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The Coordinating Committee for Earthquake Prediction (CCEP) (Japanese: 地震予知連絡会, Jishin Yochi Renraku-kai) in Japan was founded in April 1969,[1] as part of the Geodesy Council's Second Earthquake Prediction Plan, in order to carry out a comprehensive evaluation of earthquake data in Japan.[2] The committee consists of 30 members and meets four times each year, as well as publishing a report on its activities twice each year.[1] The CCEP brings together representatives from 20 governmental bodies and universities engaged in earthquake prediction and research.[3] It has a secretariat within the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism.[4]

History

The first moves towards the Committee were taken after earthquake researchers published Earthquake Prediction - Current Status and Action Plan in 1962. This was adopted by the General Assembly of Geodesy Council with the launch of their first prediction plan in 1964. Following earthquakes in 1964, 1965 and 1968 the EEPC was founded to coordinate future prediction activities.[5][6]

Geographical Areas of Observation

In order to focus future work, based on the geological evidence, and as well as the prediction of a Tōkai earthquake in the relatively near future, in 1970, the CCEP designated certain areas of Japan as Areas of Specified Observation or Areas of Intensified Observation.[2][7] The Tōkai region was upgraded to an Area of Intensified Observation in 1974.[7]

By 1978, when some of the boundaries were also changed, eight Areas of Specified Observation and two Areas of Intensified Observation had been designated.[7][8]

Areas of Intensified Observation

Participating organisations

The following organisations are represented on the CCEP:[3]

Universities

Governmental organisations

Other bodies

See also

In order to focus future work, based on the geological evidence, and as well as the prediction of a Tōkai earthquake in the relatively near future, in 1970, the CCEP designated certain areas of Japan as Areas of Specified Observation or Areas of Intensified Observation.[2][7] The Tōkai region was upgraded to an Area of Intensified Observation in 1974.[7]

By 1978, when some of the boundaries were also changed, eight Areas of Specified Observation and two Areas of Intensified Observation had been designated.[7][8]

Areas of Intensified Observation

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