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Cinnamon
Cinnamon
(/ˈsɪnəmən/ SIN-ə-mən) is a spice obtained from the inner bark of several tree species from the genus Cinnamomum. Cinnamon is used mainly as an aromatic condiment and flavoring additive in a wide variety of cuisines, sweet and savoury dishes, breakfast cereals, snackfoods, and traditional foods. The aroma and flavor of cinnamon derive from its essential oil and principal component, cinnamaldehyde, as well as numerous other constituents, including eugenol.

Cinnamon
Cinnamon
sticks, powder, and dried flowers of the Cinnamomum
Cinnamomum
verum plant

Cinnamomum
Cinnamomum
verum, from Koehler's Medicinal-Plants (1887)

Close-up view of raw cinnamon

The term "cinnamon" also is used to describe its mid-brown colour. Cinnamon
Cinnamon
is the name for several species of trees and the commercial spice products that some of them produce. All are members of the genus Cinnamomum
Cinnamomum
in the family Lauraceae.[1] Only a few Cinnamomum
Cinnamomum
species are grown commercially for spice. Cinnamomum
Cinnamomum
verum is sometimes considered to be "true cinnamon", but most cinnamon in international commerce is derived from related species, also referred to as "cassia".[2][3] In 2016, Indonesia
Indonesia
and China
China
produced 75% of the world's supply of cinnamon.

Contents

1 Etymology 2 History

2.1 Ancient history 2.2 Middle Ages 2.3 Early modern period

3 Cultivation

3.1 Species 3.2 Grading

4 Production 5 Food uses 6 Nutrition 7 Flavour, aroma, and taste

7.1 Alcohol
Alcohol
flavourant

8 Traditional medicine 9 Toxicity 10 Gallery 11 See also 12 References 13 Further reading 14 External links

Etymology[edit] The English word "cinnamon", attested in English since the fifteenth century, derives from the Greek κιννάμωμον kinnámōmon (later kínnamon), via Latin and medieval French intermediate forms. The Greek was borrowed from a Phoenician word, which was similar to the related Hebrew קינמון (qinnamon).[4] The name "cassia", first recorded in English around AD 1000, was borrowed via Latin and ultimately derives from Hebrew q'tsīʿāh, a form of the verb qātsaʿ, "to strip off bark".[5] Early Modern English
Early Modern English
also used the names canel and canella, similar to the current names of cinnamon in several other European languages, which are derived from the Latin word cannella, a diminutive of canna, "tube", from the way the bark curls up as it dries.[6] History[edit]

