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(As of 31 March 2018[update]) Government      Barisan Nasional
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Committees

5

Committee of Selection Public Accounts Committee House Committee Committee of Privileges Standing Orders Committee

Elections

Voting system

Plurality: First-past-the-post (222 single-member constituencies)

Last election

5 May 2013

Next election

24 August 2018 or earlier

Meeting place

Malaysian Houses of Parliament, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Website

www.parlimen.gov.my

Malaysia

This article is part of a series on the politics and government of Malaysia

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Law Social contract Rukun Negara

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King

Muhammad V of Kelantan

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None

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Nazrin Shah of Perak

Conference of Rulers Keeper of the Rulers' Seal Line of succession to the Malaysian throne

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Najib Razak

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Ahmad Zahid Hamidi

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Ali Hamsa

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Wan Azizah Wan Ismail

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Chief Justice: Md. Raus Sharif

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Sabah
and Sarawak: Richard Malanjum

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Chief Judge: Mukhyuddin Ibrahim

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Election Commission

Chairman: Mohd. Hashim Abdullah

Electoral districts Political parties Recent elections

General election: 2013 · 2008 · 2004

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The Dewan Rakyat
Dewan Rakyat
(Malay for House of Representatives, literally People's Hall) is the lower house of the Parliament of Malaysia, consisting of members elected during elections from federal constituencies drawn by the Election Commission. The Dewan Rakyat
Dewan Rakyat
usually proposes legislation through a draft known as a 'bill'. All bills must usually be passed by both the Dewan Rakyat (House of Representatives) and the Dewan Negara, before they are sent to the King for royal assent. However, if the Dewan Negara
Dewan Negara
rejects a bill, it can only delay the bill's passage by a maximum of a year before it is sent to the King. Like the Dewan Negara, the Dewan Rakyat meets at the Malaysian Houses of Parliament
Malaysian Houses of Parliament
in Kuala Lumpur.

Contents

1 Membership 2 Powers and procedure 3 Current composition 4 Latest election result 5 Members per state and federal territory 6 Notes and references

