HOME
The Info List - Cartoon Network


--- Advertisement ---



Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
is an American basic cable and satellite television channel owned by Turner Broadcasting System, a division of Time Warner. It was founded by Betty Cohen and launched on October 1, 1992. The channel primarily broadcasts children's shows, mostly animated programming, ranging from action to animated comedy. It is primarily aimed at children and young teenagers between the ages of 7 to 15, and targets older teens and adults with mature content during its late night daypart Adult Swim, which is treated as a separate entity for promotional purposes and as a separate channel by Nielsen for ratings purposes.[1] It operates daily from 6:00 AM to 8:00 PM (ET). A Spanish language audio track for select programs is accessible via second audio programing (SAP); some cable and satellite companies offer the Spanish feed as a separate channel by removing the main English-language audio track. It is also the related channel of Turner-owned Boomerang. As of January 2016, Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
is available to approximately 94.0 million pay television households (80.7% of households with television) in the United States.[2]

Contents

1 History

1.1 Development 1.2 1990s 1.3 2000s 1.4 2010s

2 Programming

2.1 Original series 2.2 Programming blocks

2.2.1 Current programming blocks

3 Marketing 4 Controversy and censorship 5 Related projects

5.1 Adult Swim 5.2 Toonami 5.3 Boomerang 5.4 Move It Movement 5.5 Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
On Demand 5.6 High definition channels and service 5.7 Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
Studios 5.8 Williams Street 5.9 Cartoon Network Studios
Cartoon Network Studios
Europe 5.10 Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
Productions 5.11 Mobile app 5.12 Video games

6 Online 7 International channels 8 See also 9 References

9.1 Bibliography

10 External links

History Development On August 4, 1986, Ted Turner's Turner Broadcasting System
Turner Broadcasting System
acquired Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer/ United Artists
United Artists
from Kirk Kerkorian; due to concerns over the debt load of his companies, on October 17, 1986, Turner was forced to sell MGM back to Kerkorian after approximately only 74 days of ownership. However, Turner kept much of MGM's film and television library made prior to May 1986 (as well as some of the United Artists
United Artists
library) and formed Turner Entertainment.[3] On October 3, 1988, its cable channel Turner Network Television was launched and had gained an audience with its extensive film library.[4] At this time, Turner's animation library included the MGM cartoon library, the pre-1948 color Looney Tunes
Looney Tunes
and Merrie Melodies shorts, the Harman-Ising Merrie Melodies
Merrie Melodies
shorts (except Lady, Play Your Mandolin!), and the Fleischer Studios/ Famous Studios
Famous Studios
Popeye cartoons. In 1991, Turner Entertainment
Turner Entertainment
purchased animation studio Hanna-Barbera Productions for US $320 million.[5] On February 18, 1992, Turner Broadcasting System announced its plans to launch the Cartoon Network as an outlet for Turner's considerable library of animation.[6] 1990s

The original Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
logo, used from October 1, 1992 to June 14, 2004. This logo is still in use on its merchandising products along with the 2010 version and as a production logo from 1994 until 2016.

On October 1, 1992, Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
played "The Star Spangled Banner" (which was a tradition whenever a new Turner-owned network launched) and a video of a person placing a dynamite in a field and then blowing the dynamite up; the channel's launch then occurred on that day and was hosted by the MGM cartoon character Droopy
Droopy
in a special event called Droopy's Guide to the Cartoon Network, during which the first cartoon on the network, The Great Piggy Bank Robbery, was shown.[7][8][9][10] Initial programming on the channel consisted exclusively of reruns of classic Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
cartoons (the pre-1948 Looney Tunes
Looney Tunes
and Merrie Melodies), the 1933–1957 Popeye
Popeye
cartoons, MGM cartoons, and Hanna-Barbera
Hanna-Barbera
cartoons.[6] At first, cable providers in New York City, Philadelphia, Washington D.C., and Detroit
Detroit
carried the channel.[9] By the time the network launched, Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
had an 8,500-hour cartoon library.[11] From its launch until 1995, the network's announcers said the network's name with the word "The" added before "Cartoon Network", thus calling the network "The Cartoon Network". By the time that the network debuted, Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
also operated a programming block (containing its cartoons) that aired on TNT, entitled " Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
on TNT". Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
was not the first cable channel to have relied on cartoons to attract an audience; however, it was the first 24-hour single-genre channel with animation as its main theme. Turner Broadcasting System had defied conventional wisdom before by launching CNN, a channel providing 24-hour news coverage. The concept was previously thought unlikely to attract a sufficient audience to be particularly profitable, however the CNN
CNN
experiment had been successful and Turner hoped that Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
would also find success.[12] Initially, the channel would broadcast cartoons 24 hours a day. Most of the short cartoons were aired in half-hour or hour-long packages, usually separated by character or studio – Down Wit' Droopy
Droopy
D aired old Droopy
Droopy
Dog shorts, The Tom and Jerry
Tom and Jerry
Show presented the classic cat-and-mouse team, and Bugs and Daffy Tonight provided classic Looney Tunes
Looney Tunes
shorts. Late Night Black and White showed early black-and-white cartoons (mostly from the Fleischer Studios
Fleischer Studios
and Walter Lantz cartoons from the 1930s, as well as black-and-white Merrie Melodies and MGM cartoons), and ToonHeads would show three shorts with a similar theme and provide trivia about the cartoons.[citation needed] There was also an afternoon cartoon block called High Noon Toons, which was hosted by cowboy hand puppets (an example of the simplicity and imagination the network had in its early years). The majority of the classic animation that was shown on Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
no longer airs on a regular basis, with the exception of Tom and Jerry and Looney Tunes. A challenge for Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
was to overcome its low penetration of existing cable systems. When launched on October 1, 1992, the channel was only carried by 233 cable systems. However, it benefited from package deals. New subscribers to sister channels TNT and TBS could also get access to Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
through such deals. The high ratings of Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
over the following couple of years led to more cable systems including it. By the end of 1994, Cartoon Network had become "the fifth most popular cable channel in the United States".[12] For the first few years of Cartoon Network's existence, programming meant for the channel would also be simulcast on TBS and/or TNT, both of which were still full-service cable networks that carried a variety of different programming genera, in order to increase the shows' (and Cartoon Network's) exposure; examples include The Real Adventures of Jonny Quest, Cartoon Planet, SWAT Kats: The Radical Squadron and 2 Stupid Dogs. The network's first exclusive original show was The Moxy Show, an animation anthology series first airing in 1993.[13] The first series produced by Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
was Space Ghost Coast to Coast
Space Ghost Coast to Coast
in 1994, but the show mostly consisted of "recycled animation cells" from the archives of Hanna-Barbera, being an ironic deconstruction of a talk show. It featured live-action guests, mostly consisting of celebrities which were past their prime or counterculture figures. A running gag was that the production cost was dubbed "minimal". The series found its audience among young adults who appreciated its "hip" perspective.[14] Kevin Sandler considered Space Ghost Coast to Coast
Space Ghost Coast to Coast
instrumental in establishing Cartoon Network's appeal to older audiences. Space Ghost, a 1960s superhero by Hanna-Barbera, was recast as the star of a talk show parody. This was arguably the first time the network revived a "classic animated icon" in an entirely new context for comedic purposes. Grown-ups who had ceased enjoying the original takes on the characters could find amusement in the "new ironic and self-referential context" for them. Promotional shorts such as the " Scooby-Doo
Scooby-Doo
Project", a parody of The Blair Witch Project, gave similar treatments to the Scooby gang.[15] However, there were less successful efforts at such revivals. A Day in the Life of Ranger Smith and Boo Boo Runs Wild
Boo Boo Runs Wild
(1999) were short cartoons featuring new takes on Yogi Bear's supporting cast by John Kricfalusi. Their style of humor, sexual content and break in tone from the source material was rather out of place among the rest of the Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
shows, and the network rarely found a place for them in its programming.[16] In 1994, Hanna-Barbera's new division Cartoon Network Studios
Cartoon Network Studios
was founded and started production on What a Cartoon!
What a Cartoon!
(also known as World Premiere Toons and Cartoon Cartoons). This show debuted in 1995, offering original animated shorts commissioned from Hanna-Barbera
Hanna-Barbera
and various independent animators. The network promoted the series as an attempt to return to the "classic days" of studio animation, offering full animator control, high budgets, and no limited animation. The project was spearheaded by Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
executives, plus John Kricfalusi and Fred Seibert. Kricfalusi was the creator of The Ren & Stimpy Show and served as an advisor to the network, while Seibert was formerly one of the driving forces behind Nickelodeon's Nicktoons and would go on to produce the similar animation anthology series Oh Yeah! Cartoons
Oh Yeah! Cartoons
and Random! Cartoons.[14][17] Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
was able to assess the potential of certain shorts to serve as pilots for spin-off series and signed contracts with their creators to create ongoing series.[14] Dexter's Laboratory
Dexter's Laboratory
was the most popular short series according to a vote held in 1995 and eventually became the first spin-off of What a Cartoon!
What a Cartoon!
in 1996. Three more series based on shorts debuted from 1997 to 1999: Johnny Bravo, Cow and Chicken, I Am Weasel
I Am Weasel
(the latter two as segments of the same show; I Am Weasel
I Am Weasel
was later spun off into a separate show), The Powerpuff Girls, Courage the Cowardly Dog, and Mike, Lu & Og.[14][17][18] The unrelated series Ed, Edd n Eddy
Ed, Edd n Eddy
was also launched in 1999, creating a line-up of critically acclaimed shows.[12] Many of these series premiered bearing the "Cartoon Cartoons" brand, airing throughout the network's schedule and prominently on Cartoon Cartoon Fridays, which became the marquee night for premieres of new episodes and series beginning on June 11, 1999. These original series were intended to appeal to a wider audience than the average Saturday morning cartoon. Linda Simensky, vice president of original animation, reminded adults and teenage girls that cartoons could appeal to them as well. Kevin Sandler's article of them claimed that these cartoons were both less "bawdy" than their counterparts at Comedy Central
Comedy Central
and less "socially responsible" than their counterparts at Nickelodeon. Sandler pointed to the whimsical rebelliousness, high rate of exaggeration and self-consciousness of the overall output, each individual series managed.[15] In 1996, Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
decided to air preschool programming and air them every Sunday morning, such as hiring Children's Television Workshop, the makers of Sesame Street
Sesame Street
on PBS Kids, to make a show called Big Bag, a live-action/puppet television program targeted at pre-school viewers, as well as Small World, a children's animated anthology show and variety show, in which showcased featured several segments from animated TV programs aimed at preschoolers from several countries around the world except for Japan, China, and Korea. Big Bag ran until 1998, and Small World ran until 2001. In 1996, Turner Broadcasting System
Turner Broadcasting System
merged with Time Warner[19] (ironically, Time Warner's predecessor Warner Communications
Warner Communications
had created rival Nickelodeon, now owned by Viacom, in 1977). The merger consolidated ownership of all the Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
cartoons, allowing the post-July 1948 and the former Sunset-owned black-and-white cartoons (which Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
had reacquired in the 1960s) releases to be shown on the network. Although most of the post-July 1948 cartoons were still contracted to be shown on Nickelodeon
Nickelodeon
and ABC, the network would not air them until September 1999 (from Nickelodeon) and October 2000 (from ABC), however, the majority of the post-July 1948 cartoons that were shown on its now-sibling broadcast network The WB's Kids' WB block began airing on Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
in January 1997. Newer animated productions by Warner Bros.' animation subsidiary also started appearing on the network – mostly reruns of shows that had aired on Kids' WB
Kids' WB
and some from Fox Kids, along with certain new programs such as Justice League.[20] Cartoon Network's programming would not be available in Canada until 1997 when a Canadian specialty channel called Teletoon
Teletoon
and its French-language counterpart launched. In 1997, Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
launched a new action block entitled Toonami. Its lineup initially consisted of 1980s reruns of Robotech
Robotech
and Thundercats. However, new shows were introduced and they consisted of action cartoons and anime, such as Sailor Moon, Tenchi Muyo!, Gundam Wing, and Dragon Ball Z.[21] Toonami
Toonami
was hosted by Moltar from the Space Ghost
Space Ghost
franchise until 1999, where Toonami
Toonami
was later hosted by its own original character, a muscular teenage robot named TOM. During that same year, a series of bumpers featuring the instrumental Powerhouse were introduced. These bumpers lasted from 1997 to 2004.[22] 2000s One new original series premiered in 2000: Sheep in the Big City. On April 1, Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
launched a digital cable and satellite channel known as Boomerang, which was spun off from one of their programming blocks that featured retro animated series and shorts. Three new original series premiered in 2001: Time Squad, Samurai Jack, and Grim & Evil. On June 18, Betty Cohen, who had served as Cartoon Network's president since its founding, left due to creative disagreements with Jamie Kellner, then-head of Turner Broadcasting. On August 22, Jim Samples was appointed general manager and Executive Vice President of the network, replacing Cohen. Adult Swim
Adult Swim
debuted on September 2, with an episode of Home Movies; the block initially aired on Sunday nights, with a repeat telecast on Thursdays. The initial lineup consisted of Harvey Birdman: Attorney at Law, Sealab 2021, The Brak Show, Aqua Teen Hunger Force, and Space Ghost
Space Ghost
Coast to Coast. In 2002, Whatever Happened to... Robot Jones?
Whatever Happened to... Robot Jones?
and Codename: Kids Next Door premiered; the former was short-lived, but the latter became a juggernaut for the network in the mid-2000s. The first theatrical film based on a Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
series, The Powerpuff Girls
The Powerpuff Girls
Movie, was released on July 3, 2002. It received generally positive reviews from critics and grossed $16.4 million globally on a budget of $11 million.[23] On October 1 of that year, Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
celebrated their tenth anniversary, with a montage showcasing the network's various phases over the years. 2003 saw the debuts of The Grim Adventures of Billy & Mandy and Evil Con Carne, both spinoffs of Grim & Evil. On October 3, the Cartoon Cartoon Fridays block was rebooted in a live-action format as "Fridays", hosted by Tommy Snider and Nzinga Blake (2003–2004), the latter of which was later replaced by Tara Sands (2005–2007). It aired several new Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
series, most of which did not bear the "Cartoon Cartoon" sub-brand. Acquired shows started picking up again with Totally Spies!
Totally Spies!
the following year in the fall.

