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The Info List - Don Nelson


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As player:

5× NBA champion (1966, 1968, 1969, 1974, 1976) No. 19 retired by the Boston
Boston
Celtics Third-team All-American – AP, NABC, UPI (1962)

As coach:

3× NBA Coach of the Year (1983, 1985, 1992) 2× NBA All-Star Game head coach (1992, 2002) Top 10 Coaches in NBA History

Career statistics

Points 10,898 (10.3 ppg)

Rebounds 5,192 (4.9 rpg)

Assists 1,526 (1.4 apg)

Stats at Basketball-Reference.com

Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame as coach

Medals

Men's basketball

Representing  United States

FIBA World Championship

1994 Canada Team competition

Donald Arvid Nelson (born May 15, 1940), sometimes known as Nellie, is an American former NBA player and head coach. He coached the Milwaukee Bucks, the New York Knicks, the Dallas
Dallas
Mavericks, and the Golden State Warriors. An innovator, Nelson is credited with, among other things, pioneering the concept of the point forward, a tactic which is frequently employed by teams at every level today. His unique brand of basketball is often referred to as Nellie Ball. He was named one of the Top 10 coaches in NBA history. On April 7, 2010, he passed Lenny Wilkens
Lenny Wilkens
for first place on the all-time NBA wins list with 1,333 wins.[1] His all-time record is 1,335–1,063 (.557).

