HOME
The Info List - Christian Social Union In Bavaria


--- Advertisement ---



The Christian Social Union in Bavaria
Bavaria
( CSU – Christlich-Soziale Union in Bayern (help·info)) is a Christian-democratic[2][6] and conservative[2][7][8][9] political party in Germany. The CSU operates only in Bavaria, while its larger counterpart, the Christian Democratic Union (CDU), operates in the other fifteen states of Germany. The CSU has 46 seats in the Bundestag since the 2017 federal election[10] making it the smallest of the seven parties represented. The CSU was founded in some ways as a continuation of the Weimar-era Catholic Bavarian People's Party
Bavarian People's Party
(BVP). At the federal level, the CSU forms a common faction in the Bundestag
Bundestag
with the CDU, which is frequently referred to as the Union Faction (die Unionsfraktion). Until the 2013 federal election, the CDU/CSU
CDU/CSU
formed federal government in coalition with the Free Democratic Party (FDP). In the state of Bavaria, the CSU has governed alone with an absolute majority since 1966 except for 2008–2013, when it was the leading party of a coalition government with the FDP. The CSU differs from the CDU, by being somewhat more conservative in social matters and a bit more interventionist in economic matters.

Bavaria

This article is part of a series on the politics and government of Bavaria

Constitution

Constitution

Executive

Minister-President

Horst Seehofer

Cabinet

Legislature

Landtag

President

Barbara Stamm

Divisions

Administrative regions (Regierungsbezirke) Landkreise/kreisfreie cities Gemeinden (municipalities)

Elections

Legislative: 2003, 2008, 2013

Foreign policy

Politics of Bavaria Politics of Germany European Union
European Union
politics

Other countries Atlas

v t e

The CSU is a member of the European People's Party
European People's Party
(EPP) and the International Democrat Union. The CSU currently has three ministers in the cabinet of Germany
Germany
of the federal government in Berlin including party leader Horst Seehofer
Horst Seehofer
who is Federal Minister of the Interior, while party member Markus Söder
Markus Söder
serves as Minister-President of Bavaria, a position that CSU representatives have held from 1946 to 1954 and again since 1957.

Contents

1 History 2 Relationship with the CDU 3 Leaders

3.1 Party chairmen 3.2 Ministers-President

4 Election results

4.1 Federal parliament (Bundestag) 4.2 European Parliament 4.3 Landtag of Bavaria

5 See also 6 Notes and references 7 External links

History[edit]

