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The Colorado
Colorado
Buffaloes football program represents the University of Colorado
Colorado
Boulder in college football at the NCAA Division I FBS
NCAA Division I FBS
level. The team is currently a member of the Pac-12 Conference, having previously been a charter member of the Big 12 Conference. Before joining the Big 12, they were members of the Big Eight Conference. The CU football team has played at Folsom Field
Folsom Field
since 1924.[1] The Buffs all-time record is 694–493–36 (.583 winning percentage) prior to the Valero Alamo Bowl at the end of the 2016 season. Colorado
Colorado
won a National Championship in 1990. The football program is 23rd on the all-time win list and 30th in all-time winning percentage. They are one of two NCAA Division I teams to complete a 5th down conversion (the other being Cornell). This was a result of a mistake by the officials and happened on a play displayed by chaincrew as the 4th down.

Contents

1 History 2 Conference affiliations 3 Head coaches 4 Championships

4.1 1990 national championship 4.2 Conference championships 4.3 Division championships

5 Venues 6 Rivalries

6.1 Nebraska 6.2 Colorado
Colorado
State 6.3 Utah

7 Bowl games 8 Notable players 9 Awards

9.1 Other award winners

9.1.1 Players 9.1.2 Coach

9.2 College Football Hall of Fame 9.3 All-Americans

10 Future non-conference opponents 11 References 12 External links

History[edit] See also: List of Colorado
Colorado
Buffaloes football seasons

Colorado's first Football Team in 1890.

This section needs expansion. You can help by adding to it. (December 2017)

Beginning in 1890, Colorado
Colorado
football has enjoyed much success throughout its more than 125 years of competitive play. The Buffaloes have appeared in numerous bowl games (28 appearances in bowl games (12–16), 36th all-time), and won 27 conference championships, 5 division championships and a national championship.[citation needed] Folsom Field
Folsom Field
was built in 1924, and since then, Colorado
Colorado
has a 308–169–14 record at home through the 2016 season. The road game against the Nebraska Cornhuskers on November 24, 2006 was Colorado's 1,100th football game. The game on September 12, 2015 against Massachusetts was the school's 1,200th football game.

Conference affiliations[edit]

Independent (1890–1892) Colorado Football Association (1893–1904) Independent (1905) Colorado Football Association (1906–1908) Colorado Faculty Athletic Conference
Colorado Faculty Athletic Conference
(1909) Rocky Mountain Faculty Athletic Conference
Rocky Mountain Faculty Athletic Conference
(1910–1937) Mountain States Conference
Mountain States Conference
(1938–1947) Big Eight Conference
Big Eight Conference
(1948–1995) Big 12 Conference
Big 12 Conference
(1996–2010) Pac-12 Conference
Pac-12 Conference
(2011–present)

Head coaches[edit] Main article: List of Colorado
Colorado
Buffaloes head football coaches The Buffaloes have played in 1,109 games during their 125 seasons, through 2014. In those seasons, ten coaches have led Colorado
Colorado
to postseason bowl games: Bunny Oakes, Dallas Ward, Bud Davis, Eddie Crowder, Bill Mallory, Bill McCartney, Rick Neuheisel, Gary Barnett, Dan Hawkins
Dan Hawkins
and Mike MacIntyre. Ten coaches have won conference championships with the Buffaloes: Fred Folsom, Myron Witham, William Saunders, Oakes, Jim Yeager, Sonny Grandelius, Mallory, McCartney and Barnett. The Buffaloes won the national championship in 1990, and have won a total of 28 conference championships. McCartney is the all-time leader in games coached with 153, total wins with 93, and conference wins with 58.[4] Folsom had the longest tenure as head coach, remaining in the position for 15 seasons. Harry Heller and Willis Keinholtz are tied for the highest overall winning percentage. Each served a single season and won eight of his nine games for a winning percentage of .889. Of coaches who served more than one season, Folsom leads with a .765 winning percentage. Davis, in terms of overall winning percentage, is the worst coach the Buffaloes have had with a .200 winning percentage. No Colorado
Colorado
coach has been inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame, although McCartney was inducted into the Orange Bowl Hall of Fame in 1996. The most recent coach, Mike MacIntyre, was hired on Dec. 10, 2012.[5] MacIntyre has compiled a 20-29 record in four seasons at Colorado. In 2016, MacIntyre lead Colorado
Colorado
to a 10-2 regular season and a trip to the Pac-12 Championship Game. It was the first winning season for Colorado
Colorado
since 2005, ending a 10-year streak of finishing below .500. 2016 was also the best season for the Buffaloes since 2001. As well, it marked their first time playing in a conference championship game since the 2005 Big 12 Championship Game. The team also went 8-2 in the Pac-12 after having five conference wins in the previous five seasons. Mike MacIntyre
Mike MacIntyre
was named the Walter Camp 2016 Coach of the Year by the Walter Camp Foundation, the second Colorado
Colorado
football coach to earn the honor ( Bill McCartney in 1989). MacIntyre was also awarded the 2016 Pac-12 Coach of the Year, American Football Coaches Association's coach of the year and comeback coach of the year awards, the Associated Press
Associated Press
coach of the year, and the Eddie Robinson coach of the year by the Football Writers Association of America. Championships[edit] Colorado
Colorado
has won one national championship in program history.

