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Charente
Charente
(French pronunciation: ​[ʃa.ʁɑ̃t], Saintongeais: Chérente, Occitan: Charanta) is a department in southwestern France, in the Nouvelle-Aquitaine
Nouvelle-Aquitaine
region, named after the Charente
Charente
River, the most important river in the department, and also the river beside which the department's two largest towns, Angoulême
Angoulême
and Cognac, are sited.

Contents

1 History 2 Geography 3 Demographics 4 Politics 5 Economy 6 Tourism 7 Sources and further reading 8 See also 9 External links

History[edit] Charente
Charente
is one of the original 83 departments created during the French Revolution
French Revolution
on 4 March 1790. It was created from the former province of Angoumois, west and south of Saintonge. Prior to the creation of the department, the area was not a natural unit, but much of it was commercially prosperous thanks to traditional industries such as salt and cognac production. Although the river Charente
Charente
became silted up and was unnavigable for much of the twentieth century, in the eighteenth century it provided important links with coastal shipping routes both for traditional businesses and for newly evolving ones such as paper goods and iron smelting. The accelerating pace of industrial and commercial development during the first half of the nineteenth century led to a period of prosperity, and the department's population peaked in 1851.[1] During the second half of the nineteenth century Charente, like many of France's rural departments, experienced a declining population as the economic prospects available in the cities and in France's overseas empire attracted the working age generations away. Economic ruin came to many in the Charentais wine industry with the arrival in 1872 of phylloxera. During the twentieth century, the department with its traditional industries was adversely impacted by two major world wars and even in the second half of the century experienced relatively low growth, the overall population remaining remarkably stable at around 340,000 through the second half of the twentieth century, although industrial and commercial developments in the conurbation surrounding Angoulême have added some 10,000 to the overall population during the first decade of the twenty-first century. The relatively relaxed pace of economic development in the twentieth century encouraged the immigration of retirees from overseas. Census data in 2006 revealed that the number of British citizens residing in the department had risen to 5,083,[2] placing the department fourth in this respect behind Paris, Dordogne
Dordogne
and Alpes-Maritimes.[3] Geography[edit] It is part of the Aquitaine Basin
Aquitaine Basin
for its major part, and of the Massif Central
Massif Central
for its north-eastern part. The Charente
Charente
flows through it and gave its name to the department, along with Charente-Maritime. It is composed with the historical region of Angoumois
Angoumois
and contains part of the regions of Saintonge, Limousin, Périgord
Périgord
and Poitou. The department is part of the current region of Nouvelle-Aquitaine. It is surrounded by the departments of Charente-Maritime, Dordogne, Haute-Vienne, Vienne
Vienne
and Deux-Sèvres. Its capital is Angoulême. Demographics[edit] The inhabitants of the department are called Charentais. Politics[edit] The President of the General Council is Michel Boutant of the Socialist Party.

Party seats

• Socialist Party 15

Union for a Popular Movement 6

Miscellaneous Right 6

• Miscellaneous Left 6

• French Communist Party 2

Economy[edit] Cognac and pineau are two of the major agricultural products of the region, along with butter. The Charentaise slipper (a type of slipper made from felt and wool) is another well-known traditional product.[4] Tourism[edit]

Angoulême
Angoulême
Cathedral

Champagne-Vigny

Verteuil-sur-Charente

Abbey of La Couronne

Plassac-Rouffiac

Aubeterre-sur-Dronne

Château de la Faye

Sources and further reading[edit]

^ Jean Combes (dir.) et Michel Luc (dir.), La Charente
Charente
de la préhistoire à nos jours, Imprimerie Bordessoules, coll. « L'histoire par les documents », 1986, 429 p. (ISBN 2-903504-21-0) ^ Insee ^ La Charente
Charente
libre du 4 janvier 2010 ^ "The thoroughly modern Charentaise slipper", 2 March 2012. Accessed 1 April 2013

See also[edit]

Cantons of the Charente
Charente
department Communes of the Charente
Charente
department Arrondissements of the Charente
Charente
department

External links[edit]

 "Charente". Encyclopædia Britannica. 5 (11th ed.). 1911.  (in French) Prefecture website (in French) General Council website

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Departments of France

01 Ain 02 Aisne 03 Allier 04 Alpes-de-Haute-Provence 05 Hautes-Alpes 06 Alpes-Maritimes 07 Ardèche 08 Ardennes 09 Ariège 10 Aube 11 Aude 12 Aveyron 13 Bouches-du-Rhône 14 Calvados 15 Cantal 16 Charente 17 Charente-Maritime 18 Cher 19 Corrèze 2A Corse-du-Sud 2B Haute-Corse 21 Côte-d'Or 22 Côtes-d'Armor 23 Creuse 24 Dordogne 25 Doubs 26 Drôme 27 Eure 28 Eure-et-Loir 29 Finistère 30 Gard 31 Haute-Garonne 32 Gers 33 Gironde 34 Hérault 35 Ille-et-Vilaine 36 Indre 37 Indre-et-Loire 38 Isère 39 Jura 40 Landes 41 Loir-et-Cher 42 Loire 43 Haute-Loire 44 Loire-Atlantique 45 Loiret 46 Lot 47 Lot-et-Garonne 48 Lozère 49 Maine-et-Loire 50 Manche 51 Marne 52 Haute-Marne 53 Mayenne 54 Meurthe-et-Moselle 55 Meuse 56 Morbihan 57 Moselle 58 Nièvre 59 Nord 60 Oise 61 Orne 62 Pas-de-Calais 63 Puy-de-Dôme 64 Pyrénées-Atlantiques 65 Hautes-Pyrénées 66 Pyrénées-Orientales 67 Bas-Rhin 68 Haut-Rhin 69D Rhône 70 Haute-Saône 71 Saône-et-Loire 72 Sarthe 73 Savoie 74 Haute-Savoie 75 Paris 76 Seine-Maritime 77 Seine-et-Marne 78 Yvelines 79 Deux-Sèvres 80 Somme 81 Tarn 82 Tarn-et-Garonne 83 Var 84 Vaucluse 85 Vendée 86 Vienne 87 Haute-Vienne 88 Vosges 89 Yonne 90 Territoire de Belfort 91 Essonne 92 Hauts-de-Seine 93 Seine-Saint-Denis 94 Val-de-Marne 95 Val-d'Oise

Overseas departments 971 Guadeloupe 972 Martinique 973 French Guiana 974 Réunion 976 Mayotte

Metropolis with territorial collectivity statute 69M Lyon

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 167464649 LCCN: n81032653 GND: 4090330-8 BNF:

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