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The first census in Armenia after the dissolution of the Soviet Union was conducted by the Republic of Armenia's National Statistical Service during the period October 10–19, 2001. The census night was October 10. The Azgayin Zhoghov (National Assembly) adopted the law "On Census" in 1999, but the government lacked the necessary funds to carry out the count immediately. According to Armenian law, a census must take place every 10 years.[1]

The demographic trends in modern Armenia during its history. While Armenians formed a consistent majority, Azerbaijanis were historically the second largest population in the republic under Soviet rule (forming about 2.5% in 1989[2]). However, due to hostilities with neighboring Azerbaijan over the disputed region of Nagorno-Karabakh virtually all Azeris emigrated from Armenia. Conversely, Armenia received a large influx of Armenian refugees from Azerbaijan, thus giving Armenia a more homogeneous character. This forceful population exchange also affected the Christian Udi people of Azerbaijan, many of whom were perceived as Armenians due to close cultural ties between both peoples.[3] The number of Udis residing in Armenia has increased from 19 in 1989[2] to about 200 by 2006.[3]

Additionally since independence, several other ethnic groups have emigrated especially Russians (who decreased from 51,555 persons in 1989[2] to 14,660 in 2001[4]), Ukrainians (8,341 in 1989[2] to 1,633 in 2001[4]), Greeks (4,650 in 1989[2] to 1,176 in 2001[4]), and Belarusians (1,061 in 1989[2] to 160 in 2001[5]). The numbers of Yazidis, Kurds, and Assyrians have remained consistent for the most part (though approximately 2,000 Assyrians have left Armenia between 1989[2] and 2001[4]). Although Georgians were historically counted among the largest ethnic groups in modern Armenia, their numbers have dropped substantially since the 1989 Soviet census when they numbered 1,364 persons.[2]

Soviet Armenia censuses

Year Total Urban Rural Armenians Azerbaijanis Russians Yazidis/Kurds Ukrainians Assyrians Greeks Georgians Belarusians Others
1926[6] 878,929 165,908 (18.8%) 713,021 (81.1%) 743,571 (84.5%) 83,181 (9.4%) 19,548 (2.2%) 15,2621 (1.7%) 2,826 (0.3%) 2,215 (0.3%) 2,980 (0.3%) 274 (0.03%) 360 (0.04%) 10,927 (1.2%)
1939[7] 1,282,338 Increase N/A N/A 1,061,997 (82.8%) Decrease 130,896 (10.2%) Increase 51,464 (4%) Increase 20,481 (1.5%) Decrease 5,496 (0.4%) Increase 3,280 (0.2%) Decrease 4,181 (0.3%) Steady 652 (0.05%) Increase 458 (0.03%) Decrease 3,433 (0.2%) Decrease
1959[8] 1,763,048 Increase N/A N/A 1,551,610 (88%) Increase 107,748 (6.1%) Decrease 56,477 (3.2%) Decrease 25,627 (1.4%) Decrease 5,593 (0.3%) Decrease 4,326 (0.2%) Steady 4,976 (0.2%) Decrease 816 (0.04%) Decrease 805 (0.04%) Increase 9,396 (0.5%) Increase
1970[9] 2,491,873 Increase 1,481,532 (59.4%) Increase 1,010,341 (40.5%) Decrease 2,208,327 (88.6%) Increase 148,189 (5.9%) Decrease 66,108 (2.6%) Decrease 37,486 (1.5%) Increase 8,390 (0.3%) Steady 5,544 (0.2%) Steady 5,690 (0.2%) Steady 1,439 (0.05%) Increase 1,179 (0.04%) Steady 9,521 (0.3%) Decrease
1979[10] 3,037,259 Increase 1,992,539 (65.7%) Increase 1,038,208 (34.3%) Decrease 2,724,975 (89.7%) Increase 160,841 (5.2%) Decrease 70,336 (2.3%) Decrease 50,822 (1.6%) Increase 8,900 (0.2%) Decrease 6,183 (0.2%) Steady 5,653 (0.1%) Decrease 1,314 (0.04%) Decrease 1,183 (0.03%) Decrease 7,052 (0.2%) Decrease
1989[2] 3,304,776 Increase 2,229,540 (67.8%) Increase 1,058,137 (32.2%) Decrease 3,083,616 (93.3%) Increase 84,860 (2.5%) Decrease 51,555 (1.5%) Decrease 56,127 (1.6%) Steady 8,341 (0.2%) Steady 5,963 (0.1%) Decrease 4,650 (0.1%) Steady 1,364 (0.04%) Steady 1,061 (0.03%) Steady 7,239 (0.2%) Steady

1 Includes numbers of both Yazidi and Kurdish populations which were counted separately in the 1926 census but were combined in subsequent censuses.

Republic of Armenia censuses

Year Total Urban Rural Armenians Yazidis Russians Assyrians Ukrainians Kurds Greeks Georgians Others
2001[4] 3,213,011 2,066,153 (64.3%) 1,146,858 (35.7%) 3,145,354 (97.9%) 40,620 (1.2%) 14,660 (0.4%) 3,409 (0.1%) 1,633 (0.05%) 1,519 (0.04%) 1,176 (0.03%) - 4,640 (0.1%)
2011[11] 3,018,854 Decrease 1,911,287 (63.3%) Decrease 1,107,567 (36.7%) Increase 2,961,801 (98.1%) Increase 35,308 (1.1%) Decrease 11,911 (0.3%) Decrease 2,769 (0.09%) Decrease 1,176 (0.03%) Decrease 2,162 (0.07%) Increase 900 (0.02%) Decrease 617 (0.02%) 1,734 (0.05%) Increase

References

  1. ^ "Country Studies: Armenia: Ethnic Minorities". Retrieved 2007-04-07. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i (in Russian) The All-Union Population Census of 1989 Archived January 4, 2012, at the Wayback Machine.. Demoscope.ru
  3. ^ a b "Muslim Kurds and Christian Udis". Hetq Online. 2006-11-13. Retrieved 2006-11-13. 
  4. ^ a b c d e Information from the 2001 Armenian National Census
  5. ^ Garnik Asatryan and Victoria Arakelova, The Ethnic Minorities of Armenia Archived July 10, 2007, at the Wayback Machine., Routledge, part of the OSCE, 2002
  6. ^ (in Russian) The All-Union Population Census of 1926. Demoscope.ru
  7. ^ (in Russian) The All-Union Population Census of 1939. Demoscope.ru
  8. ^ (in Russian) The All-Union Population Census of 1959. Demoscope.ru
  9. ^ (in Russian) The All-Union Population Census of 1970. Demoscope.ru
  10. ^ (in Russian) The All-Union Population Census of 1979. Demoscope.ru
  11. ^ "THE RESULTS OF 2011 POPULATION CENSUS OF THE REPUBLIC OF ARMENIA (FIGURES OF THE REPUBLIC OF ARMENIA), trilingual / Armenian Statistical Service of Republic of Armenia". www.armstat.am. Retrieved 2018-01-10. 

See also