HOME
        TheInfoList






The deportation of Chagossians from the Chagos Archipelago was the forced expulsion of the inhabitants of the island of Diego Garcia and the other islands of the British Indian Ocean Territory (BIOT) by the United Kingdom, at the request of the United States, beginning in 1968 and concluding on 27 April 1973 with the evacuation of Peros Banhos atoll.[1][2] The people, known at the time as the Ilois,[3] are today known as Chagos Islanders or Chagossians.[4]

Chagossians and human rights advocates have said that the Chagossian right of occupation was violated by the Foreign Office as a result of the 1966 agreement[5] between the British and American governments to provide an unpopulated island for a U.S. military base, and that additional compensation[6] and a right of return[7] be provided.

Legal action to claim compensation and the right of abode in the Chagos began in April 1973 when 280 islanders, represented by a Mauritian attorney, petitioned the government of Mauritius to distribute the £650,000 compensation provided in 1972 by the British government to the Mauritian government for distribution. It was not distributed until 1977.[8] Various petitions and lawsuits have been ongoing since that time. The British government has consistently denied any illegalities in the expulsion despite the February 2019 ruling of the ICJ against the continually enforced exile.

On 4 April 2012, the sufficient number of 25,000 signatures was met to require a response from the On 4 April 2012, the sufficient number of 25,000 signatures was met to require a response from the Office of the President under its policy at that time.

An undated

An undated response was posted on the White House petition web site by the United States Department of State, in the name of Michael Posner (Assistant Secretary of State for Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor), Philip Gordon (Assistant Secretary of State for European and Eurasian Affairs) and Andrew J. Shapiro (Assistant Secretary of State for Political-Military Affairs). The non-committal response read as follows:

Thank you for your petition regarding the former inhabitants of the Chagos Archipelago. The U.S. recognizes the British Indian Ocean Territories, including the Chagos Archipelago, as the sovereign territory of the United Kingdom. The United States appreciates the difficulties intrinsic to the issues raised by the Chagossian community.

In the decades following the resettlement of Chagossians in the late 1960s and early 1970s, the United Kingdom has

In the decades following the resettlement of Chagossians in the late 1960s and early 1970s, the United Kingdom has taken numerous steps to compensate former inhabitants for the hardships they endured, including cash payments and eligibility for British citizenship. The opportunity to become a British citizen has been accepted by approximately 1,000 individuals now living in the United Kingdom. Today, the United States understands that the United Kingdom remains actively engaged with the Chagossian community. Senior officials from the United Kingdom continue to meet with Chagossian leaders; community trips to the Chagos Archipelago are organized and paid for by the United Kingdom; and the United Kingdom provides support for community projects within the United Kingdom and Mauritius, to include a resource center in Mauritius. The United States supports these efforts and the United Kingdom's continued engagement with the Chagossian Community.

Thank you for taking the time to raise this important issue with us.[55]

In November 2016, the United Kingdom restated it would not permit Chagossians to return to the Chagos Archipelago.[56]

2017 UNGA vote

O

On 23 June 2017, the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) voted in favour of referring the territorial dispute between Mauritius and the UK to the International Court of Justice (ICJ) in order to clarify the legal status of the Chagos Islands archipelago in the Indian Ocean. The motion was approved by a majority vote with 94 voting for and 15 against.[57][30]

2018 ICJ hearing

In September 2018, the International Court of Justice in The Hague, heard arguments in a case regarding whether Britain violated Mauritian sovereignty when it took possession of the islands for its own purposes.[58]

On 25 February 2019 the ICJ ruled that the United Kingdom infringed on the right of self-determination of the Chagos Islanders and was obliged to cede its control of the islands.[59]

On 22 May 2019, the United Nations General Assembly adopted a resolut

On 25 February 2019 the ICJ ruled that the United Kingdom infringed on the right of self-determination of the Chagos Islanders and was obliged to cede its control of the islands.[59]

On 22 May 2019, the United Nations General Assembly adopted a resolution welcoming the 25 February 2019 ICJ advisory opinion on the legal consequences of separating the Chagos Archipelago from Mauritius in 1965, demanding that the United Kingdom unconditionally withdraw its colonial administration from the area within six months. The resolution was passed by a recorded vote of 116 in favour, to 6 against (Australia, Hungary, Israel, Maldives, United Kingdom, United States), with 56 abstentions.[60]

As of July 2020, the UK has refused to abide by the ICJ's ruling.[61]

The Court has the power to exercise jurisdiction following the 1 July 2002, when the Rome Statute was ratified by 60 States and thus entered into force (Article 126). Thus, the Rome Statute is based on the non-retroactivity principle and the temporal jurisdiction of the Court is prospective (Article 24(1)). The Rome Statute is silent in regard to violations which are committed prior to the entry into force of the Statute and continued afterwards. It is submitted that references in future cases to acts pre-dating the entry into force of the Statute may be useful in establishing the historical context but they may not be form the basis of a charge.

