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Clint Bolick (born December 26, 1957) is an Associate Justice of the Arizona Supreme Court. Previously, he served as Vice President of Litigation at the conservative/libertarian Goldwater Institute. He co-founded the libertarian Institute for Justice, where he was the Vice President and Director of Litigation from 1991 until 2004. He led two cases that went before the Supreme Court of the United States. He has also defended state-based school choice programs in the Supreme Courts of Wisconsin and Ohio.

Early life and education

Bolick was born on December 26, 1957 in Elizabeth, New Jersey. Bolick grew up in nearby Hillside and graduated from Hillside High School in 1975.[1] He graduated from Drew University in 1979 and received his J.D. from the University of California Davis School of Law in 1982. As a law student, he supported laws and legal rulings that knocked down racial discrimination (calling Brown v. Board of Education a "triumph of the principle of equality"[2]), and was a vocal opponent of race-based preferences and reverse discrimination.[3]

In 1980, he ran as a Libertarian for a seat in the California State Assembly. He lost to an incumbent Democrat but garnered 7.1 percent of the vote. (In that election, the Libertarian presidential ticket earned about 1% of the vote nationwide.)[4]

Career

Mountain States Legal Foundation

In 1982, he joined a public interest law firm, the Mountain States Legal Foundation in Denver, Colorado. He was hired by the foundation's acting president, William H. "Chip" Mellor.[5] In 1984,[6] Mellor left the organization over a conflict with one of the foundation's sponsors.[5] Bolick also left, believing that the foundation was more interested in protecting business interests than in promoting economic freedom.[6] In 2005, he said,

Chip and I discovered that there is a world of difference between an organization that is pro-business and an organization that is pro-free enterprise.[5]

After their break with Mountain States, they began planning a free-enterprise public interest law firm that would follow a philosophy of "economic liberty."[6] These plans would lead to the founding of the Institute for Justice in 1991.[5][6]

Equal Employment Opportunity Commission Justice Department

Bolick joined the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) in 1985. While he only stayed at the EEOC for a year, he became friends with its chairman, future Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas. (Thomas is the godfather to Bolick's second son.[7]) Thomas helped convince him that removing economic barriers for the poor was more important than fighting race-based "reverse discrimination."[8] His conversations with Thomas bolstered Bolick's belief that racism was a formidable barrier to blacks and other people of color. In 1991, he would support adding punitive damages to Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. He explained, "It seemed to me that if you didn't want quotas, you had to have tough remedies and punitive damages against recalcitrant discriminators ... That very much came out of Thomas."[9] Thomas also shaped his preferred remedy for inequality: removing unnecessary (an

Bolick was born on December 26, 1957 in Elizabeth, New Jersey. Bolick grew up in nearby Hillside and graduated from Hillside High School in 1975.[1] He graduated from Drew University in 1979 and received his J.D. from the University of California Davis School of Law in 1982. As a law student, he supported laws and legal rulings that knocked down racial discrimination (calling Brown v. Board of Education a "triumph of the principle of equality"[2]), and was a vocal opponent of race-based preferences and reverse discrimination.[3]

In 1980, he ran as a Libertarian for a seat in the California State Assembly. He lost to an incumbent Democrat but garnered 7.1 percent of the vote. (In that election, the Libertarian presidential ticket earned about 1% of the vote nationwide.)[4]

Career

Mountain States Legal Foundation

In 1982, he joined a public interest law firm, the Mountain States Legal Foundation in Denver, Colorado. He was hired by the foundation's acting president, William H. "Chip" Mellor.[5] In 1984,[6] Mellor left the organization over a conflict with one of the foundation's sponsors.[5] Bolick also left, believing that the foundation was more interested in protecting business interests than in promoting economic freedom.[6] In 2005, he said,

Chip and I discovered that there is a world of difference between an organization that is pro-business and an organization that is pro-free enterprise.[5]

After their break with Mountain States, they began planning a free-enterprise public interest law firm that would follow a philosophy of "economic liberty."[6] These plans would lead to the founding of the Institute for Justice in 1991.[5][6]

Equal Employment Opportunity Commission Justice Department

Goldwater Institute when that organization added a litigation group.[30]

In 2009, Bolick became a sharp critic of nationally well-known Sheriff Joe Arpaio of Maricopa County, who has worked to stem the flow of illegal immigrants in the Southwest.[neutrality is disputed] Bolick claimed that Arpaio's "effectiveness has been compromised for the past several years by misplaced priorities."[Sheriff Joe Arpaio of Maricopa County, who has worked to stem the flow of illegal immigrants in the Southwest.[neutrality is disputed] Bolick claimed that Arpaio's "effectiveness has been compromised for the past several years by misplaced priorities."[citation needed]

Bolick helped to draft model legislation known as the 'Health Care Freedom Act' that seeks to preserve the right of individuals to pay for health care directly instead of being compelled to enroll in a government-sponsored insurance plan.[31] Arizona and Oklahoma voters approved a version of the Health Care Freedom Act in their respective November 2010 general elections.[31][32]} Also in November 2010, voters in Arizona, South Carolina, South Dakota and Utah adopted a measure he drafted called Save Our Secret Ballot, which guarantees workers the right to a secret-ballot vote in union-organizing elections.[31][33][34]

On July 30, 2015, Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump called for the deportation of all of the estimated 11 million illegal immigrants in the United States. Bolick called Trump's idea "impractical and opposed by a large majority of Americans."[35]

On January 6, 2016, Governor Doug Ducey appointed Bolick to the Arizona Supreme Court.[36]

Works

Nonfiction bookspaperbacks, ebooks and audiobooks.

Awards

In 2006, he won one of the four Bradley Prizes given that year. The Bradley Prize included a one-time $250,000 stipend.[37] He is currently a Research Fellow at Stanford University's Hoover Institution.[38] American Lawyer magazine named him one of three Lawyers of the Year in 2003. In 2009, Legal Times magazine included him in their list of the "90 greatest Washington lawyers of the past 30 years".[38]

See also

References

  1. ^ Bolick, Clint. "Remedial Education (Clint Bolick)", Center for Education Reform. Accessed July 5, 2017. "I grew up in Hillside, a suburb of Newark, in a single-parent, working-class family. In 1975, Hillside High School graduated me with enough skills to secure a scholarship at an excellent college and go on to a successful career in law and public policy."
  2. ^ Easton, Nina J. (2000). Gang of Five: Leaders at the Center of the Conservative Crusade. Simon & Schuster. pp. 91. ISBN 0743203208. triumph of the principle of equality.
  3. ^ Easton, Nina J. (2000). Gang of Five: Leaders at the Center of the Conservative Crusade. Simon & Schuster. pp. 96. ISBN 0743203208. virtually alone in voicing doubts.
  4. Bradley Prizes given that year. The Bradley Prize included a one-time $250,000 stipend.[37] He is currently a Research Fellow at Stanford University's Hoover Institution.[38] American Lawyer magazine named him one of three Lawyers of the Year in 2003. In 2009, Legal Times magazine included him in their list of the "90 greatest Washington lawyers of the past 30 years".[38]

    See also