Membership[edit] Members of the Dewan Rakyat
Dewan Rakyat
are referred to as "Members of Parliament (MPs)" or "Ahli Dewan Rakyat" (literally "member of the Dewan Rakyat") in Malay. The term of office is as long as the member wins in the elections. A member of the Dewan Rakyat
Dewan Rakyat
must be at least 21 years of age and must not be a member of the Dewan Negara. The presiding officer of the Dewan Rakyat
Dewan Rakyat
is the Speaker, who is elected at the beginning of each Parliament or after the vacation of the post, by the MPs. Two Deputy Speakers are also elected, and one of them sits in place of the Speaker when he is absent. The Dewan Rakyat
Dewan Rakyat
machinery is supervised by the Clerk to the House who is appointed by the King; he may only be removed from office through the manner prescribed for judges or by mandatory retirement at age 60.[2] As of the 2013 general election, Dewan Rakyat
Dewan Rakyat
has 222 elected members. Members are elected from federal constituencies drawn by the Election Commission. Constituency boundaries are redrawn every ten years based on the latest census. Each Dewan Rakyat
Dewan Rakyat
lasts for a maximum of five years, after which a general election must be called. In the general election, voters select a candidate to represent their constituency in the Dewan Rakyat. The plurality voting system is used; the candidate who gains the most votes wins the seat. Before a general election can be called, the King must first dissolve Parliament on the advice of the Prime Minister.[2] According to the Constitution, the Yang di-Pertuan Agong
Yang di-Pertuan Agong
has the right at his own discretion to either grant or withhold consent to dissolve the parliament. Powers and procedure[edit] For a more comprehensive list, see List of Acts of Parliament in Malaysia. As the ultimate legislative body in Malaysia, Parliament is responsible for passing, amending and repealing acts of law. Parliament's members are permitted to speak on any subject without fear of censure outside Parliament; the only body that can censure an MP is the House Committee of Privileges. Such "Parliamentary immunity" takes effect from the moment a member of Parliament is sworn in, and only applies to when that member has the floor; it does not apply to statements made outside the House. An exception is made by the Sedition Act passed by Parliament in the wake of the 13 May racial riots in 1969. Under the Act, all public discussion of repealing certain Articles of the Constitution dealing with Bumiputra
Bumiputra
privileges such as Article 153 is illegal. This prohibition is extended to all members of both houses of Parliament.[3] Members of Parliament are also forbidden from criticising the King and judges.[4] The executive government, comprising the Prime Minister and his Cabinet, is usually drawn from members of Parliament; most of its members are typically members of the Dewan Rakyat. After a general election or the resignation or death of a Prime Minister, the King selects the Prime Minister, who is the Head of Government but constitutionally subordinate to him, from the Dewan Rakyat. In practice, this is usually the leader of the largest party in Parliament. The Prime Minister then submits a list containing the names of members of his Cabinet, who will then be appointed as Ministers by the King. Members of the Cabinet must also be members of Parliament. If the Prime Minister loses the confidence of the Dewan Rakyat, whether by losing a no-confidence vote or failing to pass a budget, he must either advice the King to dissolve Parliament and hold a general election or submit his resignation to the King. The King has the discretion to grant or withheld consent to the dissolution. If consent is withheld, the government must resign and the King would appoint a new Prime Minister that has the support of the majority of members of Parliament. The Cabinet formulates government policy and drafts bills, meeting in private. Its members must accept "collective responsibility" for the decisions the Cabinet makes, even if some members disagree with it; if they do not wish to be held responsible for Cabinet decisions, they must resign. Although the Constitution makes no provision for it, there is also a Deputy Prime Minister, who is the de facto successor of the Prime Minister should he die or be otherwise incapacitated.[5] A proposed act of law begins its life when a particular government minister or ministry prepares a first draft with the assistance of the Attorney-General's Department. The draft, known as a bill, is then discussed by the Cabinet. If it is agreed to submit it to Parliament, the bill is distributed to all MPs. It then goes through three readings before the Dewan Rakyat. The first reading is where the minister or his deputy submits it to Parliament. At the second reading, the bill is discussed and debated by MPs. At the third reading, the minister or his deputy formally submit it to a vote for approval. A simple majority is usually required to pass the bill, but in certain cases, such as amendments to the constitution, a two-thirds majority is required. Should the bill pass, it is sent to the Dewan Negara, where the three readings are carried out again. The Dewan Negara may choose not to pass the bill, but this only delays its passage by a month, or in some cases, a year; once this period expires, the bill is considered to have been passed by the house.[6] If the bill passes, it is presented to the Yang di-Pertuan Agong
Yang di-Pertuan Agong
who has 30 days to consider the bill. Should he disagree with it, he returns it to Parliament with a list of suggested amendments. Parliament must then reconsider the bill and its proposed amendments and return it to the King within 30 days if they pass it again. The King then has another 30 days to give the royal assent; otherwise, it passes into law. The law does not take effect until it is published in the Government Gazette.[7] The government attempts to maintain top secrecy regarding bills debated; MPs generally receive copies of bills only a few days before they are debated, and newspapers are rarely provided with copies of the bills before they are debated. In some cases, such as a 1968 amendment to the Constitution, an MP may be presented with a bill to be debated on the same day it is tabled, and all three readings may be carried out that day itself.[8] In rare circumstances, the government may release a White paper containing particular proposals that will eventually be incorporated into a bill; this has been done for legislation such as the Universities and University Colleges Act.[9] Although the process above assumes only the government can propose bills, there also exists a process for Private Member's Bills. However, as in most other legislatures following the Westminster System, few members of Parliament actually introduce bills.[10] To present a Private Member's Bill, the member in question must seek the leave of the House in question to debate the bill before it is moved. Originally, it was allowed to debate the bill in the process of seeking leave, but this process was discontinued by an amendment to the Standing Orders of Parliament.[11] It is also possible for members of the Dewan Negara
Dewan Negara
to initiate bills; however, only cabinet ministers are permitted to move finance-related bills, which must be tabled in the Dewan Rakyat.[12] It is often alleged that legislation proposed by the opposition parties, which must naturally be in the form of a Private Member's Bill, is not seriously considered by Parliament. Some have gone as far as to claim that the rights of members of Parliament to debate proposed bills have been severely curtailed by incidents such as an amendment of the Standing Orders that permitted the Speaker of the Dewan Rakyat
Dewan Rakyat
to amend written copies of MPs' speeches before they were made. Nevertheless, it is admitted by some of these critics that "Government officials often face sharp questioning in Parliament, although this [i]s not always reported in detail in the press."[13] Current composition[edit] Main article: Members of the Dewan Rakyat, 13th Malaysian Parliament See also: List of members of the Dewan Rakyat Latest election result[edit] Main articles: Results of the 2013 Malaysian general election by parliamentary constituency and Malaysian general election, 2013