  • ^ Owen Bowcott; Sam Jones (19 March 2015). "UN ruling raises hope of return for exiled Chagos islanders". The Guardian. Retrieved 29 March 2015.
  • ^ "Chagos Marine Protected Area Arbitration (Mauritius v. United Kingdom) (Press Release and Summary of Award)". Permanent Court of Arbitration. 19 March 2015. Archived from the original on 2 April 2015. Retrieved 29 March 2015.
  • ^ Sengupta, Somini (22 June 2017). "U.N. Asks International Court to Weigh in on Britain-Mauritius Dispute". The New York Times.
  • ^ a b "Chagos legal status sent to international court by UN". BBC News. 22 June 2017. Retrieved 23 June 2017.
  • ^ The High Court of Justice Queens Bench Division, Case No: HQ02X01287, Approved Judgment, 2003, Paragraph 56.
  • ^ a b The High Court of Justice Queens Bench Division, Case No: HQ02X01287, Approved Judgment, 2003, Paragraph 74.
  • ^ Evers & Kooy 2011, p. 64.
  • ^ Ottaway, David B. (9 September 1975). "Islanders Were Evicted for U.S. Base". The Washington Post.
  • ^ "Diego Garcia, 1975: The Debate Over the Base and the Island's Former Inhabitants". 4 November 1975. Archived from the original on 6 March 2005.
  • ^ Evers & Kooy 2011, p. 286.
  • ^ Winchester, S. (2003). Outposts: Journeys to the Surviving Relics of the British Empire. Penguin Books Limited. p. 73. ISBN 978-0-14-101189-9. Retrieved 29 July 2017.
  • ^ Lallah, Rajni (2 November 2010). "Rajni Lallah on Women in Chagos & Diego Garcia Struggles". www.lalitmauritius.org. Retrieved 23 July 2020.
  • ^ a b BrandFour Design Communications. "Stealing A Nation". Johnpilger.com. Retrieved 3 November 2014.
  • ^ "President's threat over Chagos". BBC News. 7 March 2007. Retrieved 27 September 2014.
  • ^ Case of R (on the application of Bancoult) v Secretary of State for the Foreign and Commonwealth Office [2001] 3 LRC 249
  • ^ Case of Chagos Islanders v The Attorney General and another [2003] EWHC 2222 (QB)
  • ^ "Developments in the British Indian Ocean Territory". Fco.gov.uk. 15 June 2004. Archived from the original on 27 September 2007.
  • ^ "Exiles protest in Downing Street". BBC News. 3 November 2004. Retrieved 1 May 2010.
  • ^ Tweedie, Neil (12 May 2006). "Britain shamed as exiles of the Chagos Islands win the right to go home". The Daily Telegraph. London. Retrieved 1 May 2010.
  • ^ "Bancoult, Olivier vs. McNamara, Robert S." (PDF). Pacer.cadc.uscourts.gov. Retrieved 3 November 2014.
  • ^ "Abuse of executive power over Chagos Islanders". The Times. London. 31 May 2007.
  • ^ "Chagos families win legal battle". BBC News. 23 May 2007. Retrieved 3 November 2014.
  • ^ "Chagos families making visit home'". BBC News. 29 February 2008. Retrieved 3 November 2014.
  • ^ R (Bancoult) v Secretary of State For Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, [2008] UKHL 61.
  • ^ "Chagos exiles ruling overturned". BBC News. 22 October 2008. Retrieved 3 November 2014.
  • ^ "Britain wins appeal over Chagos islanders' return home". AFP. 22 October 2008. Archived from the original on 20 December 2008.
  • ^ "Chagos islanders cannot return home, says Supreme Court". BBC News. 29 June 2016. Retrieved 29 June 2016.
  • Normal Exit PeriodicService.php