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Ancient history[edit] Cinnamon
Cinnamon
has been known from remote antiquity. It was imported to Egypt as early as 2000 BC, but those who report that it had come from China
China
confuse it with cassia.[3] Cinnamon
Cinnamon
was so highly prized among ancient nations that it was regarded as a gift fit for monarchs and even for a deity; a fine inscription records the gift of cinnamon and cassia to the temple of Apollo
Apollo
at Miletus.[7] Although its source was kept mysterious in the Mediterranean world for centuries by those in the spice trade to protect their monopoly as suppliers, cinnamon is native to India, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, and Myanmar.[8] The first Greek reference to kasia is found in a poem by Sappho
Sappho
in the seventh century BC. According to Herodotus, both cinnamon and cassia grew in Arabia, together with incense, myrrh, and labdanum, and were guarded by winged serpents.[citation needed] In Ancient Egypt, cinnamon was used to embalm mummies.[9] From Hellenistic times onward, Ancient Egyptian recipes for kyphi, an aromatic used for burning, included cinnamon and cassia. The gifts of Hellenistic rulers to temples sometimes included cassia and cinnamon. Cinnamon
Cinnamon
was brought around the Arabian peninsula
Arabian peninsula
on "rafts without rudders or sails or oars", taking advantage of the winter trade winds.[10] Pliny the Elder
Pliny the Elder
also mentions cassia as a flavouring agent for wine.[11] According to Pliny the Elder, a Roman pound (327 grams (11.5 oz)) of cassia, cinnamon, or serichatum cost up to 1500 denarii, the wage of fifty months' labour.[12] Diocletian's Edict on Maximum Prices[13] from 301 AD gives a price of 125 denarii for a pound of cassia, while an agricultural labourer earned 25 denarii per day. Cinnamon
Cinnamon
was too expensive to be commonly used on funeral pyres in Rome, but the Emperor Nero
Nero
is said to have burned a year's worth of the city's supply at the funeral for his wife Poppaea Sabina
Poppaea Sabina
in AD 65.[14] Malabathrum
Malabathrum
leaves (folia) were used in cooking and for distilling an oil used in a caraway sauce for oysters by the Roman gourmet, Gaius Gavius Apicius.[15] Malabathrum
Malabathrum
is among the spices that, according to Apicius, any good kitchen should contain. Middle Ages[edit] Through the Middle Ages, the source of cinnamon remained a mystery to the Western world. From reading Latin writers who quoted Herodotus, Europeans had learned that cinnamon came up the Red Sea
Red Sea
to the trading ports of Egypt, but where it came from was less than clear. When the Sieur de Joinville
Sieur de Joinville
accompanied his king to Egypt on crusade in 1248, he reported – and believed – what he had been told: that cinnamon was fished up in nets at the source of the Nile out at the edge of the world (i.e., Ethiopia). Marco Polo
Marco Polo
avoided precision on the topic.[16] Herodotus
Herodotus
and other authors named Arabia as the source of cinnamon: they recounted that giant "cinnamon birds" collected the cinnamon sticks from an unknown land where the cinnamon trees grew and used them to construct their nests, and that the Arabs employed a trick to obtain the sticks. Pliny the Elder
Pliny the Elder
wrote in the first century that traders had made this up to charge more, but the story remained current in Byzantium
Byzantium
as late as 1310. The first mention that the spice grew in Sri Lanka
Sri Lanka
was in Zakariya al-Qazwini's Athar al-bilad wa-akhbar al-‘ibad ("Monument of Places and History of God's Bondsmen") about 1270.[17] This was followed shortly thereafter by John of Montecorvino in a letter of about 1292.[18] Indonesian rafts transported cinnamon directly from the Moluccas to East Africa (see also Rhapta), where local traders then carried it north to Alexandria in Egypt.[19][20][21] Venetian traders from Italy held a monopoly on the spice trade in Europe, distributing cinnamon from Alexandria. The disruption of this trade by the rise of other Mediterranean powers, such as the Mamluk sultans and the Ottoman Empire, was one of many factors that led Europeans to search more widely for other routes to Asia. Early modern period[edit] During the 1500s, Ferdinand Magellan
Ferdinand Magellan
was searching for spices on behalf of Spain, and in the Philippines
Philippines
found Cinnamomum
Cinnamomum
mindanaense, which was closely related to C. zeylanicum, the cinnamon found in Sri Lanka. This cinnamon eventually competed with Sri Lankan cinnamon, which was controlled by the Portuguese.[22] In 1638, Dutch traders established a trading post in Sri Lanka, took control of the manufactories by 1640, and expelled the remaining Portuguese by 1658. "The shores of the island are full of it," a Dutch captain reported, "and it is the best in all the Orient. When one is downwind of the island, one can still smell cinnamon eight leagues out to sea."[23]:15 The Dutch East India
India
Company continued to overhaul the methods of harvesting in the wild and eventually began to cultivate its own trees. In 1767, Lord Brown of the British East India
India
Company established Anjarakkandy
Anjarakkandy
Cinnamon
Cinnamon
Estate near Anjarakkandy
Anjarakkandy
in the Cannanore district of Kerala; it became Asia's largest cinnamon estate. The British took control of Ceylon from the Dutch in 1796. Cultivation[edit]

