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Charles Perrault
Charles Perrault
(French: [ʃaʁl pɛʁo]; 12 January 1628 – 16 May 1703) was a French author and member of the Académie Française. He laid the foundations for a new literary genre, the fairy tale, with his works derived from pre-existing folk tales. The best known of his tales include Le Petit Chaperon Rouge (Little Red Riding Hood), Cendrillon
Cendrillon
(Cinderella), Le Chat Botté (Puss in Boots), La Belle au bois Dormant (The Sleeping Beauty), and Barbe Bleue (Bluebeard).[1] Some of Perrault's versions of old stories have influenced the German versions published by the Brothers Grimm
Brothers Grimm
more than 100 years later. The stories continue to be printed and have been adapted to opera, ballet (such as Tchaikovsky's The Sleeping Beauty), theatre, and film. Perrault was an influential figure in the 17th-century French literary scene, and was the leader of the Modern faction during the Quarrel of the Ancients and the Moderns.

Contents

1 Life and work 2 Fairy tales 3 See also 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External links

Life and work[edit] Perrault was born in Paris
Paris
to a wealthy bourgeois family, the seventh child of Pierre Perrault and Paquette Le Clerc. He attended very good schools and studied law before embarking on a career in government service, following in the footsteps of his father and elder brother Jean.[citation needed] He took part in the creation of the Academy of Sciences as well as the restoration of the Academy of Painting. In 1654, he moved in with his brother Pierre, who had purchased a post as the principal tax collector of the city of Paris. When the Academy of Inscriptions and Belles-Lettres was founded in 1663, Perrault was appointed its secretary and served under Jean Baptiste Colbert, finance minister to King Louis XIV.[2] Jean Chapelain, Amable de Bourzeys, and Jacques Cassagne (the King's librarian) were also appointed.[citation needed] Using his influence as Colbert's administrative aide, he was able to get his brother, Claude Perrault, employed as designer of the new section of the Louvre, built between 1665 and 1680, to be overseen by Colbert. His design was chosen over designs by Gian Lorenzo Bernini (with whom, as Perrault recounts in his Memories, he had stormy relations while the Italian artist was in residence at Louis's court in 1665) and François Mansart.[3] One of the factors leading to this choice included the fear of high costs, for which other architects were infamous[citation needed], and second was the personal antagonism between Bernini and leading members of Louis's court, including Colbert and Perrault; King Louis himself maintained a public air of benevolence towards Bernini, ordering the issuing of a royal bronze portrait medal in honor of the artist in 1674.[4] In 1668, Perrault wrote La Peinture ('’Painting’’) to honor the king's first painter, Charles Le Brun. He also wrote Courses de tetes et de bague (Head and Ring Races, 1670), written to commemorate the 1662 celebrations staged by Louis for his mistress, Louise-Françoise de La Baume le Blanc, duchesse de La Vallière.[citation needed]

Perrault in an early 19th-century engraved frontispiece[5]