Members of Dewan Rakyat
Dewan Rakyat
as elected in 2013 by federal constituency

Equal-area representation of members of Dewan Rakyat
Dewan Rakyat
as elected in 2013 by federal constituency

Diagram of the members of Dewan Rakyat
Dewan Rakyat
as elected in 2013

e • d Summary of the 5 May 2013 Malaysian Dewan Rakyat election results

Party Vote Seats

Votes % Won % +/–

National Front[a] BN 5,237,699 47.38 133 59.91 7

United Malays National Organisation UMNO 3,252,484 29.42 88 39.64 9

Malaysian Chinese Association MCA 867,851 7.85 7 3.15 8

Malaysian Indian Congress MIC 286,629 2.59 4 1.80 1

United Traditional Bumiputera Party PBB 232,390 2.10 14 6.31

Malaysian People's Movement Party Gerakan 191,019 1.73 1 0.45 1

Sarawak
Sarawak
United People's Party SUPP 133,603 1.21 1 0.45 5

United Sabah
Sabah
Party PBS 74,959 0.68 4 1.80 1

Sarawak
Sarawak
People's Party PRS 59,540 0.54 6 2.70

Sarawak
Sarawak
Progressive Democratic Party SPDP 55,505 0.50 4 1.80

United Pasokmomogun Kadazandusun Murut Organisation UPKO 53,584 0.48 3 1.35 1

Liberal Democratic Party LDP 13,138 0.12 0 0.00 1

United Sabah
Sabah
People's Party PBRS 9,467 0.09 1 0.45

People's Progressive Party PPP 7,530 0.07 0 0.00

Parties in the informal coalition, Pakatan Rakyat
Pakatan Rakyat
(People's Pact) PR 5,623,984 50.87 89 40.09 7

Democratic Action Party[b] DAP 1,736,267 15.71 38 17.12 10

People's Justice Party[b] PKR 2,254,328 20.39 30 13.51 1

Pan-Malaysian Islamic Party[b] PAS 1,633,389 14.78 21 9.46 2

State Reform Party STAR 45,386 0.41 0 0.00

Pan-Malaysian Islamic Front Berjasa 31,835 0.29 0 0.00

Sarawak
Sarawak
Workers Party SWP 15,630 0.14 0 0.00

Sabah
Sabah
Progressive Party[c] SAPP 10,099 0.09 0 0.00 2

Love Malaysia
Malaysia
Party PCM 2,129 0.02 0 0.00

Homeland Human's Wellbeing Party KITA 623 0.01 0 0.00

Malaysian United People's Party MUPP 257 0.00 0 0.00

Independents IND 86,935 0.79 0 0.00

Valid votes 11,054,577

Invalid/blank votes 202,570

Total votes (voter turnout: 84.84%) 11,257,147 100.00 222 100.00

Did not vote 2,010,855

Registered voters 13,268,002

Ordinary voters 12,885,434

Early voters 235,826

Postal voters 146,742

Voting age
Voting age
population (aged 21 years and above) 17,883,697

Malaysian population 29,628,392

Source: Election Commission of Malaysia Source: Nohlen et al. [1]

^ Contested using dacing election symbol on the ballot papers. ^ a b c Parties in the informal coalition, People's Pact (Pakatan Rakyat). Contested using separate election symbol on the ballot papers. ^ Net seat change of component parties is –5. Sabah
Sabah
Progressive Party left the National Front after the 2008 election, which accounted for 2 more seats lost.

Members per state and federal territory[edit]

State / federal territory Number of seats Population (2010 census) Population per seat

F. T. Kuala Lumpur
Kuala Lumpur
at-large 11 1,627,172 147,925

F. T. Labuan 1 85,272 85,272

F. T. Putrajaya 1 67,964 67,964

  Johor
Johor
at-large 26 3,233,434 124,363

  Kedah
Kedah
at-large 15 1,890,098 126,007

  Kelantan
Kelantan
at-large 14 1,459,994 104,285

  Malacca
Malacca
at-large 6 788,706 131,451

  Negeri Sembilan
Negeri Sembilan
at-large 8 997,071 124,634

  Pahang
Pahang
at-large 14 1,443,365 103,098

  Penang
Penang
at-large 13 1,520,143 116,934

  Perak
Perak
at-large 24 2,258,428 94,101

  Perlis
Perlis
at-large 3 227,025 75,675

  Sabah
Sabah
at-large 25 3,120,040 124,802

  Sarawak
Sarawak
at-large 31 2,420,009 78,065

  Selangor
Selangor
at-large 22 5,411,324 245,969

  Terengganu
Terengganu
at-large 8 1,015,776 126,972

Northern Region at-large 31 3,637,266 117,331

Central Region at-large 58 9,364,888 161,464

Southern Region at-large 40 5,019,211 125,480

Northeastern Region at-large 36 3,919,135 108,865

East Malaysian Region at-large 57 5,625,321 98,690

Notes and references[edit]

