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The Info List - Drew Gooden


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Andrew Melvin Gooden III (born September 24, 1981) is a former American professional basketball player who is currently a sports broadcaster for Comcast.[1] The 6'10", 250 lb power forward played college basketball for the University of Kansas.

Contents

1 High school career 2 College career 3 Professional career

3.1 Cleveland Cavaliers 3.2 Chicago Bulls 3.3 Sacramento Kings 3.4 San Antonio Spurs 3.5 Dallas Mavericks 3.6 Washington Wizards
Washington Wizards
/ Los Angeles Clippers 3.7 Milwaukee Bucks 3.8 Second stint with the Wizards

4 Personal life 5 Honors 6 NBA career statistics

6.1 Regular season 6.2 Playoffs

7 References 8 External links

High school career[edit] As a senior at El Cerrito High School, Gooden led his Gauchos to the 1999 California Interscholastic Federation
California Interscholastic Federation
Boys' Division III championship game. Washington Union High School (led by future NBA guard DeShawn Stevenson) won the championship game over El Cerrito HS by a score of 77–71.[2] College career[edit] Gooden joined fellow freshmen Nick Collison
Nick Collison
and Kirk Hinrich
Kirk Hinrich
for the 1999–2000 season at Kansas. Although at times, Gooden was frustrated with the way things were going his freshman year, he finally adjusted to coach Roy Williams' system. In his freshman year, the Jayhawks went 24–10 and lost to Duke in the round of 32 during the 2000 NCAA Basketball
Basketball
Tournament. The next season, the Jayhawks went 26–7 and fell to Illinois in the 2001 NCAA Tournament Sweet Sixteen. In 2002, he led the nation in rebounding and was named NABC national player of the year. The Jayhawks went 33–4, including 16–0 in Big 12 Conference play to win Kansas its first conference championship since 1998. The Jayhawks advanced to their first Final Four in the 2002 NCAA Tournament
2002 NCAA Tournament
since 1993; however, they lost to the eventual national champion Maryland in the semifinal. For being named NABC Player of the Year
NABC Player of the Year
for 2002, Gooden's jersey (#0) was retired in 2003. The ceremony occurred at halftime of a Kansas home game with Kansas State in what would have been Gooden's senior year had he not foregone his senior year for the NBA. Professional career[edit] Gooden declared himself for the draft after his junior year. Out of Kansas, Gooden was selected as the 4th overall pick by the Memphis Grizzlies in the 2002 NBA draft. In March 2003, Gooden and Gordan Giriček were traded to the Orlando Magic
Orlando Magic
for Mike Miller, Ryan Humphrey, and two draft picks.[3] Cleveland Cavaliers[edit] On July 23, 2004, the Cleveland Cavaliers
Cleveland Cavaliers
acquired Gooden, Anderson Varejão, and Steven Hunter for Tony Battie
Tony Battie
and two second-round draft picks from the Orlando Magic
Orlando Magic
via trade.[4] Gooden re-signed with the Cavaliers for three more years on August 14, 2006.[5] He agreed to a three-year, $23 million contract.[6] In the 2006–07 NBA season, he averaged 11.1 points per game and 8.5 rebounds per game.[7] Chicago Bulls[edit] On February 21, 2008, at the 2007–08 season's trade deadline, Gooden was traded by the Cavs (along with Larry Hughes, Cedric Simmons, and Shannon Brown) to the Chicago Bulls
Chicago Bulls
as a part of a three-team, 11-player deal involving the Seattle SuperSonics.[8] Sacramento Kings[edit] On February 18, 2009, at the 2008–09 season's trade deadline, Gooden was traded to the Sacramento Kings
Sacramento Kings
in a six-player deal that included Andrés Nocioni
Andrés Nocioni
and Cedric Simmons.[9] On March 1, Gooden was bought out of his contract making him a free agent after playing just one game for the Kings.[10] San Antonio Spurs[edit] On March 5, 2009, Gooden signed with the San Antonio Spurs
