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Dodecanol
Dodecanol
/ˈdoʊˈdɛkɑːnɒl/ (systematically named dodecan-1-ol) is an organic compound with the chemical formula CH3(CH2)10CH2OH (also written as C 12H 26O). It is tasteless, colourless solid with a floral smell. It is classified as a fatty alcohol.

Contents

1 Production and use 2 Toxicity 3 Mutual solubility with water 4 References 5 External links

Production and use[edit] In 1993, the European demand of dodecanol was around 60 thousand tons per year (Tt/a).[citation needed] It can be obtained from palm kernel or coconut oil fatty acids and methyl esters by hydrogenation.[3] It may also be produced synthetically via the Ziegler process. Dodecanol
Dodecanol
is used to make surfactants, lubricating oils, pharmaceuticals, in the formation of monolithic polymers and as a flavor enhancing food additive. In cosmetics, dodecanol is used as an emollient. It is also the precursor to dodecanal, an important fragrance. Toxicity[edit] Dodecanol
Dodecanol
can irritate the skin. It has about half the toxicity of ethanol, but it is very harmful to marine organisms.[4] Mutual solubility with water[edit] The mutual solubility of 1-dodecanol and water has been quantified as follows.[5]

Mutual Solubility
Solubility
of Water and 1- Dodecanol
Dodecanol
(98%, Melting Point 24 °C), Weight %

Temperature, °C Solubility
Solubility
of Dodecanol
Dodecanol
in Water Solubility
Solubility
of Water in Dodecanol

29.5 0.04 2.87

40.0 0.05 2.85

50.2 0.09 2.69

60.5 0.15 2.96

70.5 0.09 2.70

80.3 0.14 2.89

90.8 0.18 2.96

standard deviation 0.02 0.01

References[edit]

^ Merck Index, 12th Edition, 3464. ^ Record in the GESTIS Substance Database of the Institute for Occupational Safety and Health ^ Klaus Noweck, Wolfgang Grafahrend, "Fatty Alcohols" in Ullmann's Encyclopedia of Industrial Chemistry 2006, Wiley-VCH, Weinheim. doi:10.1002/14356007.a10_277.pub2 ^ MSDS Safety Sheet ^ Richard Stephenson and James Stuart, "Mutual Binary Solubilities: Water-Alcohols and Water-Esters", J. Chem. Eng. Data, 1986, 31, 56-70.

External links[edit]

MSDS at Oxford MSDS at J.T. Baker

v t e

Alcohols

Straight-chain primary alcohols (1°)

Methanol
Methanol
(C 1) Ethanol
Ethanol
(C 2) 1-Propanol
1-Propanol
(C 3) n-Butanol (C 4) 1-Pentanol
1-Pentanol
(C 5) 1-Hexanol
1-Hexanol
(C 6) 1-Heptanol
1-Heptanol
(C 7) 1-Octanol
1-Octanol
(C 8) 1-Nonanol
1-Nonanol
(C 9) 1-Decanol
1-Decanol
(C 10) Undecanol
Undecanol
(C 11) Dodecanol
Dodecanol
(C 12) Tridecan-1-ol (C 13) 1-Tetradecanol
1-Tetradecanol
(C 14) Pentadecan-1-ol (C 15) Cetyl alcohol
Cetyl alcohol
(C 16) Heptadecan-1-ol (C 17) Stearyl alcohol
Stearyl alcohol
(C 18) Nonadecan-1-ol (C 19) Arachidyl alcohol
Arachidyl alcohol
(C 20) Heneicosan-1-ol (C 21) Docosanol
Docosanol
(C 22) Tricosan-1-ol (C 23) 1-Tetracosanol
1-Tetracosanol
(C 24) Pentacosan-1-ol (C 25) 1-Hexacosanol
1-Hexacosanol
(C 26) 1-Heptacosanol
1-Heptacosanol
(C 27) 1-Octacosanol
1-Octacosanol
(C 28) 1-Nonacosanol
1-Nonacosanol
(C 29) Triacontanol
Triacontanol
(C 30)

Other primary alcohols

Isobutanol
Isobutanol
(C 4) Isoamyl alcohol
Isoamyl alcohol
(C 5) 2-Methyl-1-butanol
2-Methyl-1-butanol
(C 5) Phenethyl alcohol
Phenethyl alcohol
(C 8) Tryptophol
Tryptophol
(C 10)

Secondary alcohols (2°)

Isopropanol (C 3) 2-Butanol
2-Butanol
(C 4) 2-Pentanol
2-Pentanol
(C 5) 2-Hexanol
2-Hexanol
(C 6) 2-Heptanol
2-Heptanol
(C 7) Cyclohexanol
Cyclohexanol
(C 6) 2-Octanol
2-Octanol
(C 8)

Tertiary alcohols (3°)

tert-Butyl alcohol (C 4) tert-Amyl alcohol (C 5) 2-Methyl-2-pentanol
2-Methyl-2-pentanol
(C 6) 2-Methylhexan-2-ol (C 7) 2-Methylheptan-2-ol (C 8) 3-Methyl-3-pentanol
3-Methyl-3-pentanol
(C 6) 3-Methyloctan-3-ol (C 9)

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