HOME
The Info List - Colonna


--- Advertisement ---



The Colonna
Colonna
family, also known as Sciarrillo or Sciarra, is an Italian noble family. It was powerful in medieval and Renaissance
Renaissance
Rome, supplying one Pope
Pope
and many other Church and political leaders. The family is notable for its bitter feud with the Orsini family
Orsini family
over influence in Rome, until it was stopped by Papal Bull
Papal Bull
in 1511. In 1571, the heads of both families married nieces of Pope
Pope
Sixtus V. Thereafter, historians recorded that "no peace had been concluded between the princes of Christendom, in which they had not been included by name". [2]

Contents

1 History

1.1 Origins 1.2 Colonna
Colonna
vs Papacy 1.3 Late Middle Ages 1.4 Early modern period 1.5 Current status

2 Notable members 3 See also 4 References 5 Sources 6 External links

History[edit] Origins[edit] According to tradition, the Colonna
Colonna
are a branch of the Counts of Tusculum — by Peter (1099–1151) son of Gregory III, called Peter "de Columna" from his property the Columna Castle in Colonna, Alban Hills. Even far further back, they trace their lineage past the counts of Tusculum via Lombard and Italo-Roman nobles, merchants, and clergy through the Early Middle Ages
Middle Ages
— ultimately claiming origins from the Julio-Claudian dynasty. The first cardinal from the family was appointed in 1206 when Giovanni Colonna
Colonna
di Carbognano was made Cardinal Deacon
Cardinal Deacon
of SS. Cosma e Damiano.[3] For many years, cardinal Giovanni di San Paolo (elevated in 1193) was identified as member of the Colonna
Colonna
family and therefore its first representative in the College of Cardinals, but modern scholars have established that this was based on the false information from the beginning of 16th century.[4] Giovanni Colonna
Colonna
(1206 c. - )[5], nephew of Cardinal Giovanni Colonna di Carbognano, made his solemn vows as a Dominican c. 1228 and received his theological and philosophical training at the Roman studium of Santa Sabina, the forerunner of the Pontifical University of Saint Thomas Aquinas, Angelicum. He served as the Provincial of the Roman province of the Dominican Order
Dominican Order
and led the provincial chapter of 1248 at Anagni.[6] Colonna
Colonna
was appointed as Archbishop of Messina in 1255.[7] In 1248, after having dedicated her entire life to serving God and the poor, Margherita Colonna died. A member of the Franciscan Order, she was beatified by Pope
Pope
Pius IX
Pius IX
in 1848. At this time a rivalry began with the pro-papal Orsini family, leaders of the Guelph faction. This reinforced the pro-Emperor Ghibelline course that the Colonna
Colonna
family followed throughout the period of conflict between the Papacy
Papacy
and the Holy Roman Empire. Colonna
Colonna
vs Papacy[edit] In 1297, Cardinal Jacopo (Giacomo Colonna) disinherited his brothers Ottone, Matteo, and Landolfo of their lands. The latter three appealed to Pope
Pope
Boniface VIII who ordered Jacopo to return the land, and furthermore hand over the family's strongholds of Colonna, Palestrina, and other towns to the Papacy. Jacopo refused; in May, Boniface removed him from the College of Cardinals
College of Cardinals
and excommunicated him and his followers. The Colonna
Colonna
family (aside from the three brothers allied with the Pope) declared that Boniface had been elected illegally following the unprecedented abdication of Pope
Pope
Celestine V. The dispute led to open warfare, and in September Boniface appointed Landolfo to the command of his army, to put down the revolt of Landolfo's own Colonna relatives. By the end of 1298 Landolfo had captured Colonna, Palestrina
Palestrina
and other towns and razed them to the ground. The family's lands were distributed among Landolfo and his loyal brothers; the rest of the family fled Italy. The exiled Colonna
Colonna
allied with the Pope's other great enemy, Philip IV of France, who in his youth had been tutored by Cardinal Egidio Colonna. In September 1303, Sciarra and Philipp's advisor, Guillaume de Nogaret, led a small force into Anagni
Anagni
to arrest of Boniface VIII and bring him to France, where was to stand trial. While the two managed to apprehend the Pope
Pope
and Sciarra reportedly slapped the pope in the face in the process, which was accordingly dubbed the "Outrage of Anagni". The attempt eventually failed after a few days, when locals freed the Pope. However, Boniface VIII died on 11 October, allowing France to dominate his weaker successors during the Avignon papacy. Late Middle Ages[edit] The family remained at the centre of civic and religious life throughout the late Middle Ages. Cardinal Egidio Colonna
Colonna
died at the papal court in Avignon
Avignon
in 1314. An Augustinian, he had studied theology in Paris under St. Thomas of Aquinas
Thomas of Aquinas
to become one of the most authoritative thinkers of his time. In the 14th century, the family sponsored the decoration of the Church of San Giovanni, most notably the floor mosaics. In 1328, Louis IV of Germany marched into Italy
Italy
for his coronation as Holy Roman Emperor. As Pope
Pope
John XXII was residing in Avignon
Avignon
and had publicly declared that he would not crown Louis, the King decided to be crowned by a member of the Roman aristocracy, who proposed Sciarra Colonna. In honor of this event, the Colonna
Colonna
family was granted the privilege of using the imperial pointed crown on top of their coat of arms. The celebrated poet Petrarch, was a great friend of the family, in particular of Giovanni Colonna
Colonna
and often lived in Rome
Rome
as a guest of the family. He composed a number of sonnets for special occasions within the Colonna
Colonna
family, including " Colonna
Colonna
the Glorious, the great Latin name upon which all our hopes rest". In this period, the Colonna started claiming they were descendants of the Julio-Claudian dynasty.