Cartoon Network's second logo, used in various forms and styles from June 14, 2004 to May 28, 2010.

In 2004, Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
premiered three new original series: Megas XLR, Foster's Home for Imaginary Friends, and Hi Hi Puffy AmiYumi, and Code Lyoko
Code Lyoko
(which was also an acquired series). On June 14, Cartoon Network rebranded, which included an updated version of its original logo (with the checkerboard motif retained and the "C" and "N" being the centerpiece) and a new slogan, "This is Cartoon Network!"[24] The bumpers introduced as part of the rebrand featured 2D cartoon characters from its shows interacting in a CGI city composed of sets from their shows. These bumpers lasted from 2004 to 2007. By now, nearly all of Cartoon Network's classic programming had been relocated to its sister network Boomerang to make way for new programming. 2005 saw the debuts of four more original series: The Life and Times of Juniper Lee, Camp Lazlo, My Gym Partner's a Monkey, and Ben 10. On August 22, Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
launched a block aimed at the preschool demographic known as Tickle U; shows on the block included Gordon the Garden Gnome, Harry and His Bucket Full of Dinosaurs, Peppa Pig, Firehouse Tales, and Gerald McBoing-Boing. The block was largely unsuccessful and was discontinued in 2007. From 2005 to 2008, most of the network's older Cartoon Cartoons
Cartoon Cartoons
(such as Dexter's Laboratory
Dexter's Laboratory
and The Powerpuff Girls) could be viewed in segments on a half-hour block known as The Cartoon Cartoon Show.[25] After its predecessor, What a Cartoon!, Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
created an all-new animated short series consisting of overseas shorts, pilots, college shorts, or even shorts created for the show itself. That show was called Sunday Pants; it first aired on the day of October 2, 2005. Sunday Pants
Sunday Pants
varies on different types of animation, from traditional hand-drawn animation to Flash, or even CGI, possibly making it similar to other shows such as Liquid Television
Liquid Television
on MTV
MTV
or KaBlam!
KaBlam!
on Nickelodeon. The show was created by Craig "Sven" Gordon and Stuart Hill, and was produced at Spitfire Studios. The show has a similar concept to What a Cartoon!, except that the shorts are 1–3 minutes long and the show is squeezed to be 23 minutes (without commercials). There are animated and live-action intervals in-between shorts. The live-action ones are performed by American band The Slacks, while the animated ones are animated by WeFail. The show lasted for less than a month, with its final airing taking place on October 23, 2005. In January 2006, the show was announced to be returning the month after but said return never came to fruition and the series was ultimately cancelled. Two new Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
original series premiered in 2006: Squirrel Boy and Class of 3000. Three made-for-TV movies debuted this year: Codename: Kids Next Door – Operation Z.E.R.O., Foster's Home for Imaginary Friends: Good Wilt Hunting, and Re-Animated, the latter of which was the network's first live-action TV movie and a collaboration between live-action and animation. Samples resigned from his post on February 9, 2007, following a bomb scare in Boston caused by packages left around the city that were part of an outdoor marketing campaign promoting the Adult Swim
Adult Swim
series Aqua Teen Hunger Force.[26][27] On May 2, Stuart Snyder was named Samples' successor.[28] On September 1, the network's look was revamped, with bumpers and station IDs themed to The Hives
The Hives
song "Fall is Just Something That Grown-Ups Invented." 2007 saw the debut of Out of Jimmy's Head, a spin-off of the movie Re-Animated, and the first live-action Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
series. 2007 also saw the debut of the series Chowder. In late 2007, The network began broadcasting programs from Canadian channels such as YTV and Teletoon, including George of the Jungle, 6teen, Storm Hawks, League of Super Evil, Chaotic, Bakugan Battle Brawlers, Stoked, and the Total Drama
Total Drama
series. Each October from 2007 to 2009, Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
also re-ran 40 episodes of the former Fox Kids
Fox Kids
series Goosebumps. Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
announced at its 2008 upfront that it was working on a new project called The Cartoonstitute, which was headed by animators Craig McCracken
Craig McCracken
as executive producer and Rob Renzetti as supervising producer. Both reported to Rob Sorcher, who created the idea. It would have worked similar to What a Cartoon!, by creating at least 150 pieces of animation within 20 months.[29] Cartoonstitute was eventually cancelled,[citation needed] and out of all the shorts, two or three, Regular Show, Secret Mountain Fort Awesome
Secret Mountain Fort Awesome
and Uncle Grandpa, were selected, after animator Craig McCracken
Craig McCracken
(creator of The Powerpuff Girls and Foster's Home for Imaginary Friends) left the network after 15 years in 2009.[citation needed] On September 20, 2008, Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
ended Toonami
Toonami
after its 11-year run.[30] From 2008 to 2010, Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
aired animated shorts that served as interstitials between programs, called Wedgies, which included The Talented Mr. Bixby, Nacho Bear, Big Baby and The Bremen Avenue Experience. On July 14, 2008, the network took on a refreshed look created by Tristan Eaton and animated by Crew972. The bumpers of that era had white, faceless characters called Noods, based on the DIY toy, Munny. These characters had many variations that made them look like characters from different CN shows. The standard network logo was changed to be white, adopting different colors based on the occasion in the same style.[31] In June 2009, Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
introduced a block of live-action reality shows called "CN Real", featuring programs such as The Othersiders, Survive This, BrainRush, Destroy Build Destroy, Dude, What Would Happen and Bobb'e Says.[32] The network also aired some limited sports programming, including basketball recaps and Slamball games, during commercial breaks. That year, it also started airing live-action feature films from Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
and New Line Cinema. 2010s

