HOME
The Info List - Chernobyl





Chernobyl
Chernobyl
or Chornobyl (/tʃɜːrˈnoʊbəl/; Ukrainian: Чорно́биль, translit. Chornobyl′, Ukrainian pronunciation: [tʃɔrˈnɔbɪlʲ]; Russian: Черно́быль, tr. Chernobyl′, IPA: [t͡ɕɪrˈnobɨlʲ]; Belarusian: Чарно́быль, translit. Charnobyl′, Belarusian pronunciation: [ʈʂarˈnɔbɨlʲ]) is a city in the restricted Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
situated in the Ivankiv Raion
Ivankiv Raion
of northern Kiev
Kiev
Oblast, near Ukraine's border with Belarus. Chernobyl
Chernobyl
is about 90 kilometres (56 mi) northeast of Kiev, and approximately 140 kilometres (87 mi) southwest of the Belarusian city of Gomel
Gomel
and 16 km from Ukraines border with Belarus. The city was the administrative center of Chernobyl Raion
Chernobyl Raion
(district) from 1923 until it was disestablished in 1988. Before its evacuation, the city had about 14,000 residents.[1] As of 2017[update], the city has a population of 690. The city was evacuated on 27 April 1986, 30 hours after the Chernobyl disaster at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant
Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant
which was the most disastrous nuclear accident in history. The power plant was within the Chernobyl Raion
Chernobyl Raion
district. Pripyat, a city larger and closer to the power plant than Chernobyl, had been built as home for the power plant workers. After the accident, administration of the Chernobyl
Chernobyl
Raion district was transferred to the neighboring Ivankiv Raion. The city of Slavutych, built for those evacuated from Pripyat, received the population relocated from Chernobyl. Today Chernobyl
Chernobyl
is mostly a ghost town, but a small number of people still reside in houses marked with signs stating: "Owner of this house lives here".[2] Workers on watch and administrative personnel of the Zone of Alienation are stationed in the city on a long-term basis. There are two general stores and a hotel for tourists.

Contents

1 History

1.1 Name origin 1.2 History

2 Chernobyl
Chernobyl
nuclear reactor disaster

2.1 Chernobylite

3 Personalities 4 See also 5 References 6 External links

History[edit] Name origin[edit] The city's name is the same as a Ukrainian name for Artemisia vulgaris, mugwort or common wormwood, which is Ukrainian: чорнобиль, translit. chornóbyl’ (or more commonly Ukrainian: полин звичайний, translit. polýn zvycháynyy, lit. 'common artemisia').[3] The name is inherited from Proto-Slavic *čьrnobylъ or Proto-Slavic *čьrnobyl, a compound of Proto-Slavic *čьrnъ 'black' + Proto-Slavic *bylь 'grass', the parts related to Ukrainian: чорний, translit. chórnyy, lit. 'black' and Ukrainian: било, translit. byló, lit. 'stalk', so named in distinction to the lighter-stemmed wormwood A. absinthium.[3] History[edit]