Palazzo Colonna, Rome
Rome
(begun by Pope
Pope
Martin V, to this day residence of the family.

At the Council of Constance, the Colonna
Colonna
finally succeeded in their papal ambitions when Oddone Colonna
Colonna
was elected on 14 November 1417. As Martin V, he reigned until his death on 20 February 1431. Early modern period[edit] Vittoria Colonna
Colonna
became famous in the sixteenth century as a poet and a figure in literate circles. In 1627 Anna Colonna, daughter of Filippo I Colonna, married Taddeo Barberini
Barberini
of the family Barberini; nephew of Pope
Pope
Urban VIII. In 1728, the Carbognano branch ( Colonna
Colonna
di Sciarra) of the Colonna family added the name Barberini
Barberini
to its family name[8] when Giulio Cesare Colonna
Colonna
di Sciarra married Cornelia Barberini, daughter of the last male Barberini
Barberini
to hold the name and granddaughter of Maffeo Barberini
Barberini
(son of Taddeo Barberini). Current status[edit] The Colonna
Colonna
family have been Prince
Prince
Assistants to the Papal Throne[9] since 1710, though their papal princely title only dates from 1854. The family residence in Rome, the Palazzo Colonna, is open to the public every Saturday morning. The main ' Colonna
Colonna
di Paliano' family is represented today by Prince Marcantonio Colonna
Colonna
di Paliano, Prince
Prince
and Duke
Duke
of Paliano
Paliano
(b. 1948), whose heir is Don Giovanni Andrea Colonna
Colonna
di Paliano
Paliano
(b. 1975), and by Don Prospero Colonna
Colonna
di Paliano, Prince
Prince
of Avella (b. 1956), whose heir is Don Filippo Colonna
Colonna
di Paliano
Paliano
(b. 1995). The ' Colonna
Colonna
di Stigliano' line is represented by Don Prospero Colonna di Stigliano, Prince
Prince
of Stigliano (b. 1938), whose heir is his nephew Don Stefano Colonna
Colonna
di Stigliano (b. 1975).[10] Notable members[edit]