A variation of the network's current logo which resembles its original logo, used as of 2010[update]. It is also used as the production logo at the end of their shows since November 10, 2016 and on some of its merchandising products along with the 1992 logo.

A new identity for the channel was introduced on May 29, 2010, along with a new theme and new bumpers, and a new tagline, "CHECK it". The branding, designed by Brand New School, makes heavy use of the black and white checkerboard which made up the network's first logo (and was carried over in a minimized form to the second logo), as well as various CMYK
CMYK
color variations and various patterns.[33] On December 27, 2010, Adult Swim
Adult Swim
expanded by one hour, moving its start time from 10 p.m. to 9 p.m. ET.[34] In February 2011, Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
aired its first sports award show Hall of Game Awards, hosted that year by professional skateboarder Tony Hawk. At its 2011 upfront, Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
announced 14 new series, including Adventure Time, Regular Show, The Problem Solverz (originally planned for Adult Swim, but switched to CN for being "too cute"), The Looney Tunes
Looney Tunes
Show, Secret Mountain Fort Awesome, Level Up (a scripted live-action comedy series with a 90-minute precursor film), Tower Prep, Green Lantern, Dragons: Riders of Berk (a series based on the DreamWorks film, How to Train Your Dragon), The Amazing World of Gumball, Total Drama: Revenge of the Island, the 4th season of Total Drama; ThunderCats, Ninjago: Masters of Spinjitzu and Ben 10: Omniverse.[35] The network announced it planned to debut a new programming block called DC Nation
DC Nation
which would focus on the DC superheroes, the first being the series Green Lantern.[36] After announcing two new live-action shows in Unnatural History and Tower Prep, which were both cancelled after their first seasons, Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
acquired the game show, Hole in the Wall (originally aired on Fox). By the end of 2011, Hole in the Wall and the final two CN Real shows, Destroy Build Destroy
Destroy Build Destroy
and Dude, What Would Happen? were removed from Cartoon Network's schedule completely. In 2012, Cartoon Network acquired the television rights to The High Fructose Adventures of Annoying Orange, based on the web series, The Annoying Orange
The Annoying Orange
and added it to its primetime lineup.[37] On February 2, 2012, Corus Entertainment
Corus Entertainment
and Astral Media, owners of Teletoon, announced they would launch a Canadian version of Cartoon Network that also includes a version of the U.S. network's Adult Swim nighttime block.[38] The channel launched on July 4, 2012.[39] On March 18, 2012, Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
aired its first documentary, Speak Up, an anti-bullying campaign featuring a special appearance by President Barack Obama.[40] On April 28, 2013, the network aired the CNN
CNN
half-hour documentary The Bully Effect, which details the story of teenager Alex Libby and his struggle with bullying in high school.[41] The special is based on the 2011 film Bully directed by Lee Hirsch.[41] To celebrate the 20th anniversary of Cartoon Network, the Cartoon Planet block was revived on March 30, 2012, now airing the channel's original programming from the late 1990s through mid-2000s.[42] From October 1 to November 4, 2012, Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
celebrated its 20th birthday, airing birthday and party-themed reruns of its shows. In 2012, Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
announced new programming for the upcoming year, including the live-action series Incredible Crew; the animated series Teen Titans
Teen Titans
Go!, Uncle Grandpa, Steven Universe, I Heart Tuesdays, Clarence, Total Drama: All-Stars, Grojband, Beware the Batman, The Tom and Jerry
Tom and Jerry
Show, and Legends of Chima; and a new Powerpuff Girls special, the latter of which aired on January 20, 2014. On May 20, 2013, Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
gave a refresh to its look by adding new bumpers, graphics, and sounds. A short animation was created for each show, and these animations were used when featuring the show in Next bumpers. The background used in its promos and bumpers was also changed from black to white.[43] On March 6, 2014, Stuart Snyder was confirmed to have been removed as president and COO of Turner's Animation, Young Adults & Kids Media division after company changes.[44] On July 16, 2014, Christina Miller was named his successor as president and general manager of Cartoon Network, Adult Swim, and Boomerang.[45] On March 31, 2014, Cartoon Network's 8 pm ET/PT primetime hour was given to its night time block Adult Swim, causing new episodes of the network's programming to change timeslots.[46] On October 21, 2014, Cartoon Network, along with CNN
CNN
and Boomerang, were taken off the Dish Network
Dish Network
in the United States after Turner Broadcasting declined to renew its contract with the Dish Network.[47] The channels were restored on November 21, 2014. On May 30, 2016, Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
USA refreshed the channel with a new graphics package based on previous rebrands in the Check It family called "Dimensional". The new graphics were developed by Bent Design Lab and feature various characters in 3D CGI, stop-motion, and 2D graphic techniques. Branding and marketing agency Troika developed the "Dimensional" style guide, a list of rules on how the graphics should be implemented on the channel.[48] In September 2016, the network took back an extra hour from its Adult Swim
Adult Swim
block, ending its broadcasting daily at 9 pm in order to air new episodes of Regular Show
Regular Show
later. This was later reversed. On October 22, 2016, AT&T reached a deal to buy Time Warner
Time Warner
for $108.7 billion. If approved by federal regulators, the merger would bring Time Warner's properties, including Cartoon Network, under the same umbrella as AT&T's telecommunication holdings, including satellite provider DirecTV.[49][50] To celebrate the network's 25th anniversary, Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
made an exhibit called "Cartoon Network: 25 Years of Drawing on Creativity" in partnership with the Paley Center, with showings from September 16 to October 8 in their New York City
New York City
location, and will move to their Beverly Hills
Beverly Hills
location with showings from October 14 to November 19.[51] On January 26, 2018, the network announced that it will launch a brand new cruise ship, the Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
Wave, in late 2018, in a partnership between Turner Broadcasting and Oceanic Group.[52][53] Programming Main article: List of programs broadcast by Cartoon Network Cartoon Network's current programming includes original animated series such as Adventure Time, The Amazing World of Gumball, and Steven Universe, as well as acquired programming from other studios, which as of January 2018 includes Lego Ninjago: Masters of Spinjitzu, Teen Titans
Teen Titans
Go!, Justice League
Justice League
Action, and Unikitty. In the past, Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
has also produced live-action programming, such as the live-action/animated hybrids Out of Jimmy's Head
Out of Jimmy's Head
and The High Fructose Adventures of Annoying Orange, and shows such as Level Up, Tower Prep, and Incredible Crew. In addition, Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
reruns various Looney Tunes
Looney Tunes
and Tom and Jerry cartoons, which have been in constant rotation since the network's launch in 1992. In its early days, Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
benefited from having access to a large collection of animated programming, including the libraries of Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
( Looney Tunes
Looney Tunes
and Merrie Melodies), Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
( Tom and Jerry
Tom and Jerry
and other series), and Hanna-Barbera
Hanna-Barbera
(The Flintstones, Scooby-Doo, Snorks, and others). Turner's ownership of Hanna-Barbera
Hanna-Barbera
gave the network access to an established animation studio, something chief rival Nickelodeon
Nickelodeon
did not yet have.[54] Original series See also: Cartoon Cartoons Much of Cartoon Network's original programming originates from the network's in-house studio, Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
Studios. Beginning as a division of Hanna-Barbera, this studio would produce some of the network's earliest original series, including Dexter's Laboratory, Cow and Chicken, I Am Weasel, Johnny Bravo, and The Powerpuff Girls. Cartoon Cartoons
Cartoon Cartoons
was once the branding for Cartoon Network's original animated television series, but it has seldom been used by the network since 2003. Programming blocks By the early 2000s, Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
had established programming blocks aimed at different age demographics. The shows broadcast during the early morning had preschoolers as their target audience and mostly had prosocial behavior as a theme. The Toonami
Toonami
programming block, featured later in the day, mostly included anime shows and its target audience was tweens and teenagers. Prime time
Prime time
shows mostly included classic cartoons, featured as part of The Tex Avery Show, The Chuck Jones Show and The Bob Clampett Show. Current programming blocks