Contents

1 Playing career 2 Coaching history 3 Records 4 NBA career statistics

4.1 Regular season 4.2 Playoffs

5 Head coaching record 6 Personal life 7 References

Playing career[edit] After a very successful high school career at Rock Island High School, Nelson played for the University of Iowa
University of Iowa
as a two-time All-American averaging 21.1 points and 10.5 rebounds a game. He was drafted 19th overall by the Chicago Zephyrs
Chicago Zephyrs
of the NBA. He played for the Zephyrs one season, and was acquired by the Los Angeles Lakers
Los Angeles Lakers
in 1963. After two years with the Lakers, he was signed by the Boston
Boston
Celtics. In his first season with Boston, Nelson averaged 10.2 points and 5.4 rebounds, helping the Celtics to the 1966 NBA title as one of their role players. Four more championships with Boston
Boston
followed in 1968, 1969, 1974, and 1976. In Game 7 of the 1969 NBA Finals, against his former team, the Lakers, Nelson converted one of the most famous shots in playoff history — a foul-line jumper which dropped through the basket after hitting the back rim and bouncing several feet straight up. The shot, taken with just over a minute to go in the game and the Celtics clinging to a 103–102 lead, helped secure Boston's 11th NBA title in 13 seasons. A model of consistency, Nelson would average more than 10 points per game every season between 1968–69 and 1974–75 (before the introduction of the three-point shot). He led the NBA in field-goal percentage in 1974–75. Nelson was coined as one of the best "sixth men" ever to play in the NBA. He was also known for his distinctive one-handed style for shooting free throws. He would place the ball in his shooting hand, lean in almost off-balance and toe the free-throw line with his right foot and his left leg trailing. He would then push the ball toward the basket completely with his right hand while springing with his right knee and lifting the trailing foot in a sort of "hop". This technique helped him to a career 76.5% free-throw shooting percentage. Nelson retired as a player following the 1975–76 season. His number 19 jersey was retired to the Boston Garden
Boston Garden
rafters in 1978. Coaching history[edit] Nelson was named the general manager and head coach of the Milwaukee Bucks in 1976, and began to show what would later become his signature style of wheeling and dealing players. He made his first trade of Swen Nater to the Buffalo Braves
Buffalo Braves
and turned the draft pick he received into Marques Johnson, who had a solid career with the Bucks. In 1980, he sent off an underachieving Kent Benson
Kent Benson
to the Detroit Pistons
Detroit Pistons
for Bob Lanier. Perhaps his most publicized deal came before the 1984–85 season when he dealt Johnson, Junior Bridgeman, Harvey Catchings, and cash to the San Diego Clippers
San Diego Clippers
for Terry Cummings, Craig Hodges, and Ricky Pierce. And, in 1986, he would deal Alton Lister to the Seattle SuperSonics for Jack Sikma. Taking over a Bucks team in the aftermath of Kareem Abdul-Jabbar's departure to Los Angeles, Nelson was able to improve their win total by 14 games in his first full season as head coach, and established the team as a legitimate championship contender by 1980. It was in Milwaukee
Milwaukee
where Nelson became known for his unorthodox, innovative basketball philosophy. He pioneered the concept of the point forward – a tactic wherein small forwards are used to direct the offense. In Nelson's tenure with the Bucks, he used 6–5 small forward Paul Pressey for the role.[2] This enabled Nelson to field shooting guards Sidney Moncrief
Sidney Moncrief
and Craig Hodges or Ricky Pierce at the same time without worrying about who would run the offense. In his offensive half-court sets, he would also put a center who wasn't a threat on offense, like Lister or Randy Breuer, at mid-court instead of near the basket to keep a shot-blocking center like the Utah Jazz's Mark Eaton away from the basket to make him less of a threat on defense. This system, known as "Nellieball", created a lot of mismatches and enabled Nelson to lead the Bucks to seven straight Central Division championships with over 50 wins in each of those seasons. He earned NBA Coach of the Year honors in 1983 and 1985. However, for seven straight years, despite finishing no worse than second best in the Eastern Conference, the Bucks would end up being eliminated in the playoffs by either the Larry Bird-led Boston Celtics
Boston Celtics
or the Julius Erving-led Philadelphia 76ers. After the 1986-87 season, Nelson left the Bucks. Nelson was named head coach and vice president of the Golden State Warriors after one season away from the NBA. In Golden State, he instilled a run-and-gun style of offense. Again using an unconventional lineup which featured three guards (Mitch Richmond, Tim Hardaway and Sarunas Marciulionis) and two forwards (Chris Mullin and the 6'8" Rod Higgins at center), he coached the Warriors to a 23-game turnaround of their previous season and back into the playoffs with his lineup popularly known as Run TMC. He was named NBA Coach of the Year a third time in the 1991-92 season. Nelson continued to retool the team, drafting Latrell Sprewell in 1992, and trading for the rights to Chris Webber
Chris Webber
in the following draft. Despite Webber averaging 17.5 points and 9.1 rebounds per game and winning the NBA Rookie of the Year Award, he found himself at odds with Nelson's preference to play him at Center rather than Power Forward. Frequently clashing with one another, Webber threatened to use the out-clause in his contract if he wasn't traded. Nelson reportedly offered to resign rather than let the team trade away their young star, but nonetheless Webber was dealt to the Washington Bullets. Nelson then resigned from the team midway through the 1994–95 season. Nelson had made the playoffs with Golden State in four of his six seasons there; the Warriors did not qualify for the playoffs for the next 12 seasons, until he returned to the team in 2006. Nelson coached the Team USA national basketball team at the 1994 FIBA World Championship in Toronto, and led them to the Gold Medal.[3] The team was marketed as "Dream Team II".[4][5] In 1995, Nelson would begin his stint with the Knicks,[6] which lasted from July 1995 until March 1996. He had coached the Knicks to a respectable 34–25 record, but he favored a more up-tempo style of offense, which sharply contrasted the Knicks preferred hard-nosed defensive style of play.[7] Nelson also suggested management try to trade Patrick Ewing
Patrick Ewing
in order to be in a position to make an offer to Shaquille O'Neal, who was rumored to be interested in a move to New York.[7] He was replaced as head coach by his assistant, Jeff Van Gundy. Nelson was named head coach and general manager of the Dallas Mavericks in 1997. Nelson was coming to a team that had been dormant through the 90's and a permanent fixture in the NBA lottery. In 1998, his first full offseason in charge, Nelson worked out draft day deals with the Milwaukee Bucks
Milwaukee Bucks
and the Phoenix Suns: essentially trading the draft rights of Robert Traylor and Pat Garrity for Dirk Nowitzki
Dirk Nowitzki
and Steve Nash, whom he wanted to pair with the Mavericks rising star Michael Finley. The trio of Nash, Finley and Nowitzki became the foundation for the Mavericks dramatic turnaround, as Nelson coached the Mavericks to four consecutive 50-win seasons. The height of their success was a 60-win season in 2002-03, when they reached Western Conference Finals against the Spurs. An injury to Nowitzki in game 3 that kept him out for the rest of the series doomed the Mavericks as they lost in six games. Lacking an interior presence to combat low-post players such as Shaquille O'Neal, Nelson introduced the "Hack-a-Shaq" defense to the NBA while in Dallas. In the 2004 offseason, Steve Nash
Steve Nash
was offered a max contract from the Phoenix Suns; despite Nelson's insistence on matching the offer, Mark Cuban
Mark Cuban
declined to and Nash accepted Phoenix's offer.[8] Nash won consecutive MVPs with the Suns. On March 19, 2005, Nelson stepped down as Dallas' Head Coach, naming Avery Johnson
Avery Johnson
as his successor. Nelson retained his job as Dallas' GM until after the season, when he named his son, Assistant GM Donnie Nelson, as his replacement. The Mavericks reached the NBA Finals the following season, though they would lose to Miami in six games. Nelson has spoke fondly of his time in Dallas, but admitted he lost in interest in remaining with the team when they did not re-sign Nash.

