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The Info List - Charles W. Fairbanks





Charles Warren Fairbanks (May 11, 1852 – June 4, 1918) was an American politician who served as the 26th Vice President of the United States
United States
from 1905 to 1909 and a Senator from Indiana
Indiana
from 1897 to 1905. He was also the Republican vice presidential nominee in the 1916 presidential election. Born in Unionville Center, Ohio, Fairbanks moved to Indianapolis
Indianapolis
after graduating from Ohio
Ohio
Wesleyan University. He became an attorney and railroad financier, working under railroad magnate Jay Gould. Fairbanks delivered the keynote address at the 1896 Republican National Convention and won election to the Senate the following year. In the Senate, he became an adviser of President William McKinley
William McKinley
and served on a commission that helped settle the Alaska
Alaska
boundary dispute. The 1904 Republican National Convention
1904 Republican National Convention
selected Fairbanks as the running mate for President Theodore Roosevelt. As vice president, Fairbanks worked against Roosevelt's progressive policies. Fairbanks unsuccessfully sought the Republican nomination at the 1908 Republican National Convention and backed William Howard Taft
William Howard Taft
in 1912 against Roosevelt. Fairbanks sought the presidential nomination at the 1916 Republican National Convention, but was instead selected as the vice presidential nominee, serving on a ticket with Charles Evans Hughes. In the 1916 election, the Republican ticket lost to the Democratic ticket of President Woodrow Wilson
Woodrow Wilson
and Vice President Thomas R. Marshall.

Contents

1 Early life 2 Early career 3 Senator 4 Vice President 5 Hughes' running mate 6 Death 7 Legacy 8 See also 9 References 10 External links

Early life[edit] Fairbanks was born in a log cabin near Unionville Center, Ohio, the son of Mary Adelaide (Smith) and Loriston Monroe Fairbanks, a wagon-maker.[1] Fairbanks's ancestry traced back to Puritan followers of Oliver Cromwell, with Jonathan Fairbanks
Jonathan Fairbanks
being the first family member to reach America, in 1632. Fairbanks in his youth saw his family's home used as a hiding place for runaway slaves. After attending country schools and working on a farm, Fairbanks attended Ohio
Ohio
Wesleyan University, where he graduated in 1872. While there, Fairbanks was co-editor of the school newspaper with Cornelia Cole, whom he married after both graduated from the school.[2] Early career[edit]

Charles W. Fairbanks
Charles W. Fairbanks
as Vice President of the United States

Fairbanks' first position was as an agent of the Associated Press
Associated Press
in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, reporting on political rallies for Horace Greeley during the 1872 presidential election.[3] He studied law in Pittsburgh before moving to Cleveland, Ohio, where he continued to work for the Associated Press
Associated Press
while attending a semester at Cleveland Law School to complete his legal education. Fairbanks was admitted to the Ohio
Ohio
bar in 1874, and moved to Indianapolis, Indiana. In 1875 he received his master of arts degree from Ohio
Ohio
Wesleyan. During his early years in Indiana, Fairbanks was paid $5,000 a year as manager for the bankrupt Indianapolis, Bloomington and Western Railroad. With the assistance of his uncle, Charles W. Smith, whose connections had helped him obtain the position, Fairbanks was able to become a railroad financier, and served as counsel for millionaire Jay Gould.