Perrault was elected to the Académie française
Académie française
in 1671.[citation needed] He married Marie Guichon, age 19, in 1672; she died in 1678.[citation needed] In 1669 Perrault advised Louis XIV to include thirty-nine fountains each representing one of the fables of Aesop in the labyrinth of Versailles in the gardens of Versailles. The work was carried out between 1672 and 1677. Water jets spurting from the animals' mouths were conceived to give the impression of speech between the creatures. There was a plaque with a caption and a quatrain written by the poet Isaac de Benserade
Isaac de Benserade
next to each fountain. Perrault produced the guidebook for the labyrinth, Labyrinte de Versailles, printed at the royal press, Paris, in 1677, and illustrated by Sebastien le Clerc.[6] Philippe Quinault, a longtime family friend of the Perraults, quickly gained a reputation as the librettist for the new musical genre known as opera, collaborating with composer Jean-Baptiste Lully. After Alceste (1674) was denounced by traditionalists who rejected it for deviating from classical theater, Perrault wrote in response Critique de l'Opéra (1674) in which he praised the merits of Alceste over the tragedy of the same name by Euripides.[citation needed] This treatise on Alceste initiated the Quarrel of the Ancients and the Moderns (Querelle des Anciens et des Modernes), which pitted supporters of the literature of Antiquity (the "Ancients") against supporters of the literature from the century of Louis XIV (the "Moderns"). He was on the side of the Moderns and wrote Le Siècle de Louis le Grand (The Century of Louis the Great, 1687) and Parallèle des Anciens et des Modernes (Parallel between Ancients and Moderns, 1688–1692) where he attempted to prove the superiority of the literature of his century. Le Siècle de Louis le Grand was written in celebration of Louis XIV's recovery from a life-threatening operation. Perrault argued that because of Louis's enlightened rule, the present age was superior in every respect to ancient times. He also claimed that even modern French literature was superior to the works of antiquity, and that, after all, even Homer nods.[citation needed] In 1682, Colbert forced Perrault into retirement at the age of 56, assigning his tasks to his own son, Jules-Armand, marquis d'Ormoy. Colbert would die the next year, and Perrault stopped receiving the pension given to him as a writer. Colbert's bitter rival succeeded him, François-Michel Le Tellier, marquis de Louvoi, and quickly removed Perrault from his other appointments.[citation needed] After this, in 1686, Perrault decided to write epic poetry and show his genuine devotion to Christianity, writing Saint Paulin, évêque de Nôle (St. Paulinus, Bishop of Nola, about Paulinus of Nola). Just like Jean Chapelain's La Pucelle, ou la France délivrée, an epic poem about Joan of Arc, Perrault became a target of mockery from Nicolas Boileau-Despréaux.[citation needed] Charles Perrault
Charles Perrault
died in Paris
Paris
in 1703 at the age of 75.[citation needed] On 12 January 2016 Google honoured him with a doodle by artist Sophie Diao depicting characters from the Tales of Mother Goose (Histoires ou contes du temps passé).[7] Fairy tales[edit] In 1695, when he was 67, Perrault lost his post as secretary. He decided to dedicate himself to his children. In 1697 he published Tales and Stories of the Past with Morals (Histoires ou Contes du Temps passé), subtitled Tales of Mother Goose
Tales of Mother Goose
(Les Contes de ma Mère l’Oye). (The spelling of the name is with “y” although modern French uses only an “i”.) This “Mother Goose” has never been identified as a person, but used to refer to popular and rural storytelling traditions in proverbial phrases of the time. (Source : Dictionnaire de l’Académie, 1694, quoted by Nathalie Froloff in her edition of the ‘’Tales’’ (Gallimard, Folio, Paris, 1999.- p.10).[8]) These tales, based on French popular tradition, were very popular in sophisticated court circles. Its publication made him suddenly very widely known and he is often credited as the founder of the modern fairy tale genre.[9] Naturally, his work reflects awareness of earlier fairy tales written in the salons, most notably by Marie-Catherine Le Jumel de Barneville, Baroness d'Aulnoy, who coined the phrase "fairy tale" and wrote tales as early as 1690.[10][11] Some of his popular stories, particularly Cinderella[12] and The Sleeping Beauty, are still commonly told similar to the way Perrault had written them, while others have been revised over the years. For example, some versions of Sleeping Beauty
Sleeping Beauty
published today are based partially on a Brothers Grimm
Brothers Grimm
tale, Little Briar Rose, a modified version of the Perrault story,[13] but the Disney version is quite true to the original Perrault tale. Perrault had written Little Red Riding Hood
Little Red Riding Hood
as a warning to readers about men who were trying to prey on young girls who were walking through the forest. He provided the following comment about the morality or lesson provided by the story. "I say Wolf, for all wolves are not of the same sort; there is one kind with an amenable disposition – neither noisy, nor hateful, nor angry, but tame, obliging and gentle, following the young maids in the streets, even into their homes. Alas! Who does not know that these gentle wolves are of all such creatures the most dangerous!"[14] Indeed, the girl gets into bed with the wolf and is devoured. There is no happy ending as in most current versions of the story.[15] He had actually published his collection under the name of his last son (born in 1678), Pierre (Perrault) Darmancourt ("Armancourt" being the name of a property he bought for him), probably fearful of criticism from the "Ancients".[16] In the tales, he used images from around him, such as the Chateau Ussé
Chateau Ussé
for The Sleeping Beauty, and the Marquis of the Château d'Oiron
Château d'Oiron
as the model for the Marquis de Carabas in Puss in Boots. He ornamented his folktale subject matter with details, asides and subtext drawn from the world of fashion. Following up on these tales, he translated the Fabulae Centum (100 Fables) of the Latin poet Gabriele Faerno
Gabriele Faerno
into French verse in 1699.[17] See also[edit]