^ Standing Order 13 (1) of the Dewan Rakyat ^ a b "Government: Parliament: Dewan Rakyat". Retrieved 8 February 2006. Archived 14 June 2004 at the Wayback Machine. ^ Means, Gordon P. (1991). Malaysian Politics: The Second Generation, pp. 14, 15. Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-588988-6. ^ Myytenaere, Robert (1998). "The Immunities of Members of Parliament". Retrieved 12 February 2006. ^ "Branches of Government in Malaysia" Archived 7 February 2006 at the Wayback Machine.. Retrieved 3 February 2006. ^ Shuid, Mahdi & Yunus, Mohd. Fauzi (2001). Malaysian Studies, pp. 33, 34. Longman. ISBN 983-74-2024-3. ^ Shuid & Yunus, p. 34. ^ Tan, Chee Koon & Vasil, Raj (ed., 1984). Without Fear or Favour, p. 7. Eastern Universities Press. ISBN 967-908-051-X. ^ Tan & Vasil, p. 11. ^ Ram, B. Suresh (16 December 2005). "Pro-people, passionate politician" Archived 27 April 2006 at the Wayback Machine.. The Sun. ^ Lim, Kit Siang (1997). "Consensus Against Corruption". Retrieved 11 February 2006. ^ Henderson, John William, Vreeland, Nena, Dana, Glenn B., Hurwitz, Geoffrey B., Just, Peter, Moeller, Philip W. & Shinn, R.S. (1977). Area Handbook for Malaysia, p. 219. American University, Washington D.C., Foreign Area Studies. LCCN 771294. ^ "Malaysia". Retrieved 22 January 2006.

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Current Members of the Malaysian House of Representatives (Dewan Rakyat) from Perlis

Padang Besar: Zahidi Zainul Abidin Kangar: Shaharuddin Ismail Arau: Shahidan Kassim

Johor Kedah Kelantan Malacca Negeri Sembilan Pahang Penang Perak Perlis Sabah Sarawak Selangor Terengganu Kuala Lumpur Putrajaya Labuan

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Current Members of the Malaysian House of Representatives (Dewan Rakyat) from Kedah

Langkawi: Nawawi Ahmad Jerlun: Othman Aziz Kubang Pasu: Mohd Johari Baharum Padang Terap: Mahdzir Khalid Pokok Sena: Mahfuz Omar Alor Setar: Gooi Hsiao-Leung Kuala Kedah: Azman Ismail Pendang: Othman Abdul Jerai: Jamil Khir Baharom Sik: Mansor Abd Rahman Merbok: Ismail Daut Sungai Petani: Johari Abdul Baling: Abdul Azeez Abdul Rahim Padang Serai: Surendran Nagarajan Kulim-Bandar Baharu: Abd. Aziz Sheikh Fadzir

Johor Kedah Kelantan Malacca Negeri Sembilan Pahang Penang Perak Perlis Sabah Sarawak Selangor Terengganu Kuala Lumpur Putrajaya Labuan

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Current Members of the Malaysian House of Representatives (Dewan Rakyat) from Kelantan

Tumpat: Kamarudin Jaffar Pengkalan Chepa: Izani Husin Kota Bharu: Takiyuddin Hassan Pasir Mas: Nik Mohamad Abduh Nik Abdul Aziz Rantau Panjang: Siti Zailah Mohd Yusoff Kubang Kerian: Ahmad Baihaki Atiqullah Bachok: Ahmad Marzuk Shaary Ketereh: Annuar Musa Tanah Merah: Ikmal Hisham Abdul Aziz Pasir Puteh: Nik Mazian Nik Mohamad Machang: Ahmad Jazlan Yaakub Jeli: Mustapa Mohamed Kuala Krai: Mohd Hatta Ramli Gua Musang: Tengku Razaleigh Hamzah

