HOME
        TheInfoList






The Chevrolet Chevy II/Nova is a small automobile manufactured by Chevrolet, and produced in five generations for the 1962 through 1979, and 1985 through 1988 model years. Nova was the top model in the Chevy II lineup through 1968. The Chevy II nameplate was dropped after 1968, with Nova becoming the nameplate for all of the 1969 through 1979 models. Built on the X-body platform, the Nova was replaced by the 1980 Chevrolet Citation introduced in the spring of 1979. The Nova nameplate returned in 1985, produced through 1988 as a S-car based, NUMMI manufactured, subcompact based on the front wheel drive, Japan home-based Toyota Sprinter.

[26] and sold exclusively through Canadian PontiacBuickGMC dealerships. Due to the Canadian tariffs on imports put into place many years before, there was no compact car available to the Canadian Pontiac dealer. The U.S built Pontiac Tempest, which started production in 1961 was not available initially to the Canadian buyer – import duties would have made it too expensive to compete in the thrifty Canadian compact market. The Acadian was introduced to give the unhappy Canadian Pontiac – Buick dealer a car he could sell in the growing compact market. During its entire run, the Acadian offered the same body styles as were offered in the Chevy II/Nova, and the cars were virtually the same, save minor trim and badging details.

Originally offered in top-line Beaumont and base Invader trim, the top trim line was renamed Canso in anticipation of the Chevelle-based Acadian Beaumont which would arrive for 1964. A sporty model, the Sport Deluxe (or "SD"), was equivalent to the US-market Nova SS, and it also featured bucket seats, deluxe exterior trim, and special badging.

Base price for the 1966 Acadian was $2,507. The 327-350 hp (L79) was available; 85 were produced. The Acadian line was now down to six models; 7,366 Acadians were sold in 1966.[27] It survived until mid-1971, after which it was replaced by the Pontiac Ventura II.

In 1962 Argentina offered the 1962-64-style Chevy II as the Chevrolet 400 through 1974, and the 1968–72 Nova as the Chevrolet Chevy from late 1969 through 1978, both models overlapping for several years. An upscale model (Chevy Super) was produced from about 1973 with different trim, front turn indicators and taillights, a much better appointed interior with plastic "wood" trim, named Malibu with no relation to the American Chevelle. All engines were inline-sixes. The first and second generations were available, depending on year and model, with the 194 cu in (3.18 L), 230 cu in (3.8 L) and 250 cu in (4.1 L) engines.

The third generation ("Chevys") were produced with the 230 cu in (3.8 L) and 250 cu in (4.1 L) engines with specially tuned carburetors for sporting models. The "Chevy" metal emblem for the third generation had the same font as the "Nova" emblem of 1968–1974 American Novas, and was, for the first few years, in the rearmost section of both rear fenders. Later, it was moved to the rearmost section of both front fenders, as it was in the American cars from 1969. Sidemarker lights were not mandatory and changed much during the production run, from being deleted, to leaving a small chrome plate, to the same light as in the American cars. Rear deck emblems just said "CHEVROLET" in chrome letters, obviating the typical "Model by Chevrolet" used in the American cars at the time. The hood emblem was similar to the 1969 American Novas: the bow tie, either in blue or just chrome.

Initially, t

The third generation ("Chevys") were produced with the 230 cu in (3.8 L) and 250 cu in (4.1 L) engines with specially tuned carburetors for sporting models. The "Chevy" metal emblem for the third generation had the same font as the "Nova" emblem of 1968–1974 American Novas, and was, for the first few years, in the rearmost section of both rear fenders. Later, it was moved to the rearmost section of both front fenders, as it was in the American cars from 1969. Sidemarker lights were not mandatory and changed much during the production run, from being deleted, to leaving a small chrome plate, to the same light as in the American cars. Rear deck emblems just said "CHEVROLET" in chrome letters, obviating the typical "Model by Chevrolet" used in the American cars at the time. The hood emblem was similar to the 1969 American Novas: the bow tie, either in blue or just chrome.

Initially, the Argentinian Chevy used very similar trim to the American counterpart, while more luxurious – a "big" car by local standards. They there standard models without accessories and were often used for taxi service. The interior layout remained the American 1968 version for the entire run. The ignition switch remained dash mounted as the US-mandated steering lock was not required in Argentina. Power steering became available at the end of the production run. V8s versions weren't produced: Power windows were not available, tinted windows were darker than American versions, and the darker band on the upper edge of the windshield was not present.

