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The District of Galicia (german: Distrikt Galizien, pl, Dystrykt Galicja, ua, Дистрикт Галичина) was a World War II administrative unit of the General Government created by Nazi Germany on 1 August 1941 after the opening of Operation Barbarossa. Initially, during the invasion of Poland by Germany and the Soviet Union, the territory temporarily fell under the Soviet occupation in 1939 as part of Soviet Ukraine. Then Adolf Hitler (Document No. 1997-PS of 17 July 1941) formed a capital in Lemberg (Lviv), the ''Galizien'' province existed from 1941 until 1944. It ceased to exist after the Soviet counter-offensive.


History

District of Galicia comprised mainly the pre-war Lwów Voivodeship of the Second Polish Republic, today part of western Ukraine. The territory was taken over by Nazi Germany in 1941 after Operation Barbarossa, the attack on USSR and incorporated into the General Government, governed by ''Gauleiter'' Hans Frank since the invasion of 1939. The region was taken over again by the Soviet Union in 1944. The district area was managed by Frank's brother-in-law Karl Lasch (:de:Karl Lasch, de, :pl:Karl Lasch, pl) from 1 August 1941 to 6 January 1942, and by SS Brigadeführer Dr. Otto Wächter from 6 January 1942 to September 1943. Wächter utilised the district capital Lvov, Lemberg as a recruitment base for the 14th Waffen Grenadier Division of the SS Galicia (1st Ukrainian). In the course of the Holocaust in occupied Poland starting from the year of the invasion, the largest Polish Jews, Jewish Ghettos in Nazi-occupied Europe, extermination ghettos were Lwów Ghetto, created in Lwów (Lemberg) and Stanisławów Ghetto, in Stanisławów (Stanislau).


Governors of the District Galizien (German occupation)


See also

*Administrative division of Polish territories during World War II *Soviet annexation of Western Ukraine, 1939–1940


References

{{DEFAULTSORT:Galicia History of Eastern Galicia General Government World War II occupied territories Invasion of Poland 1941 establishments in Europe 1944 disestablishments in Europe History of Lviv Oblast History of Ternopil Oblast History of Ivano-Frankivsk Oblast