Johor Kedah Kelantan Malacca Negeri Sembilan Pahang Penang Perak Perlis Sabah Sarawak Selangor Terengganu Kuala Lumpur Putrajaya Labuan

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Current Members of the Malaysian House of Representatives (Dewan Rakyat) from Terengganu

Besut: Idris Jusoh Setiu: Che Mohamad Zulkifly Jusoh Kuala Nerus: Mohd Khairudin Aman Razali Kuala Terengganu: Raja Kamarul Bahrin Shah Raja Ahmad Marang: Abdul Hadi Awang Hulu Terengganu: Jailani Johari Dungun: Wan Hassan Mohd Ramli Kemaman: Ahmad Shabery Cheek

Johor Kedah Kelantan Malacca Negeri Sembilan Pahang Penang Perak Perlis Sabah Sarawak Selangor Terengganu Kuala Lumpur Putrajaya Labuan

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Current Members of the Malaysian House of Representatives (Dewan Rakyat) from Penang

Kepala Batas: Reezal Merican Naina Merican Tasek Gelugor: Shabudin Yahaya Bagan: Lim Guan Eng Permatang Pauh: Wan Azizah Wan Ismail Bukit Mertajam: Steven Sim Chee Keong Batu Kawan: Kasthuriraani Patto Nibong Tebal: Mansor Othman Bukit Bendera: Zairil Khir Johari Tanjong: Ng Wei Aik Jelutong: Jeff Ooi Chuan Aun Bukit Gelugor: Ramkarpal Singh Bayan Baru: Sim Tze Tzin Balik Pulau: Hilmi Yahaya

Johor Kedah Kelantan Malacca Negeri Sembilan Pahang Penang Perak Perlis Sabah Sarawak Selangor Terengganu Kuala Lumpur Putrajaya Labuan

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Current Members of the Malaysian House of Representatives (Dewan Rakyat) from Perak

Gerik: Hasbullah Osman Lenggong: Shamsul Anuar Nasarah Larut: Hamzah Zainudin Parit Buntar: Mujahid Yusof Rawa Bagan Serai: Noor Azmi Ghazali Bukit Gantang: Idris Ahmad Taiping: Nga Kor Ming Padang Rengas: Mohamed Nazri Abdul Aziz Sungai Siput: Michael Jeyakumar Devaraj Tambun: Ahmad Husni Hanadzlah Ipoh Timor: Su Keong Siong Ipoh Barat: M. Kulasegaran Batu Gajah: V. Sivakumar Kuala Kangsar: Mastura Mohd Yazid Beruas: Ngeh Koo Ham Parit: Mohd Zaim Abu Hassan Kampar: Ko Chung Sen Gopeng: Lee Boon Chye Tapah: M. Saravanan Pasir Salak: Tajuddin Abdul Rahman Lumut: Mohamad Imran Abd Hamid Bagan Datok: Ahmad Zahid Hamidi Telok Intan: Mah Siew Keong Tanjong Malim: Ong Ka Chuan

Johor Kedah Kelantan Malacca Negeri Sembilan Pahang Penang Perak Perlis Sabah Sarawak Selangor Terengganu Kuala Lumpur Putrajaya Labuan

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Current Members of the Malaysian House of Representatives (Dewan Rakyat) from Pahang

Cameron Highlands: G. Palanivel Lipis: Abdul Rahman Mohamad Raub: Ariff Sabri Abdul Aziz Jerantut: Ahmad Nazlan Idris Indera Mahkota: Fauzi Abdul Rahman Kuantan: Fuziah Salleh Paya Besar: Abdul Manan Ismail Pekan: Najib Razak Maran: Ismail Muttalib Kuala Krau: Ismail Mohamed Said Temerloh: Nasrudin Hassan Bentong: Liow Tiong Lai Bera: Ismail Sabri Yaakob Rompin: Hasan Arifin

Johor Kedah Kelantan Malacca Negeri Sembilan Pahang Penang Perak Perlis Sabah Sarawak Selangor Terengganu Kuala Lumpur Putrajaya Labuan

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Current Members of the Malaysian House of Representatives (Dewan Rakyat) from Selangor