Nelson as Golden State Warriors' head coach on March 15, 2009 to play the Phoenix Suns

On August 29, 2006, the Warriors hired Nelson to return to the team for a second stint as coach. Chris Mullin, a longtime favorite of Nelson's from his first stint as Warriors head coach, was the team's general manager. Nelson's style of coaching favored the play of Baron Davis, Monta Ellis, Matt Barnes, Jason Richardson, and Andris Biedriņš. Midway through the season, Mullin (at behest of Nelson) orchestrated a trade for Al Harrington
Al Harrington
and Stephen Jackson
Stephen Jackson
of the Pacers. The new lineup thrived under Nelson; Davis, Biedriņš and Jackson saw an increase in scoring and efficiency, Barnes went from a virtual unknown to a solid rotation contributor,[9] and Ellis was named the NBA's Most Improved Player after averaging 16.5 points per game, a substantial increase from his average of 6.8 points per game the prior season.[10] The Warriors closed out the season strong and just managed to qualify for the 2007 playoffs. Nelson faced his old team, the Mavericks, in the first round of the playoffs. The Mavs had the NBA's best record, and were a trendy pick to win the NBA championship that year. However, in one of the biggest upsets in NBA playoff history, Nelson coached the 8th-seeded Warriors to victory over the top-seeded Mavericks in six games. It was numerically the largest upset in the history of the NBA playoffs, with the 67–15 Mavericks' regular-season win-loss record 25 games better than the 42–40 Warriors'. The Warriors went on to lose to the Utah Jazz in the second round of the playoffs.

Nelson in 2015

On January 29, 2008, Chris Webber
Chris Webber
signed with the Warriors, reuniting with Nelson and returning to the team that had drafted him 15 years earlier.[11] His return lasted only nine games as he was forced to retire due to injuries,[12] but his return signaled closure to arguably the biggest blemish on Nelson's otherwise impressive resume as a player's coach.[13] The Warriors finished 48–34 that season-their most wins since 1993–94 (during his first stint as coach). However, in a Western Conference where all eight playoff teams won at least 50 games, they missed the playoffs by two games. The next two seasons saw the Warriors plunge back into mediocrity, losing most of the players from their 2007 playoff run to either trades or free agency. One bright spot was created in the 2009 NBA draft, when Nelson agreed with Larry Riley to draft Stephen Curry
Stephen Curry
with their seventh overall pick,[14][15] despite skepticism from critics. Curry went on to win back-to-back MVP awards and lead Golden State to a championship in 2015 and 2017, along with Kevin Durant. On September 23, Comcast SportsNet Bay Area, Nelson announced he would resign as head coach.[16] The San Francisco Chronicle
San Francisco Chronicle
reported that new owners Joe Lacob and Peter Guber wanted "a young, up-and-coming coach" to help revive the Warriors' fortunes. Longtime assistant Keith Smart succeeded Nelson as coach.[17] Nelson in February 2011 said on Bay Area radio station KNBR
KNBR
that he was fired: "I talked to (Lacob) on the phone before I got fired, and I was really impressed. I was a little surprised with the way things happened, but I think it is for the best for everybody."[18] On September 7, 2012, Nelson was inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame.[19] Records[edit] On December 29, 2001, Don Nelson
Don Nelson
became the third coach in NBA history to win 1,000 games, behind Lenny Wilkens
Lenny Wilkens
and Pat Riley. Nelson won his 1,300th career game on February 21, 2009, joining Wilkens as the only coach to pass this milestone. Don Nelson
Don Nelson
defeated the Minnesota Timberwolves on April 7, 2010, achieving his 1,333rd career win. He passed Lenny Wilkens
Lenny Wilkens
for first all-time on the list of the NBA's winningest coaches. NBA career statistics[edit]

Legend

  GP Games played   GS  Games started  MPG  Minutes per game

 FG%  Field goal percentage  3P%  3-point field goal percentage  FT%  Free throw
Free throw
percentage

 RPG  Rebounds per game  APG  Assists per game  SPG  Steals per game

 BPG  Blocks per game  PPG  Points per game  Bold  Career high

† Denotes seasons in which Nelson won an NBA championship

* Led the league

Regular season[edit]