Chairman Franz Josef Strauß
Franz Josef Strauß
in 1976

Franz Josef Strauß
Franz Josef Strauß
(1915–1988) had left behind the strongest legacy as a leader of the party, having led the party from 1961 until his death in 1988. His political career in the federal cabinet was unique in that he had served four ministerial posts in the years between 1953 and 1969. From 1978 until his death in 1988, Strauß served as the Minister-president of Bavaria. Strauß was the first leader of the CSU to be a candidate for the German chancellery, in 1980. In the 1980 federal election Strauß ran against the incumbent Helmut Schmidt
Helmut Schmidt
of the Social Democratic Party of Germany
Germany
(SPD), but lost thereafter, as the SPD and the Free Democratic Party (FDP) managed to secure an absolute majority together, forming a Social-liberal coalition. The CSU has led the Bavarian state government since it came into existence in 1946, save from 1954 to 1957 when the SPD formed a state government in coalition with the Bavaria
Bavaria
Party and the state branches of the GB/BHE and FDP. Before the 2008 elections in Bavaria, the CSU perennially achieved absolute majorities at the state level by itself. This level of dominance is unique among Germany's 16 states. Edmund Stoiber took over the CSU leadership in 1999. He ran for Chancellor of Germany
Germany
in 2002, but his preferred CDU/CSU–FDP coalition lost against the SPD candidate Gerhard Schröder's SPD-Green alliance. In the 2003 Bavarian state election, the CSU won 60.7% of the vote and 124 of 180 seats in the state parliament. This was the first time any party had won a 2/3 majority in a German state parliament.[11] The Economist later suggested that this exceptional result was due to a backlash against Schröder's government in Berlin.[12] The CSU's popularity declined in subsequent years. Stoiber stepped down from the posts of Minister-President and CSU chairman in September 2007. A year later, the CSU lost its majority in the 2008 Bavarian state election, with its vote share dropping from 60.7% to 43.4%. The CSU remained in power by forming a coalition with the Free Democratic Party. In the 2009 general election, the CSU received only 42.5% of the vote in Bavaria
Bavaria
in the 2009 election, which constitutes its weakest showing in the party's history. The CSU made gains in the 2013 Bavarian state election and the 2013 federal election, which were held a week apart in September 2013. The CSU regained their majority in the Bavarian Landtag and remained in government in Berlin. They have three ministers in Angela Merkel's current cabinet: Christian Schmidt (Minister of Food and Agriculture), Alexander Dobrindt
Alexander Dobrindt
(Minister of Transport and Digital Infrastructure) and Gerd Müller (Minister for Economic Cooperation and Development). Relationship with the CDU[edit] The CSU is the sister party of the Christian Democratic Union (CDU).[13] Together, they are called "The Union".[13] The CSU operates only within Bavaria, and the CDU operates in all other states, but not Bavaria. While virtually independent,[14] at the federal level, the parties form a common CDU/CSU
CDU/CSU
faction. No Chancellor has ever come from the CSU, although Strauß and Edmund Stoiber
Edmund Stoiber
were CDU/CSU candidates for Chancellor in the 1980 federal election and the 2002 federal election, respectively, which were both won by the Social Democratic Party of Germany
Germany
(SPD). Below the federal level, the parties are entirely independent.[15] Since its formation, the CSU has been more conservative than the CDU.[7] The CSU and the state of Bavaria
Bavaria
decided not to sign the Grundgesetz
Grundgesetz
of the Federal Republic of Germany, as they could not agree with the division of Germany
Germany
into two states, after World War II. Although Bavaria, like all German states, has a separate police and justice system (distinctive and non-federal), the CSU has actively participated in all political affairs of the German Parliament, the German Government, the German Bundesrat, the parliamentary elections of the German President, the European Parliament, and meetings with Gorbachev in Russia. Leaders[edit] Party chairmen[edit]

Chairman From To

1st Josef Müller 17 December 1945 28 May 1949

2nd Hans Ehard 28 May 1949 22 January 1955

3rd Hanns Seidel 22 January 1955 16 February 1961

4th Franz Josef Strauß 18 March 1961 3 October 1988

5th Theodor Waigel 16 November 1988 16 January 1999

6th Edmund Stoiber 16 January 1999 29 September 2007

7th Erwin Huber 29 September 2007 25 October 2008

8th Horst Seehofer 25 October 2008 Present day

Ministers-President[edit] The CSU has contributed eleven of the twelve Ministers-President of Bavaria
Bavaria
since 1945, with only Wilhelm Hoegner (1945–46, 1954–57) of the SPD also holding the office.

Minister-President From To

Fritz Schäffer 28 May 1945 28 September 1945

Hans Ehard
Hans Ehard
(1st time) 21 December 1946 14 December 1954

Hanns Seidel 16 October 1957 22 January 1960

Hans Ehard
Hans Ehard
(2nd time) 26 January 1960 11 December 1962

Alfons Goppel 11 December 1962 6 November 1978

Franz Josef Strauss 6 November 1978 3 October 1988

Max Streibl 19 October 1988 27 May 1993

Edmund Stoiber 28 May 1993 30 September 2007

Günther Beckstein 9 October 2007 27 October 2008

Horst Seehofer 27 October 2008 13 March 2018

Markus Söder 16 March 2018 Present day

Election results[edit] Federal parliament (Bundestag)[edit]

Election year # of constituency votes # of party list votes % of party list votes # of overall seats won +/–