Season Coach Selectors Record Bowl Opponent Result

1990 Bill McCartney AP, FWAA, NFF, USAT/CNN 11–1–1 Orange Bowl Notre Dame W 10–9

1990 national championship[edit] Main article: 1990 Colorado
Colorado
Buffaloes football team Colorado
Colorado
won its first national championship in 1990 under the direction of head coach Bill McCartney, who helmed the team from 1982 to 1994. The national title was split with Georgia Tech who won the United Press International
United Press International
Coaches Poll, whereas Colorado
Colorado
won the Associated Press
Associated Press
and Football Writers Association of America polls. The largest arguments against Colorado
Colorado
were that they had a loss and a tie, whereas Georgia Tech had a tie and no losses, and Colorado's "unfair" win in the Fifth Down Game against Missouri. Another major controversy was a Colorado's Orange Bowl win over Notre Dame, which Colorado
Colorado
won in part because of a controversial clipping call that brought back a Notre Dame touchdown. The major argument for Colorado was that they played a more difficult schedule than Georgia Tech.[6] Colorado
Colorado
capped the season with a 10–9 win over Notre Dame in the Orange Bowl, a rematch of the 1989 season Orange Bowl Game which Notre Dame won 21–6. Colorado's tie came against Tennessee, who was ranked #8, the first week of the season when Colorado
Colorado
was ranked #5. The second week gave the Buffs a scare, scoring with 12 seconds left in the game on a 4th and Goal attempt. The next week gave Colorado
Colorado
its only loss of the season, losing 23–22 to Illinois and dropping Colorado
Colorado
to #20 in the polls. Colorado
Colorado
then went on to beat teams ranked (at the time) #22 Texas, #12 Washington, #22 Oklahoma, and #3 Nebraska. They ended the season 7–0 in the Big Eight Conference
Big Eight Conference
for the second straight season. They then capped the season with a win over Notre Dame who were number 1 until a loss in their second to last game of the regular season.[7] Conference championships[edit] Colorado
Colorado
has won 27 conference championships in over a century of college play, spanning through five conferences.

