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The Dongan Charter
Charter
is the 1686 document incorporating Albany, New York as a city. Albany's charter was issued by Governor Thomas Dongan
Thomas Dongan
of the Province of New York, a few months after Governor Dongan issued a similarly worded, but less detailed charter for the city of New York.[1] The city of Albany was created three years after Albany County.[2] The charter is the oldest existing city charter still in force in the United States and "arguably in all the Western Hemisphere", according to Stefan Bielinski, former senior historian of the New York State Museum.[3] In 1936 the United States Congress commemorated the charter's 250th anniversary by minting a half dollar coin.[4]

Contents

1 History 2 Provisions 3 Amendments 4 Commemorative coin 5 References 6 External links

History[edit] After the city of New York received a municipal charter from Governor Dongan the governor came to Albany, at which time the village sent a delegation of prominent men to request a charter of their own. The Patroon, after being encouraged by the governor, finally released all claims to Albany and forfeited a strip of land 1 mile (1.6 km) wide and 16 miles (26 km) long to Albany.[5] Albany at the time consisted of about 500 residents living in around 140 houses.[6] In July 1686 a delegation led by Pieter Schuyler
Pieter Schuyler
and Robert Livingston traveled to New York to receive the charter for Albany;[7] the charter was signed on July 25, 1686 and was read aloud to the citizens of Albany three days later.[8] Due to England, and by extension Albany, using the Julian calendar
Julian calendar
at the time, the corrected date for the signing of the document under the Gregorian calendar
Gregorian calendar
is August 1, 1686.[9] During Leisler's Rebellion
Leisler's Rebellion
Jacob Leisler
Jacob Leisler
demanded the charters of Albany and the city of New York be forfeited, and New York yielded but Albany's mayor, Pieter Schuyler, refused. Schuyler went on to become one of the major leaders in suppressing the rebellion.[10] The next major threat to the charter government came during the American Revolution when the Common Council stopped meeting in 1775. The local Committee of Safety took over daily functions until 1778 when the Common Council began meeting again.[11] A Dongan Charter
Charter
Parade was held in 1936 for the 250th anniversary celebrations,[12] and as part of the ceremonies the United States Congress authorized the minting of an Albany Charter
Charter
half dollar coin.[4] Tricentennial celebrations held in 1986 included a re-enactment of the signing and awarding of the charter by Governor Mario Cuomo
Mario Cuomo
playing Governor Dongan, and Mayor Thomas Whalen
Thomas Whalen
playing Mayor Schuyler.[13] Other events during the tricentennial were fireworks, music, the unveiling of a tricentennial clock, a hot-air balloon lift-off from Lincoln Park, and a cake large enough to feed thousands. Mayors from other Albanys around the world were among the visiting dignitaries who were invited to the ceremonies and given a tour of the city by Mayor Whalen.[14] Provisions[edit]

The original Dongan Charter partially unfolded

The charter turned the village of Albany into a city under the name of "The Mayor, Aldermen, and Commonalty of the city of Albany";[10][15] this legally separated it from Rensselaerswyck, a nearby colonial estate. The charter also established Albany's boundaries and a municipal government, as well as specifically naming the first officers. Certain special rights were put into the charter as well, such as the exclusive right to negotiate with the Native Americans. It also established Albany as the sole market town in the upper Hudson region, with the right to purchase land at Tionnderoge and Schaghticoke.[16] The mayor of Albany was the executive officer and selected by the Lieutenant Governor. He was also designated as the clerk of the marketplace and the coroner for both the city and Albany County. Two alderman and two assistant aldermen were chosen from each ward and sat on the Common Council along with the mayor and recorder. The mayor, recorder, and aldermen were also justices, the assistants however did not have any judicial powers.[10] The sole right to issue trading privileges anywhere in Albany County rested with the mayor and Common Council. Albany County encompassed all of Upstate New York north and west of Ulster County at that time, as well as the state of Vermont.[10] All residents of New York, except those of Albany, were specifically banned from trading with any Iroquois
Iroquois
nation, or with any other native tribe to the west, east, or north of the city of Albany, or with native tribes anywhere within Albany County.[15] Amendments[edit] The Dongan Charter
Charter
was first amended on March 21, 1787 to remove the mayor's powers to act as the city and county's sole coroner, and to regulate trade with Indians. It continued to be used with only minor changes until March 16, 1870,[17][18] when it saw major changes by the state legislature in 1870 and 1883.[10] In the 1870 revision, the city's official name was changed from "The Mayor, Aldermen, and Commonalty of the city of Albany" to the "City of Albany".[10] In 1998, the charter was almost completely rewritten after a municipal referendum. Legally, however, the revised charter was reckoned as an amendment to the Dongan Charter.[3][19][20] Commemorative coin[edit] Main article: Albany Charter
Charter
half dollar The United States Congress
United States Congress
authorized on June 16, 1936 the minting of 25,000 half dollar coins celebrating the 250th anniversary of the Dongan Charter.[4][21] References[edit]