San Antonio Spurs
for the remainder of the season.[11] Dallas Mavericks[edit] On July 25, 2009, Gooden posted a message on his Twitter page that said "Dallas Here I Come!!!" Dallas Mavericks
Dallas Mavericks
owner, Mark Cuban, reposted Gooden's tweet, adding "Welcome Drew.. !". On July 30, Gooden officially signed with the Mavericks.[12] Washington Wizards
Washington Wizards
/ Los Angeles Clippers[edit] On February 13, 2010, Gooden was traded to the Washington Wizards along with Josh Howard, James Singleton, and Quinton Ross
Quinton Ross
for Caron Butler, Brendan Haywood, and DeShawn Stevenson.[13] Four days later, he was traded again, this time to the Los Angeles Clippers
Los Angeles Clippers
as part of a three-team, six-player trade that sent Antawn Jamison
Antawn Jamison
from Washington to the Cleveland Cavaliers, Žydrūnas Ilgauskas, a 2010 first-round pick and the rights to Emir Preldžič
Emir Preldžič
from the Cavaliers to Washington, Al Thornton
Al Thornton
from Los Angeles to Washington, and Sebastian Telfair
Sebastian Telfair
from Los Angeles to Cleveland. Gooden changed his number from #90 to #0 during his tenure with the Clippers.[14] Milwaukee Bucks[edit] On July 1, 2010, Gooden agreed to a 5-year/$32 million contract with the Milwaukee Bucks, which would make the Bucks his ninth team in as many seasons in the league. On April 9, 2011, he recorded his first career triple-double in a win over the Cavaliers with 15 points, 13 rebounds, and 13 assists.[15] On March 14, 2012, Gooden recorded his second career triple-double in a win over the Cavaliers with 15 points, 10 rebounds, and 13 assists.[16] On July 16, 2013, the Bucks waived Gooden using the NBA's amnesty clause.[17] Second stint with the Wizards[edit] On February 26, 2014, Gooden signed a 10-day contract with the Washington Wizards.[18][19] On March 8, 2014, he signed a second 10-day contract with the Wizards.[20] On March 18, 2014, he signed with the Wizards for the rest of the season.[21] On July 18, 2014, Gooden re-signed with the Wizards.[22] In the team's season opener on October 29, 2014, against the Miami Heat, Gooden was named the starting power forward in what was his first of just seven starts for the season. He subsequently scored a season-high 18 points and did not top that mark for the rest of the season.[23] On July 13, 2015, Gooden again re-signed with the Wizards.[24] On July 7, 2016, the Wizards declined their option on Gooden's contract, making him an unrestricted free agent.[25] Personal life[edit] Gooden is half Finnish; his father, Andrew Gooden, met Drew's mother, Ulla, while playing pro basketball[26][27] in Äänekoski, Finland. Gooden's parents divorced later on, and he stayed with his father in California. In August 2014, Gooden attempted to get Finnish citizenship in order to play for their national team, but he failed to do so before the 2014 FIBA Basketball
Basketball
World Cup.[28] Gooden enjoys playing the piano.[4] At the beginning of the 2006–07 season, Gooden appeared with a patch of hair on the back of his head. He refers to this hair style as a "duck tail."[29] Gooden said, "It is drawing a lot of attention ... One thing I've found out is even negative publicity is good publicity. At least I had the (guts) to do it." He claims women love it: "I went from getting compliments to now being sexy."[30] In 2012, Gooden opened a Wingstop
Wingstop
restaurant franchise in Altamonte Springs, Florida. In 2016, Gooden returned to University of Kansas
University of Kansas
and finished his degree of communication studies in December, 2016.[31][32][33] Honors[edit]

2003 Cover athlete for EA Sports' NCAA March Madness 2003.[34] 2007 NBA Eastern Conference Champions with the Cavaliers Big 12 Conference
Big 12 Conference
Player of the Year