Year Team GP MPG FG% FT% RPG APG STL BLK PPG

1962–63 Chicago 62 17.3 .440 .729 4.5 1.2 – – 6.8

1963–64 L.A. Lakers 80 17.6 .418 .741 4.0 1.0 – – 5.2

1964–65 L.A. Lakers 39 6.1 .424 .769 1.9 0.6 – – 2.4

1965–66† Boston 75 23.5 .439 .684 5.4 1.1 – – 10.2

1966–67 Boston 79 15.2 .446 .742 3.7 0.8 – – 7.5

1967–68† Boston 82 18.3 .494 .728 5.3 1.3 – – 10.0

1968–69† Boston 82 21.6 .485 .776 5.6 1.1 – – 11.6

1969–70 Boston 82 27.1 .501 .775 7.3 1.8 – – 15.4

1970–71 Boston 82 27.5 .468 .744 6.9 1.9 – – 13.9

1971–72 Boston 82 25.4 .480 .788 5.5 2.3 – – 13.8

1972–73 Boston 72 19.8 .476 .846 4.4 1.4 – – 10.8

1973–74† Boston 82 21.3 .508 .788 4.2 2.0 0.2 0.2 11.5

1974–75 Boston 79 26.0 .539* .827 5.9 2.3 0.4 0.2 14.0

1975–76† Boston 75 12.6 .462 .789 2.4 1.0 0.2 0.1 6.4

Career 1053 20.6 .480 .765 4.9 1.4 0.3 0.1 10.3

Playoffs[edit]

Year Team GP MPG FG% FT% RPG APG STL BLK PPG

1964 L.A. Lakers 5 11.2 .538 1.000 2.6 0.4 – – 3.4

1965 L.A. Lakers 11 19.3 .453 .760 5.4 1.7 – – 6.1

1966† Boston 17 18.6 .424 .808 5.0 0.8 – – 8.4

1967 Boston 9 15.8 .458 .588 4.7 1.0 – – 7.1

1968† Boston 19 24.6 .520 .743 7.5 1.7 – – 12.5

1969† Boston 18 19.3 .518 .833 4.6 1.2 – – 12.4

1972 Boston 11 28.0 .525 .854 5.5 1.9 – – 13.2

1973 Boston 13 23.3 .465 .875 2.9 1.2 – – 11.0

1974† Boston 18 25.9 .500 .774 5.4 1.9 0.4 0.2 11.4

1975 Boston 11 24.9 .564 .902 4.1 2.4 0.2 0.2 15.4

1976† Boston 18 17.5 .481 .870 2.9 0.9 0.2 0.1 9.1

Career 150 21.4 .498 .817 4.8 1.4 0.3 0.1 10.5

Head coaching record[edit]

Nelson dunking during his college days with the Iowa Hawkeyes.

Legend

Regular season G Games coached W Games won L Games lost W–L % Win–loss %

Post season PG Playoff games PW Playoff wins PL Playoff losses PW–L % Playoff win–loss %

Team Year G W L W–L% Finish PG PW PL PW–L% Result

Milwaukee 1976–77 64 27 37 .422 6th in Midwest — — — — Missed Playoffs

Milwaukee 1977–78 82 44 38 .537 2nd in Midwest 9 5 4 .556 Lost in Conf. Semifinals

Milwaukee 1978–79 82 38 44 .463 4th in Midwest — — — — Missed Playoffs

Milwaukee 1979–80 82 49 33 .598 1st in Midwest 7 3 4 .429 Lost in Conf. Semifinals

Milwaukee 1980–81 82 60 22 .732 1st in Central 7 3 4 .429 Lost in Conf. Semifinals

Milwaukee 1981–82 82 55 27 .671 1st in Central 6 2 4 .333 Lost in Conf. Semifinals

Milwaukee 1982–83 82 51 31 .622 1st in Central 9 5 4 .556 Lost in Conf. Finals

Milwaukee 1983–84 82 50 32 .610 1st in Central 16 8 8 .500 Lost in Conf. Finals

Milwaukee 1984–85 82 59 23 .720 1st in Central 8 3 5 .375 Lost in Conf. Semifinals

Milwaukee 1985–86 82 57 25 .695 1st in Central 14 7 7 .500 Lost in Conf. Finals

Milwaukee 1986–87 82 50 32 .610 3rd in Central 12 6 6 .500 Lost in Conf. Semifinals