Fairbanks in his office

Prior to the 1888 Republican National Convention, federal judge Walter Q. Gresham sought Fairbanks' help in seeking the as a Republican nomination for U.S. President. When Benjamin Harrison
Benjamin Harrison
won the nomination, Fairbanks supported him and made campaign speeches on his behalf. Afterwards, Fairbanks began to take an even greater interest in politics, and made campaign speeches on Harrison's behalf again in the campaign of 1892. In 1893, Fairbanks was a candidate for the United States
United States
Senate, but Democrats controlled the state legislature and reelected incumbent Democrat David Turpie. In 1894, Fairbanks was the most visible organizer and speaker on behalf of Republicans in elections for the state legislature. He was credited with delivering Republican majorities to both the Indiana House of Representatives and Indiana
Indiana
Senate, ensuring that a Republican would be elected to succeed Daniel W. Voorhees
Daniel W. Voorhees
in the United States Senate
United States Senate
at the end of Voorhees' term in 1897. At the 1896 Republican National Convention, Fairbanks was both temporary chairman and keynote speaker, further raising his public profile. Fairbanks was the most likely Republican candidate for Voorhees' seat, and in January 1897 Republican legislators formally chose him as their nominee. On January 19, 1897, Fairbanks was elected to the Senate, and he took his seat on March 4. Senator[edit] During his eight years in the U.S. Senate, Fairbanks served as a key adviser to McKinley during the Spanish–American War
Spanish–American War
and was also the Chairman of the Committee on Immigration and the Committee on Public Buildings and Grounds. In 1898, Fairbanks was appointed a member of the United States
United States
and British Joint High Commission which met in Quebec City
Quebec City
for the adjustment of Canadian questions, including the boundary dispute about Alaska. Vice President[edit]

Fairbanks and Theodore Roosevelt.

Fairbanks was elected Vice President of the United States
Vice President of the United States
in 1904 on the Republican ticket with Theodore Roosevelt
Theodore Roosevelt
and served a four-year term, 1905 to 1909. He became the first vice president to serve a complete term without casting any tie-breaking votes as President of the Senate. Fairbanks, a conservative whom Roosevelt had once labeled a "reactionary machine politician" (and who had been caricatured as a "Wall Street Puppet" during the campaign), actively worked against Roosevelt's progressive "Square Deal" program. Roosevelt did not give Fairbanks a significant role in his administration, and (having chosen not to seek reelection) strongly promoted William Howard Taft
William Howard Taft
as his potential successor in 1908.[4][5] Fairbanks also sought the Republican nomination for President, but was unsuccessful and returned to the practice of law. In 1912, Fairbanks supported Taft's reelection against Roosevelt's Bull Moose candidacy. Hughes' running mate[edit] In 1916, Fairbanks was in charge of establishing the platform for the Republican party. In 1916, he sought the Republican presidential nomination, and although he failed in that bid, he did win the nomination for vice president as the running-mate of Charles Evans Hughes on June 10. Five months later, Hughes and Fairbanks lost a close election to the Democratic incumbents Woodrow Wilson
Woodrow Wilson
and Thomas Marshall. Fairbanks is the most recent former Vice President to seek reelection for a non-consecutive term (with Adlai Stevenson I
Adlai Stevenson I
before him). Fairbanks once again resumed the practice of law in Indianapolis, but his health started to fail. Death[edit] He died of nephritis in his home on June 4, 1918.[6] He was interred in Crown Hill Cemetery.

Fairbanks' grave in Crown Hill Cemetery
Crown Hill Cemetery
in Indianapolis, Indiana.

Legacy[edit] Fairbanks received the honorary degree of LL.D. from Ohio
Ohio
Wesleyan University in 1901, and from Northwestern University
Northwestern University
in 1907. The Charles W. Fairbanks
Charles W. Fairbanks
Professor of Politics and Government position at Ohio Wesleyan University
Ohio Wesleyan University
is named for him. The city of Fairbanks, Alaska,[7] and the Fairbanks North Star Borough it lies within; the Fairbanks School District in Union County, Ohio; Fairbanks, Minnesota; Fairbanks, Oregon; and Fairbanks Township, Michigan, are named after him. In 1966, the Indiana
Indiana
Sesquicentennial Commission placed an Indiana historical marker in front of Fairbanks' home at 30th and Meridian Streets in Indianapolis.[8] On May 15, 2009, an Ohio
Ohio
historical marker was dedicated in Unionville Center, commemorating Fairbanks' birthplace.[9] See also[edit]

Biography portal

List of Vice Presidents of the United States
List of Vice Presidents of the United States
by time in office