Leaves from a wild cinnamon tree

Cinnamon
Cinnamon
is an evergreen tree characterized by oval-shaped leaves, thick bark, and a berry fruit. When harvesting the spice, the bark and leaves are the primary parts of the plant used.[9] Cinnamon
Cinnamon
is cultivated by growing the tree for two years, then coppicing it, i.e., cutting the stems at ground level. The following year, about a dozen new shoots form from the roots, replacing those that were cut. A number of pests such as Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, Diplodia spp., and Phytophthora cinnamomi
Phytophthora cinnamomi
(stripe canker) can affect the growing plants.[24] The stems must be processed immediately after harvesting while the inner bark is still wet. The cut stems are processed by scraping off the outer bark, then beating the branch evenly with a hammer to loosen the inner bark, which is then pried off in long rolls. Only 0.5 mm (0.02 in) of the inner bark is used;[citation needed] the outer, woody portion is discarded, leaving metre-long cinnamon strips that curl into rolls ("quills") on drying. The processed bark dries completely in four to six hours, provided it is in a well-ventilated and relatively warm environment. Once dry, the bark is cut into 5- to 10-cm (2- to 4-in) lengths for sale. A less than ideal drying environment encourages the proliferation of pests in the bark, which may then require treatment by fumigation. Fumigated bark is not considered to be of the same premium quality as untreated bark. Species[edit] A number of species are often sold as cinnamon:[25]

Cinnamomum
Cinnamomum
cassia (cassia or Chinese cinnamon, the most common commercial type) C. burmannii (Korintje, Padang cassia, or Indonesian cinnamon) C. loureiroi (Saigon cinnamon, Vietnamese cassia, or Vietnamese cinnamon) C. verum ( Sri Lanka
Sri Lanka
cinnamon or Ceylon cinnamon) C. citriodorum (Malabar cinnamon) C. tamale (Indian cinnamon)

Cassia induce a strong, spicy flavour and is often used in baking, especially associated with cinnamon rolls, as it handles baking conditions well. Among cassia, Chinese cinnamon is generally medium to light reddish brown in colour, hard and woody in texture, and thicker (2–3 mm (0.079–0.118 in) thick), as all of the layers of bark are used. Ceylon cinnamon, using only the thin inner bark, has a lighter brown colour, a finer, less dense and more crumbly texture. It is considered to be subtle and more aromatic in flavour than cassia and it loses much of its flavour during cooking. Levels of the blood-thinning agent coumarin in Ceylon cinnamon are much lower than those in cassia.[26][27] The barks of the species are easily distinguished when whole, both in macroscopic and microscopic characteristics. Ceylon cinnamon sticks (quills) have many thin layers and can easily be made into powder using a coffee or spice grinder, whereas cassia sticks are much harder. Indonesian cinnamon is often sold in neat quills made up of one thick layer, capable of damaging a spice or coffee grinder. Saigon cinnamon (C. loureiroi) and Chinese cinnamon (C. cassia) are always sold as broken pieces of thick bark, as the bark is not supple enough to be rolled into quills. The powdered bark is harder to distinguish, but if it is treated with tincture of iodine (a test for starch), little effect is visible with pure Ceylon cinnamon, but when Chinese cinnamon is present, a deep-blue tint is produced.[28][29] Grading[edit] See also: Food grading The Sri Lankan grading system divides the cinnamon quills into four groups:

Alba, less than 6 mm (0.24 in) in diameter Continental, less than 16 mm (0.63 in) in diameter Mexican, less than 19 mm (0.75 in) in diameter Hamburg, less than 32 mm (1.3 in) in diameter

These groups are further divided into specific grades. For example, Mexican is divided into M00 000 special, M000000, and M0000, depending on quill diameter and number of quills per kilogram. Any pieces of bark less than 106 mm (4.2 in) long are categorized as quillings. Featherings are the inner bark of twigs and twisted shoots. Chips are trimmings of quills, outer and inner bark that cannot be separated, or the bark of small twigs. Production[edit]

Cinnamon
Cinnamon
production – 2016

Country (tonnes)

 Indonesia

91,300

 China

77,055

 Vietnam

35,516

 Sri Lanka

16,931

World

223,574

Source: FAOSTAT of the United Nations[30]

Combined, Indonesia
Indonesia
and China
China
produced 75% of the world's cinnamon in 2016 when global production was 223,574 tonnes (table). Four countries accounted for 99% of the world total: Indonesia, China, Vietnam, and Sri Lanka.[30] Food uses[edit]