Sabak Bernam: Mohd Fasiah Mohd Fakeh Sungai Besar: Budiman Mohd Zohdi Hulu Selangor: P. Kamalanathan Tanjong Karang: Noh Omar Kuala Selangor: Irmohizam Ibrahim Selayang: William Leong Jee Keen Gombak: Mohamed Azmin Ali Ampang: Zuraida Kamaruddin Pandan: Rafizi Ramli Hulu Langat: Che Rosli Che Mat Serdang: Ong Kian Ming Puchong: Gobind Singh Deo Kelana Jaya: Wong Chen Petaling Jaya Selatan: Hee Loy Sian Petaling Jaya Utara: Tony Pua
Tony Pua
Kiam Wee Subang: Sivarasa Rasiah Shah Alam: Khalid Abdul Samad Kapar: Manivannan Gowindasamy Klang: Charles Santiago Kota Raja: Siti Mariah Mahmud Kuala Langat: Abdullah Sani Abdul Hamid Sepang: Mohamed Hanipa Maidin

Johor Kedah Kelantan Malacca Negeri Sembilan Pahang Penang Perak Perlis Sabah Sarawak Selangor Terengganu Kuala Lumpur Putrajaya Labuan

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Current Members of the Malaysian House of Representatives (Dewan Rakyat) from the Federal Territory of Kuala Lumpur

Kepong: Tan Seng Giaw Batu: Chua Tian Chang Wangsa Maju: Tan Kee Kwong Segambut: Lim Lip Eng Setiawangsa: Ahmad Fauzi Zahari Titiwangsa: Johari Abdul Ghani Bukit Bintang: Fong Kui Lun Lembah Pantai: Nurul Izzah Anwar Seputeh: Teresa Kok Suh Sim Cheras: Tan Kok Wai Bandar Tun Razak: Abdul Khalid Ibrahim

Johor Kedah Kelantan Malacca Negeri Sembilan Pahang Penang Perak Perlis Sabah Sarawak Selangor Terengganu Kuala Lumpur Putrajaya Labuan

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Current Members of the Malaysian House of Representatives (Dewan Rakyat) from Federal Territory of Putrajaya

Putrajaya: Tengku Adnan Tengku Mansor

Johor Kedah Kelantan Malacca Negeri Sembilan Pahang Penang Perak Perlis Sabah Sarawak Selangor Terengganu Kuala Lumpur Putrajaya Labuan

v t e

Current Members of the Malaysian House of Representatives (Dewan Rakyat) from Negeri Sembilan

Jelebu: Zainudin Ismail Jempol: Mohd Isa Abdul Samad Seremban: Loke Siew Fook Kuala Pilah: Hasan Malek Rasah: Teo Kok Seong Rembau: Khairy Jamaluddin
Khairy Jamaluddin
Abu Bakar Telok Kemang: Kamarul Baharin Abbas Tampin: Shaziman Abu Mansor

Johor Kedah Kelantan Malacca Negeri Sembilan Pahang Penang Perak Perlis Sabah Sarawak Selangor Terengganu Kuala Lumpur Putrajaya Labuan

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Current Members of the Malaysian House of Representatives (Dewan Rakyat) from Malacca

Masjid Tanah: Mas Ermieyati Samsudin Alor Gajah: Koh Nai Kwong Tangga Batu: Abu Bakar Mohamad Diah Bukit Katil: Shamsul Iskandar Md. Akin Kota Melaka: Sim Tong Him Jasin: Ahmad Hamzah

Johor Kedah Kelantan Malacca Negeri Sembilan Pahang Penang Perak Perlis Sabah Sarawak Selangor Terengganu Kuala Lumpur Putrajaya Labuan

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Current Members of the Malaysian House of Representatives (Dewan Rakyat) from Johor

Segamat: Subramaniam Sathasivam Sekijang: Anuar Abdul Manap Labis: Chua Tee Yong Pagoh: Muhyiddin Yassin Ledang: Hamim Samuri Bakri: Er Teck Hwa Muar: Razali Ibrahim Parit Sulong: Noraini Ahmad Ayer Hitam: Wee Ka Siong Sri Gading: Aziz Kaprawi Batu Pahat: Mohd Idris Jusi Simpang Renggam: Liang Teck Meng Kluang: Liew Chin Tong Sembrong: Hishammuddin Hussein Mersing: Abdul Latiff Ahmad Tenggara: Halimah Mohamed Sadique Kota Tinggi: Noor Ehsanuddin Mohd Harun Narrashid Pengerang: Azalina Othman Said Tebrau: Khoo Soo Seang Pasir Gudang: Normala Abdul Samad Johor
Johor
Bahru: Shahrir Abdul Samad Pulai: Nur Jazlan Mohamed Gelang Patah: Lim Kit Siang Kulai: Teo Nie Ching Pontian: Ahmad Maslan Tanjong Piai: Wee Jeck Seng