Children's literature portal Kingdom of France portal Biography portal

Hans Christian Andersen, who continued the fairy tale genre in the 19th century Madame d'Aulnoy Giambattista Basile Charles Deulin Brothers Grimm Marie-Jeanne L'Héritier, Charles Perrault's niece Giovanni Francesco Straparola, widely regarded as the first person to compile a collection of fairy tales

References[edit]

Page 133, illustration from Fairy tales of Charles Perrault

^ Biography, Bibliography Archived 14 January 2006 at the Wayback Machine. (in French)/ ^ Sideman, B. B.: "The World's Best Fairy Tales", page 831. The Reader's Digest Association, 1967. ^ For the conflict between Bernini and Perrault in Paris, see Mormando, Franco (2011). Bernini: His Life and His Rome. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. pp. 268–288. ISBN 978-0-226-53852-5.  ^ Mormando, Franco (2011). Bernini: His Life and His Rome. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. pp. 245–288, passim. ISBN 978-0-226-53852-5.  ^ The engraving is derived at more than one remove from the portrait of 1671, now at the Musée de Versailles, by an unknown artist. ^ "scan of the book at the Bibliothèque nationale de France". Gallica.bnf.fr. 2007-10-15. Retrieved 2014-03-24.  ^ "Charles Perrault's 388th Birthday". Google Doodle. Google Inc. 12 January 2016. Retrieved 12 January 2016.  ^ Neil, Philip; Nicoletta Simborowski (1993). The Complete Fairy Tales of Charles Perrault. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. p. 126. ISBN 0-395-57002-6.  ^ Flood, Alison (12 January 2016). "Charles Perrault: the modern fairytale's fairy godfather". The Guardian- Books. The Guardian. Retrieved 12 January 2016. The stories...might have been old, but what he did with them was new.  ^ The Oxford Companion to English Literature, 6th Edition. Edited by Margaret Drabble, Oxford University Press, 2000 Pp781 ^ Jasmin, Nadine (2002). Naissance du conte féminin, Mots et merveilles, Les contes de fées de Madame d’Aulnoy, 1690-1698. Paris: Champion. ISBN 2-7453-0648-0.  ^ "The many versions of Cinderella: One of the most ancient fairy tales". Swide Art & Culture. Dolce&Gabbana. 21 February 2015. Retrieved 12 January 2016. The famous fairy tale of Cinderella
Cinderella
is best known from the film made by Walt Disney in 1950, which in turn is based on the story penned by Charles Perrault.  ^ Williams, Rhiannon (12 January 2016). "Who was Charles Perrault? Why the fairy tales you know may not be as they seem". The Telegraph. London, England. Retrieved 12 January 2016.  ^ Williams, Rhiannon (12 January 2016). "Who was Charles Perrault? Why the fairy tales you know may not be as they seem". The Telegraph. London, England. Retrieved 12 January 2016.  ^ " Little Red Riding Hood
Little Red Riding Hood
Charles Perrault". Pitt.Edu. University of Pittsburgh. 21 September 2003. Retrieved 12 January 2016. And, saying these words, this wicked wolf fell upon Little Red Riding Hood, and ate her all up.  ^ Collin, F. (1999). Charles Perrault, le fantôme du XVIIe siècle. Draveil, Colline. ISBN 2-9513668-0-9.  ^ The 1753 London re-edition is available online