Uncooked cinnamon roll buns

Cinnamon
Cinnamon
bark is used as a spice. It is principally employed in cookery as a condiment and flavouring material. It is used in the preparation of chocolate, especially in Mexico. Cinnamon
Cinnamon
is often used in savoury dishes of chicken and lamb. In the United States, cinnamon and sugar are often used to flavour cereals, bread-based dishes, such as toast, and fruits, especially apples; a cinnamon-sugar mixture is sold separately for such purposes. It is also used in Turkish cuisine for both sweet and savoury dishes. Cinnamon
Cinnamon
can also be used in pickling and Christmas drinks such as eggnog. Cinnamon
Cinnamon
powder has long been an important spice in enhancing the flavour of Persian cuisine, used in a variety of thick soups, drinks, and sweets.[31]:10–12 Nutrition[edit]

Cinnamon, spice, ground

Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)

Energy 247 kJ (59 kcal)

Carbohydrates

80.6 g

Sugars 2.2 g

Dietary fiber 53.1 g

Fat

1.2 g

Protein

4 g

Vitamins

Vitamin
Vitamin
A equiv.

(2%) 15 μg

Thiamine
Thiamine
(B1)

(2%) 0.02 mg

Riboflavin
Riboflavin
(B2)

(3%) 0.04 mg

Niacin
Niacin
(B3)

(9%) 1.33 mg

Vitamin
Vitamin
B6

(12%) 0.16 mg

Folate
Folate
(B9)

(2%) 6 μg

Vitamin
Vitamin
C

(5%) 3.8 mg

Vitamin
Vitamin
E

(15%) 2.3 mg

Vitamin
Vitamin
K

(30%) 31.2 μg

Minerals

Calcium

(100%) 1002 mg

Iron

(64%) 8.3 mg

Magnesium

(17%) 60 mg

Phosphorus

(9%) 64 mg

Potassium

(9%) 431 mg

Sodium

(1%) 10 mg

Zinc

(19%) 1.8 mg

Other constituents

Water 10.6 g

Link to USDA Database entry

Units μg = micrograms • mg = milligrams IU = International units

Percentages are roughly approximated using US recommendations for adults. Source: USDA Nutrient Database

Ground cinnamon is composed of around 11% water, 81% carbohydrates (including 53% dietary fiber), 4% protein, and 1% fat (table). In a 100 gram reference amount (100 g allows comparison to other foods and spices; typical serving size is one teaspoon or 2.6 grams),[32] ground cinnamon is a rich source (20% of more of the Daily Value, DV) of vitamin K, calcium, and iron, while providing moderate amounts (10 to 19% DV) of vitamin B6, vitamin E, magnesium, and zinc (table). Flavour, aroma, and taste[edit] The flavour of cinnamon is due to an aromatic essential oil that makes up 0.5 to 1% of its composition. This essential oil is prepared by roughly pounding the bark, macerating it in sea water, and then quickly distilling the whole. It is of a golden-yellow colour, with the characteristic odour of cinnamon and a very hot aromatic taste. The pungent taste and scent come from cinnamaldehyde (about 90% of the essential oil from the bark) and, by reaction with oxygen as it ages, it darkens in colour and forms resinous compounds.[33] Cinnamon
Cinnamon
constituents include some 80 aromatic compounds,[34] including eugenol found in the oil from leaves or bark of cinnamon trees.[35] Alcohol
Alcohol
flavourant[edit] Cinnamon
Cinnamon
is a popular flavouring in numerous alcoholic beverages,[36] such as Fireball Cinnamon
Cinnamon
Whisky. Cinnamon
Cinnamon
brandy concoctions, called "cinnamon liqueur" and made with distilled alcohol, are popular in parts of Greece. In Europe, popular examples of such beverages are Maiwein
Maiwein
(white wine with woodruff) and Żubrówka
Żubrówka
(vodka flavoured with bison grass). Traditional medicine[edit] Cinnamon
Cinnamon
has a long history of use in traditional medicine. It has been tested in a variety of clinical conditions, such as bronchitis or diabetes,[37] but there is no scientific evidence to date that consuming cinnamon has any health benefits.[38] Toxicity[edit] Further information: Coumarin In 2008, The European Food Safety Authority
European Food Safety Authority
considered toxicity of coumarin, a significant component of cinnamon, and confirmed a maximum recommended tolerable daily intake (TDI) of 0.1 mg of coumarin per kg of body weight. Coumarin
Coumarin
is known to cause liver and kidney damage in high concentrations and metabolic effect in humans with CYP2A6
CYP2A6
polymorphism.[39][40] Based on this assessment, the European Union set a guideline for maximum coumarin content in foodstuffs of 50 mg per kg of dough in seasonal foods, and 15 mg per kg in everyday baked foods.[41] According to the maximum recommended TDI of 0.1 mg of coumarin per kg of body weight, which is 5 mg of coumarin for a body weight of 50 kg:

Cinnamomum
Cinnamomum
cassia Cinnamomum
Cinnamomum
verum

milligrams of coumarin/kilograms of cinnamon 100 mg – 12,180 mg/kg less than 100 mg/kg

milligrams of coumarin/grams of cinnamon 0.10 mg – 12.18 mg/g less than 0.10 mg/g

TDI cinnamon at 50 kg body weight 0.4 g – 50 g more than 50 g

Note: Due to the highly variable amount of coumarin in C. cassia, usually well over 1,000 mg of coumarin per kg of cinnamon and sometimes up to 12 times that, C. cassia has a very low safe intake level to adhere to the above TDI.[42] Gallery[edit]

Quills of Ceylon cinnamon ( Cinnamomum
Cinnamomum
verum) on the left, and Indonesian cinnamon ( Cinnamomum
Cinnamomum
burmannii) on the right

Essential oil
Essential oil
prepared from cinnamon bark

Besides use as flavourant and spice in foods, cinnamon-flavoured tea is consumed as a hot beverage

Cinnamon
Cinnamon
toast

See also[edit]

Food portal

Canella, a plant known as "wild cinnamon" or "white cinnamon" Cinnamomea, a New Latin adjective meaning "cinnamon-coloured" Cinnamon
Cinnamon
challenge List of culinary herbs and spices

References[edit]