Chernobyl
Chernobyl
area as seen from the Russian space station Mir
Mir
in 1997

Chernobyl
Chernobyl
was originally part of the land of Kievan Rus′. The first known mention of Chernobyl
Chernobyl
is from an 1193 charter, which describes it as a hunting-lodge of Knyaz
Knyaz
Rurik Rostislavich.[4][5] In the 13th century, it was a crown village of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania. The village was granted to Filon Kmita, a captain of the royal cavalry, as a fiefdom in 1566. The province where Chernobyl
Chernobyl
is located was transferred to the Kingdom of Poland in 1569, and later annexed by the Russian Empire
Russian Empire
in 1793.[6] Prior to the 20th century, Chernobyl
Chernobyl
was inhabited by Ukrainian, some Polish peasants and a relatively large number of Jews.[citation needed] Jews
Jews
were brought to Chernobyl
Chernobyl
by Filon Kmita, during the Polish campaign of colonization. After 1596, the traditionally Eastern Orthodox Ukrainian peasantry of the district were forcibly converted, by Poland, to the Greek Catholic
Greek Catholic
Uniate religion.[citation needed] Many of these converts returned to Eastern Orthodoxy
Eastern Orthodoxy
after the Partitions of Poland.[citation needed] In 1626, during the Counter-reformation, the Dominican church and monastery were founded by Lukasz Sapieha. A group of Old Catholics opposed the decrees of the Council of Trent.[clarification needed] In 1832, following the failed Polish November Uprising, the Dominican monastery was sequestrated. The church of the Old Catholics
Old Catholics
was disbanded in 1852.[4] In the second half of the 18th century, Chernobyl
Chernobyl
became a major center of Hasidic Judaism. The Chernobyl
Chernobyl
Hasidic dynasty had been founded by Rabbi Menachem Nachum Twersky. The Jewish population suffered greatly from pogroms in October 1905 and in March–April 1919; many Jews
Jews
were killed or robbed at the instigation of the Russian nationalist Black Hundreds. When the Twersky Dynasty left Chernobyl
Chernobyl
in 1920, it ceased to exist as a centre of Hasidism. Chernobyl
Chernobyl
had a population of 10,800 in 1898, including 7,200 Jews. Chernobyl
Chernobyl
was occupied in World War I[by whom?]; Ukrainians
Ukrainians
and Bolsheviks
Bolsheviks
fought over the city in the ensuing Civil War. In the Polish–Soviet War
Polish–Soviet War
of 1919–20, Chernobyl
Chernobyl
was taken first by the Polish Army and then by cavalry of the Red Army. From 1921 onwards, it was incorporated into the Ukrainian SSR.[4] Between 1929 and 1933, Chernobyl
Chernobyl
suffered from killings during Stalin's collectivization campaign. It was also affected by the famine that resulted from Stalin's policies.[citation needed] The Polish community of Chernobyl
Chernobyl
was deported to Kazakhstan
Kazakhstan
in 1936, during the Frontier Clearances. During World War II, Chernobyl
Chernobyl
was occupied by the German Army from 25 August 1941 to 17 November 1943. The Jewish community was murdered during the Nazi occupation of 1941–44.[4] Twenty years later, the area was chosen as the site of the first nuclear power station to be built on Ukrainian soil. The Duga-3 over-the-horizon radar array, several miles outside of Chernobyl, was the origin of the Russian Woodpecker; it was designed as part of an anti-ballistic missile early warning radar network. With the dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1991, Chernobyl
Chernobyl
remained part of Ukraine. Chernobyl
Chernobyl
nuclear reactor disaster[edit]

A grocery store in Chernobyl. The words on the window read "Café Bar".

Main article: Chernobyl
Chernobyl
disaster On 26 April 1986, Reactor No. 4 at the Chernobyl
Chernobyl
Nuclear Power Plant exploded after tests were done on the reactor improperly and lost control. Chernobyl
Chernobyl
city was evacuated soon after the disaster. The base of operations for the administration and monitoring of the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone was moved from Pripyat
Pripyat
to Chernobyl. Chernobyl currently contains offices for the State Agency of Ukraine
Ukraine
on the Exclusion Zone Management and accommodations for visitors. Apartment blocks have been repurposed as accommodations for employees of the State Agency. The length of time that workers may spend within the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
is restricted by regulations that have been implemented to limit exposure to radiation. The city has become overgrown and many types of animals live there. In fact, according to census information that was collected over an extended period of time, it is estimated that more mammals live there now than before the disaster.[7] In 2003, the United Nations Development Programme
United Nations Development Programme
launched a project, called the Chernobyl Recovery and Development Programme
Chernobyl Recovery and Development Programme
(CRDP), for the recovery of the affected areas.[8] The program, initiated in February 2002, based its activities on the Human Consequences of the Chernobyl
Chernobyl
Nuclear Accident report recommendations. The main goal of the CRDP's activities is supporting the efforts of the Government of Ukraine
Ukraine
to mitigate the long-term social, economic, and ecological consequences of the Chernobyl
Chernobyl
disaster. CRDP works in the four areas of Ukraine
Ukraine
that have been most affected by the Chernobyl
Chernobyl
nuclear accident: Kiev
Kiev
Oblast, Zhytomyrska Oblast, partially Kiev, Chernihivska Oblast, and Rivne Oblast. Chernobylite[edit] Main article: Chernobylite Chernobylite
Chernobylite
is the name cited by two media sources[9][10] for highly radioactive, unusual and potentially novel crystalline formations found at the Chernobyl
Chernobyl
power plant after the meltdown. These formations were found in the basement below Reactor No. 4 during an investigation into missing reactor fuel.[11] Personalities[edit]