Year Conference Coach Overall record Conference record

1894 Colorado
Colorado
Football Association Harry Heller 8–1 5–0

1895 Colorado
Colorado
Football Association Fred Folsom 5–1 3–0

1896 Colorado
Colorado
Football Association Fred Folsom 5–0 2–0

1897 Colorado
Colorado
Football Association Fred Folsom 7–1 2–0

1901 Colorado
Colorado
Football Association Fred Folsom 5–1–1 2–0

1902 Colorado
Colorado
Football Association Fred Folsom 5–1 4–0

1903 Colorado
Colorado
Football Association Dave Cropp 8–2 4–0

1908^ Colorado
Colorado
Football Association Fred Folsom 5–2 3–1

1909 Rocky Mountain Athletic Conference Fred Folsom 6–0 3–0

1910 Rocky Mountain Athletic Conference Fred Folsom 6–0 3–0

1911 Rocky Mountain Athletic Conference Fred Folsom 6–0 4–0

1913 Rocky Mountain Athletic Conference Fred Folsom 5–1–1 3–0–1

1923 Rocky Mountain Athletic Conference Myron E. Witham 9–0 7–0

1924 Rocky Mountain Athletic Conference Myron E. Witham 8–1–1 5–0–1

1934 Rocky Mountain Athletic Conference Bill Saunders 6–1–2 6–1

1935 Rocky Mountain Athletic Conference Bunny Oakes 5–4 5–1

1937 Rocky Mountain Athletic Conference Bunny Oakes 8–1 7–0

1939 Mountain States Conference Bunny Oakes 5–3 5–1

1942 Mountain States Conference James J. Yeager 7–2 5–1

1943 Mountain States Conference James J. Yeager 5–2 2–0

1944 Mountain States Conference Frank Potts 6–2 2–0

1961 Big Eight Conference Sonny Grandelius 9–2 7–0

1976† Big Eight Conference Bill Mallory 8–4 5–2

1989 Big Eight Conference Bill McCartney 11–1 7–0

1990 Big Eight Conference Bill McCartney 11–1–1 7–0

1991† Big Eight Conference Bill McCartney 8–3–1 6–0–1

2001 Big 12 Conference Gary Barnett 10–3 7–1

† Co-champions Division championships[edit]

Year Division Coach Overall record Conference record

2001^ Big 12 North Gary Barnett 10–3 7–1

2002 Big 12 North Gary Barnett 9–5 7–1

2004^ Big 12 North Gary Barnett 8–5 4–4

2005 Big 12 North Gary Barnett 8–5 4–4

2016 Pac-12 South Mike MacIntyre 10–4 8–1

Venues[edit]

Campus fields (1890–1901) Gamble Field
Gamble Field
(1901–1924) Folsom Field
Folsom Field
(1924–present)

Rivalries[edit] Nebraska[edit] Main article: Colorado–Nebraska football rivalry A traditional college football rivalry with the Nebraska Cornhuskers restarted in the 1980s (many historical documents show the importance of this game going back to 1898) when Bill McCartney declared the conference opponent to be their rival. His theory was since Nebraska was such a powerhouse team, if Colorado
Colorado
was able to beat them then they would be a good team. Colorado
Colorado
began to repeatedly threaten Nebraska in the late 1980s, following their win over the Huskers in 1986, and then surpassed the Huskers for the Big 8 crown in 1989. In 1990, Colorado
Colorado
beat Nebraska 27–12 in Lincoln for the first time since 1967, en route to their first national title. From 1996–2000, the series was extremely competitive, with the margin of victory by NU in those five years being only 15 points combined. The rivalry was further buoyed by the introduction of the Big 12 Conference
Big 12 Conference
in 1996, which moved Oklahoma & Oklahoma State to the southern division with the four new schools from Texas, formerly in the Southwest Conference. Nebraska had traditionally finished the Big 8 conference schedule with a rivalry game with Oklahoma, but the two were now in different divisions, which meant they met every other year in the regular season. Colorado
Colorado
replaced Oklahoma as Nebraska's final conference game of the regular season, which further intensified the rivalry. In 2001 #1 Nebraska came to Folsom Field
Folsom Field
undefeated and left at the short end of a nationally televised 62–36 blowout. Both teams departed the Big 12 in 2011, as NU headed east to join the Big Ten and the future of the rivalry was in doubt. On February 7, 2013, Colorado and Nebraska agreed to renew the rivalry.[8][9][10][11][12][13] Colorado
Colorado
will travel in 2018 to Lincoln, and then return to Boulder in 2019. After a 3-year break, Nebraska will go to Boulder in 2023 and then host CU again the next year to finish the series. Nebraska currently leads the series 49–18–2.[when?][citation needed] Colorado
Colorado
State[edit] Main article: Rocky Mountain Showdown Colorado's in-state rival is the Colorado
Colorado
State Rams of the Mountain West Conference, located north of Boulder in Fort Collins. The two schools are separated by 45 miles (72 km) and both consider it important and noteworthy to beat the other for bragging rights for the next year. The two football teams annually compete in the Rocky Mountain Showdown for the Centennial Cup, played in Denver, Fort Collins, and Boulder. The trophy takes its name from the state of Colorado's nickname of "The Centennial State". Colorado
Colorado
currently leads the series 64–22–2.[when?][citation needed] Utah[edit] Main article: Rumble in the Rockies The rivalry with Utah ran from 1903–62, in which Utah and Colorado played each other nearly every year; through 1962 they had met 57 times.[14] At the time, it was the second-most played rivalry for both teams (Utah had played Utah State 62 times;[15] Colorado
Colorado
had played Colorado
Colorado
State 61 times[16]). The rivalry was dormant until 2011, when both teams joined the Pac-12, renewing the rivalry on an annual basis. The Colorado–Utah rivalry remains the fifth-most played rivalry in Utah's history, and eighth-most in Colorado's history.[17][18] Bowl games[edit] Main article: List of Colorado
Colorado
Buffaloes bowl games Colorado
Colorado
has participated in 29 bowl games. The Buffaloes have a record of 12–17.