Further reading[edit]

Zarucchi, Jeanne Morgan (2003), Seventeenth-Century French Writers, Detroit: Gale, ISBN 978-0-7876-6012-3  Perrault, Charles (1696), Les hommes illustres qui ont paru en France pendant ce siècle - avec leur portraits au naturel (in French), 1 (2 vols. folio ed.), Paris  Perrault, Charles (1701), Les hommes illustres qui ont paru en France pendant ce siècle - avec leur portraits au naturel (in French), 2 (2 vols. folio ed.), Paris 

Ozell, John, Characters historical panegyrical of the Greatest men that have appeared in France during the last century 1704–5 (2 volumes 8vo ed.)  vol. 1 (1704), [vol. 2] (1705) (English translation without the portraits)

External links[edit]

Wikisource
Wikisource
has original works written by or about: Charles Perrault

Quotations related to Charles Perrault
Charles Perrault
at Wikiquote Media related to Charles Perrault
Charles Perrault
at Wikimedia Commons  Herbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). "Charles Perrault". Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company.  Works by Charles Perrault
Charles Perrault
at Project Gutenberg Works by or about Charles Perrault
Charles Perrault
at Internet Archive Works by Charles Perrault
Charles Perrault
at LibriVox
LibriVox
(public domain audiobooks) Charles Perrault
Charles Perrault
at the Internet Speculative Fiction Database Charles Perrault's fairy tales at World of tales SurLaLune Fairy Tale Pages: Fairy Tales of Charles Perrault (in French) Charles Perrault, his work in audio version Fairy Tales of Charles Perrault The Tales of Mother Goose
Tales of Mother Goose
- Illustrated fairy Tales of Charles Perrault

v t e

Académie française
Académie française
seat 23

Guillaume Colletet (1634) Gilles Boileau (1659) Jean de Montigny (1670) Charles Perrault
Charles Perrault
(1671) Armand Gaston Maximilien de Rohan
Armand Gaston Maximilien de Rohan
(1703) Louis-Gui de Guérapin de Vauréal
Louis-Gui de Guérapin de Vauréal
(1749) Charles Marie de La Condamine
Charles Marie de La Condamine
(1760) Jacques Delille
Jacques Delille
(1774) François-Nicolas-Vincent Campenon
François-Nicolas-Vincent Campenon
(1813) Marc Girardin (1844) Alfred Mézières (1874) René Boylesve
René Boylesve
(1918) Abel Hermant
Abel Hermant
(1927) Étienne Gilson
Étienne Gilson
(1946) Henri Gouhier (1979) Pierre Rosenberg (1995)

v t e

Charles Perrault

Works

Histoires ou contes du temps passé
Histoires ou contes du temps passé
(1697) Griselidis (1695) The Ridiculous Wishes
The Ridiculous Wishes
(1695) Donkeyskin
Donkeyskin
(1695) Cinderella
Cinderella
(1697) Little Red Riding Hood
Little Red Riding Hood
(1697) Sleeping Beauty
Sleeping Beauty
(1697) Puss in Boots
Puss in Boots
(1697) Bluebeard
Bluebeard
(1697) Diamonds and Toads
Diamonds and Toads
(1697) Riquet with the Tuft
Riquet with the Tuft
(1697) Hop-o'-My-Thumb
Hop-o'-My-Thumb
(1697)

Related

Marie-Jeanne L'Héritier Brothers Grimm

v t e

Cinderella
Cinderella
by Charles Perrault
Charles Perrault
and the Brothers Grimm

Characters

Buttons Cinderella Ugly sisters Fairy godmother Wicked stepmother Prince Charming