NBA career statistics[edit]

Legend

  GP Games played   GS  Games started  MPG  Minutes per game

 FG%  Field goal percentage  3P%  3-point field goal percentage  FT%  Free throw
Free throw
percentage

 RPG  Rebounds per game  APG  Assists per game  SPG  Steals per game

 BPG  Blocks per game  PPG  Points per game  Bold  Career high

Regular season[edit]

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG

2002–03 Memphis 51 29 26.1 .443 .304 .697 5.8 1.2 .7 .4 12.1

2002–03 Orlando 19 18 28.6 .498 .000 .738 8.4 1.1 .8 .7 13.6

2003–04 Orlando 79 17 27.0 .445 .214 .637 6.5 1.1 .8 .9 11.6

2004–05 Cleveland 82 80 30.8 .492 .179 .810 9.2 1.6 .9 .9 14.4

2005–06 Cleveland 79 79 27.5 .512 .333 .682 8.4 .7 .7 .6 10.7

2006–07 Cleveland 80 80 28.0 .473 .167 .714 8.5 1.1 .9 .4 11.1

2007–08 Cleveland 51 51 30.7 .444 .000 .728 8.3 1.0 .7 .6 11.3

2007–08 Chicago 18 14 31.0 .461 .000 .813 9.3 1.7 .7 1.3 14.0

2008–09 Chicago 31 27 29.6 .457 .000 .866 8.6 1.4 .8 .5 13.1

2008–09 Sacramento 1 0 26.0 .556 .000 1.000 13.0 2.0 .0 .0 12.0

2008–09 San Antonio 19 1 16.8 .490 .000 .789 4.4 .2 .2 .2 9.8

2009–10 Dallas 46 11 22.4 .467 .167 .809 6.9 .6 .6 1.1 8.9

2009–10 L.A. Clippers 24 22 30.2 .492 .000 .921 9.4 .9 .6 .3 14.8

2010–11 Milwaukee 35 18 24.6 .431 .150 .794 6.8 1.3 .6 .5 11.3

2011–12 Milwaukee 56 46 26.2 .437 .291 .846 6.5 2.6 .8 .6 13.7

2012–13 Milwaukee 16 0 9.4 .328 .200 .688 1.9 .4 .3 .4 3.3

2013–14 Washington 22 0 18.0 .531 .412 .889 5.2 .7 .5 .3 8.3

2014–15 Washington 51 7 16.9 .399 .390 .773 4.4 1.0 .4 .2 5.4

2015–16 Washington 30 0 10.2 .320 .171 .643 2.8 .4 .3 .4 2.7

Career 790 500 25.5 .462 .257 .760 7.1 1.1 .7 .6 11.0

Playoffs[edit]

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG

2003 Orlando 7 7 33.4 .400 1.000 .722 12.7 .6 .4 .9 14.0

2006 Cleveland 13 13 21.7 .529 1.000 .944 7.5 .6 .2 .2 8.2

2007 Cleveland 20 20 30.3 .493 1.000 .769 8.0 1.0 .5 .5 11.4

2009 San Antonio 4 0 17.8 .333 1.000 1.000 3.8 .3 .3 .3 7.3

2014 Washington 10 0 14.6 .368 1.000 .750 4.3 .4 .3 .4 3.4

2015 Washington 10 0 17.8 .377 1.000 .769 5.5 .8 .2 1.0 6.8

Career 64 40 23.7 .449 1.000 .793 7.2 .7 .5 .3 9.2

References[edit]