Oddo Colonna
Colonna
(1368–1431), since 1417 Pope
Pope
Martin V

Prospero Colonna
Colonna
(1452–1523), papal condottiere

Blessed Margaret Colonna
Colonna
(d. 1284) Sciarra Colonna, who took part in the Outrage of Anagni
Anagni
against Pope Boniface VIII Stefano Colonna, an influential noble in Medieval Rome
Rome
an Imperial vicar in the early 14th century. Oddone Colonna, whose election as Pope
Pope
Martin V in 1417 ended the Western Schism. Guido Colonna
Colonna
di Paliano
Paliano
(1908-1982), diplomat and European Commissioner. Giovanni Colonna
Colonna
(1295-1348), influential cardinal during the Avignon papacy. Francesco Colonna
Colonna
(1453? - 1517?) [La "Pugna d'amore in sogno" di Francesco Colonna
Colonna
Romano, 1996, Maurizio Calvesi], who was credited, along with the monk Francesco Colonna, with the authorship of the Hypnerotomachia Poliphili
Hypnerotomachia Poliphili
by an acrostic in the text. Also believed to have written the story. Fabrizio Colonna, who was the father of Vittoria Colonna, and a general in the Holy League. Vittoria Colonna, (1490 - 1547), friend of Michelangelo. Married in 1507 Spanish-Italian Fernando d'Avalos, marquis of Pescara, deceased 1525, adopting on becoming a widow, Alfonso d'Avalos, also marquis del Vasto, a nephew of her former husband. Prospero Colonna, (1452 - 1523), who fought alongside his cousin Fabrizio Colonna. Pompeo Colonna, (1479 - 1532), cardinal. A nephew of Prospero Colonna, mentioned above. Viceroy of Naples
Viceroy of Naples
from 1530 to 1532. Marcantonio I Colonna
Colonna
(1478 - 1522) condottiero of the 15th-16th century. Pirro Colonna, 16th century captain under Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor Marcantonio II Colonna
Colonna
the Younger, (1535 - 1584). Duke
Duke
of Tagliacozzo. Son of Ascanio Colonna
Colonna
and Juana de Aragón. He participated in the naval Battle of Lepanto
Battle of Lepanto
against the Turks, 7 October 1571 and was Viceroy of Sicily
Viceroy of Sicily
in 1577-1584. Prince
Prince
of Paliano. Ascanio Colonna
Colonna
(1560 - 1608) Cardinal Federico Colonna
Colonna
y Tomacelli, Prince
Prince
of Butera, (1601 - 1641) Viceroy of Valencia, in Spain, 1640–1641, Viceroy of Catalonia, 1641. He was Great Constable of the kingdom of Naples (1639-1641) as had been his father Filippo I Colonna, (1578 – 11 April 1639). Marcantonio V Colonna, Prince
Prince
of Paliano, (1606/1610-1659) Lorenzo Onofrio Colonna
Colonna
Viceroy of Aragon, 1678–1681, in Spain. Carlo Colonna
Colonna
(1665 - 1739), created cardinal by Clement XI
Clement XI
in 1706.

See also[edit]

Medieval Rome Orsini Palestrina Prösels Castle

References[edit]

^ Virgil's Aeneid
Aeneid
Book X, Line 771 (in Latin).  ^ History of the popes; their church and state (Volume III) by Leopold von Ranke ( Wellesley College
Wellesley College
Library, reprint; 2009) ^ Werner Maleczek, Papst und Kardinalskolleg von 1191 bis 1216, Vienna 1984, p. 154-155 ^ Helene Tillmann, "Ricerche sull'origine dei membri del collegio cardinalizio nel XII secolo. II/2. Identificazione dei cardinali del secolo XII di provenienza Romana", Rivista di Storia della Chiesa in Italia, 1975, p. 401-402 ^ Stefano, Antonio N. Di (1995-01-01). Fra Giovanni Colonna
Colonna
(in Italian). Edizioni Studio Domenicano. ISBN 9788870941920.  ^ Monumenta et antiquitates veteris disciplinae Ordinis Praedicatorum ab anno 1216 ad 1348 praesertim in romana provincia praefectorumque qui eandem rexerunt biographica chronotaxis... opera et studio p. fr. Pii-Thomae Masetti... (in Latin). ex Typographia Rev. Cam. Apostolicae. 1864-01-01.  ^ Fra Giovanni Colonna
Colonna
By Antonio N. Di Stefano, 1995, 30-31, https://books.google.com/books?id=AIFCN2Smn9cC&pg=PA31#v=onepage&q&f=false Accessed 2-24-2013 ^ Worldroots - Barberini
Barberini
Archived October 15, 2009, at the Wayback Machine. ^ Article by Guy de Stair Sainty on Papal Court Archived March 13, 2007, at the Wayback Machine. ^ "Colonna". www.angelfire.com. Retrieved 2016-05-08. 