Adult Swim
Adult Swim
- A night time program block aimed at young adults, which airs content unsuitable for children. It does not feature any advertising for Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
programming and, due to its long runtime and different demographics, is branded as a separate channel. Adult Swim
Adult Swim
airs a mix of live-action and animated comedies, including both original series such as Rick and Morty
Rick and Morty
and Aqua Teen Hunger Force, as well as acquired programming like FOX
FOX
shows and Japanese animation, aired under the Toonami
Toonami
branding. Adult Swim
Adult Swim
is currently broadcast from 8:00 p.m. to 6:00 a.m. ET/PT; its starting time has changed various times, from 11:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. and to 9:00 p.m. New New New New - A Friday night premiere block that airs from 6:00  to 8:00 p.m. ET. Originally launched in January 2017 as Friday Party!, new episodes of Teen Titans
Teen Titans
Go!, The Amazing World of Gumball, We Bare Bears, and OK K.O.! Let's Be Heroes
OK K.O.! Let's Be Heroes
are showcased. This block marked the return of Friday night premieres, which had not been seen on the network in 10 years; the last block to premiere episodes on Friday nights was Cartoon Cartoon Fridays, which ran from 1999 to 2007.

Marketing Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
shows with established fan followings, such as Dexter's Laboratory, allowed the network to pursue licensing agreements with companies interested in selling series-related merchandise. For example, agreements with Kraft Foods
Kraft Foods
led to widespread in-store advertising for Cartoon Network-related products. The network also worked on cross-promotion campaigns with both Kraft and Tower Records. In product development and marketing, the network has benefited from its relation to corporate parent Time Warner, allowing for mutually beneficial relationships with various subsidiary companies.[55] Time Warner
Time Warner
Cable, the former cable television subsidiary of the corporate parent (which was spun off from Time Warner
Time Warner
in 2009), distributes Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
as part of its packages. Turner Broadcasting System, the subsidiary overseeing various Time Warner-owned networks, helped cross-promote Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
shows and at times arranged for swapping certain shows between the networks. For example, Samurai Jack, one of CN's original shows, was at times seen at Kids' WB, while Cardcaptors, an anime licensed by Kids' WB, was at times seen at Cartoon Network. In each case, the swap intended to cultivate a shared audience for the two networks. Time Inc., the former subsidiary overseeing the magazines of the corporate parent, ensured favorable coverage of Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
and advertising space across its publications. Printed advertisements for CN shows could appear in magazines such as Time, Entertainment Weekly
Entertainment Weekly
and Sports Illustrated Kids until Time Inc.
Time Inc.
was spun off from Time Warner
Time Warner
on June 9, 2014. AOL, a now-former sibling company to Time Warner
Time Warner
covering Internet services, helped promote Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
shows online by offering exclusive contents for certain animated series, online sweepstakes and display advertising for CN.[55] Warner Home Video, the home video subsidiary, distributed VHS tapes, DVDs and Blu-ray Discs featuring Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
shows. Select Warner Bros. Family Entertainment VHS releases came with bonus cartoons from Cartoon Network. Rhino Entertainment, the former record label subsidiary of the corporate parent (which was spun off from Time Warner in 2004), distributed cassette tapes and CDs with Cartoon Network-related music. These products were also available through the Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
Studio Store. DC Comics, the comic book subsidiary, published a series featuring the Powerpuff Girls, indicating it could handle other CN-related characters. Warner Bros., the film studio subsidiary, released The Powerpuff Girls
The Powerpuff Girls
Movie in 2002. Kevin Sandler considered it likely that the film would find its way to HBO
HBO
or Cinemax, two television network subsidiaries which regularly broadcast feature films. Sandler also viewed book tie-ins through Warner Books as likely, since it was the only area of marketing not covered yet by 2001.[55] Controversy and censorship Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
has, during its history, broadcast most of the Warner Bros. animated shorts originally created between the 1920s and the 1960s, but the network edited out scenes depicting discharge of gunfire, alcohol ingestion, cowboys and Indians gags, tobacco, and politically incorrect humor. The unedited versions were kept from both broadcasting and wide release on the video market. Coal Black and de Sebben Dwarfs (1943), a politically incorrect but critically well-regarded short, was notably omitted entirely, while The Scarlet Pumpernickel (1950) and Feed the Kitty
Feed the Kitty
(1952), both well-regarded, had their finales heavily edited due to violence.[56] There was media attention in June 2001 over a network decision concerning further omissions from broadcasting. Cartoon Network formerly scheduled a 49-hour-long marathon annually known as June Bugs, promising to broadcast every Bugs Bunny animated short in chronological order. The network originally intended to include 12 shorts for its 2001 airing of the marathon (some of them part of the Censored Eleven list of Merrie Melodies
Merrie Melodies
and Looney Tunes
Looney Tunes
cartoons effectively shelved from distribution) that had become controversial for using ethnic stereotypes, albeit broadcasting them past midnight to ensure few children were watching, with introductions concerning their historic value as representatives of another time. The network's corporate parent, however, considered it likely that there would be complaints concerning racial insensitivity. This led to all 12 being omitted in their entirety. Laurie Goldberg, vice-president of public relations, defended the decision, stating, "We're the leader in animation, but we're also one of the top-rated general entertainment networks. There are certain responsibilities that come with that".[56] Related projects Adult Swim Main article: Adult Swim Adult Swim
Adult Swim
(often stylized as [adult swim] or [as]) is a teen/adult-oriented nighttime programming service that airs on Cartoon Network from 8:00 p.m. to 6:00 a.m. ET/PT in the United States, and broadcasts in countries such as Australia
Australia
and New Zealand; Adult Swim
Adult Swim
is treated by Nielsen as a separate network in its ratings reports (similar to the company's ratings treatment of Nickelodeon, Nick at Nite
Nick at Nite
and the now-defunct Nickmom) due to differing target demographics between it and Cartoon Network.[1] The network features myriad stylistically variable animated and live-action shows, including original programming, syndicated shows mainly consisting of Fox animated programming, and Japanese anime, generally with minimal or no editing for content. The programs featured on Adult Swim
Adult Swim
are geared toward a mature audience, in contrast to the originally all-ages young teen and preteen daytime programming on Cartoon Network. Adult Swim
Adult Swim
moved its start time up an hour at 8 pm on March 31, 2014. Toonami Main article: Toonami Toonami
Toonami
(a portmanteau of "cartoon" and "tsunami", suggesting a "tidal wave" of animated cartoons) is a brand of Cartoon Network, used initially for action-oriented programming blocks on Cartoon Network television channels worldwide, mostly showing American cartoons and Japanese anime, originating in the United States on March 17, 1997, and ending on September 20, 2008. It was revived on May 26, 2012, as a Saturday night anime block on Adult Swim, reclaiming their Saturday anime lineup, similar to its previous mature-geared "Midnight Run" incarnation which was that block's forerunner. The host was a muscular teenage robot named TOM, voiced by Steven Blum. The Toonami
Toonami
brand was subsequently used in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
as the name of an action-oriented animation channel with two CGI hosts. It replaced a former Cartoon Network-owned channel, CNX, which had been a Toonami/live-action hybrid network. Toonami
Toonami
was launched as a 24-hour channel in Asia in December 2011, in India in February 2015 and in France in February 2016. "It really is the ultimate home of the action hero," said Sunny Saha from Turner International.[57] Boomerang Main article: Boomerang (TV channel) Boomerang began as a programming block on Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
on December 8, 1992, and continued until October 2004, aimed towards the Baby Boom generation. The block's start time changed frequently but was always aired in the weekends. On April 1, 2000, Boomerang received a new look and was spun off into its own cable channel.[58] In 2017, an online Boomerang video-on-demand service was launched. The SVOD service is the only platform that airs new episodes of “Scooby-Doo”, “Looney Tunes” and “Tom & Jerry”.[59] Move It Movement Move It Movement (previously named Get Animated) is a campaign of the channel, encouraging children to get active, more importantly in outdoor areas.[60] The program is designed "to provide support and encouragement in the ongoing battle against childhood obesity."[61] The Get Animated campaign was launched on February 28, 2005.[62]

Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
On Demand Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
On Demand is a video on demand service, which launched in 2002, and allows viewers to watch the latest episodes of the most Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
programming. These Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
episodes can be rented and are available in widescreen and in high definition. Some on-demand programs for Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
will restrict the ability to fast forward if the episode is fairly new. If the program cannot fast forward, the intro will be replaced by an advisory bumper saying: "You're watching Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
On Demand, Fast-Forward is not available during this program".[63] High definition channels and service A high definition feed of Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
is available on many cable and all satellite service providers. The high definition feed was launched on October 15, 2007. Like all Turner networks, 4:3-sourced content is stretched on the high definition feed to fill the 16:9 aspect ratio. The network's HD content airs with letterboxing on the standard definition channel, and since May 13, 2013, the high definition feed is downscaled by the provider for the standard definition feed, resulting in all programming appearing in a 16:9 ratio with letterboxing. Unlike the other Turner networks, standard definition advertising is also stretched into 16:9 mode. Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
Studios Main article: Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
Studios Cartoon Network Studios
Cartoon Network Studios
is a production studio located in the network's West Coast headquarters of Burbank, California, which serves as the network's first animation studio division to provide original programs for the network. While the studio makes original programs for the network, original Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
shows like The Moxy Show, Big Bag, Cow and Chicken, I.M. Weasel, Mike, Lu & Og, Ed, Edd n Eddy, Courage the Cowardly Dog, Sheep in the Big City, Codename: Kids Next Door, The Secret Saturdays, and Sunday Pants
Sunday Pants
were all co-produced by the network itself without the studio. Williams Street Main article: Williams Street Williams Street
Williams Street
Productions is the adult production studio division that provides original program to the network's late-night program Adult Swim, that is located in Atlanta, Georgia, along with the main headquarters of the network. Cartoon Network Studios
Cartoon Network Studios
Europe Main article: Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
Development Studio Europe Cartoon Network Studios
Cartoon Network Studios
Europe (formerly known as Cartoon Network Development Studio Europe), is the network's European production studio division that is located in London, England
England
which provides other original programs but from the United Kingdom. Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
Productions Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
Productions is the distribution arm of the channel. Since 1994, it distributed all of the network's shows, pilots, and films made within and outside the United States through various Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
channels around the world. Mobile app Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
has a mobile app that provides the latest full episodes, a live stream from the East and West coast, and games, as well as the network's schedule. Video games Main article: List of Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
video games In 2011, Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
characters were featured in a four-player mascot brawler fighting game similar to Nintendo's Super Smash Bros. video game series called Cartoon Network: Punch Time Explosion for the Nintendo
Nintendo
3DS. The game was later released for the Xbox 360, PlayStation 3
PlayStation 3
and the Wii
Wii
as Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
Punch Time Explosion XL. Several video games based on the cartoon series Ben 10 were released by Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
as well. The Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
website also features various flash games incorporating characters from various Cartoon Network franchises. For example, FusionFall which was a massive multiplayer game released on January 14, 2009, and shut down on August 29, 2013. Online See also: Cartoon Orbit Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
registered its official website, CartoonNetwork.com, on January 9, 1996. It officially launched on July 27, 1998.[64] Sam Register served as the site's Senior Vice President and Creative Director from 1997 to 2001.[65] In its early years, small studios partnered with the network to produce exclusive "Web Premiere Toons", short cartoons made specifically for CartoonNetwork.com.[66] More about animation was included in the "Department of Cartoons", which featured storyboards, episode guides, backgrounds, sound and video files, model sheets, production notes, and other information about shows on the network. In January 1999, the Department of Cartoons showcased the "MGM Golden Age Collection", most of which had not been published or even seen in more than 50 years.[67] Cartoon Network launched Cartoon Orbit, an online gaming network characterized by digital trading cards called "cToons", in October 2000.[68] The game officially ended on October 16, 2006. In October 2000, CartoonNetwork.com outdid its rival Nickelodeon's website in terms of unique users, scoring 2.12 million compared to Nick.com's 1.95 million.[69] In July 2007, Nielsen ratings data showed visitors spent an average of 77 minutes on the site, surpassing the previous record of 71 minutes set in 2004, and the site ranked 26th in terms of time spent for all US domains.[70][71] International channels

This section needs expansion. You can help by adding to it. (October 2015)

Main article: List of international Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
channels Since the inception of Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
and Boomerang, Turner has set up international feeds of both networks.[72][73] See also

Book: Cartoon Network

Cartoonito Tooncast List of international Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
channels

Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
portal Animation
Animation
portal Television in the United States portal Companies portal Atlanta
Atlanta
portal Greater Los Angeles portal