Golden State 1988–89 82 43 39 .524 4th in Pacific 8 4 4 .500 Lost in Conf. Semifinals

Golden State 1989–90 82 37 45 .451 5th in Pacific — — — — Missed Playoffs

Golden State 1990–91 82 44 38 .537 4th in Pacific 9 4 5 .444 Lost in Conf. Semifinals

Golden State 1991–92 82 55 27 .671 2nd in Pacific 4 1 3 .250 Lost in First Round

Golden State 1992–93 82 34 48 .415 6th in Pacific — — — — Missed Playoffs

Golden State 1993–94 82 50 32 .610 3rd in Pacific 3 0 3 .000 Lost in First Round

Golden State 1994–95 45 14 31 .311 (fired) — — — — —

New York 1995–96 59 34 25 .576 (resigned) — — — — —

Dallas 1997–98 66 16 50 .242 5th in Midwest — — — — Missed Playoffs

Dallas 1998–99 50 19 31 .380 5th in Midwest — — — — Missed Playoffs

Dallas 1999–00 82 40 42 .488 4th in Midwest — — — — Missed Playoffs

Dallas 2000–01 82 53 29 .646 2nd in Midwest 10 4 6 .400 Lost in Conf. Semifinals

Dallas 2001–02 82 57 25 .695 2nd in Midwest 8 4 4 .500 Lost in Conf. Semifinals

Dallas 2002–03 82 60 22 .732 1st in Midwest 20 10 10 .500 Lost in Conf. Finals

Dallas 2003–04 82 52 30 .634 3rd in Midwest 5 1 4 .200 Lost in First Round

Dallas 2004–05 64 42 22 .656 (resigned) — — — — —

Golden State 2006–07 82 42 40 .512 3rd in Pacific 11 5 6 .455 Lost in Conf. Semifinals

Golden State 2007–08 82 48 34 .585 3rd in Pacific — — — — Missed Playoffs

Golden State 2008–09 82 29 53 .354 3rd in Pacific — — — — Missed Playoffs

Golden State 2009–10 82 26 56 .317 4th in Pacific — — — — Missed Playoffs

Career

2,398 1,335 1,063 .557

166 75 91 .452

Personal life[edit] Nelson married Joy Wolfgram at the Oakland Coliseum in 1991. Nelson has five grown children, one of whom, Donnie Nelson, is the general manager of the Dallas
Dallas
Mavericks. Nelson also has thirteen grandchildren. Nelson graduated from the University of Iowa
University of Iowa
with a degree in physical education in 2012. He had left the school in 1962 with most of his coursework completed, and later took Spanish classes to make up for some of his missing credit hours. He still lacked student-teaching hours until 2012, when the school decided that his NBA coaching experience would fulfill that requirement.[20][21] References[edit]

^ "Nelson sets NBA career victories mark in Warriors' defeat of Wolves'". Associated Press. April 7, 2010. ^ Aschburner, Steve (December 21, 2010). "LeBron a point forward? Well, he wouldn't be the first". NBA.com. Archived from the original on June 1, 2012.  ^ "1994 World Championship for Men". .fiba.com archive. 1994-08-14. Retrieved 2010-08-27.  ^ Araton, Harvey (August 15, 1994). "BASKETBALL; Dream Team Ends Its Sequel Predictably". The New York Times. Archived from the original on July 17, 2012.  ^ Taylor, Phil (August 22, 1994). "Yes, It Was A Joke". Sports Illustrated. Archived from the original on July 17, 2012.  ^ Mike Wise (1995-07-07). "Knicks Crown Nelson Coach Of New York - tribunedigital-orlandosentinel". Articles.orlandosentinel.com. Retrieved 2017-03-25.  ^ a b Hindsight, The Knicks And Nelson's Foresight, The New York Times, 2 March 2007] ^ Kelly Dwyer (2012-12-12). " Mark Cuban
Mark Cuban
contends that Don Nelson
Don Nelson
once wanted to trade Jason Terry for … Raul Lopez?". Sports.yahoo.com. Retrieved 2017-03-25.  ^ Hu, Janny (December 14, 2006). "Barnes turns Warriors into believers". San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved August 5, 2010.  ^ "Ellis edges Martin, wins most improved award". Sports.espn.go.com. 2007-04-26. Retrieved 2017-03-25.  ^ Beacham, Greg (2008-02-01). " Chris Webber
Chris Webber
hopes ancient feud stays buried when he rejoins Warriors". Usatoday30.usatoday.com. Retrieved 2017-03-25.  ^ Warriors' Webber calls it quits, SI.com. Retrieved on March 25, 2008. ^ Dubow, Josh (2008-03-25). " Chris Webber
Chris Webber
ends comeback, will retire". Usatoday30.usatoday.com. Retrieved 2017-03-25.  ^ Berman, Marc (2015-05-30). "Don Nelson: Stephen Curry
Stephen Curry
pick wasn't vendetta vs. Knicks New York Post". Nypost.com. Retrieved 2017-03-25.  ^ McCallum, Jack, "Golden Days" (2017), p. 53 ^ [1][permanent dead link] ^ Simmons, Rusty. No more Nellieball
Nellieball
for the Warriors. San Francisco Chronicle, 2010-09-24. ^ Simmons, Rusty (February 4, 2011). "Nelson cites Warriors' effort, calls roster flawed". San Francisco Chronicle. p. B-1. Archived from the original on February 7, 2011. It was done really professionally", Nelson said. "I talked to (Lacob) on the phone before I got fired, and I was really impressed. I was a little surprised with the way things happened, but I think it is for the best for everybody.  ^ " Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame: Don Nelson
Don Nelson
inducted". Mercurynews.com. 2012-09-07. Retrieved 2017-03-25.  ^ Simmons, Rusty (2012-03-20). "Hall of Fame? Don Nelson
Don Nelson
prefers graduating". SFGate. Retrieved 2017-03-25.  ^ " Dallas
Dallas
Mavericks: Ex-Mavs coach Don Nelson
Don Nelson
set to graduate 50 years after leaving Iowa SportsDay". Dallasnews.com. Retrieved 2017-03-25. 