Films

Cinderella
Cinderella
(1899) Cinderella
Cinderella
or the Glass Slipper (1912) Cinderella
Cinderella
(1914) A Lowland Cinderella
Cinderella
(1921) A Kiss for Cinderella
Cinderella
(1925 film) Ella Cinders (1926) The Cookie Carnival (1935) The Magic Shoes (1935) First Love (1939) Cinderella
Cinderella
(1947) Cinderella
Cinderella
(1950) The Glass Slipper
The Glass Slipper
(1955) Cinderfella
Cinderfella
(1960) Stop! Look! and Laugh
Stop! Look! and Laugh
(1960) More Than a Miracle
More Than a Miracle
(1967) Tři oříšky pro Popelku
Tři oříšky pro Popelku
(1973) The Slipper and the Rose
The Slipper and the Rose
(1976) Cinderella
Cinderella
(1979) Cinderella
Cinderella
'80 (1984) Maid to Order
Maid to Order
(1987) If the Shoe Fits (1990) Ever After
Ever After
(1998) Ella Enchanted
Ella Enchanted
(2004) Cinderella
Cinderella
(2006) Elle: A Modern Cinderella
Cinderella
Tale (2010) Cinderella
Cinderella
(2015)

A Cinderella
Cinderella
Story series

A Cinderella
Cinderella
Story (2004) Another Cinderella
Cinderella
Story (2008) Once Upon a Song (2011) If the Shoe Fits (2016)

Animation

Cinderella
Cinderella
Blues (1931) Poor Cinderella
Cinderella
(1934) Cinderella
Cinderella
Meets Fella (1938) Swing Shift Cinderella
Cinderella
(1945) Cinderella
Cinderella
(1950) Señorella and the Glass Huarache
Señorella and the Glass Huarache
(1964) Cinderella
Cinderella
(1979) The Tender Tale of Cinderella
Cinderella
Penguin (1981) The Magic Riddle (1991) Cinderella
Cinderella
(1994) Happily N' Ever After
Ever After
(2007) Year of the Fish
Year of the Fish
(2008) Cinderella
Cinderella
the Cat (2017) Charming (2018)

Sequels

Princess Cinderella
Cinderella
(1941) Cinderella
Cinderella
II: Dreams Come True (2002) Cinderella
Cinderella
III: A Twist in Time (2007)

Television

Hey, Cinderella! (1968) Cindy (1978) Cinderella
Cinderella
Monogatari (1996) Cinderella
Cinderella
(1997) CinderElmo
CinderElmo
(1999) Cinderella
Cinderella
(2000) La Cenicienta (2003) Bawang Merah Bawang Putih (2004) Floricienta (2004) Floribella (2005 Brazil) Floribella (2006 Portugal) Grazilda
Grazilda
(2010) Rags (2012) Aik Nayee Cinderella
Cinderella
(2012)

Literary adaptations

Celestina (1791) Cinderella, or the Little Glass Slipper
Cinderella, or the Little Glass Slipper
(1954) Nine Coaches Waiting
Nine Coaches Waiting
(1958) Carrie (1974) The Coachman Rat (1989) Witches Abroad (1991) Ella Enchanted
Ella Enchanted
(1997) I Was a Rat! or The Scarlet Slippers
I Was a Rat! or The Scarlet Slippers
(1999) Just Ella (1999) Confessions of an Ugly Stepsister
Confessions of an Ugly Stepsister
(1999) Chinese Cinderella
Cinderella
(1999) The Fairy Godmother (2004) Phoenix and Ashes
Phoenix and Ashes
(2004) Bella at Midnight
Bella at Midnight
(2006) Ash (2009) Princess of Glass (2010) Cinder (2012)

Opera

Cendrillon
Cendrillon
(1810 Isouard) La Cenerentola
La Cenerentola
(1817 Rossini) Cendrillon
Cendrillon
(1899 Massenet) Cendrillon
Cendrillon
(1904 Viardot) La Cenicienta (1966 Hen)

Ballet

Cinderella
Cinderella
(1893 Fitinhof-Schell) Aschenbrödel (1900 Strauss-Bayer) Cinderella
Cinderella
(1945 Prokofiev) Cinderella
Cinderella
(1948 Ashton)

Musicals

Cinderella
Cinderella
and the Prince, or The Castle of Heart's Desire (1904) Stubborn Cinderella
Cinderella
(1909) Mr. Cinders (1929) Cinderella
Cinderella
(1957) Cindy (1964) The Penny Friend (1966) The Slipper and the Rose
The Slipper and the Rose
(1984) Soho Cinders
Soho Cinders
(2008) Cinderella
Cinderella
(2013)