1949

1,380,448 5.8

24 / 402

1953 2,450,286 2,427,387 8.8

52 / 509

28

1957 3,186,150 3,133,060 10.5

55 / 519

3

1961 3,104,742 3,014,471 9.6

50 / 521

5

1965 3,204,648 3,136,506 9.6

49 / 518

1

1969 3,094,176 3,115,652 9.5

49 / 518

0

1972 3,620,625 3,615,183 9.72

48 / 518

1

1976 4,008,514 4,027,499 10.6

53 / 518

5

1980 3,941,365 3,908,459 10.3

52 / 519

1

1983 4,318,800 4,140,865 10.6

53 / 520

1

1987 3,859,244 3,715,827 9.8

49 / 519

4

1990 3,423,904 3,302,980 7.1

51 / 662

2

1994 3,657,627 3,427,196 7.3

50 / 672

1

1998 3,602,472 3,324,480 6.8

47 / 669

3

2002 4,311,178 4,315,080 9.0

58 / 603

11

2005 3,889,990 3,494,309 7.4

46 / 614

12

2009 3,191,000 2,830,238 6.5

45 / 622

1

2013 3,544,079 3,243,569 7.4

56 / 631

11

2017 3,255,604 2,869,744 6.2

46 / 709

10

European Parliament[edit]

Election year # of overall votes % of overall vote # of overall seats won +/–

1979 2,817,120 10.1 (#3)

8 / 81

1984 2,109,130 8.5 (#3)

7 / 81

1

1989 2,326,277 8.2 (#4)

7 / 81

0

1994 2,393,374 6.8 (#4)

8 / 99

1

1999 2,540,007 9.4 (#4)

10 / 99

2

2004 2,063,900 8.0 (#4)

9 / 99

1

2009 1,896,762 7.2 (#6)

8 / 99

1

2014 1,567,258 5.3 (#6)

5 / 96

3

Landtag of Bavaria[edit]

Election year # of constituency votes # of party list votes % of overall votes # of overall seats won +/– Government

1946

1,593,908 52.2

104 / 180

CSU - SPD

1950 1,264,993 1,262,377 27.4

64 / 204

40 CSU - SPD

1954 1,855,995 1,835,959 37.9

83 / 204

19 SPD - BP - FDP - BHE

1958 2,101,645 2,091,259 45.5

101 / 204

18 CSU - FDP - BHE

1962 2,343,169 2,320,359 47.5

108 / 204

7 CSU - BP

1966 2,549,610 2,524,732 48.1

110 / 204

2 CSU Majority

1970 3,205,170 3,139,429 56.4

124 / 204

14 CSU Majority

1974 3,520,065 3,481,486 62.0

132 / 204

8 CSU Majority

1978 3,394,096 3,387,995 59.1

129 / 204

3 CSU Majority

1982 3,557,068 3,534,375 58.2

133 / 204

4 CSU Majority

1986 3,142,094 3,191,640 55.7

128 / 204

5 CSU Majority

1990 3,007,566 3,085,948 54.9

127 / 204

1 CSU Majority

1994 3,063,635 3,100,253 52.8

120 / 204

7 CSU Majority

1998 3,168,996 3,278,768 52.9

123 / 204

3 CSU Majority

2003 3,050,456 3,167,408 60.6

124 / 180

1 CSU Majority

2008 2,267,521 2,336,439 43.4

92 / 187

32 CSU - FDP

2013 2,754,256 2,882,169 47.7

101 / 180

9 CSU Majority

See also[edit]

List of Christian Social Union of Bavaria
Bavaria
politicians Politics of Germany

Notes and references[edit]

