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Distributive justice concerns the socially just allocation of resources. Often contrasted with just process, which is concerned with the administration of law, distributive justice concentrates on outcomes. This subject has been given considerable attention in philosophy and the social sciences.

In social psychology, distributive justice is defined as perceived fairness of how rewards and costs are shared by (distributed across) group members.[1] For example, when some workers work more hours but receive the same pay, group members may feel that distributive justice has not occurred. To determine whether distributive justice has taken place, individuals often turn to the behavioral expectations of their group.[1] If rewards and costs are allocated according to the designated distributive norms of the group, distributive justice has occurred.[2]

Distributive justice is also fundamental to the Catholic Church's social teaching, inspiring such figures as Dorothy Day[3] and Pope John Paul II.[4]

Distributive justice considers whether the distribution of goods among the members of society at a given time is subjectively acceptable.

Not all advoc

Distributive justice considers whether the distribution of goods among the members of society at a given time is subjectively acceptable.

Not all advocates of consequentialist theories are concerned with an equitable society. What unites them is the mutual interest in achieving the best possible results or, in terms of the example above, the best possible distribution of wealth.

Environmental justice