^ John Archibald Fairlie (September 1898). "Municipal Corporations in the Colonies". Municipal Affairs. Reform Club, Committee on Municipal Administration. II (3): 846–847. Retrieved 2010-05-24.  ^ Joel Munsell (1869). The Annals of Albany. p. 191. Retrieved 2009-05-24.  ^ a b Fitzpatrick, Edward (1998-06-03). "312-Year-Old Document Shapes City's Government". Times Union (Albany). Hearst Newspapers. p. B4. Archived from the original on 2013-01-11. Retrieved 2010-05-23.  ^ a b c "1936 Albany Charter
Charter
Half Dollar". Numismatic Guaranty Corporation. Retrieved 2010-11-06.  ^ Cuyler Reynolds (1906). Albany Chronicles. pp. 84–85. Retrieved 2009-05-24.  ^ Judy Shepard (July 6, 1986). "The First Hundred Years (1686-1786): In the Beginning". Albany Times Union. p. T1. Retrieved 2010-05-30. [permanent dead link] ^ Reynolds, Cuyler (1914). Genealogical and Family History of Southern New York and the Hudson River
Hudson River
Valley : A Record of the Achievements of Her People in the Making of a Commonwealth and the Building of a Nation. 3. New York, NY: Lewis Historical Publishing Company. p. 1306.  ^ Bruce A. Scruton (July 22, 1986). "Dongan Charter
Charter
Born Out of Trading Rights Tiff". Albany Knickerbocker News. p. 3A. Retrieved 2010-05-30. [permanent dead link] ^ Thomas Kearns (March 24, 1986). "Albany's Political Clout, Civic Pride Told in the Stars". Albany Knickerbocker News. p. 1A. Retrieved 2010-05-30. [permanent dead link] ^ a b c d e f Proceedings of the Third National Conference for Good City Government and of the Second Annual Meeting of the National Municipal League. Philadelphia, PA: Selmeiner Printing Company. 1896. pp. 137–138. Retrieved 2010-05-24.  ^ Nancy Connell (July 6, 1986). "Gov. Dongan's Charter: Was City's First Milestone". Albany Times Union. p. T9. Retrieved 2010-05-30. [permanent dead link] ^ "Looking Back". Albany Times Union. November 21, 2001. p. F2. Retrieved 2010-05-30. [permanent dead link] ^ Greg B. Smith and Brad Kelly (July 22, 1986). "Cuomo, Whalen Re-enact Signing of City's Charter". Albany Knickerbocker News. p. 1A. Retrieved 2010-05-30. [permanent dead link] ^ " Charter
Charter
Day's Array of Tricentennial Events". July 21, 1986. p. B1. [permanent dead link] ^ a b A. Bleeker Banks (1888). Albany Bi-centennial. Banks and Brothers. pp. 431–454. Retrieved 2010-05-27.  ^ "Dongan Charter". New York State Museum. Retrieved 2009-12-09.  ^ Banks, Anthony Bleecker; Danaher, Franklin Martin; Hamilton, Andrew (1888). Albany bi-centennial: Historical memoirs. Albany, NY: Charles Van Benthuysen & Sons. p. 363.  ^ Faculty of Yale Law School (1901). Two Centuries Growth of American Law 1701-1901: Volume 1. Yale Law School. pp. 217–218. Retrieved 2010-05-24.  ^ "City Charter". City of Albany, New York. Retrieved 2010-05-24.  ^ "Albany Charter". Council of Albany Neighborhood Associations. Retrieved 2010-05-24.  ^ "PUBLIC—NO. 687—74TH CONGRESS H.R. 7690". United States Congress. June 16, 1936. Archived from the original on May 7, 2009. Retrieved 2010-05-31. 