Year Coach Bowl Opponent Result Attendance Network

1937 Bunny Oakes Cotton Rice L 14–28 35,000 –

1956 Dallas Ward Orange Clemson W 27–21 72,552 NBC

1961 Sonny Grandelius Orange LSU L 7–25 62,391 NBC

1967 Eddie Crowder Bluebonnet Miami (FL) W 31–21 30,156 ABC

1969 Liberty Alabama W 47–33 50,144 ABC

1970 Liberty Tulane L 3–17 44,500 ABC

1971 Astro-Bluebonnet Houston W 29–17 54,720 ABC

1972 Gator Auburn L 3–24 71,114 ABC

1975 Bill Mallory Astro-Bluebonnet Texas L 21–38 52,728 ABC

1976 Orange Ohio State L 10–27 65,537 NBC

1985 Bill McCartney Freedom Washington L 17–20 30,961 Lorimar

1986 Bluebonnet Baylor L 9–21 40,470 Raycom

1988 Freedom Brigham Young L 17–20 35,941 Raycom

1989 Orange Notre Dame L 6–21 81,191 NBC

1990 Orange Notre Dame W 10–9 77,062 NBC

1991 Blockbuster Alabama L 25–30 52,644 CBS

1992 Fiesta Syracuse L 22–26 70,224 NBC

1993 Aloha Fresno State W 41–30 44,009 ABC

1994 Fiesta Notre Dame W 41–24 73,968 NBC

1995 Rick Neuheisel Cotton Oregon W 38–6 58,214 CBS

1996 Holiday Washington W 33–21 54,749 ESPN

1998 Aloha Oregon W 51–43 34,803 ABC

1999 Gary Barnett Insight.com Boston College W 62–28 35,762 ESPN

2001 Fiesta Oregon L 16–38 74,118 ABC

2002 Alamo Wisconsin L 28–31 (OT) 50,690 ESPN

2004 Houston UTEP W 33–28 27,235 ESPN

2005 Mike Hankwitz Champs Sports Clemson L 10–19 31,470 ESPN

2007 Dan Hawkins Independence Alabama L 24–30 47,043 ESPN

2016 Mike MacIntyre Alamo Oklahoma State L 8–38 59,815 ESPN

Notable players[edit] See also: Colorado
Colorado
Buffaloes football statistical leaders

This section may be too long to read and navigate comfortably. Please consider splitting content into sub-articles, condensing it, or adding or removing subheadings. (September 2016)

Dick Anderson Bobby Anderson Troy Archer Tom Ashworth David Bakhtiari Estes Banks Marlon Barnes Brad Bedell Mitch Berger Frank Bernardi Tony Berti Greg Biekert Eric Bienemy Jeremy Bloom Frank Bosch Ronnie Bradford Cliff Branch Tyler Brayton Paul Briggs Pete Brock – Stan Brock Tom Brookshier Chad Brown Chris Brown Jalil Brown Bill Brundige Larry Brunson Cullen Bryant Brian Cabral J.V. Cain Brian Calhoun Gary Campbell Jeff Campbell Rae Carruth Darrin Chiaverini Franklin Clarke Shannon Clavelle Mark Cooney Eric Coyle

Claude Crabb Ken Crawley Mason Crosby T. J. Cunningham Brian Daniels Charlie Davis Mike Davis John Denvir Koy Detmer Tyson DeVree Jordon Dizon Jeff Donaldson Eddie Dove Boyd Dowler Justin Drescher Jon Embree Christian Fauria Mark Fenton Deon Figures Bill Frank Joe Garten Daniel Graham Charlie Greer (American football) Dan Grimm Andre Gurode D.J. Hackett Carroll Hardy Don Hasselbeck Dennis Havig Mark Haynes Ralph Heck Barry Helton Jerry Hillebrand Merwin Hodel Darius Holland Greg Horton Garry Howe