Alexander Krasnoshchyokov
Alexander Krasnoshchyokov
(1880–1937), politician Vladimir Pravik
Vladimir Pravik
(1962–1986), firefighter and liquidator Aaron Twersky of Chernobyl (1784–1871), rabbi Arnold Lakhovsky
Arnold Lakhovsky
(1880–1937), artist

See also[edit]

Chernobyl
Chernobyl
liquidators Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant
Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant
Exclusion Zone Battle of Czarnobyl (1920) List of Chernobyl-related articles

References[edit]

^ Mould, Richard. "Evacuation zones and populations". Chernobyl Record. Bristol, England: Institute of Physics. p. 105. ISBN 0-7503-0670-X.  ^ Withington, John (13 December 2013). Disaster!: A History of Earthquakes, Floods, Plagues, and Other Catastrophes. Skyhorse Publishing Company, Incorporated. p. 328. ISBN 978-1-62636-708-1.  ^ a b Etymology from O. S. Melnychuk, ed. (1982–2012), Etymolohichnyi slovnyk ukraïnsʹkoï movy (Etymological dictionary of the Ukrainian language) v 7, Kyiv: Naukova Dumka. ^ a b c d Norman Davies, Europe: A History, Oxford University Press, 1996, ISBN 0-19-820171-0 ^ Chernobyl
Chernobyl
ancient history and maps. ^ Davies, Norman (1995) "Chernobyl", The Sarmatian Review, vol. 15, No. 1. ^ "Wild mammals 'have returned' to Chernobyl" ( BBC News
BBC News
– Science & Environment) ^ CRDP: Chernobyl Recovery and Development Programme
Chernobyl Recovery and Development Programme
(United Nations Development Program) ^ " BBC News
BBC News
Chernobyl
Chernobyl
– Containing Chernobyl?". news.bbc.co.uk.  ^ "Alsos: Suicide Mission to Chernobyl". alsos.wlu.edu.  ^ "YouTube". www.youtube.com. 

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Chernobyl.

Look up chernobyl in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.

United Nations Chernobyl Recovery and Development Programme
Chernobyl Recovery and Development Programme
See the actions of the Chernobyl Recovery and Development Programme
Chernobyl Recovery and Development Programme
towards Chernobyl-affected area and its population. Chernobyl
Chernobyl
and Pripyat
Pripyat
22 years later Chornobyl city information at the Verkhovna Rada Chernobylgallery.com – Photographs of Chernobyl EU To Extend Checks On Food From Chernobyl
Chernobyl
Area History of Jewish Community in Chernobyl 25 years of satellite imagery over Chernobyl
Chernobyl
404 Photographs of Chernobyl
Chernobyl
2015 Polish Game Developer Creates an Eerily Realistic Virtual Tour of Chornobyl Nuclear Downturn: How Can Fukushima and Chernobyl
Chernobyl
Compare and Contrast?