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Complete text The Dongan Charter

v t e

Albany, New York

History

General

History (Prehistory–1664, 1664–1784, 1784–1860, 1860–1900, 1900–1942, 1942–1983, 1983–present) Architecture National Register of Historic Places listings

17th century

Mohawks Mahicans Dutch West India Company
Dutch West India Company
(1621–1791) Fort Nassau (1614) Fort Orange (1624) Rensselaerswijck
Rensselaerswijck
(1629–1840) Beverwijck
Beverwijck
(1652–1664) Stadt Huys
Stadt Huys
(1635, 1646, or 1673) Fort Frederick (1676–1789) Dongan Charter
Charter
(1686)

18th century

Van Ostrande-Radliff House
Van Ostrande-Radliff House
(1728) Quackenbush House
Quackenbush House
(1736) Albany Plan
Albany Plan
of Union (1754) Schuyler Mansion
Schuyler Mansion
(1765)

19th century

Clermont (1807) Erie Canal
Erie Canal
(1825) Albany Basin
Albany Basin
(1825) Albany Lumber District
Albany Lumber District
(1830s–1908) City Hall (1832) Governor's Mansion (1856) City Hall (1883) New York State Capitol
New York State Capitol
(1899)

20th century

Albany Municipal Airport (1908) Miss Albany Diner
Miss Albany Diner
(1941) W. Averell Harriman State Office Building Campus
W. Averell Harriman State Office Building Campus
(1956–1994) Albany County Airport (1960) Empire State Plaza
Empire State Plaza
(1965–1978) Times Union Center
Times Union Center
(1990) Albany International Airport
Albany International Airport
(1996–1998)

21st century

Hudson River Way
Hudson River Way
(2002) Albany Convention Center
Albany Convention Center
(proposed)

Government

Mayor of Albany (current: Kathy Sheehan) Albany City Hall Coat of arms Albany Fire Department See also: Government of New York (state)

Neighborhoods

Arbor Hill Buckingham Pond Center Square Chinatown Delaware Avenue Dudley Heights Dunes Eagle Hill Helderberg Hudson-Park Melrose New Albany Normansville North Albany Park South Pine Hills Sheridan Hollow South End (Kenwood, Krank Park, Mansion District, Mount Hope, The Pastures, Second Avenue) University Heights Washington Park West Hill Whitehall

People

Thomas Dongan
Thomas Dongan
(1634–1715) Peter Schuyler
Peter Schuyler
(1657–1724) Erastus Corning
Erastus Corning
(1794–1872) Daniel P. O'Connell (1885–1977) Erastus Corning
Erastus Corning
2nd (1909–1983) John McEneny
John McEneny
(1943–present)

Geography

Land

Albany Pine Bush Westerlo Island

Water

Buckingham Lake Hudson River
Hudson River
(Valley) Normans Kill Patroon Creek Rensselaer Lake Tivoli Lake Washington Park Lake

Education

Secondary

Academy of the Holy Names The Albany Academy Albany Academy for Girls Albany Free School Bishop Maginn High School City School District of Albany
City School District of Albany
(Albany High School) LaSalle School See also: List of school districts in New York's Capital District

Higher

Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences Albany Law School Albany Medical College College of Saint Rose Excelsior College Maria College Mildred Elley Sage College of Albany SUNY Albany See also: List of colleges and universities in New York's Capital District

Religion

Episcopal Diocese of Albany
Episcopal Diocese of Albany
(Cathedral of All Saints, Bishop William Love) Roman Catholic Diocese of Albany
Roman Catholic Diocese of Albany
(Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception, Bishop Howard Hubbard)

Culture

Culture in New York's Capital District Sports in New York's Capital District

Transportation

Adirondack Northway Albany–Rensselaer Rail Station Albany International Airport CDTA Interstate 87 Interstate 90 Interstate 787 New York State Thruway Port of Albany–Rensselaer Streets of Albany, New York

Capital District Portal

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Municipalities and communities of Albany County, New York, United States