Chris Hudson Hale Irwin Heath Irwin Brian Iwuh Charles Johnson Charlie Johnson Ken Johnson (Canadian football) Richard Johnson (wide receiver) Sam Rogers Ted Johnson Brad Jones Fred Jones Greg Jones (linebacker, born 1974) Vance Joseph Ben Kelly Jon Keyworth Mark Koncar Joe Klopfenstein Gary Knafelc Mark Koncar Mike Kozlowski Terry Kunz Jay Leeuwenburg Matt Lepsis Michael Lewis Dave Logan Wayne Lucier Vaka Manupuna Bo Matthews Matt McChesney Dave McCloughan Mike McCoy Kanavis McGhee Odis McKinney Ron Merkerson Matt Miller

Mike Montler Emery Moorehead Chris Naeole Hannibal Navies Erik Norgard Gabe Nyenhuis Lance Olander Herb Orvis Whitney Paul Rod Perry Tyler Polumbus Mike Pritchard Mickey Pruitt Vince Rafferty Tony Reed Leonard Renfro Paul Richardson Sam Rogers Tom Rouen Lee Rouson Matt Russell Rashaan Salaam Brendan Schaub Victor Scott Jimmy Smith Nate Solder Ariel Solomon Nelson Spruce Kordell Stewart Donald Strickland Quinn Sypniewski McKenzie Tilmon Sean Tufts Mark Vander Poel Lawrence Vickers Thaddaeus Washington Michael Westbrook Byron White Sam Wilder Alfred Williams

Awards[edit] Heisman Trophy[citation needed]

Year Name Position Rank in Heisman voting Points

1937 Byron White HB 2nd 264

1961 Joe Romig OG/LB 6th 279

1969 Bobby Anderson TB 11th 100

1971 Charlie Davis TB 16th 28

1989 Darian Hagan QB 5th 242

1990 Eric Bieniemy TB 3rd 798

Darian Hagan QB 17th 17

Mike Pritchard WR 50th 2

1991 Darian Hagan QB 20th 12

1992 Ronnie Blackmon CB 30th 4

1993 Charles Johnson WR 15th 24

Michael Westbrook WR 61st 1

1994 Rashaan Salaam TB 1st 743

Kordell Stewart QB 13th 16

2002 Chris Brown TB 8th 48

Other award winners[edit] Players[edit]

Walter Camp Award[19]

Rashaan Salaam
Rashaan Salaam
– 1994

Dick Butkus Award[20]

Alfred Williams – 1990 Matt Russell – 1996

Doak Walker Award[20]

Rashaan Salaam
Rashaan Salaam
– 1994

Draddy Trophy

Jim Hansen – 1992

Jim Thorpe Award[20]

Deon Figures – 1992 Chris Hudson – 1994

John Mackey Award[21]

Daniel Graham
Daniel Graham
– 2001

Ray Guy Award[21]

Mark Mariscal – 2002

Coach[edit]

Paul "Bear" Bryant Award

1989 Bill McCartney

Walter Camp Coach of the Year Award

2016 Mike MacIntyre

Dodd Trophy as Coach of the Year

2016 Mike MacIntyre

Associated Press
Associated Press
Coach of the Year Award

2016 Mike MacIntyre

Home Depot Coach of the Year Award

2016 Mike MacIntyre

FWAA/Eddie Robinson Coach of the Year Award

2016 Mike MacIntyre

Pac-12 Conference
Pac-12 Conference
Football Coach of the Year

2016 Mike MacIntyre

College Football Hall of Fame[edit]

Name Induction Ref

Byron White 1952 [22]

Joe Romig 1984 [23]

Dick Anderson 1993 [24]

Bobby Anderson 2006 [25]

Alfred Williams 2010 [26]

John Wooten 2012 [27]

Bill McCartney 2013 [28]

All-Americans[edit]

This section needs to be updated. Please update this article to reflect recent events or newly available information. (December 2017)

The following is a list of Consensus All-Americans from CU as listed[when?] in NCAA record books.[2]