Other

Plays

A Kiss for Cinderella
Cinderella
(1916)

Comics

Cinderella: From Fabletown with Love Cinderalla

Games

Cinders

Songs

"Spread a Little Happiness" (1929) "Bibbidi-Bobbidi-Boo" (1949) "A Dream Is a Wish Your Heart Makes" (1950) "Cinderella" (1987) "Hey Cinderella" (1993) "It's Midnight Cinderella" (1996) "Cinderella" (2001) "Cinderella" (2002) "Cinderella" (2003) "Stealing Cinderella" (2007) "Cinderella" (2007) "CC (CinderellaComplex)" (2008)

Albums

A Cinderella
Cinderella
Story (2004 soundtrack) Disney's Princess Favorites
Disney's Princess Favorites
(2002)

Sociology

Cinderella
Cinderella
complex Cinderella
Cinderella
effect The Cinderella
Cinderella
Movement

Commercials

A Coach for Cinderella A Ride for Cinderella

Adult

Cinder Ellen up too Late Cinderella
Cinderella
(1977) Naughty Cinderella

National variation

Bawang Merah Bawang Putih (Malay and Indonesian) Beauty and Pock Face (Chinese) Chūjō-hime
Chūjō-hime
(Japanese) Fair, Brown and Trembling (Irish) Finette Cendron (French) The Green Knight (Danish) Katie Woodencloak
Katie Woodencloak
(Norwegian) Kongji and Patzzi (Korean) Ochikubo Monogatari (Japanese) "Rhodopis" (Greek) Rushen Coatie
Rushen Coatie
(Scottish) The Sharp Grey Sheep (Scottish) The Story of Tam and Cam (Vietnamese) Sumiyoshi Monogatari (Japanese) The True Bride (German) The Wonderful Birch (Russian) Ye Xian (Chinese)

Related

Catskin Into the Woods Into the Woods
Into the Woods
(2014 film)

Politically Correct Bedtime Stories Disney's characters Stop! Look! and Laugh Waltz Suite Black Cinderella
Cinderella
Two Goes East Cinderella
Cinderella
Monogatari Cinderella's Sister Cinderella
Cinderella
(sports) Lying to Be Perfect Cinderella's Eyes
Cinderella's Eyes
(2011)

v t e

"Sleeping Beauty"/"Little Briar Rose" by Charles Perrault
Charles Perrault
and the Brothers Grimm

Theatre

La Belle au Bois Dormant (opera) The Sleeping Beauty
Sleeping Beauty
(ballet)

Variants

Sun, Moon, and Talia The Young Slave The Glass Coffin

Retellings

Alinda of the Loch Enchantment The Light Princess "Little Daylight" The Ordinary Princess The Sleeping Beauty
Sleeping Beauty
Quartet Spindle's End The Gates of Sleep

Films

Sleeping Beauty
Sleeping Beauty
(1959) Some Call It Loving
Some Call It Loving
(1973) Sleeping Beauty
Sleeping Beauty
(1987) Sleeping Beauty
Sleeping Beauty
(1995) Keys to the Kingdom (2007) Sleeping Betty
Sleeping Betty
(2008) Maleficent
Maleficent
(2014) Descendants (2015) Charming (2018)

Disney

"Once Upon a Dream" (song) Sleeping Beauty
Sleeping Beauty
Castle Le Château de la Belle au Bois Dormant "Evil Like Me" (song) Kingdom Hearts series

Characters

Prince Charming Wicked fairy godmother Disney's Sleeping Beauty
Sleeping Beauty
characters

Princess Aurora Flora, Fauna, and Merryweather Maleficent

v t e

"Little Red Riding Hood" by Charles Perrault
Charles Perrault
and the Brothers Grimm