^  "Cinnamon". Encyclopædia Britannica. 6 (11th ed.). 1911. p. 376.  ^ Iqbal, Mohammed (1993). "International trade in non-wood forest products: An overview". FO: Misc/93/11 – Working Paper. Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. Retrieved 12 November 2012.  ^ a b Bell, Maguelonne Toussaint-Samat ; translated by Anthea (2009). A history of food (New expanded ed.). Chichester, West Sussex: Wiley-Blackwell. ISBN 978-1405181198. Cassia, also known as cinnamon or Chinese cinnamon is a tree that has bark similar to that of cinnamon but with a rather pungent odour  ^ "cinnamon". Oxford English Dictionary
Oxford English Dictionary
(2nd ed.). Oxford University Press. 1989. ; also Harper, Douglas. "cinnamon". Online Etymology Dictionary. . ^ "cassia". Oxford English Dictionary
Oxford English Dictionary
(2nd ed.). Oxford University Press. 1989. ; also Harper, Douglas. "cassia". Online Etymology Dictionary. . ^ "canella; canel". Oxford English Dictionary
Oxford English Dictionary
(2nd ed.). Oxford University Press. 1989. . ^ Toussaint-Samat 2009, p. 437 ^ "Cinnamon". Encyclopaedia Britannica. 2008. ISBN 1-59339-292-3. (species Cinnamomum
Cinnamomum
zeylanicum), bushy evergreen tree of the laurel family (Lauraceae) native to Malabar Coast of India, Sri Lanka (Ceylon) Bangladesh
Bangladesh
and Myanmar
Myanmar
(Burma).  ^ a b Burlando, B.; Verotta, L.; Cornara, L.; Bottini-Massa, E. (2010). Herbal principles in cosmetics: properties and mechanisms of action. Boca Raton: CRC Press. p. 121. ISBN 978-1-4398-1214-3.  ^ Pliny the Elder; Bostock, J.; Riley, H.T. (1855). "42, Cinnamomum. Xylocinnamum". Natural History of Pliny, book XII, The Natural History of Trees. 3. London: Henry G. Bohn. pp. 137–140.  ^ Pliny the Elder
Pliny the Elder
(1938). Natural History. Harvard University Press. p. 14. ISBN 978-0-674-99433-1.  ^ Pliny the Elder. Natural History. http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=Perseus%3Atext%3A1999.02.0137%3Abook%3D12%3Achapter%3D42. The right of regulating the sale of the cinnamon belongs solely to the king of the Gebanitæ, who opens the market for it by public proclamation. The price of it was formerly as much as a thousand denarii per pound; which was afterwards increased to half as much again, in consequence, it is said, of the forests having been set on fire by the barbarians, from motives of resentment[...]  ^ Graser, E. R. A text and translation of the Edict of Diocletian, in An Economic Survey of Ancient Rome, Volume V: Rome and Italy of the Empire. Johns Hopkins Press. 1940. ISBN 978-0374928483 ^ Toussaint-Samat 2009, p. 437f. ^ De re coquinaria, I, 29, 30; IX, 7 ^ Toussaint-Samat 2009, p. 438 discusses cinnamon's hidden origins and Joinville's report. ^ Tennent, Sir James Emerson. "Account of the Island of Ceylon". Retrieved 8 November 2014.  ^ Yule, Henry. "Cathay and the Way Thither". Retrieved 15 July 2008.  ^ "The life of spice; cloves, nutmeg, pepper, cinnamon ". UNESCO Courier. Findarticles.com. 1984. Archived from the original on 9 July 2012. Retrieved 18 August 2010.  ^ Independent Online. "News – Discovery: Sailing the Cinnamon
Cinnamon
Route (Page 1 of 2)". Iol.co.za. Archived from the original on 8 April 2005. Retrieved 18 August 2010.  ^ Gray, E. W.; Miller, J. I. (1970). "The Spice
Spice
Trade of the Roman Empire 29 B.C. – A.D. 641". The Journal of Roman Studies. 60: 222–224. doi:10.2307/299440. JSTOR 299440.  ^ Mallari, Francisco (December 1974). "The Mindinao Cinnamon". Philippine Quarterly of Culture and Society. University of San Carlos Publications. 2 (4): 190–194. JSTOR 29791158.  ^ Braudel, Fernand (1984). The Perspective of the World. 3. University of California Press. p. 699. ISBN 0-520-08116-1.  ^ "Cinnamon". Plant Village, Pennsylvania State University. 2017. Retrieved 28 February 2017.  ^ Culinary Herbs and Spices, The Seasoning and Spice
Spice
Association. Retrieved 3 August 2010. ^ High daily intakes of cinnamon: Health risk cannot be ruled out. BfR Health Assessment No. 044/2006, 18 August 2006 ^ "Espoo daycare centre bans cinnamon as 'moderately toxic to liver'". Archived from the original on 14 October 2009. Retrieved 5 September 2010.  ^ "A Modern Herbal – Cassia (Cinnamon)". www.botanical.com. Retrieved 17 April 2017.  ^ Pereira, Jonathan (1854). The Elements of materia medica and therapeutics. 2. p. 390.  ^ a b "Global cinnamon production in 2016; Crops/Regions/World Regions/Production Quantity (pick lists)". UN Food and Agriculture Organization, Corporate Statistical Database (FAOSTAT). 2017. Retrieved 12 March 2018.  ^ Czarra, Fred (1 May 2009). Spices: A Global History. Reaktion Books. ISBN 9781861896827.  ^ "Cinnamon, spice, ground, per 100 g". US National Nutrient Database, Release 28, United States Department of Agriculture. May 2016. Retrieved 18 September 2017.  ^ Yokomi, Naoka; Ito, Michiho (1 July 2009). "Influence of composition upon the variety of tastes in Cinnamomi cortex". Journal of Natural Medicines. 63 (3): 261–266. doi:10.1007/s11418-009-0326-8. ISSN 1861-0293. PMID 19291358.  ^ Jayaprakasha, G. K.; Rao, L. J. (2011). "Chemistry, biogenesis, and biological activities of Cinnamomum
Cinnamomum
zeylanicum". Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition. 51 (6): 547–62. doi:10.1080/10408391003699550. PMID 21929331.  ^ "Oil of cinnamon". Toxicology Data Network (TOXNET). 6 August 2002. Retrieved 29 November 2016.  ^ Haley Willard (16 Dec 2013). "11 Cinnamon-Flavored Liquors for the Holidays". The Daily Meal. Retrieved 17 April 2017.  ^ Castro, M.D., M. Regina, Diabetes
Diabetes
treatment: Can cinnamon lower blood sugar?, Mayo Clinic newsletter, 2018.03.12 ^ "Cinnamon". National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health, US National Institutes of Health. September 2016. Retrieved 28 February 2017.  ^ Harris, Emily. "German Christmas Cookies Pose Health Danger". National Public Radio. Retrieved 1 May 2007.  ^ " Coumarin
Coumarin
in flavourings and other food ingredients with flavouring properties - Scientific Opinion of the Panel on Food Additives, Flavourings, Processing Aids and Materials in Contact with Food (AFC)". EFSA Journal. 6 (10): 793. 2008. doi:10.2903/j.efsa.2008.793.  ^ Russell, Helen (20 December 2013). " Cinnamon
Cinnamon
sparks spicy debate between Danish bakers and food authorities". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Retrieved 26 November 2016.  ^ Ballin, Nicolai Z.; Sørensen, Ann T. (2014). " Coumarin
Coumarin
content in cinnamon containing food products on the Danish market" (PDF). Food Control. 38: 198. doi:10.1016/j.foodcont.2013.10.014. 