References[edit]

^ "Charles Warren Fairbanks - vice president of United States".  ^ Harvey, Official Proceedings of the Republican National Convention, 1904, pp 23 - 32, Original from Harvard University, Digitized Oct 26, 2007 ^ "The Pittsburgh Press - Google News Archive Search". news.google.com.  ^ Boomhower, Ray E. (2010). "Charles Warren Fairbanks". In Purcell, L. Edward. Vice Presidents: A Biographical Dictionary (4 ed.). Facts on File. p. 256. ISBN 9781438130712. Retrieved 5 Jun 2016.  ^ Morris, Edmund (2002). Theodore Rex. The Modern Library. pp. 875,937. ISBN 978-0-307-77781-2.  ^ " Indiana
Indiana
Statesman Succumbs to Intestinal Nephritis
Nephritis
After Long Illness at His Home. His Political Career Began After He Was a Successful Railroad Attorney. Adept in Platform Making. Reporter for The Associated Press. Attorney for Jay Gould. Beginning of His Political Career. Roosevelt's Running Mate". New York Times. June 5, 1918. Retrieved 2010-03-06. Charles Warren Fairbanks, former Vice President of the United States
United States
and former United States
United States
Senator for Indiana, died at his home at 8:55 o'clock tonight.  ^ https://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/resources/pdf/charles_fairbanks.pdf ^ "Home of Charles Warren Fairbanks May 11, 1852 - June 4, 1918". Indiana
Indiana
Historical Bueau. Retrieved April 8, 2017.  ^ Patrick Dundr, Fairbanks historical marker, Marysville Journal-Tribune, May 16, 2009

External links[edit]

The life and speeches of Hon. Charles Warren Fairbanks : Republican candidate for vice-president

United States
United States
Congress. " Charles W. Fairbanks
Charles W. Fairbanks
(id: F000003)". Biographical Directory of the United States
United States
Congress. Retrieved August 28, 2010.  "Charles W. Fairbanks". Find a Grave. Retrieved August 28, 2010. 

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Preceded by Daniel W. Voorhees U.S. Senator (Class 3) from Indiana March 4, 1897 – March 4, 1905 Served alongside: David Turpie, Albert J. Beveridge Succeeded by James A. Hemenway

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(1900 ←) United States
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presidential election, 1904 (→ 1908)

Democratic Party Convention

Nominee

Alton B. Parker

VP nominee

Henry G. Davis

Candidates

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Republican Party Convention

Nominee

Theodore Roosevelt

VP nominee

Charles W. Fairbanks

Candidates

Mark Hanna

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Nominee

Eugene V. Debs

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Nominee

Thomas E. Watson

VP nominee

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Nominee

Charles Hunter Corregan

VP nominee

William Wesley Cox

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presidential election, 1908 (→ 1912)

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Nominee

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VP nominee

John W. Kern

Candidates

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Republican Party Convention

Nominee

William Howard Taft

VP nominee

James S. Sherman

Candidates

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Socialist Party

Nominee

Eugene V. Debs

VP nominee

Ben Hanford

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Nominee

Eugene W. Chafin

VP nominee

Aaron S. Watkins

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Nominee

Thomas L. Hisgen

VP nominee

John Temple Graves

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Nominee

Thomas E. Watson

VP nominee

Samuel Williams

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(1912 ←) United States presidential election, 1916
United States presidential election, 1916
(→ 1920)

Democratic Party Convention

Nominee

Woodrow Wilson

VP nominee

Thomas R. Marshall

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Nominee

Charles Evans Hughes

VP nominee

Charles W. Fairbanks

Candidiates:

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Nominee

Allan L. Benson

VP nominee

George Ross Kirkpatrick

Prohibition Party

Nominee

Frank Hanly

VP nominee

Ira Landrith

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WorldCat Identities VIAF: 35940081 LCCN: n86114870 ISNI: 0000 0000 2670 1498 US Congress: F000003 SN

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