 2013). "Facebook's Dustin Moskovitz
Dustin Moskovitz
hugs the Winklevoss twins
Winklevoss twins
at Burning Man. Dustin Moskovitz
Dustin Moskovitz
of Facebook tells how he met the Winklevoss twins
Winklevoss twins
at the Burning Man
Burning Man
festival in Nevada. Is one of the most celebrated feud of the internet age over?". The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved September 22, 2016.  ^ Shontell, Alyson (September 5, 2013). "A Strange Thing Happened the First Time Facebook's Co-Founder Met the Winklevoss Twins — They Hugged". Business Insider. Retrieved September 22, 2016.  ^ Moskovitz, Dustin."Reply on Quora
Quora
to: What does Dustin Moskovitz think of the Facebook
Facebook
movie?", Quora, July 16, 2010. Retrieved 2011-02-15.

Further reading[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Dustin Moskovitz.

Kirkpatrick, David (2010). The Facebook
Facebook
Effect: The Inside Story of the Company That Is Connecting the World. Simon and Schuster. ISBN 978-1-4391-0980-9. 

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