Further reading[edit]

Wijesekera R O B, Ponnuchamy S, Jayewardene A L, "Cinnamon" (1975) monograph published by CISIR, Colombo, Sri Lanka

External links[edit]

Look up cinnamon in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.

Wikibooks Cookbook has a recipe/module on

Cinnamon

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Cinnamomum
Cinnamomum
verum.

"In pictures: Sri Lanka's spice of life". BBC News.

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(garlic) Allyl isothiocyanate
Allyl isothiocyanate
(mustard, radish, horseradish, wasabi) AM404 Bradykinin Cannabichromene
Cannabichromene
(cannabis) Cannabidiol
Cannabidiol
(cannabis) Cannabigerol
Cannabigerol
(cannabis) Cinnamaldehyde
Cinnamaldehyde
(cinnamon) CR gas
CR gas
(dibenzoxazepine; DBO) CS gas
CS gas
(2-chlorobenzal malononitrile) Curcumin
Curcumin
(turmeric) Dehydroligustilide (celery) Diallyl disulfide Dicentrine
Dicentrine
( Lindera
Lindera
spp.) Farnesyl thiosalicylic acid Formalin Gingerols (ginger) Hepoxilin A3 Hepoxilin B3 Hydrogen peroxide Icilin Isothiocyanate Ligustilide (celery, Angelica acutiloba) Linalool
Linalool
(Sichuan pepper, thyme) Methylglyoxal Methyl salicylate
Methyl salicylate
(wintergreen) N-Methylmaleimide Nicotine
Nicotine
(tobacco) Oleocanthal
Oleocanthal
(olive oil) Paclitaxel
Paclitaxel
(Pacific yew) Paracetamol
Paracetamol
(acetaminophen) PF-4840154 Phenacyl chloride Polygodial
Polygodial
(Dorrigo pepper) Shogaols (ginger, Sichuan and melegueta peppers) Tear gases Tetrahydrocannabinol
Tetrahydrocannabinol
(cannabis) Thiopropanal S-oxide
Thiopropanal S-oxide
(onion) Umbellulone
Umbellulone
(Umbellularia californica) WIN 55,212-2

Blockers

Dehydroligustilide (celery) Nicotine
Nicotine
(tobacco) Ruthenium red

TRPC

Activators

Adhyperforin
Adhyperforin
(St John's wort) Diacyl glycerol GSK1702934A Hyperforin
Hyperforin
(St John's wort) Substance P

Blockers

DCDPC DHEA-S Flufenamic acid GSK417651A GSK2293017A Meclofenamic acid N-(p-amylcinnamoyl)anthranilic acid Niflumic acid Pregnenolone sulfate Progesterone Pyr3 Tolfenamic acid