References

^ a b "Adult Swim/CN Split Cements Strategy". ICv2. GCO. March 3, 2005. Retrieved November 30, 2012.  ^ "Cable Network Coverage Area Household Universe Estimates: January 2016". Broadcasting & Cable. NewBay Media. January 31, 2016. Retrieved November 6, 2016.  ^ Delugach, Al (March 4, 1986). "Way Cleared for Turner's MGM Deal". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved August 30, 2010.  ^ Hall, Jane (January 23, 1990). "Ted Turner's TNT Exploding Onto the Cable Scene". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved August 30, 2010.  ^ "Turner Buying Hanna-Barbera". The New York Times. The New York Times Company. October 30, 1991. Retrieved June 13, 2012.  ^ a b Carter, Bill (February 19, 1992). "THE MEDIA BUSINESS; Turner Broadcasting Plans To Start a Cartoon Channel". The New York Times. The New York Times
The New York Times
Company. Retrieved April 28, 2013.  ^ Winfrey, Lee (October 4, 1992). "That's All Cartoons, Folks – 24 Hours Daily". The Philadelphia
Philadelphia
Inquirer. Philadelphia
Philadelphia
Media Network. Archived from the original on February 4, 2014. Retrieved May 31, 2013.  ^ "New Network Sold Out to Toon of First 3 Months". The Hollywood Reporter. Prometheus Global Media: 81. September 11, 1992.  ^ a b Scott, Jeffry (October 1, 1992). "Turner's 5th: The Cartoon Network". The Free Lance-Star. Retrieved May 30, 2011.  ^ Partible, Van (October 1, 2012). "CN TWENTY". VanPartible.com. Archived from the original on May 23, 2013. Retrieved October 2, 2012.  ^ " Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
off to a slow start". Observer-Reporter. October 1, 1992. Retrieved September 3, 2011.  ^ a b c Mittell (2004), p. 80 ^ Winfrey, Lee (February 12, 1995). " Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
Brings Some Fresh Faces To Life". Chicago Tribune. Tribune Company. Retrieved November 30, 2012.  ^ a b c d Mittell (2004), p. 82-83 ^ a b Stabile, Harrison (2003), p. 98-99 ^ Stabile, Harrison (2003), p. 100 ^ a b Strike, Joe (July 15, 2003). "The Fred Seibert Interview – Part 1". Animation
Animation
World Network. Retrieved August 30, 2010.  ^ "Mike, Lu And Og (1996) – What A Cartoon! Show Cartoon Episode Guide". Big Cartoon DataBase. Retrieved November 30, 2012.  ^ Lander, Mark (September 23, 1995). "Turner To Merge Into Time Warner; A $7.5 Billion Deal". The New York Times. The New York Times Company. Retrieved July 30, 2010.  ^ Sellers, John (November 16, 2001). "Equal 'Justice'?". Entertainment Weekly. Time Inc.
Time Inc.
Retrieved April 28, 2013.  ^ Arnold, Gordon B. (November 28, 2016). Animation
Animation
and the American Imagination: A Brief History. ABC-CLIO. ISBN 9781440833601.  ^ Goldmark, Daniel; Taylor, Yuval (January 1, 2002). The Cartoon Music Book. Chicago Review Press. p. 159. Retrieved February 27, 2017.  ^ " The Powerpuff Girls
The Powerpuff Girls
Movie (2002) - Box Office Mojo". boxofficemojo.com.  ^ " Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
Launches New On-air Re-face and Supplemental Logo to Kick Off Summer". Time Warner. June 28, 2004. Retrieved August 12, 2010.  ^ "The Fall of Cartoon Network". themarysue.com.  ^ "Two held after ad campaign triggers Boston bomb scare". CNN. February 1, 2007. Retrieved July 30, 2010.  ^ " Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
Boss Quits Over Bomb Scare". CNN. February 9, 2007. Retrieved May 5, 2009.  ^ Romano, Allison (October 21, 2007). "Stuart Snyder: The Perfect Combination". Broadcasting & Cable. Retrieved August 13, 2010.  ^ Moody, Annemarie (April 3, 2008). " Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
Upfront Presentation Announcements". Animation
Animation
World Network. Retrieved July 14, 2011.  ^ " Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
to End Toonami
Toonami
on September 20". Anime
Anime
News Network. September 20, 2008. Retrieved June 12, 2011.  ^ Cone, Justin (January 13, 2009). "Capacity: Cartoon Network Rebrand". Motionographer. Retrieved October 24, 2012.  ^ Lloyd, Robert (June 17, 2009). "Cartoon Network's new reality shows, kid style". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved July 30, 2010.  ^ Schneider, Michael (May 28, 2010). " Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
unveils new logo, image campaign". Variety. Archived from the original on January 3, 2012. Retrieved July 25, 2012.  ^ Crupi, Anthony (February 14, 2010). " Adult Swim
Adult Swim
Preps for Deeper Dive Into Prime". Adweek. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved July 13, 2011.  ^ " Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
Continues the Funny and Builds on Success". Facebook.com. Cartoon Network. March 23, 2011. Retrieved August 7, 2011.  ^ DeMott, Rick (March 23, 2011). " Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
Builds on Brands, Launches DC Nation
DC Nation
Block". Animation
Animation
World Network. Retrieved July 12, 2011.  ^ " Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
signs 'Annoying Orange'". Bakersfield.com. November 22, 2011. Archived from the original on February 2, 2014. Retrieved October 24, 2012.  ^ Harris, Bill (February 2, 2012). " Teletoon
Teletoon
launching Canadian Cartoon Network". Toronto Sun. Sun Media. Retrieved November 30, 2012.  ^ " Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
and Adult Swim
Adult Swim
Launch in Canada Today". newswire.com (Press release). CNW Group. PR Newswire. July 4, 2012. Retrieved November 30, 2012.  ^ "Obama Denounces Bullying On Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
Documentary, 'Speak Up' (VIDEO)". The Huffington Post. AOL. March 19, 2012. Retrieved November 30, 2012.  ^ a b Weisman, Jon (April 15, 2013). "Documentary follows subject of feature doc 'Bully'". Variety. Retrieved April 28, 2013.  ^ Walton, Zach (March 29, 2012). " Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
Brings Back The Classics With Cartoon Planet". WebProNews. iEntry Network. Retrieved March 31, 2012.  ^ "Listen & Look: New Work for Cartoon Network". Impactist. June 4, 2013. Retrieved February 6, 2014.  ^ Stuart Snyder Out at Turner. Variety.com Retrieved on March 18, 2014. ^ Christina Miller Tapped to Head Cartoon Network, Adult Swim
Adult Swim
and Boomerang. Animation
Animation
World Network. Retrieved on July 16, 2014. ^ "[adult swim] on Twitter". Twitter.  ^ Roger Yu, USA TODAY (October 21, 2014). "Turner networks taken off Dish lineup on contract row". USA TODAY.  ^ " Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
And Troika Develops Dimensional Rebrand Style Guide". RegularCapital.com. Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
International. Retrieved September 18, 2016.  ^ Yu, Roger (October 22, 2016). "AT&T agrees to buy Time Warner for more than $80B". USA Today. Retrieved October 22, 2016.  ^ Gryta, Thomas; Hagey, Keach; Cimmiluca, Dana (October 22, 2016). "AT&T Reaches Deal to Buy Time Warner
Time Warner
for $86 Billion". The Wall Street Journal. Retrieved October 22, 2016.  ^ "Paley Center Hosting Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
25th Anniversary Exhibit". Animation
Animation
Magazine. August 29, 2017.  ^ Street, Francesca (January 26, 2018). " Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
reveals colorful new cruise ship". CNN
CNN
Travel.  ^ "Cartoon Network-branded Cruise Ship to Set Sail in Late 2018". Turner (Press release). January 24, 2018.  ^ Stabile, Harrison (2003), p. 98 ^ a b c Stabile, Harrison (2003), p. 101-102 ^ a b Stabile, Harrison (2003), p. 105-107 ^ Anil Wanvari. "Indian Television Dot Com — Toonami
Toonami
to launch in Hong Kong on 1 December". indiantelevision.com.  ^ King, Susan (April 1, 2000). " Hanna-Barbera
Hanna-Barbera
Cartoons Return on New Boomerang". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved August 31, 2010.  ^ Spangler, Todd (March 7, 2017). "Turner, Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
to Launch Boomerang Cartoon Streaming-Subscription Service for $5 Monthly". Variety. Retrieved November 10, 2017.  ^ "Move It Movement". Cartoon Network. Retrieved December 27, 2012.  ^ " Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
Launches Third Annual MOVE IT MOVEMENT TOUR". Turner Newsroom. Retrieved December 27, 2012.  ^ Bynum, Aaron H. (February 16, 2005). "CN Upfront: Healthy Lifestyles Initiative". Animation
Animation
Insider. Archived from the original on May 14, 2013. Retrieved January 22, 2013.  ^ Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
On Demand Bumper on YouTube ^ "The Toons Are Taking Over the Web with Launch of CartoonNetwork.com". Time Warner. July 27, 1998. Retrieved June 5, 2013.  ^ DeMott, Rick (November 27, 2007). "Register Inks Deal with Warners". Animation
Animation
World Network. Retrieved January 19, 2013.  ^ Burr, Ty (April 9, 1999). "Now playing on a PC near you". Entertainment Weekly. Time Inc.
Time Inc.
Retrieved January 19, 2013.  ^ "CartoonNetwork.com to Showcase Never-Before-Published Animation from MGM's Golden Age Beginning January 18". Business Wire. January 19, 1999. Retrieved November 15, 2013.  ^ "CartoonNetwork.com to Launch Cartoon Orbit". Time Warner. September 12, 2000. Retrieved March 16, 2009.  ^ Kempner, Matt (December 15, 2000). " Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
is Adding Punch to Its Online Presence". The Atlanta
Atlanta
Journal-Constitution. p. 8H.  ^ Ball, Ryan (August 23, 2007). "CartoonNetwork.com Hits Visitor High". Animation
Animation
Magazine. Retrieved December 28, 2012.  ^ DeMott, Rick (August 24, 2007). "CartoonNetwork.com Sets Sticky Record". Animation
Animation
World Network. Retrieved December 28, 2012.  ^ Newcomb, Horace (2014). Encyclopedia of Television. Routledge. p. 469. ISBN 1135194726.  ^ "Cartoon Network – International Sites". Turner Broadcasting System. Retrieved October 3, 2015. 

Bibliography

Mittell, Jason (2004). Genre and Television: From Cop Shows to Cartoons in American Culture. Routledge. ISBN 978-0-415-96903-1  Stabile, Carol A.; Harrison, Mark (2003). Prime Time Animation:Television Animation
Animation
and American culture. Routledge. ISBN 978-0-415-28326-7 

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Cartoon Network.

Official website

v t e

Cartoon Network

Programs & blocks (U.S.)

Current

Adult Swim

programming

Boomerang

programming

Toonami

programming Jetstream

Former

Acme Hour Cartoon Cartoons Cartoon Planet DC Nation High Noon Toons Tickle-U

International channels

Asia and Oceania (TBSAP)

Australia
Australia
& New Zealand India Japan Pakistan & Bangladesh Philippines Southeast Asia South Korea Taiwan

Europe, the Middle East, & Africa (TBSE)

Arab World Arab World, Africa and Cyprus Central and Eastern Europe Russia and Southeastern Europe France Germany Israel (television block) Italy Netherlands and Flanders Pan-Nordic Poland Portugal Spain (via Boing) Turkey United Kingdom
United Kingdom
& Ireland

The Americas (TBSLA & Corus)

Canada (Adult Swim) Latin America

Studios

Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
Studios Cartoon Network Studios
Cartoon Network Studios
Europe Williams Street

Albums

Space Ghost
Space Ghost
Coast to Coast Modern Music for Swinging Superheroes Space Ghost's Musical Bar-B-Que Space Ghost's Surf & Turf Dexter's Laboratory: The Musical Time Machine Cartoon Medley The Powerpuff Girls
The Powerpuff Girls
albums Dexter's Laboratory: The Hip-Hop Experiment Hi Hi Puffy AmiYumi The Music of Ooo

See also

AKA Cartoon Network Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
Too Cartoon Network, LP v. CSC Holdings, Inc. Cartoon Orbit Cartoonito Children's programming on TBS and TNT CNX Hall of Game Awards Hanna-Barbera List of Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
video games Boing