Johor Kedah Kelantan Malacca Negeri Sembilan Pahang Penang Perak Perlis Sabah Sarawak Selangor Terengganu Kuala Lumpur Putrajaya Labuan

v t e

Current Members of the Malaysian House of Representatives (Dewan Rakyat) from Federal Territory of Labuan

Labuan: Rozman Isli

Johor Kedah Kelantan Malacca Negeri Sembilan Pahang Penang Perak Perlis Sabah Sarawak Selangor Terengganu Kuala Lumpur Putrajaya Labuan

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Current Members of the Malaysian House of Representatives (Dewan Rakyat) from Sabah

Kudat: Abdul Rahim Bakri Kota Marudu: Maximus Ongkili Kota Belud: Abdul Rahman Dahlan Tuaran: Wilfred Madius Tangau Sepanggar: Jumat Idris Kota Kinabalu: Jimmy Wong Sze Phin Putatan: Marcus Mojigoh Penampang: Ignatius Dorrel Leiking Papar: Rosnah Abdul Rashid Shirlin Kimanis: Anifah Aman Beaufort: Azizah Mohd Dun Sipitang: Sapawi Ahmad Ranau: Ewon Ebin Keningau: Joseph Pairin Kitingan Tenom: Raime Unggi Pensiangan: Joseph Kurup Beluran: Ronald Kiandee Libaran: Juslie Ajirol Batu Sapi: Linda Tsen Thau Lin Sandakan: Wong Tien Fatt Kinabatangan: Bung Moktar Radin Silam: Nasrun Mansur Semporna: Shafie Apdal Tawau: Mary Yap Kain Ching Kalabakan: Abdul Ghapur Salleh

Johor Kedah Kelantan Malacca Negeri Sembilan Pahang Penang Perak Perlis Sabah Sarawak Selangor Terengganu Kuala Lumpur Putrajaya Labuan

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Current Members of the Malaysian House of Representatives (Dewan Rakyat) from Sarawak

Mas Gading: Nogeh Gumbek Santubong: Wan Junaidi Tuanku Jaafar Petra Jaya: Fadillah Yusof Bandar Kuching: Chong Chieng Jen Stampin: Julian Tan Kok Ping Kota Samarahan: Rubiah Wang Mambong: James Dawos Mamit Serian: Richard Riot Jaem Batang Sadong: Nancy Shukri Batang Lupar: Rohani Abdul Karim Sri Aman: Masir Kujat Lubok Antu: William Nyallau Badak Betong: Douglas Uggah Embas Saratok: Willian Mawan Ikom Tanjong Manis: Norah Abdul Rahman Igan: Wahab Dolah Sarikei: Wong Ling Biu Julau: Joseph Salang Gandum Kanowit: Aaron Ago Dagang Lanang: Alice Lau Kiong Yieng Sibu: Oscar Ling Chai Yew Mukah: Leo Michael Toyad Selangau: Joseph Entulu Belaun Kapit: Alexander Nanta Linggi Hulu Rajang: Wilson Ugak Kumbong Bintulu: Tiong King Sing Sibuti: Ahmad Lai Bujang Miri: Michael Teo Yu Keng Baram: Anyi Ngau Limbang: Hasbi Habibollah Lawas: Henry Sum Agong

Johor Kedah Kelantan Malacca Negeri Sembilan Pahang Penang Perak Perlis Sabah Sarawak Selangor Terengganu Kuala Lumpur Putrajaya Labuan

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Parliament of Malaysia

Components

Yang di-Pertuan Agong
Yang di-Pertuan Agong
(King) Dewan Negara
Dewan Negara
(Senate) Dewan Rakyat
Dewan Rakyat
(House of Representatives)

Parliamentary officers

Dewan Negara

President of the Dewan Negara Deputy President of the Dewan Negara Secretary of the Dewan Negara Leader of the Government in the Dewan Negara Manager of Government Business in the Dewan Negara Leader of the Opposition in the Dewan Negara Manager of Opposition Business in the Dewan Negara Whips (list)

Dewan Rakyat

Speaker of the Dewan Rakyat Deputy Speaker of the Dewan Rakyat Secretary of the Dewan Rakyat Leader of the Dewan Rakyat Leader of the Opposition Manager of Opposition Business in the Dewan Rakyat Whips (list)