Sources[edit]

Original 1922 Almanach de Gotha (edited by Justice Perthes) entry for the Colonna
Colonna
family, link to the original universally-recognised genealogical reference document, with details of family honours

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to House of Colonna.

Palazzo Colonna
Palazzo Colonna
official site (in Italian)

v t e

Royal houses of Europe

Nordic countries

Denmark

Knýtlinga Fairhair Estridsen Griffins Palatinate-Neumarkt Oldenburg Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg

Finland

Bjelbo Mecklenburg Griffins Palatinate-Neumarkt Bonde Oldenburg Vasa Palatinate-Zweibrücken Hesse Holstein-Gottorp Romanov

Norway

Fairhair Knýtlinga Hardrada Gille Sverre Bjelbo Estridsen Griffins Palatinate-Neumarkt Bonde Oldenburg Holstein-Gottorp Bernadotte Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg

Sweden

Munsö Stenkil Sverker Eric Bjelbo Estridsen Mecklenburg Griffins Palatinate-Neumarkt Bonde Oldenburg Vasa Palatinate-Zweibrücken Hesse-Kassel Holstein-Gottorp Bernadotte

Iceland

Fairhair Bjelbo Estridsen Griffins Palatinate-Neumarkt Bonde Oldenburg Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg

Britain and Ireland

England

Mercia Wuffing Kent Sussex Essex Bernicia Deira Northumbria Uí Ímair Wessex Knýtlinga Normandy Angevin Plantagenet Lancaster York Tudor

Scotland

Fergus Óengus Strathclyde Mann and the Isles Alpin Northumbria Bernicia Uí Ímair Galloway Dunkeld Sverre Balliol Bruce Stuart

Wales

Dinefwr Aberffraw Gwynedd Mathrafal Cunedda Tudor

Ireland

Ulaid Dál Riata Érainn Corcu Loígde Laigin Connachta Uí Néill Ó Gallchobhair Ó Domhnail Ó Néill Ó Máel Sechlainn Mac Murchada Ó Briain Mac Lochlainn Ó Conchobhair

Gaelic Ireland

Laigin Síl Conairi Ulaid Dáirine Osraige Cruthin Dál nAraidi Connachta Uí Fiachrach Uí Briúin Uí Néill Síl nÁedo Sláine Clann Cholmáin Eóganachta Chaisil Glendamnach Raithlind Uí Dúnlainge Uí Ímair
Uí Ímair
(Norse) Uí Ceinnselaig Dál gCais Ó Briain Mac Carthaig Ó Conchobhair Ó Ruairc De Burgh (Norman) FitzGerald (Norman) Ó Domhnaill Ó Néill

Great Britain

Stuart Orange-Nassau Hanover Saxe-Coburg and Gotha Windsor

Eastern Europe

Albania

Angevin Progon Arianiti Thopia Kastrioti Dukagjini Wied Zogu Ottoman Savoy

Armenia2

Orontid Artaxiad Arsacid Bagratid Artsruni Rubenids Hethumids Lusignan Savoy

Bosnia

Boričević Kulinić Kotromanić Kosača Ottoman Habsburg-Lorraine

Bulgaria

Dulo Krum Cometopuli Asen Smilets Terter Shishman Sratsimir Battenberg Saxe-Coburg and Gotha

Croatia

Trpimirović Domagojević Svačić Ottoman Luxembourg Habsburg Habsburg-Lorraine Bonaparte Savoy (disputed)