Italy Spain France Africa

Pogo Tooncast

Category Portal Book

Links to related articles

v t e

Toonami
Toonami
programming and soundtracks

Toonami
Toonami
(France) Toonami
Toonami
(India)

Former:

Toonami
Toonami
(Asia) Toonami
Toonami
(Australia) Toonami
Toonami
(UK & Ireland)

Cartoon Network / Kids' WB
Kids' WB
era

1997

Cartoon Roulette (composed of Space Ghost
Space Ghost
(TV series), Birdman and the Galaxy Trio, The Herculoids, Mightor, Shazzan, Teen Force, The Impossibles, and the 1940s Superman
Superman
cartoons) The Real Adventures of Jonny Quest ThunderCats Voltron

1998

Beast Wars: Transformers Dragon Ball Z
Dragon Ball Z
(Ocean Dub/Funimation Dub '99) Robotech Sailor Moon
Sailor Moon
(DiC Dub '98-'99/Cloverway, Inc. Dub '00) Superfriends

1999

ReBoot Ronin Warriors The Powerpuff Girls

2000

Batman: The Animated Series Blue Submarine No. 6 G-Force: Guardians of Space Gundam Wing Superman: The Animated Series Tenchi in Tokyo Tenchi Muyo! Tenchi Universe

2001

Batman
Batman
Beyond Cardcaptors Dragon Ball (Funimation Dub) Gundam 0080 The 08th MS Team Mobile Suit Gundam Outlaw Star The Big O The New Batman/ Superman
Superman
Adventures Zoids: New Century Zero

2002

G Gundam G.I. Joe He-Man and the Masters of the Universe Samurai Jack Transformers: Armada Zoids: Chaotic Century

2003

Cyborg 009 Dai-Guard Gigantor .hack//Sign IGPX: Micro Series Justice League Martian Successor Nadesico Neon Genesis Evangelion Rurouni Kenshin Star Wars: Clone Wars SD Gundam Force Yu Yu Hakusho

2004

Astro Boy Duel Masters Gundam SEED Jackie Chan Adventures Justice League
Justice League
Unlimited Megas XLR Rave Master Teen Titans Transformers: Energon

2005

Bobobo-bo Bo-bobo Dragon Ball Z
Dragon Ball Z
(uncut) Hot Wheels AcceleRacers D.I.C.E. Dragon Ball GT IGPX Naruto One Piece
One Piece
(4Kids dub) The Batman Transformers: Cybertron Zatch Bell!

2006

Fantastic Four: World's Greatest Heroes MÄR Pokémon: Battle Frontier Pokémon
Pokémon
Chronicles The Prince of Tennis Wulin Warriors

2007

Yu-Gi-Oh! GX One Piece
One Piece
(Funimation dub) Storm Hawks

2008

Bakugan Battle Brawlers Ben 10: Alien Force Blue Dragon

Adult Swim
Adult Swim
era

2012

Bleach Deadman Wonderland Casshern Sins Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood Ghost in the Shell: S.A.C 2nd GIG Cowboy Bebop Ghost in the Shell: Stand Alone Complex Samurai 7 Eureka Seven Sym-Bionic Titan ThunderCats (2011 TV series) Inuyasha Tenchi Muyo!
Tenchi Muyo!
GXP Naruto
Naruto
(uncut)

2013

Soul Eater One Piece
One Piece
(uncut) Sword Art Online The Big O
The Big O
(season 2) Star Wars: The Clone Wars FLCL
FLCL
(OVA)

2014

Space Dandy Naruto: Shippuden (uncut) Blue Exorcist Black Lagoon Attack on Titan Beware The Batman Gurren Lagann Hellsing Ultimate Dragon Ball Z
Dragon Ball Z
Kai (uncut) Inuyasha: The Final Act

2015

Kill la Kill Sword Art Online
Sword Art Online
II Michiko & Hatchin Akame ga Kill! Parasyte
Parasyte
-the maxim-

2016

Samurai Champloo Dimension W Hunter × Hunter
Hunter × Hunter
(2011 series) Gundam: Iron-Blooded Orphans One-Punch Man JoJo's Bizarre Adventure

2017

Dragon Ball Super Dragon Ball Z
Dragon Ball Z
Kai: The Final Chapters Gundam Unicorn RE:0096 Samurai Jack
Samurai Jack
(revival series) Sand Whale and Me (microseries) Tokyo Ghoul Lupin the Third Part IV Tokyo Ghoul
Tokyo Ghoul
√A JoJo's Bizarre Adventure: Stardust Crusaders Outlaw Star
Outlaw Star
(uncut) Black Clover

2018

FLCL
FLCL
(television series)

Portal Category

v t e

Adult Swim
Adult Swim
original programming

Former

2000s debuts

12 oz. Mouse
12 oz. Mouse
(2005–06) Aqua Teen Hunger Force
Aqua Teen Hunger Force
(alternative titles) (2001–15) Assy McGee (2006–08) The Boondocks (2005–14) The Brak Show
The Brak Show
(2001–03) Delocated
Delocated
(2009–13) The Drinky Crow Show
The Drinky Crow Show
(2008–09) Fat Guy Stuck in Internet
Fat Guy Stuck in Internet
(2008) Frisky Dingo
Frisky Dingo
(2006–08) Harvey Birdman, Attorney at Law
Harvey Birdman, Attorney at Law
(2001–07) Home Movies (2001–04) Lucy, the Daughter of the Devil
Lucy, the Daughter of the Devil
(2007) Metalocalypse
Metalocalypse
(2006–13) Minoriteam
Minoriteam
(2006) Moral Orel
Moral Orel
(2005–08; 2012) Perfect Hair Forever
Perfect Hair Forever
(2004–07; 2014) The Rising Son
The Rising Son
(2009) Saul of the Mole Men
Saul of the Mole Men
(2007) Sealab 2021
Sealab 2021
(2001–05) Space Ghost Coast to Coast
Space Ghost Coast to Coast
(2001–04) Stroker and Hoop
Stroker and Hoop
(2004–05) Superjail!
Superjail!
(2008–14) Tim and Eric Awesome Show, Great Job!
Tim and Eric Awesome Show, Great Job!
(2007–10; 2010 & 2017) Tom Goes to the Mayor
Tom Goes to the Mayor
(2004–06) Titan Maximum
Titan Maximum
(2009) Xavier: Renegade Angel (2007–09)

2010s debuts

Black Dynamite (2012–15) Brad Neely's Harg Nallin' Sclopio Peepio
Brad Neely's Harg Nallin' Sclopio Peepio
(2016) Childrens Hospital
Childrens Hospital
(2010–16) China, IL
China, IL
(2011–15) Eagleheart (2011–14) The Greatest Event in Television History (2012–14) The Heart, She Holler
The Heart, She Holler
(2011-14) Hot Package
Hot Package
(2013-15) The Jack and Triumph Show (2015) King Star King
King Star King
(2014) Loiter Squad
Loiter Squad
(2012–14) Mary Shelley's Frankenhole
Mary Shelley's Frankenhole
(2010–12) Million Dollar Extreme Presents: World Peace (2016) Mongo Wrestling Alliance
Mongo Wrestling Alliance
(2011) Newsreaders
Newsreaders
(2013–15) NTSF:SD:SUV:: (2011–13) Samurai Jack
Samurai Jack
(2017) Soul Quest Overdrive
Soul Quest Overdrive
(2011) You're Whole
You're Whole
(2012–13)

Current

Apollo Gauntlet (since 2016) Black Jesus (since 2014) Check It Out! with Dr. Steve Brule
Check It Out! with Dr. Steve Brule
(since 2010) Decker (since 2016) Dream Corp, LLC (since 2016) The Eric Andre Show
The Eric Andre Show
(since 2012) FishCenter Live
FishCenter Live
(since 2014) Hot Streets (since 2018) Infomercials (since 2009) The Jellies
The Jellies
(since 2017) Mike Tyson Mysteries
Mike Tyson Mysteries
(since 2014) Mr. Pickles
Mr. Pickles
(since 2013) Neon Joe, Werewolf Hunter
Neon Joe, Werewolf Hunter
(since 2015) Off the Air (since 2011) Rick and Morty
Rick and Morty
(since 2013) Robot Chicken
Robot Chicken
(since 2005) Squidbillies
Squidbillies
(since 2005) Tender Touches (since 2017) Tim & Eric's Bedtime Stories (since 2013) The Venture Bros.
The Venture Bros.
(since 2004) Your Pretty Face Is Going to Hell
Your Pretty Face Is Going to Hell
(since 2013)

Upcoming

Ballmastrz: 9009 (2018) FLCL
FLCL
(2018) Mostly 4 Millennials (2018)