^ "Mitgliederzahlen: SPD baut Vorsprung gegenüber CDU aus". Der Spiegel. 16 August 2012. Retrieved 2013-08-16.  ^ a b c Parties and Elections in Europe: The database about parliamentary elections and political parties in Europe, by Wolfram Nordsieck ^ Christina Boswell; Dan Hough (2009). Politicizing migration: Opportunity or liability for the centre-right in Germany. Immigration and Integration Policy in Europe: Why Politics – and the Centre-Right – matter. Routledge. pp. 18, 21.  ^ Klaus Detterbeck (2012). Multi-Level Party Politics in Western Europe. Palgrave Macmillan. p. 105.  ^ Margret Hornsteiner; Thomas Saalfeld (2014). Parties and the Party System. Developments in German Politics. Palgrave Macmillan. p. 80.  ^ Hans Slomp (2011). Europe, a Political Profile: An American Companion to European Politics. ABC-CLIO. p. 364. ISBN 978-0-313-39181-1.  ^ a b Budge, Ian; Robertson, David; Hearl, Derek (1987). Ideology, Strategy, and Party Change: Spatial Analyses of Post-war Election Programmes in 19 Democracies. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. p. 296. ISBN 9780521306485.  ^ Paul Statham; Hans-Jörg Trenz (2012). The Politicization of Europe: Contesting the Constitution in the Mass Media. Routledge. p. 120. ISBN 978-0-415-58466-1.  ^ Antje Ellermann (2009). States Against Migrants: Deportation in Germany
Germany
and the United States. Cambridge University Press. p. 58. ISBN 978-0-521-51568-9.  ^ Officer, The Federal Returning. "Results - The Federal Returning Officer". www.bundeswahlleiter.de.  ^ Stoiber – Dominant But Not Omnipotent Archived 3 October 2008 at the Wayback Machine. American Institute for contemporary German studies, author: Prof. Clayton Clemens, accessed: 7 June 2008 ^ The Economist: Old soldiers march into the unknown ^ a b "A Quick Guide to Germany's Political Parties". Der Spiegel. 25 September 2009. Retrieved 1 December 2012.  ^ The Economist
The Economist
(1983). Political Europe. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. p. 16. ISBN 978-0-521-27793-8.  ^ Solsten, Eric (1999). Germany: A Country Study. Quezon: DANE Publishing. p. 375. ISBN 978-0-521-27793-8. 

External links[edit]

Christlich-Soziale Union – Official site (English page) https://web.archive.org/web/20090413234940/http://allstates-flag.com/fotw/flags/de%7Dcsu.html https://web.archive.org/web/20090414155018/http://www.deutschland.de/link.php?lang=2&category2=190&link_id=1002

v t e

Political parties in Germany
Germany

Parties represented in the European Parliament
European Parliament
and in the Bundestag

AfD (92) Blue
Blue
Party (1) CDU (200) CSU (46) FDP (80) SPD (153) The Greens (67) The Left (69)

Other parties represented in the European Parliament* or in state parliaments**

Citizens in Rage** Ecological Democratic Party* Family Party** Free Voters*/** LKR*/** NPD* Die PARTEI* Pirate Party* South Schleswig Voters' Association**

Minor parties (without representation above district level)

Anarchist Pogo Party Basic Income Alliance Bavaria
Bavaria
Party Centre Party Christian Centre Civil Rights Movement Solidarity Communist Party (Roter Morgen) Communist Party (1990) Feminist Party Die Friesen Human Environment Animal Protection German Communist Party German Freedom Party German Social Union Marxist–Leninist Party New Liberals Party for Health Research Party of Bible-abiding Christians Party of Reason Pro Germany
Germany
Citizens' Movement The Republicans Revolutionary Socialist League Social Equality Party Statt Party V-Partei³

Portal:Politics List of political parties Politics of Germany

v t e

European People's Party
European People's Party
(EPP)

Parliamentary group: European People's Party
European People's Party
Group

Parties

Member parties (EU)

ÖVP cdH CD&V GERB/ГЕРБ DSB/ДСБ DP/ДП SDS/СДС HDZ HSS DISY/ΔΗ.ΣΥ. KDU–ČSL TOP 09 K D IRL Kok./Saml. LR CDU CSU ND/Ν.Δ. Fidesz KDNP FG FI AP UdC PpI V TS-LKD CSV PN CDA PO PSL CDS PPD-PSD PNL PMP UDMR/RMDSz KDH MOST-HÍD SDKÚ-DS SMK-MKP NSi SDS SLS PP UDC KD M

Associated parties (non-EU)