Film

Red Riding Hood (1901) Little Red Riding Hood
Little Red Riding Hood
(1920) Little Red Riding Hood
Little Red Riding Hood
(1954) Rotkäppchen (1962) About the Little Red Riding Hood
Little Red Riding Hood
(1977) Red Riding Hood (1989) Little Red Riding Hood
Little Red Riding Hood
(1997) Red Riding Hood (2003) Red Riding Hood (2006) Red Riding Hood (2011)

Animation

Little Red Riding Hood
Little Red Riding Hood
(1922 cartoon) Dizzy Red Riding Hood (1931 film) Little Red Walking Hood
Little Red Walking Hood
(1937 cartoon) The Big Bad Wolf
Big Bad Wolf
(1934 cartoon) Red Hot Riding Hood
Red Hot Riding Hood
(1943 cartoon) Little Red Riding Rabbit
Little Red Riding Rabbit
(1944 cartoon) Little Rural Riding Hood
Little Rural Riding Hood
(1949 cartoon) Little Red Rodent Hood (1952 cartoon) Red Riding Hoodwinked (1955 cartoon) Red Riding Hoodlum
Red Riding Hoodlum
(1957 cartoon) Little Red Riding Hood
Little Red Riding Hood
(1995 film) Redux Riding Hood (1997 film) Hoodwinked!
Hoodwinked!
(2005 film) Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil
Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil
(2011 film)

Video games

Little Red Riding Hood's Zombie BBQ
Little Red Riding Hood's Zombie BBQ
(2008) The Path (2009) Overlord: Dark Legend (2009) Dragon Fin Soup
Dragon Fin Soup
(2015)

Stage adaptations

Little Red Riding Hood
Little Red Riding Hood
(1911 opera) Grimm (2014 musical)

Literary adaptations

The Tale of Jemima Puddle-Duck
The Tale of Jemima Puddle-Duck
(1908) Anguish Languish (1956) Flossie & the Fox (1986) Lon Po Po: A Red-Riding Hood Story from China (1989) Wolf (1990) Little Red Cap (1999) Scarlet (2013)

Other adaptations

Li'l Red Riding Hood (1966) The Company of Wolves
The Company of Wolves
(1984) The Red Spectacles
The Red Spectacles
(1987) Freeway (1996) Black XXX-Mas (1999) Jin-Roh: The Wolf Brigade (1999) Tokyo Red Hood
Tokyo Red Hood
(2003) A Wicked Tale
A Wicked Tale
(2005) "Red-Handed" (2012) "Child of the Moon" (2012)

Related

Once Upon a Time (TV series) Akazukin Chacha
Akazukin Chacha
(1994 anime series) Goldilocks and the Jivin' Bears Now Hare This Deadtime Stories Baby Bear and the Big, Bad Wolf Big Bad Wolf
Big Bad Wolf
(character) Red (character)

v t e

Bluebeard
Bluebeard
(1697) by Charles Perrault

Film

Barbe-bleue (1901) Bluebeard
Bluebeard
(1944) Secret Beyond the Door... (1948) Bluebeard
Bluebeard
(1951) Landru (1963) Bluebeard
Bluebeard
(1972) Barbe Bleue (2009) Kékszakállú (2016)

Opera

Ariane et Barbe-bleue
Ariane et Barbe-bleue
(Dukas 1907) Bluebeard's Castle
Bluebeard's Castle
(Bartók 1911) Barbe-bleue (Offenbach 1856) Ritter Blaubart (Emil Nikolaus von Reznicek 1920)

Ballet

Bluebeard
Bluebeard
(1896)

Related

Bluebeard
Bluebeard
(Vonnegut novel) Very Blue Beard (1979 film)

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 34461426 LCCN: n79018715 ISNI: 0000 0001 2127 2484 GND: 118740008 SELIBR: 208540 SUDOC: 027066150 BNF: cb119192165 (data) ULAN: 500070296 MusicBrainz: 41bcc521-b494-4263-8991-1caf88fa1247 NLA: 35417665 NDL: 00452534 NKC: jn19990006466 BNE: XX1124700 KulturNav: e1657036-0ea5-4ee5-956d-c17fd42e85ba RKD: 460

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