^ "CSN MID-ATLANTIC NAMES KARA LAWSON PRIMARY WIZARDS ANALYST". NBA.com. September 27, 2017. Retrieved September 27, 2017.  ^ "SoCalHoops High School News". Southern Cal Hoops. Retrieved March 6, 2009.  ^ "ESPN.com: NBA – Gooden acquires sunny disposition in Orlando". ESPN.com. Retrieved June 4, 2015.  ^ a b " Drew Gooden
Drew Gooden
Bio Page". NBA.com. Archived from the original on March 7, 2009. Retrieved March 6, 2009.  ^ "Gooden signs three-year, $23M deal with Cavaliers". Sports.espn.go.com. September 11, 2006. Retrieved March 6, 2009.  ^ Stein, Marc (September 11, 2006). "Gooden signs three-year, $23M deal with Cavaliers". ESPN. Retrieved March 6, 2009.  ^ "Drew Gooden: Season Averages". NBA.com. Retrieved March 6, 2009.  ^ "Cavaliers Acquire Ben Wallace, Wally Szczerbiak in Three-way Trade With Chicago, Seattle". Sports.myway.com. Retrieved March 6, 2009.  ^ "Kings acquire four players in three-team trade". NBA.com. February 18, 2009. Retrieved February 19, 2009.  ^ "Final year of Drew Gooden's deal bought out by Sacramento Kings". Sports.espn.go.com. March 2, 2009. Retrieved March 6, 2009.  ^ "Forward Gooden joins Spurs for playoff run". NBA.com. February 27, 2009. Retrieved March 6, 2009.  ^ Mavericks sign Gooden ^ "Wizards Acquire Howard, Gooden, Singleton, and Ross From Mavericks". NBA.com. February 13, 2010. Retrieved February 17, 2010.  ^ "Wizards Acquire Ilgauskas, Thornton and First-Round Pick In Three-Team Deal". NBA.com. February 17, 2010. Retrieved February 17, 2010.  ^ " Cleveland Cavaliers
Cleveland Cavaliers
vs. Milwaukee Bucks
Milwaukee Bucks
- Recap - April 09, 2011 - ESPN". espn.go.com. 2011. Retrieved April 10, 2011.  ^ " Cleveland Cavaliers
Cleveland Cavaliers
vs. Milwaukee Bucks
Milwaukee Bucks
- Box Score - March 14, 2012 - ESPN".  ^ "Bucks Designate Gooden As Team's Amnesty Player". NBA.com. Turner Sports Interactive, Inc. July 16, 2013. Retrieved July 16, 2013.  ^ Wizards Sign Drew Gooden
Drew Gooden
to 10-Day Contract ^ WIZARDS NEW POST OPTION: DREW GOODEN ^ Wizards sign Drew Gooden
Drew Gooden
to second 10-day contract ^ Wizards Sign Gooden for Remainder of Season ^ Wizards Re-Sign Drew Gooden ^ Drew Gooden
Drew Gooden
2014-15 Game Log ^ "WIZARDS RE-SIGN DREW GOODEN". MonumentalNetwork.com. July 13, 2015. Retrieved July 13, 2015.  ^ Wizards Decline Option On Drew Gooden ^ Jemele Hill. "Riding with Drew Gooden". ESPN. October 5, 2007. Retrieved on December 30, 2008. ^ Chris Mannix. "First Person: Drew Gooden" Sports Illustrated. April 10, 2006. Retrieved on December 30, 2008. ^ Report: Wizards' Drew Gooden
Drew Gooden
won't play for Finland at FIBA World Cup ^ "Garbage Time". NBA.com. Retrieved March 6, 2009.  ^ "Drew defends that patch of hair on neck". InsideBayArea.com. Retrieved March 6, 2009.  ^ Allen, Scott (March 13, 2017). "'It was a helluva senior year': Drew Gooden to graduate 15 years after leaving Kansas". The Washington Post. Retrieved March 13, 2017.  ^ Bedore, Gary (March 10, 2017). "Fifteen years after leaving KU for the NBA, Drew Gooden
Drew Gooden
will graduate in May". KansasCity.com. Retrieved March 16, 2017.  ^ Spears, Marc (May 12, 2017). "DREW GOODEN FULFILLS PROMISE TO EARN HIS COLLEGE DEGREE After a 14-year NBA career, the former Jayhawk will walk with the Kansas graduating class on Sunday". The Undefeated. ESPN Internet Ventures. Retrieved May 12, 2017.  ^ "Former Kansas star Drew Gooden
Drew Gooden
takes it to the hoop with EA Sports in NCAA March Madness 2003". Gamezone.com. September 10, 2008. Archived from the original on February 5, 2008. Retrieved March 6, 2009. 