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NBA Coach of the Year Award

1963: Gallatin 1964: Hannum 1965: Auerbach 1966: Schayes 1967: J. Kerr 1968: Guerin 1969: Shue 1970: Holzman 1971: Motta 1972: Sharman 1973: Heinsohn 1974: R. Scott 1975: P. Johnson 1976: Fitch 1977: Nissalke 1978: H. Brown 1979: Fitzsimmons 1980: Fitch 1981: McKinney 1982: Shue 1983: Nelson 1984: Layden 1985: Nelson 1986: Fratello 1987: Schuler 1988: Moe 1989: Fitzsimmons 1990: Riley 1991: Chaney 1992: Nelson 1993: Riley 1994: Wilkens 1995: Harris 1996: Jackson 1997: Riley 1998: Bird 1999: Dunleavy 2000: Rivers 2001: L. Brown 2002: Carlisle 2003: Popovich 2004: H. Brown 2005: D'Antoni 2006: A. Johnson 2007: Mitchell 2008: B. Scott 2009: M. Brown 2010: Brooks 2011: Thibodeau 2012: Popovich 2013: Karl 2014: Popovich 2015: Budenholzer 2016: S. Kerr 2017: D'Antoni

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Boston
Boston
Celtics

Founded in 1946 Based in Boston, Massachusetts

Franchise

Franchise Team history All-time roster Seasons Accomplishments Head coaches Current season

Arenas

Boston
Boston
Arena Boston
Boston
Garden Hartford Civic Center TD Garden

Administration

Boston
Boston
Basketball
Basketball
Partners (owner) Wyc Grousbeck (CEO) Wyc Grousbeck, H. Irving Grousbeck, Stephen Pagliuca (managing partners) Danny Ainge
Danny Ainge
(General manager) Brad Stevens
Brad Stevens
(Head coach)

General managers

Brown Auerbach Volk Wallace Ainge

Retired numbers

00 1 2 3 6 10 14 15 16 17 18 LOSCY 19 21 22 23 24 25 31 32 33 34 35 MIC

Hall of Famers

Boston Celtics
Boston Celtics
Hall of Famers

G League affiliate

Maine Red Claws

Rivalries

Detroit Pistons Los Angeles Lakers New York Knicks Philadelphia 76ers

Culture

Celtic Pride Greatest game ever played Tommy Points "Love ya, Cooz!" Close, but no cigar! Bill Russell Beat L.A. Celtics/Lakers: Best of Enemies Mike Gorman Johnny Most "Havlicek stole the ball!" Henderson steals the ball! Bird steals the ball! Boston
Boston
Garden North Station Larry Legend DJ The Chief The Truth The Sports Museum
The Sports Museum
of New England

NBA Championships (17)

1957 1959 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1968 1969 1974 1976 1981 1984 1986 2008

Eastern Conference Championships (21)

1957 1958 1959 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1968 1969 1974 1976 1981 1984 1985 1986 1987 2008 2010