2010 – Nate Solder, Colorado
Colorado
(AP, FWAA, TSN, WCFF, ESPN, PFW, SI) 2007 – Jordon Dizon, Colorado
Colorado
(Associated Press, Walter Camp, Sporting News, ESPN, College Football News, Rivals.com) 2006 – Mason Crosby, Colorado
Colorado
(Walter Camp Foundation, Pro Football Weekly) 2005 – Mason Crosby, Colorado
Colorado
(Associated Press, FWAA-Writers, Walter Camp, Sporting News, Sports Illustrated, Pro Football Weekly, ESPN, CBS Sports, College Football News, Rivals.com) 2004 – John Torp, Colorado
Colorado
(ESPN) 2002 – Chris Brown, Colorado
Colorado
(AFCA-Coaches) 2002 – Wayne Lucier, Colorado
Colorado
(TSN) 2002 – Mark Mariscal, Colorado
Colorado
(AP, AFCA-Coaches, Walter Camp, TSN, CNNSI, ESPN) 2001 – Daniel Graham, Colorado
Colorado
(Walter Camp, AFCA-Coaches, FWAA, AP, TSN, PFW, FN) 2001 – Andre Gurode, Colorado
Colorado
(AP, TSN, PFW, CNNSI) 2001 – Roman Hollowell, Colorado
Colorado
(TSN, CNNSI-PR) 1999 – Ben Kelly, Colorado
Colorado
(FN) 1999 – Ben Kelly, Colorado(CNNSI-KR) 1996 – Rae Carruth, Colorado, (TSN) 1996 – Chris Naeole, Colorado
Colorado
(AP, AFCA-Coaches, Walter Camp,FN) 1996 – Matt Russell, Colorado
Colorado
(AP, FWAA-Writers, Walter Camp, TSN) 1995 – Heath Irwin, Colorado
Colorado
(AP) 1995 – Bryan Stoltenberg, Colorado
Colorado
(UPI, Walter Camp, FN) 1994 – Rashaan Salaam, Colorado
Colorado
(Associated Press, Walter Camp, FWAA-Writers, AFCA-Coaches, Scripps-Howard, Sporting News, Football News) 1994 – Michael Westbrook, Colorado
Colorado
(Walter Camp, AFCA-Coaches, Sporting News) 1994 – Chris Hudson, Colorado
Colorado
(Associated Press, Walter Camp, FWAA-Writers, Scripps-Howard) 1992 – Michael Westbrook, Colorado
Colorado
(NEA) 1992 – Deon Figures, Colorado
Colorado
(AP, UPI, NEA, WC, FWAA, SH, TSN, FN) 1992 – Mitch Berger, Colorado
Colorado
(UPI) 1991 – Jay Leeuwenburg, Colorado
Colorado
(AP, UPI, NEA, WC, AFCA, FWAA, SH, TSN, FN) 1991 – Joel Steed, Colorado
Colorado
(WC) 1990 – Eric Bieniemy, Colorado
Colorado
(AP, UPI, NEA, WC, AFCA, FWAA, SH, TSN, FN) 1990 – Joe Garten, Colorado
Colorado
(AP, UPI, NEA, WC, AFCA, FWAA, SH, TSN, FN) 1990 – Alfred Williams, Colorado
Colorado
(AP, UPI, NEA, WC, AFCA, FWAA, SH, TSN, FN) 1989 – Joe Garten, Colorado
Colorado
(AP, UPI, AFCA, FWAA, TSN) 1989 – Darian Hagan, Colorado
Colorado
(TSN) 1989 – Alfred Williams, Colorado
Colorado
(UPI, AFCA, FWAA, FN) 1989 – Kanavis McGhee, Colorado
Colorado
(WC) 1989 – Tom Rouen, Colorado
Colorado
(AP, UPI, WC, FWAA) 1988 – Keith English, Colorado
Colorado
(AP) 1986 – Barry Helton, Colorado
Colorado
(AP, UPI, TSN) 1979 – Stan Brock, Colorado
Colorado
(TSN) 1979 – Mark Haynes, Colorado
Colorado
(AP) 1978 – Matt Miller, Colorado
Colorado
(UPI) 1976 – Don Hasselbeck, Colorado
Colorado
(TSN) 1975 – Mark Koncar, Colorado
Colorado
(AP) 1975 – Dave Logan, Colorado
Colorado
(TSN) 1975 – Pete Brock, Colorado
Colorado
(TSN, NEA, Time) 1975 – Troy Archer, Colorado
Colorado
(Time) 1973 – J.V. Cain, Colorado
Colorado
(TSN, Time) 1973 – Bo Matthews, Colorado
Colorado
(Time) 1972 – Bud Magrum, Colorado
Colorado
(FWAA) 1972 – Cullen Bryant, Colorado
Colorado
(UPI, NEA, AFCA, TSN, Time) 1971 – Cliff Branch, Colorado
Colorado
(FN) 1971 – Herb Orvis, Colorado
Colorado
(WC, AFCA, TSN) 1970 – Don Popplewell, Colorado
Colorado
(AP, UPI, NEA, FWAA, WC, CP, FN) 1970 – Pat Murphy, Colorado
Colorado
(WC) 1969 – Bobby Anderson, Colorado
Colorado
(AP, UPI, NEA, TSN) 1968 – Mike Montler, Colorado
Colorado
(AP, AFCA) 1967 – Dick Anderson, Colorado
Colorado
(AP, NEA) 1961 – Jerry Hillebrand, Colorado
Colorado
(FWAA) 1961 – Joe Romig, Colorado, (WC, TSN, FWAA) 1960 – Joe Romig, Colorado, (WC) 1956 – John Bayuk, Colorado
Colorado
(INS-2; CP-3) 1954 – Frank Bernardi, Colorado
Colorado
(AP-2) 1953 – Gary Knafelc, Colorado
Colorado
(AP-3) 1943 – Robert Hall, Colorado
Colorado
(AP-2)