Very popular accessories were vinyl roofs, rally wheels, sport steering wheels, bucket seats with high backs, and tufted leatherette upholstery (many sedans were produced this way). Interiors were usually black. Steering wheels and instrument panels were only black for many years, as were seatbelts. American style interior color coordination was absent. The last year of the Nova in Argentina is called locally "Opus 78" (because the slogan of the publicity) and it was the most equipped, adding simil-leather bucket seats, air-conditioning, power steering, electric antenna, and a new dashboard with integrated central console.

Their Super Sports, "SS" counterparts were both coupés and 4-door sedans, the latter of which was unheard of in the US prior to the introduction of the 1994 Impala SS. In fact, a majority were fitted with inline-sixes coupled to a ZF manual transmission with floor lever 4 speeds, a single two-barrel Holey 2300 RX 7214-A carburetor giving out 168 hp (125 kW) and a sporting exhaust note. Corsa, a local auto publication magazine tested a Chevy Coupé SS Serie 2 and obtained a 0–100 km/h (0–62 mph) time of 11.1 seconds.

A popular but false urban legend claims that the vehicle sold poorly in Spanish-speaking countries because no va literally translates to "it doesn't go". This has since been debunked, however, as Nova (one word) means "nova" in Spanish just as in English. In fact, the car actually sold quite well in Mexico, as well as many Central and South American countries. Nova was also the name of a successful brand of gasoline sold in Mexico at the time, further proving that the name confusion was not a problem.[28]

A similar story has been told of the British Vauxhall Nova (a small car that was completely unrelated to the Chevrolet Nova aside from both being built by GM). According to the story, it had t

A similar story has been told of the British Vauxhall Nova (a small car that was completely unrelated to the Chevrolet Nova aside from both being built by GM). According to the story, it had to be sold as an Opel Corsa in Spain due to the same alleged language confusion. This version of the story is also a myth, as the Spanish-market version of the car was known as a Corsa from the outset. In fact, the car was called the Corsa in all markets except the United Kingdom.

There was also a Nova kit car designed and built by A.D.D. from 1971. It lost a court case with GM Vauxhall over the use of the name, after it was shown that GM's Chevrolet had a prior claim.

From its introduction in 1962, the Chevy II/Nova was a big seller and the '62 was available in 1/25 scale as a promotional model, as well an assembly kit, from AMT. Both the hardtop and convertible were available. AMT continued to offer kits of the Nova in later years, and some of these are still current and available at reasonable prices including the 1966, 1972, and 1976 models. The original '63 Nova wagon was available as a Craftsman promo kit. It was molded in grey and had a fixed hood and no engine. They also offered the '75 as the "Nova Pro Stock", featuring a large hood scoop and custom wheels. The '76, and more recently, the '79 Nova models have been re-issued. The '79 kit is current, molded in black plastic, and can be built either stock, or as a souped-up police cruiser.

Other model manufacturers offer Novas from other years, including Revell, which offers both a '69 Nova SS, and COPO coupe. Trumpeter offers a 1963 Nova Super Sport in Revell, which offers both a '69 Nova SS, and COPO coupe. Trumpeter offers a 1963 Nova Super Sport in 1/25 scale. Both the hardtop and convertible are available, and these kits are extremely detailed.

In diecast, the '63 Nova SS was modelled in 1:18 scale by Sun Star. These came in a variety of colors and were available in both hardtop and convertible body styles. Some wore whitewall tires. In the same diecast 1:18 scale, ERTL offered a '66 Nova SS hardtop with a 327 V8, '69 Nova SS396 and '70 Nova SS396, in a variety of colors and wheels. Peachtree made '68 and '69 Novas in detailed 1:18 scale. Although detailed, these do not feature opening doors or trunk. The hood does open, however, to reveal a detailed Chevrolet V8 engine.

Pro-Line currently offers a '69 Nova body for the Traxxas Slash, a popular radio-controlled car platform.[29] The body is roughly 1/8 scale, and like most Slash bodies, is made of vacuum-formed clear Lexan, intended to be painted from the inside to prevent scratches. (Several companies offer specialized spray paints for this purpose, as traditional spray paint does not stick to Lexan.) Although the Slash is primarily an off-road vehicle, the Pro-Line body is intended to fit a Slash that has been heavily modified for miniature drag racing. However, it can also be made to fit other Slash setups, or other R/C vehicle platforms with the same wheelbase and body mounting system as the Slash.