Media

TV NBC Sports Boston Radio WBZ-FM Announcers Mike Gorman Tom Heinsohn Brian Scalabrine Sean Grande Cedric Maxwell John Wallach

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Milwaukee
Milwaukee
Bucks

Founded in 1968 Based in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Franchise

Franchise 1968 Expansion Draft All-time roster Draft history Seasons Records Head coaches Current season

Arenas

MECCA Arena BMO Harris Bradley Center Wisconsin Entertainment and Sports Center
Wisconsin Entertainment and Sports Center
(planned for 2018)

General managers

Erickson Embry Nelson D. Harris Dunleavy Weinhauer Grunfeld L. Harris Hammond Horst

G League affiliate

Wisconsin Herd

Administration

Owner Wesley Edens & Marc Lasry General Manager Jon Horst Head Coach Joe Prunty (interm)

Retired numbers

1 2 4 10 14 16 32 33

Hall of Famers

Lew Alcindor Ray Allen Nate Archibald Dave Cowens Wayne Embry Alex English Bob Lanier Moses Malone Oscar Robertson

NBA Championships (1)

1971

Conference Championships (2)

1971 1974

Division titles (13)

1971 1972 1973 1974 1976 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 2001

Culture & lore

The Big O Bango The Fastest Expansion Champion MECCA Court Fear the Deer The Greek Freak

Media

TV Fox Sports Wisconsin

Jim Paschke (play-by-play) Gus Johnson (part-time play-by-play) Jon McGlocklin (color) Marques Johnson
Marques Johnson
(part-time color)

Radio WTMJ

Ted Davis Dennis Krause

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Golden State Warriors

Founded in 1946 Played in Philadelphia (1946–1962) and San Francisco (1962–1971) Based in Oakland, California

Franchise

Franchise Team history All-time roster Draft history Seasons Head coaches Current season

Arenas

Philadelphia Arena Philadelphia Convention Hall Cow Palace San Francisco Civic Auditorium War Memorial Gymnasium
War Memorial Gymnasium
(University of San Francisco) San Jose Arena Oracle Arena Chase Center

General managers

Tyrell Gottlieb Feerick Vertlieb Stirling Attles Nelson Twardzik St. Jean Mullin Riley Myers

G League affiliate

Santa Cruz Warriors

Retired numbers

13 14 16 17 24 42

Hall of Famers

Paul Arizin Rick Barry Wilt Chamberlain Joe Fulks Tom Gola Neil Johnston Jerry Lucas Šarūnas Marčiulionis Chris Mullin Mitch Richmond Don Nelson Robert Parish Andy Phillip Guy Rodgers Ralph Sampson Nate Thurmond Jamaal Wilkes

NBA Championships (5)

1947 1956 1975 2015 2017

Conference Championships (9)

1947 1948 1956 1964 1967 1975 2015 2016 2017

Culture/lore

Wilt the Stilt

100 point game

Nate the Great Nellie Ball Run TMC The Sleepy Floyd game Splash Brothers Death Lineup Warrior Girls 73–9 The Block

Rivalries

Cleveland Cavaliers

Media

TV NBC Sports Bay Area Radio KGMZ Announcers Bob Fitzgerald Jim Barnett Tim Roye

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Dallas
Dallas
Mavericks

Founded in 1980 Based in Dallas, Texas

Franchise

Franchise History Seasons Players Draft history Expansion Draft Head coaches Current season

Arenas

Reunion Arena Moody Coliseum American Airlines Center

General managers

Norm Sonju Keith Grant Frank Zaccanelli Nelson Sr. Nelson Jr.

G League affiliates

Fort Worth Flyers Albuquerque Thunderbirds Texas Legends

Retired numbers

12 15 22

NBA Championships (1)

2011

Western Conference Championships (2)

2006 2011

Division Championships (3)

1987 2007 2010

Rivals

Houston Rockets

Culture and lore

Don Carter Mark Cuban Nellie Ball Moody Madness German Wunderkind "Eminence Front"

Media

TV KTXA Fox Sports Southwest Radio KESN-FM KFLC-AM Announcers Mark Followill Derek Harper Chuck Cooperstein Brad Davis Victor Villalba

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Members of the Naismith Memorial Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame

Players

Guards

R. Allen Archibald Beckman Belov Bing Blazejowski Borgmann Brennan Cervi Cheeks Clayton Cooper-Dyke Cousy Dampier Davies Drexler Dumars Edwards Frazier Friedman Galis Gervin Goodrich Greer Guerin Hanson Haynes Holman Hyatt Isaacs Iverson Jeannette D. Johnson E. Johnson K. Jones S. Jones Jordan Kidd Lieberman Maravich Marcari Marčiulionis Martin McDermott McGrady D. McGuire Meyers R. Miller Monroe C. Murphy Nash Page Payton Petrović Phillip Posey Richmond Robertson Rodgers Roosma J. Russell Schommer Scott Sedran Sharman K. Smith Staley Steinmetz Stockton Swoopes Thomas Thompson Vandivier Wanzer West J. White Wilkens Woodard Wooden

Forwards

Arizin Barkley Barry Baylor Bird Bradley R. Brown Cunningham Curry Dalipagić Dantley DeBusschere Dehnert Endacott English Erving Foster Fulks Gale Gates Gola Hagan Havlicek Hawkins Hayes Haywood Heinsohn Hill Howell G. Johnson King Lucas Luisetti K. Malone McClain B. McCracken J. McCracken McGinnis McHale Mikkelsen C. Miller Mullin Pettit Pippen Pollard Radja Ramsey Rodman Schayes E. Schmidt O. Schmidt Stokes C. Thompson T. Thompson Twyman Walker Washington N. White Wilkes Wilkins Worthy Yardley

Centers

Abdul-Jabbar Barlow Beaty Bellamy Chamberlain Ćosić Cowens Crawford Daniels DeBernardi Donovan Ewing Gallatin Gilmore Gruenig Harris-Stewart Houbregs Issel W. Johnson Johnston M. Krause Kurland Lanier Leslie Lovellette Lapchick Macauley M. Malone McAdoo Meneghin Mikan Mourning S. Murphy Mutombo Olajuwon O'Neal Parish Pereira Reed Risen Robinson B. Russell Sabonis Sampson Semjonova Thurmond Unseld Wachter Walton Yao

Coaches

Alexeeva P. Allen Anderson Auerbach Auriemma Barmore Barry Blood Boeheim L. Brown Calhoun Calipari Cann Carlson Carnesecca Carnevale Carril Case Chancellor Chaney Conradt Crum Daly Dean Díaz-Miguel Diddle Drake Driesell Ferrándiz Gaines Gamba Gardner Gaze Gill Gomelsky Gunter Hannum Harshman Haskins Hatchell Heinsohn Hickey Hobson Holzman Hughes Hurley Iba Izzo P. Jackson Julian Keaney Keogan Knight Krzyzewski Kundla Lambert Leonard Lewis Litwack Loeffler Lonborg Magee McCutchan McGraw A. McGuire F. McGuire McLendon Meanwell Meyer Miller Moore Nelson Nikolić Novosel Olson Pitino Ramsay Richardson Riley Rubini Rupp Rush Sachs Self Sharman Shelton Sloan D. Smith Stringer Summitt Tarkanian Taylor Teague J. Thompson VanDerveer Wade Watts Wilkens G. Williams R. Williams Wooden Woolpert Wootten Yow

Contributors

Abbott Barksdale Bee Biasone H. Brown W. Brown Bunn Buss Clifton Colangelo Cooper Davidson Douglas Duer Embry Fagan Fisher Fleisher Gavitt Gottlieb Granik Gulick Harrison Hearn Henderson Hepp Hickox Hinkle Irish M. Jackson Jernstedt Jones Kennedy Knight J. Krause Lemon Liston Lloyd McLendon Lobo Mokray Morgan Morgenweck Naismith Newell Newton J. O'Brien L. O'Brien Olsen Podoloff Porter Raveling Reid Reinsdorf Ripley Sanders Saperstein Schabinger St. John Stagg Stanković Steitz Stern Taylor Thorn Tower Trester Vitale Wells Welts Wilke Winter Zollner

Referees

Bavetta Enright Garretson Hepbron Hoyt Kennedy Leith Mihalik Nichols Nucatola Quigley Rudolph Shirley Strom Tobey Walsh

Teams

1960 United States Olympic Team 1992 United States Olympic Team All-American Red Heads Buffalo Germans The First Team Harlem Globetrotters Immaculata College New York Renaissance Original Celtics Texas Western

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Naismith Memorial Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame Class of 2012

Players

Mel Daniels Katrina McClain Reggie Miller Ralph Sampson Chet Walker Jamaal Wilkes

Coaches

Lidia Alexeeva Don Nelson

Contributors

Donald Barksdale Phil Knight

Referees

Hank Nichols

Teams

All

.