Future non-conference opponents[edit] Announced schedules as of January 19, 2017[29]

2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028

Colorado
Colorado
State (at Denver) Colorado
Colorado
State (at Denver) Colorado
Colorado
State (at Denver) Colorado
Colorado
State (at Denver) vs Minnesota at Minnesota vs Nebraska vs. North Dakota State vs. Georgia Tech at Georgia Tech vs. Kansas State at Kansas State

vs Texas State at Nebraska vs Nebraska at Texas A&M vs UMass vs. TCU at TCU at Nebraska

vs Northern Colorado vs New Hampshire vs Air Force vs Fresno State vs. Texas A&M at Air Force

References[edit]

^ a b c " Folsom Field
Folsom Field
Home". CUBuffs.com. Retrieved 2007-03-06.  ^ a b "NCAA Football Award Winners" (PDF). NCAA Football Records. NCAA. 2009. p. 13. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2010-06-11. Retrieved 2010-11-13.  ^ "Color Brand and Messaging University of Colorado
Colorado
at Boulder". Retrieved December 31, 2016.  ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2015-05-21. Retrieved 2015-05-19.  "All-Time Record" (PDF). CUBuffs.com. 2014-06-28. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2015-05-21. Retrieved 2015-05-19.  ^ http://www.cubuffs.com/ViewArticle.dbml?DB_LANG=C&DB_OEM_ID=600&ATCLID=205823352&SPID=255&SPSID=3843 "MacIntyre Named Head Football Coach At Colorado". CUBuffs.com. 2012-12-10. Retrieved 2015-05-19.  ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2009-01-29. Retrieved 2009-01-03.  ^ "The McMNC for 1990: Georgia Institute of Technology – rec.sport.football.college Google Groups". Groups.google.com. Retrieved 2013-04-22.  ^ " Colorado
Colorado
Buffaloes renew football rivalry with Nebraska Cornhuskers". denverpost.com.  ^ " Colorado
Colorado
and Nebraska schedule 4-Game Football Series". FBSchedules.com.  ^ "Nebraska Cornhuskers, Colorado
Colorado
Buffaloes to renew rivalry in 2018". ESPN.  ^ " Colorado
Colorado
& Nebraska To Renew Football Rivalry". CUBuffs.com.  ^ "Huskers and Colorado
Colorado
Agree to Four-Game Series". Huskers.com.  ^ "Agreement reached on resuming Colorado-Nebraska rivalry". nbcsports.com.  ^ " Colorado
Colorado
vs Utah". College Football Data Warehouse. Archived from the original on 2004-05-20. Retrieved 2010-06-19.  ^ "Utah vs Utah St". College Football Data Warehouse. Archived from the original on 2011-05-25. Retrieved 2010-06-19.  ^ " Colorado
Colorado
vs Colorado
Colorado
St". College Football Data Warehouse. Archived from the original on 2010-06-10. Retrieved 2010-06-19.  ^ "Utah Opponents". College Football Data Warehouse. Archived from the original on 2010-09-14. Retrieved 2010-06-19.  ^ " Colorado
Colorado
Opponents". College Football Data Warehouse. Archived from the original on 2010-02-16. Retrieved 2010-06-19.  ^ "NCAA Football Award Winners" (PDF). NCAA Football Records. NCAA. 2009. p. 19. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2010-06-11. Retrieved 2010-11-13.  ^ a b c "NCAA Football Award Winners" (PDF). NCAA Football Records. NCAA. 2009. p. 20. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2010-06-11. Retrieved 2010-11-13.  ^ a b "NCAA Football Award Winners" (PDF). NCAA Football Records. NCAA. 2009. p. 21. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2010-06-11. Retrieved 2010-11-13.  ^ [1][dead link] ^ [2][dead link] ^ [3][dead link] ^ "Throwin' You A Bohn – CUBuffs.com University of Colorado Buffaloes Athletics". CUBuffs.com. Retrieved 2017-06-19.  ^ " Alfred Williams Elected To College Football Hall Of Fame – CUBuffs.com University of Colorado
Colorado
Buffaloes Athletics". CUBuffs.com. Retrieved 2017-06-19.  ^ " John Wooten Named To College Football Hall Of Fame – CUBuffs.com University of Colorado
Colorado
Buffaloes Athletics". CUBuffs.com. Retrieved 2017-06-19.  ^ " Bill McCartney To Enter College Football Hall of Fame
College Football Hall of Fame
– CUBuffs.com University of Colorado
Colorado
Buffaloes Athletics". CUBuffs.com. Retrieved 2017-06-19.  ^ "Future Football Schedules – CUBuffs.com University of Colorado Buffaloes Athletics". CUBuffs.com. Retrieved 2017-06-19. 