County seat: Albany

Cities

Albany Cohoes Watervliet

Towns

Berne Bethlehem Coeymans Colonie Green Island Guilderland Knox New Scotland Rensselaerville Westerlo

Villages

Altamont Colonie Green Island Menands Ravena Voorheesville

CDPs

Preston-Potter Hollow Westmere

Other hamlets

Alcove Beckers Corners Boght Corners Clarksville Coeymans Coeymans Hollow Crescent Station Delmar Dormansville Dunsbach Ferry Elsmere Feura Bush Fort Hunter Fullers Glenmont Guilderland Guilderland Center Karner Latham Lisha Kill Loudonville Mannsville McKownville Medusa New Salem Newtonville Normansville Roessleville Selkirk Slingerlands South Bethlehem Verdoy West Albany

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Capital District, New York

Central communities

Albany (history City Hall coat of arms) Schenectady (City Hall) Troy (history) List of all incorporated places

Largest communities (over 20,000 in 2010)

Bethlehem Clifton Park Town of Colonie Glenville Guilderland Halfmoon Niskayuna Queensbury Rotterdam Saratoga Springs

Medium-sized communities (10,000 to 20,000 in 2000)

City of Amsterdam Brunswick Cohoes East Greenbush Glens Falls Gloversville Malta North Greenbush Schodack Watervliet Wilton

Small communities (5,000 to 10,000 in 2000)

Town of Amsterdam Ballston Spa Cobleskill Village of Colonie Duanesburg City of Johnstown Town of Johnstown Kinderhook Mechanicville New Scotland Rensselaer Sand Lake Scotia Town of Stillwater Waterford

Counties

Albany Columbia Fulton Greene Montgomery Rensselaer Saratoga Schenectady Schoharie Warren Washington

History

Mohawks Mahicans Fort Orange Rensselaerswyck Beverwyck Albany Plan
Albany Plan
of Union Timeline of town creation Toponymies of places Tech Valley

Geography

Hudson River
Hudson River
(Valley) Mohawk River Erie Canal Lake Albany Lake George Albany Pine Bush
Albany Pine Bush
(Rensselaer Lake Woodlawn Preserve) Adirondack Mountains Catskill Mountains Rensselaer Plateau

Religion and culture

Culture in New York's Capital District Sports in New York's Capital District Episcopal Diocese of Albany Roman Catholic Diocese of Albany

Education

List of school districts List of colleges and universities

Newspapers

Albany Times Union Metroland Glens Falls Post-Star The Saratogian Schenectady Gazette Troy Record

Television

v t e

Broadcast television in the Capital District of New York and Berkshire County, Massachusetts, including Albany and Pittsfield

Reception may vary by location and some stations may only be viewable with cable television

Local stations

WRGB
WRGB
(6.1 CBS, 6.2 TBD, 6.3 Comet) WTEN
WTEN
(10.1 ABC, 10.2 GetTV, 10.3 Justice, 10.4 Escape) WNYT (13.1 NBC, 13.2 MeTV, 13.3 H&I) WMHT (17.1 PBS, 17.2 Create, 17.3 World, 17.4 PBS
PBS
Kids) WXXA-TV
WXXA-TV
(23.1 Fox, 23.2 Capital OTB TV, 23.3 Laff, 23.4 Bounce TV) WNGN-LP 35 / WNGX-LD 42 Analog (FN) WCWN
WCWN
(45.1 The CW, 45.2 Charge!, 45.3 CBS
CBS
simulcast) WNYA
WNYA
(51.1 MNTV, 51.2 Light TV, 51.3 Decades)

Outlying area stations

WYCX-CD (2.1/.2 Retro, 2.3 Tuff TV; Manchester, VT) W04AJ 4 (PBS; Glens Falls, via WMHT) W04BD 4 (PBS; Schoharie, via WMHT) WNCE-CD (8.1 YTA; Glens Falls) WYBN-LD
WYBN-LD
(14.1 BUZZR, 14.2 ASN, 14.3 Tuff TV, 14.4 France 24, 14.5 Rev'n, 14.6 LATV, 14.7 This TV; Cobleskill) WNYT 18 (NBC, Troy) W21CP-D 21 (NBC, Gloversville, via WNYT) W28DA-D 28 (NBC, Pittsfield, MA, via WNYT) W38DL-D 38 (NBC, Adams, MA, via WNYT) WVBG-LP 41 Analog (Ind; Greenwich) WNYT 45 (NBC, Glens Falls) W47CM 47 Analog (silent; Glens Falls) WYPX (55.1 Ion, 55.2 qubo, 55.3 Life; Amsterdam)