Cyprus2

Plantagenet Lusignan Ottoman Savoy

Georgia1

Pharnavazid Artaxiad Arsacid Ottoman Chosroid Bagrationi

Greece

Argead Macedonian Doukas Komnenos Angelos Laskaris Palaiologos Ottoman Wittelsbach Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg

Lithuania

Mindaugas Gediminids Jagiellon Valois Báthory Vasa Wiśniowiecki Sobieski Wettin Leszczyński Poniatowski Holstein-Gottorp-Romanov

Moldavia

Dragoș (Drăgoșești) Rossetti Bogdan-Muşat Movilești Drăculeşti Ghica Cantacuzene Cantemirești Racoviță Mavrocordato Ypsilantis Soutzos Mourousi Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen Basarab

Montenegro

Vojislavljević Balšić Ottoman Crnojević Petrović-Njegoš

Romania

House of Basarab Rossetti Bogdan-Mușat Movilești Drăculești Ghica Cantacuzene Cantemirești Romanov Racoviță Ottoman Mavrocordato Ypsilantis Soutzos Mourousi Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen Romania/Royal family

Russia1

Rurik Borjigin Godunov Shuysky Vasa Romanov

Serbia

Vlastimirović Vukanović Nemanjić Lazarević Mrnjavčević Dejanović Branković Ottoman Obrenović Karađorđević

Turkey1

Ottoman

Ukraine

Rurikids Piast Gediminids Olshanski Olelkovich Giray Romanov Habsburg-Lorraine

1 Transcontinental country. 2 Entirely in Southwest Asia
Asia
but having socio-political connections with Europe.

Western Europe

Belgium

Saxe-Coburg and Gotha

France

Merovingian Carolingian Capet Valois Bourbon Bonaparte Orléans

Italy

Aleramici Appiani Bonaparte Bourbon-Parma Bourbon-Two Sicilies Carolingian Della Rovere Este Farnese Flavian Gonzaga Grimaldi Habsburg Julio-Claudian Malatesta Malaspina Medici Montefeltro Nerva–Antonine Ordelaffi Orsini Palaiologos Pallavicini Savoy Severan Sforza Visconti

Luxembourg

Orange-Nassau Nassau-Weilburg Bourbon-Parma

Monaco

Grimaldi

Netherlands

Bonaparte Orange-Nassau (Mecklenburg) (Lippe) (Amsberg)

Portugal

Vímara Peres Burgundy Aviz Habsburg Spanish Braganza

Braganza-Saxe-Coburg and Gotha

Spain

Asturias Barcelona Jiménez Burgundy Champagne Capet Évreux Trastámara Habsburg Bourbon

Bonaparte Savoy

Central Europe

Austria

Babenberg Habsburg Habsburg-Lorraine

Bohemia

Přemyslid Piast Luxembourg Jagiellon Habsburg Habsburg-Lorraine

Germany

Ascania Carolingian Conradines Ottonian Luitpolding Salian Süpplingenburg Hohenstaufen Welf Habsburg Hanover Saxe-Coburg and Gotha Nassau Luxembourg Wittelsbach Schwarzburg Brunswick-Lüneburg House of Pomerania Hohenzollern Württemberg Oldenburg Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg Orange-Nassau Nassau-Weilburg Mecklenburg Vasa Palatine Zweibrücken Hesse Holstein-Gottorp Romanov Bonaparte Wettin Lippe Zähringen

Hungary

Árpád Přemyslid Wittelsbach Angevin Luxembourg Hunyadi Jagiellon Szapolyai Ottoman Habsburg Habsburg-Lorraine

Liechtenstein

Liechtenstein

Poland

Piast Přemyslid Samborides Griffins Jagiellon Valois Báthory Vasa Wiśniowiecki Sobieski Wettin Leszczyński Poniatowski

After partitions:

Holstein-Gottorp-Romanov
Holstein-Gottorp-Romanov
Kingdom of Poland Habsburg Kingdom of Galicia and Lodomeria Wettin Duchy of Warsaw Lefebvre Duchy of Gdańsk Hohenzoller

.