VMRO - DPMNE/ВМРО - ДПМНЕ H SNS CVP-PDC-PPD-PCD

Observer parties

PD HHK/ՀՀԿ OEK/ՕԵԿ Heritage/Ժառանգություն BNF/БНФ AHP/АГП HDZ BiH PDP SDA HDZ 1990 KD ENM/ენმ LDK SVP PATT PLDM KrF PDCS VMSZ Batkivshchyna/Батьківщина NRU/НРУ UDAR/УДАР

Party Presidents

Leo Tindemans Piet Bukman Jacques Santer Wilfried Martens Joseph Daul

European Parliament Group Presidents

Maan Sassen Pierre Wigny Alain Poher Joseph Illerhaus Hans Lücker Alfred Bertrand Egon Klepsch Paolo Barbi Egon Klepsch Leo Tindemans Wilfried Martens Hans-Gert Pöttering Joseph Daul Manfred Weber see European Parliament

European Commissioners

José Manuel Barroso
José Manuel Barroso
(President) Andris Piebalgs
Andris Piebalgs
(Development) Jyrki Katainen
Jyrki Katainen
(Economic and Monetary Affairs and the Euro) Michel Barnier
Michel Barnier
(Internal Market and Services) Algirdas Šemeta
Algirdas Šemeta
(Taxation and Customs Union, Audit and Anti-Fraud) Tonio Borg
Tonio Borg
(Health and Consumer Policy) Jacek Dominik (Financial Programming and the Budget) Kristalina Georgieva
Kristalina Georgieva
(International Cooperation, Humanitarian Aid and Crisis Response) Günther Oettinger
Günther Oettinger
(Energy) Johannes Hahn
Johannes Hahn
(Regional Policy) Connie Hedegaard
Connie Hedegaard
(Climate Action) Dacian Cioloș
Dacian Cioloș
(Agriculture and Rural Development) see Barroso II Commission

Heads of government at the European Council

Nicos Anastasiades
Nicos Anastasiades
(Cyprus) Alexander Stubb
Alexander Stubb
(Finland) Angela Merkel
Angela Merkel
(Germany) Antonis Samaras
Antonis Samaras
(Greece) Viktor Orbán
Viktor Orbán
(Hungary) Enda Kenny
Enda Kenny
(Ireland) Laimdota Straujuma
Laimdota Straujuma
(Latvia) Pedro Passos Coelho
Pedro Passos Coelho
(Portugal) Traian Băsescu
Traian Băsescu
(Romania) Mariano Rajoy
Mariano Rajoy
(Spain) see European Council

Eurofoundation: Wilfried Martens
Wilfried Martens
Centre for European Studies

v t e

International Democrat Union

Alliance of European Conservatives and Reformists Asia Pacific Democrat Union Caribbean Democrat Union Democrat Union of Africa European Democrat Union European People's Party International Women's Democrat Union International Young Democrat Union Union of Latin American Parties

Member parties

     

Democratic Party Liberal Party Austrian People's Party National Independence Party Social Democrat Movement Party of Democratic Action Democrats Union of Democratic Forces Conservative Party Independent Democratic Union National Renewal Kuomintang Conservative Party Democratic Union Democratic Rally Civic Democratic Party Conservative People's Party National Progressive Force

Social Christian Party Nationalist Republican Alliance Pro Patria and Res Publica Union National Coalition Party The Republicans Christian-Democratic Movement United National Movement Christian Democratic Union Christian Social Union in Bavaria New Patriotic Party New Democracy Unionist Party National Party Fidesz Independence Party Bharatiya Janata Party National Awakening Party Jamaica
Jamaica
Labour Party VMRO–DPMNE

Maldivian Democratic Party Liberal Democratic Party Democratic Party National Party Conservative Party Conservative Party Christian People's Party CDS–PP Democratic Party of Serbia Slovenian Democratic Party Liberty Korea Party People's Party United National Party Moderate Party Forum for Democratic Change Conservative Party Republican Party Project Venezuela

Christian democracy portal Conservatism
Conservatism
portal Germany
Germany
portal

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 169808522 LCCN: n50000990 ISNI: 0000 0001 2190 4488 GND: 2006707-0 BNF:

.