Coordinates: 51°16′20″N 30°13′27″E / 51.27222°N 30.22417°E / 51.27222; 30.22417

v t e

Populated places of the Chernobyl
Chernobyl
Exclusion Zone

Raions1

Chornobyl (former) Ivankiv Luhyny Narodychi Ovruch Poliske

Cities

Chernobyl Pripyat

Urban-type settlements

Poliske Vilcha

Villages

Andriivka Benivka Bober Bovyshche Buda Buda-Varovychi Budoliubivka Buriakivka Bychky Chapaievka Cherevach Chistohalivka Denisovychi Derevtsi Derkachi Dibrova Dovhyi Lis Fabrykivka Hlynka Horodchan Horodyshche Hrezlia Hriazeve Illintsi Ilovnytsia Ivanivka Kamianka Khryplia Klyvyny Kopachi Korohod Korolivka Kosharivka Koshivka Kotsiubynske Kovshylivka Krasne I Krasne II Kryva Hora Kupuvate Ladyzhychi Leliv Lubianka Lypski Romany Malenivka Mali Klishchi Mali Minky Malynka Martynovychi Masheve Moshchanytsia Motyli Nova Krasnytsia Nove Sharne Novoshepelychi Novosilky Novyi Mir Omelnyky Opachychi Otashiv Paryshiv Pereizd Peremoha Pidchashia Pliutovyshche Poliske Richytsia Rohy Rozizhdzhe Rozsokha Rudky Rudnia-Hrezlianska Rudnia-Illinetska Rudnia-Ososhnia Rudnia-Veresnia Severivka Shevchenkove Shyshelivka Sloboda Sosnivka Stara Krasnytsia Stara Rudnia Stare Sharne Stari Shepelychi Starosillia Stebli Stechanka Stepky Sytivka Tarasy Terekhy Teremtsi Tovstyi Lis Usiv Varovychi Velyki Klishchi Vesniane Vilshanka Volodymyrivka Yampil Yaniv Yasen Zalissia Zamoshnia Zapillia Zholudivka Zhovtneve Zhurba Zvizdal Zymovyshche

1Only portions of these raions (large or small) were affected due to the Chernobyl
Chernobyl
disaster List of places in the PSRER (Belarus)

v t e

Administrative divisions of Kiev
Kiev
Oblast

Administrative center: Kiev

Raions

Baryshivka Bila Tserkva Bohuslav Boryspil Borodianka Brovary Fastiv Ivankiv Kaharlyk Kiev-Sviatoshyn Makariv Myronivka Obukhiv Pereiaslav-Khmelnytskyi Poliske Rokytne Skvyra Stavyshche Tarashcha Tetiiv Vasylkiv Volodarka Vyshhorod Yahotyn Zghurivka

Cities

Regional

Berezan Bila Tserkva Boryspil Brovary Bucha Fastiv Irpin Obukhiv Pereiaslav-Khmelnytskyi Pripyat Rzhyshchiv Slavutych Vasylkiv

District

Bohuslav Boyarka Chernobyl Kaharlyk Myronivka Skvyra Tarashcha Tetiiv Ukrainka Uzyn Vyshhorod Vyshneve Yahotyn

Urban-type settlements Category: Kiev
Kiev
Oblast

v t e

Chernobyl
Chernobyl
disaster

Effects Comparisons

People

Liquidators Samosely List of people involved Deaths due to the disaster

Places

Exclusion Zone

Pripyat

Amusement park Polissya hotel Azure Swimming Pool Avanhard Stadium Palace of Culture Energetik Jupiter Factory Yaniv Station

Chernobyl Duga radar Red Forest List of populated settlements

Power Plant

Sarcophagus New Safe Confinement

Other

Slavutych Dytiatky Ukrainian National Chernobyl
Chernobyl
Museum Polesie State Radioecological Reserve
Polesie State Radioecological Reserve
(list of settlements)

Works

Cultural impact of the Chernobyl
Chernobyl
disaster Documentation and media

Organisations

Chernobyl
Chernobyl
Children International Chernobyl
Chernobyl
Forum Chernobyl
Chernobyl
Recovery and Development Programme Chernobyl
Chernobyl
Shelter Fund Friends of Chernobyl's Children Bellesrad List of Chernobyl-related charities

Related articles

Chernobylite Chernihiv–Ovruch railway

List Category

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 150028504 GND: 4127036-8 BNF: cb1204

.