Adjacent locals

Burlington, VT/Plattsburgh

WCAX-TV
WCAX-TV
(3.1 CBS, 3.2 Movies!, 3.3 Ion; Burlington, VT) WVER (28.1 PBS/VPBS, 28.2 PBS+/World, 28.3 Create, 28.4 PBS
PBS
Kids; Rutland)

New York City

WNYW
WNYW
(5.1 Fox, 5.2 Movies!, 5.4 Light TV; New York) WWOR-TV
WWOR-TV
(9.1 MNTV, 9.3 Buzzr, 9.4 H&I; Secaucus, NJ) WEPT-CD (15.1 AMGTV; Newburgh) WRNN-TV
WRNN-TV
(48.1 Ind / AMGTV
AMGTV
/ JTV / News, 48.2 Stadium, 48.3 Arirang TV, 48.4 NHK World; Kingston)

Utica

WKTV
WKTV
(2.1 NBC, 2.2 CBS, 2.3 CW, 2.4 MeTV; Utica) WUTR
WUTR
(20.1 ABC, 20.2 MNTV, 20.3 Grit, 20.4 Bounce TV; Utica)

Cable-only stations

MSG Network MSG Plus Spectrum News
News
Capital Region SNY YES

Defunct stations

TW3 WEDG-TV (UPN, cable-only) WCDC-TV 19 (CBS/ABC, Adams, MA) WCDB 29 (CBS, Hagaman) W52DF 52 (TBN, Glens Falls)

Radio

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Radio stations in the Albany–Schenectady–Troy market

By AM frequency

590 8101 900 930 980 1160 1190 1230 1240 1300 1330 1340 1400 1440 1460 1490 1540 1570

By FM frequency

88.3 89.1 89.7 89.9 90.3 90.7 (Acra) 90.7 (Pattersonville) 90.9 91.1 91.5 92.3 92.9 93.1 93.5 93.7 94.3 94.5 94.9 95.5 96.3 96.7 97.3 97.5 (Albany) 97.5 (Hoosick Falls) 97.7 97.9 98.3 98.5 98.7 99.1 99.5 99.9 100.5 100.9 101.1 101.3 101.9 102.3 102.7 102.9 103.1 103.5 103.9 104.3 104.5 104.7 104.9 105.7 106.1 106.5 107.1 107.3 107.7

NOAA Weather Radio frequency

162.550

Digital radio by frequency & subchannel

810 980 89.1-1 89.1-2 90.3-1 90.3-2 98.3-1 98.3-2 99.5-1 99.5-2 102.3-1 102.3-2 103.1-1 103.1-2 105.7-1 105.7-2 106.5-1 106.5-2 107.7-1 107.7-2 107.7-3

By callsign

W226AC W232CE W235AY W248AX W256BU W260CH W263CG W266BX W275BS W282BI W284BZ W287AB W291BY WABY WAIX WAJZ WAMC WAMC-FM

HD2

WBPM WCAA-LP WCDB WCSS WCTW WDCD WDCD-FM WENT WEQX WEXT WFLY WFNY WGDJ WGNA-FM

HD2 HD3

WGXC WGY1 WGY-FM

HD2

WHAZ WHAZ-FM WHUC WHVP WINU WIZR WJIV WJKE WKBE WKKF

HD2

WKLI-FM WMHT-FM

HD2

WMYY WOFX WOPG WOPG-FM WPGL WPTR WPYX

HD2

WQBJ WQBK-FM WQSH

HD2

WRIP WROW WRPI WRUC WRVE

HD2

WSDE WTMM-FM WTRY-FM

HD2

WVCR-FM WVTL WXL34 WYAI WYJB WYKV WZCR

Defunct

WCKL/560 WGFM/99.5 WHRL/103.1 WRSA/1280 WROW-FM/95.5 WTRI WXKW

1 = Clear-channel stations with extended nighttime coverage.

Capit

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