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Colorado
Colorado
Buffaloes football.

Official website

v t e

Colorado
Colorado
Buffaloes football

Venues

Campus fields (1890–1901) Gamble Field
Gamble Field
(1901–1924) Folsom Field
Folsom Field
(1924–present)

Bowls & rivalries

Bowl games Colorado
Colorado
State: Rocky Mountain Showdown Nebraska Utah: Rumble in the Rockies

Culture & lore

Ralphie the Buffalo "CU Fight Song" "Golden Buffalo" Marching band Fifth Down Game (1990) Miracle at Michigan

People

Head coaches Statistical leaders

Seasons

1890 1891 1892 1893 1894 1895 1896 1897 1898 1899 1900 1901 1902 1903 1904 1905 1906 1907 1908 1909 1910 1911 1912 1913 1914 1915 1916 1917 1918 1919 1920 1921 1922 1923 1924 1925 1926 1927 1928 1929 1930 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

National championship seasons in bold

v t e

University of Colorado
Colorado
Boulder

Located in: Boulder, Colorado

Academics

College of Architecture and Planning College of Arts and Sciences College of Engineering and Applied Science College of Music Graduate School Leeds School of Business School of Education School of Journalism and Mass Communication Boulder School of Law University of Colorado
Colorado
Engineering Management Program

Student life

Fight Song "Golden Buffalo" Marching Band KVCU CU Triathlon Team CU Independent JILA Mazal Holocaust Collection University of Colorado
Colorado
Museum of Natural History Society for the Advancement of Central and East European Cultures University of Colorado
Colorado
Student Government

Athletics

Crew Football Men's basketball Women's basketball Folsom Field Coors Events Center Pac-12 Conference Mascot

People

Alumni

Residence halls

Cheyenne Arapaho Hall

Founded: 1876 Students: 32,201 Endowment: $1.09 billion

v t e

Pac-12 Conference
Pac-12 Conference
football

North Division

California Golden Bears Oregon Ducks Oregon State Beavers Stanford Cardinal Washington Huskies Washington State Cougars

South Division

Arizona Wildcats Arizona State Sun Devils Colorado
Colorado
Buffaloes UCLA Bruins USC Trojans Utah Utes

Championships & awards

Champions All-time standings Annual finishes Championship game Awards All-Pac-12

Seasons

1916 1917 1918 1919 1920 1921 1922 1923 1924 1925 1926 1927 1928 1929 1930 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2

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