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Drew Gooden.

Career statistics and player information from NBA.com, or Basketball-Reference.com

Links to related articles

v t e

NABC Player of the Year

1975: Thompson 1976: May 1977: M. Johnson 1978: Ford 1979: Bird 1980: Brooks 1981: Ainge 1982: Sampson 1983: Sampson 1984: Jordan 1985: Ewing 1986: Berry 1987: D. Robinson 1988: Manning 1989: Elliott 1990: Simmons 1991: L. Johnson 1992: Laettner 1993: Cheaney 1994: G. Robinson 1995: Respert 1996: Camby 1997: Duncan 1998: Jamison 1999: Brand 2000: Martin 2001: Williams 2002: Gooden & Williams 2003: Collison 2004: Nelson & Okafor 2005: Bogut 2006: Morrison & Redick 2007: Durant 2008: Hansbrough 2009: Griffin 2010: Turner 2011: Fredette 2012: Green 2013: Burke 2014: McDermott 2015: Kaminsky 2016: Valentine 2017: Mason 2018: Brunson

v t e

2002 NCAA Men's Basketball
Basketball
Consensus All-Americans

First Team

Dan Dickau Juan Dixon Drew Gooden Steve Logan Jason Williams

Second Team

Sam Clancy Mike Dunleavy Jr. Casey Jacobsen Jared Jeffries David West

v t e

Pete Newell Big Man Award
Pete Newell Big Man Award
winners

2000: Fizer 2001: Collins 2002: Gooden 2003: West 2004: E. Okafor 2005: Bogut 2006: G. Davis 2007: Oden 2008: Beasley 2009: Griffin 2010: Monroe 2011: Johnson 2012: A. Davis 2013: Plumlee 2014: Young 2015: J. Okafor 2016: Pöltl 2017: Swanigan 2018: Bagley

v t e

Big 12 Conference
Big 12 Conference
Men's Basketball
Basketball
Player of the Year

1997: LaFrentz 1998: LaFrentz 1999: Hamilton 2000: Fizer 2001: Tinsley 2002: Gooden 2003: Collison 2004: Allen 2005: Simien 2006: Tucker 2007: Durant 2008: Beasley 2009: Griffin 2010: Anderson 2011: Morris 2012: Robinson 2013: Smart 2014: Ejim 2015: Hield 2016: Hield 2017: Mason III 2018: Graham

v t e

2002 NBA draft

First round

Yao Ming Jay Williams Mike Dunleavy Jr. Drew Gooden Nikoloz Tskitishvili Dajuan Wagner Nenê
Nenê
Hilario Chris Wilcox Amar'e Stoudemire Caron Butler Jared Jeffries Melvin Ely Marcus Haislip Fred Jones Boštjan Nachbar Jiří Welsch Juan Dixon Curtis Borchardt Ryan Humphrey Kareem Rush Qyntel Woods Casey Jacobsen Tayshaun Prince Nenad Krstić Frank Williams John Salmons Chris Jefferies Dan Dickau

Second round

Steve Logan Roger Mason Jr. Robert Archibald Vincent Yarbrough Dan Gadzuric Carlos Boozer Miloš Vujanić David Andersen Tito Maddox Rod Grizzard Juan Carlos Navarro Mario Kasun Ronald Murray Jason Jennings Lonny Baxter Sam Clancy Matt Barnes Jamal Sampson Chris Owens Peter Fehse Darius Songaila Federico Kammerichs Marcus Taylor Rasual Butler Tamar Slay Mladen Šekularac Luis Scola Randy Holco

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