Members

Dewan Negara

Current Women

Dewan Rakyat

Current Women

Procedure

Royal Address Joint meetings Question time Standing orders Order Paper Hansard Readings of bills Act of Parliament Question time Royal assent Committees: Dewan Negara  Dewan Rakyat

Elections

Current First-past-the-post voting Electoral districts List of the winning political parties in the Malaysian general election by parliamentary constituency By-elections Caretaker government

Locations

Malaysian Houses of Parliament
Malaysian Houses of Parliament
(1963–present) Tunku Abdul Rahman Hall (1959–63)

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Legislatures of Malaysia

Parliament of Malaysia (list)

Houses

Dewan Negara Dewan Rakyat

Members of the Dewan Negara

1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th 13th Women

Members of the Dewan Rakyat

1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th 13th Women

State Legislative Assemblies

State

Johor Kedah Kelantan Malacca Negeri Sembilan Pahang Perak Perlis Penang Sabah Sarawak Selangor Terengganu

State Assembly Representatives

1959–64 1964–69 1969–74 1974–78 1978–82 1982–86 1986–90 1990–95 1995–99 1999–2004 2004–08 2008–13 2013–

See also: Members of the Federal Legislative Council (1955–59) List of Malayan State and Settlement Council Representatives (1954–59)

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Malaysia articles

History

Timeline Prehistoric Portuguese Malacca Dutch Malacca British Malaya

Straits Settlements Federated Malay States Unfederated Malay States

British Borneo

Kingdom of Sarawak Crown Colony of Labuan North Borneo

Japanese occupation of Malaya
Japanese occupation of Malaya
/ Borneo British Military Administration (Malaya / Borneo) Malayan Union Federation
Federation
of Malaya

Independence

Malayan Emergency Crown Colony of Singapore

Self-government

Crown Colony of Sarawak

Self-government

Crown Colony of North Borneo

Self-government

Malaysia
Malaysia
Agreement 1962 Singapore referendum Cobbold Commission

18-point agreement 20-point agreement

Indonesia– Malaysia
Malaysia
confrontation Sarawak
Sarawak
Communist Insurgency Proclamation

Malaysia
Malaysia
Day

PAP–UMNO relations 1964 race riots Singapore in Malaysia Second Malayan Emergency 13 May Incident 1988 Malaysian constitutional crisis 1997 Asian financial crisis

Geography

Cities, towns and villages Districts Divisions East Malaysia Environment Fauna Flora World Heritage Sites Islands Lakes Mountains National parks Peninsular Malaysia Rivers States

Politics

Cabinet Constitution Elections Foreign relations Government Human rights Judiciary Law Law enforcement Military Monarchies Parliament Political parties Prime Minister State legislative assemblies Head of state

Economy

Agriculture Banks

Central bank

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Society

Crime Demographics

Malaysians

Education

Post-secondary Universities

Ethnic groups Health Income disparity Languages Poverty Religion Water supply and sanitation Women International rankings

Culture

Architecture Cinema Cuisine Folklore

Mythology

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Symbols

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Outline Index

Book Category Portal

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Lower houses of national legislatures

Federal

Argentina Australia Austria Belgium Bosnia and Herzegovina Brazil Canada Ethiopia Germany India Malaysia Mexico Nepal Nigeria Pakistan Russia Somalia South Sudan Sudan Switzerland United States

Unitary

Afghanistan Algeria Antigua and Barbuda Bahamas Bahrain Barbados Belarus Belize Bhutan Bolivia Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Central African Republic Chile Colombia Democratic Republic of the Congo Republic of the Congo Czech Republic Dominican Republic Equatorial Guinea France Gabon Grenada Haiti Indonesia Ireland Italy Ivory Coast Jamaica Japan Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Lesotho Liberia Madagascar Mauritania Morocco Myanmar Namibia Netherlands New Zealand Oman Palau Paraguay Philippines Poland Romania Rwanda Saint Lucia Slovenia South Africa Spain Swaziland Tajikistan Trinidad and Tobago United Kingdom Uruguay Uzbekistan Zimbabwe

Dependent and other territories

American Samoa Bermuda Isle of Man Northern Mariana Islands Puerto Rico

Non-UN states

Somaliland

Related

Bicameralism Unicameralism List of legislatures by country

National upper houses National bicameral legislatures National unica

.