TRPM

Activators

ADP-ribose BCTC Calcium
Calcium
(intracellular) Cold Coolact P Cooling Agent 10 CPS-369 Eucalyptol
Eucalyptol
(eucalyptus) Frescolat MGA Frescolat ML Geraniol Hydroxycitronellal Icilin Linalool Menthol
Menthol
(mint) PMD 38 Pregnenolone sulfate Rutamarin (Ruta graveolens) Steviol glycosides (e.g., stevioside) (Stevia rebaudiana) Sweet tastants (e.g., glucose, fructose, sucrose; indirectly) Thio-BCTC WS-3 WS-12 WS-23

Blockers

Capsazepine Clotrimazole DCDPC Flufenamic acid Meclofenamic acid Mefenamic acid N-(p-amylcinnamoyl)anthranilic acid Nicotine
Nicotine
(tobacco) Niflumic acid Ruthenium red Rutamarin (Ruta graveolens) Tolfenamic acid TPPO

TRPML

Activators

MK6-83 PI(3,5)P2 SF-22

TRPP

Activators

Triptolide
Triptolide
(Tripterygium wilfordii)

Blockers

Ruthenium red

TRPV

Activators

2-APB 5',6'-EET 9-HODE 9-oxoODE 12S-HETE 12S-HpETE 13-HODE 13-oxoODE 20-HETE α- Sanshool
Sanshool
(ginger, Sichuan and melegueta peppers) Allicin
Allicin
(garlic) AM404 Anandamide Bisandrographolide (Andrographis paniculata) Camphor
Camphor
(camphor laurel, rosemary, camphorweed, African blue basil, camphor basil) Cannabidiol
Cannabidiol
(cannabis) Cannabidivarin
Cannabidivarin
(cannabis) Capsaicin
Capsaicin
(chili pepper) Carvacrol
Carvacrol
(oregano, thyme, pepperwort, wild bergamot, others) DHEA Diacyl glycerol Dihydrocapsaicin
Dihydrocapsaicin
(chili pepper) Estradiol Eugenol
Eugenol
(basil, clove) Evodiamine
Evodiamine
(Euodia ruticarpa) Gingerols (ginger) GSK1016790A Heat Hepoxilin A3 Hepoxilin B3 Homocapsaicin
Homocapsaicin
(chili pepper) Homodihydrocapsaicin
Homodihydrocapsaicin
(chili pepper) Incensole
Incensole
(incense) Lysophosphatidic acid Low pH (acidic conditions) Menthol
Menthol
(mint) N-Arachidonoyl dopamine N-Oleoyldopamine N-Oleoylethanolamide Nonivamide
Nonivamide
(PAVA) (PAVA spray) Nordihydrocapsaicin
Nordihydrocapsaicin
(chili pepper) Paclitaxel
Paclitaxel
(Pacific yew) Paracetamol
Paracetamol
(acetaminophen) Phorbol esters
Phorbol esters
(e.g., 4α-PDD) Piperine
Piperine
(black pepper, long pepper) Polygodial
Polygodial
(Dorrigo pepper) Probenecid Protons RhTx Rutamarin (Ruta graveolens) Resiniferatoxin
Resiniferatoxin
(RTX) (Euphorbia resinifera/pooissonii) Shogaols (ginger, Sichuan and melegueta peppers) Tetrahydrocannabivarin
Tetrahydrocannabivarin
(cannabis) Thymol
Thymol
(thyme, oregano) Tinyatoxin
Tinyatoxin
(Euphorbia resinifera/pooissonii) Tramadol Vanillin
Vanillin
(vanilla) Zucapsaicin

Blockers

α- Spinasterol
Spinasterol
( Vernonia
Vernonia
tweediana) AMG-517 Asivatrep BCTC Cannabigerol
Cannabigerol
(cannabis) Cannabigerolic acid (cannabis) Cannabigerovarin (cannabis) Cannabinol
Cannabinol
(cannabis) Capsazepine DCDPC DHEA DHEA-S Flufenamic acid GRC-6211 HC-067047 Lanthanum Meclofenamic acid N-(p-amylcinnamoyl)anthranilic acid NGD-8243 Niflumic acid Pregnenolone sulfate RN-1734 RN-9893 Ruthenium red SB-705498 Tivanisiran Tolfenamic acid

See also: Receptor/signaling modulators • Ion channe

.