See also: Adult Swim
Adult Swim
pilots and specials

v t e

Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
Animation

Looney Tunes
Looney Tunes
and Merrie Melodies

Shorts

characters

The Bugs Bunny Show The Looney Looney Looney Bugs Bunny Movie
The Looney Looney Looney Bugs Bunny Movie
(1981) Bugs Bunny's 3rd Movie: 1001 Rabbit Tales (1982) Daffy Duck's Fantastic Island
Daffy Duck's Fantastic Island
(1983) Daffy Duck's Quackbusters
Daffy Duck's Quackbusters
(1988) Tiny Toon Adventures

characters

Taz-Mania The Plucky Duck Show The Sylvester & Tweety Mysteries Space Jam
Space Jam
(1996) Baby Looney Tunes Duck Dodgers

characters

Looney Tunes: Back in Action (2003) Loonatics Unleashed

characters

The Looney Tunes
Looney Tunes
Show

episodes

New Looney Tunes

DC Comics

Batman: The Animated Series Superman: The Animated Series The New Batman
Batman
Adventures Batman
Batman
Beyond Static Shock The Zeta Project Justice League Teen Titans Justice League
Justice League
Unlimited The Batman Krypto the Superdog Legion of Super Heroes Batman: The Brave and the Bold Young Justice Green Lantern: The Animated Series DC Nation
DC Nation
Shorts Teen Titans
Teen Titans
Go! Beware the Batman Justice League: Gods and Monsters Chronicles Vixen Justice League
Justice League
Action Freedom Fighters: The Ray Constantine: City of Demons DC Super Hero Girls

TV series

Scooby-Doo

What's New, Scooby-Doo? Shaggy & Scooby-Doo
Scooby-Doo
Get a Clue! Scooby-Doo! Mystery Incorporated Be Cool, Scooby-Doo! Scoobynatural

Animaniacs

Animaniacs

characters

Pinky and the Brain Pinky, Elmyra & the Brain Animaniacs
Animaniacs
(reboot; 2020)

Tom and Jerry

Tom and Jerry
Tom and Jerry
Tales The Tom and Jerry
Tom and Jerry
Show

The Lego Movie

The Lego Movie
The Lego Movie
(2014) The Lego Batman
Batman
Movie (2017) The Lego Ninjago
Ninjago
Movie (2017) Unikitty! The Lego Movie
The Lego Movie
Sequel (2019)

Theatrical feature-length films

The Looney Looney Looney Bugs Bunny Movie
The Looney Looney Looney Bugs Bunny Movie
(1981) Bugs Bunny's 3rd Movie: 1001 Rabbit Tales (1982) Daffy Duck's Fantastic Island
Daffy Duck's Fantastic Island
(1983) Daffy Duck's Quackbusters
Daffy Duck's Quackbusters
(1988) Batman: Mask of the Phantasm (1993) Space Jam
Space Jam
(1996) Quest for Camelot
Quest for Camelot
(1998) The Iron Giant
The Iron Giant
(1999) Osmosis Jones
Osmosis Jones
(2001) Looney Tunes: Back in Action (2003) The Lego Movie
The Lego Movie
(2014) Storks (2016) The Lego Batman
Batman
Movie (2017) The Lego Ninjago
Ninjago
Movie (2017) Teen Titans Go!
Teen Titans Go!
To the Movies (2018) Smallfoot (2018) The Lego Movie
The Lego Movie
Sequel (2019)

Other TV series

Freakazoid! Histeria! Coconut Fred's Fruit Salad Island Detention Baby Blues Ozzy & Drix ¡Mucha Lucha!
¡Mucha Lucha!
(characters) 3 South Xiaolin Showdown Firehouse Tales Johnny Test

characters

Road Rovers Mad ThunderCats Waynehead Mike Tyson Mysteries Bunnicula Right Now Kapow Dorothy and the Wizard of Oz Wacky Races Green Eggs and Ham

Television specials

A Miser Brothers' Christmas (2008) Scooby-Doo! Spooky Games (2012) Robot Chicken
Robot Chicken
DC Comics
DC Comics
Special
Special
(2012 Scooby-Doo! Haunted Holidays (2012) Scooby-Doo! and the Spooky Scarecrow
Scooby-Doo! and the Spooky Scarecrow
(2013) Scooby-Doo! Mecha Mutt Menace (2013) Robot Chicken
Robot Chicken
DC Comics
DC Comics
Special
Special
2: Villains in Paradise (2014) Scooby-Doo! Ghastly Goals (2014) Tom and Jerry: Santa's Little Helpers (2014) Lego DC Comics: Batman
Batman
Be-Leaguered (2014) Elf: Buddy's Musical Christmas (2014) Scooby-Doo! and the Beach Beastie (2015) Robot Chicken
Robot Chicken
DC Comics
DC Comics
Special
Special
III: Magical Friendship (2015) Lego Scooby-Doo! Knight Time Terror (2015) DC Super Hero Girls: Super Hero High (2016)

Direct-to-video films

Tiny Toon Adventures: How I Spent My Vacation (1992) Batman
Batman
& Mr. Freeze: SubZero (1998) Scooby-Doo
Scooby-Doo
on Zombie Island (1998) Scooby-Doo! and the Witch's Ghost
Scooby-Doo! and the Witch's Ghost
(1999) Wakko's Wish
Wakko's Wish
(1999) Tweety's High-Flying Adventure (2000) Scooby-Doo
Scooby-Doo
and the Alien Invaders (2000) Batman
Batman
Beyond: Return of the Joker (2000) Scooby-Doo
Scooby-Doo
and the Cyber Chase (2001) Tom and Jerry: The Magic Ring (2002) Baby Looney Tunes' Eggs-traordinary Adventure
Baby Looney Tunes' Eggs-traordinary Adventure
(2003) Scooby-Doo! and the Legend of the Vampire
Scooby-Doo! and the Legend of the Vampire
(2003) Scooby-Doo! and the Monster of Mexico
Scooby-Doo! and the Monster of Mexico
(2003) Batman: Mystery of the Batwoman (2003) Scooby-Doo! and the Loch Ness Monster
Scooby-Doo! and the Loch Ness Monster
(2004) Kangaroo Jack: G'Day U.S.A.! (2004) ¡Mucha Lucha!: The Return of El Maléfico (2005) Tom and Jerry: Blast Off to Mars (2005) Aloha, Scooby-Doo!
Aloha, Scooby-Doo!
(2005) Tom and Jerry: The Fast and the Furry (2005) The Batman
Batman
vs. Dracula (2005) Scooby-Doo! in Where's My Mummy?
Scooby-Doo! in Where's My Mummy?
(2005) Scooby-Doo! Pirates Ahoy!
Scooby-Doo! Pirates Ahoy!
(2005) Superman: Brainiac Attacks (2006) Tom and Jerry: Shiver Me Whiskers (2006) Teen Titans: Trouble in Tokyo (2006) Bah, Humduck! A Looney Tunes
Looney Tunes
Christmas (2006) Chill Out, Scooby-Doo!
Chill Out, Scooby-Doo!
(2007) Superman: Doomsday (2007) Tom and Jerry: A Nutcracker Tale (2007) Justice League: The New Frontier (2008) Batman: Gotham Knight (2008) Scooby-Doo! and the Goblin King
Scooby-Doo! and the Goblin King
(2008) Wonder Woman (2009) Scooby-Doo! and the Samurai Sword
Scooby-Doo! and the Samurai Sword
(2009) Green Lantern: First Flight (2009) Superman/Batman: Public Enemies (2009) Scooby-Doo! Abracadabra-Doo
Scooby-Doo! Abracadabra-Doo
(2010) Justice League: Crisis on Two Earths (2010) Batman: Under the Red Hood (2010) Tom and Jerry
Tom and Jerry
Meet Sherlock Holmes (2010) Scooby-Doo! Camp Scare (2010) Superman/Batman: Apocalypse (2010) All-Star Superman
Superman
(2011) Green Lantern: Emerald Knights (2011) Tom and Jerry
Tom and Jerry
and the Wizard of Oz (2011) Scooby-Doo! Legend of the Phantosaur
Scooby-Doo! Legend of the Phantosaur
(2011) Batman: Year One (2011) Justice League: Doom (2012) Scooby-Doo! Music of the Vampire
Scooby-Doo! Music of the Vampire
(2012) Superman
Superman
vs. The Elite (2012) Batman: The Dark Knight Returns (2012/2013) Tom and Jerry: Robin Hood and His Merry Mouse (2012) Big Top Scooby-Doo!
Big Top Scooby-Doo!
(2012) Scooby-Doo! Mask of the Blue Falcon
Scooby-Doo! Mask of the Blue Falcon
(2013) Superman: Unbound (2013) Scooby-Doo! Adventures: The Mystery Map (2013) Justice League: The Flashpoint Paradox (2013) Tom and Jerry's Giant Adventure
Tom and Jerry's Giant Adventure
(2013) Scooby-Doo! Stage Fright
Scooby-Doo! Stage Fright
(2013) JLA Adventures: Trapped in Time (2014) Justice League: War (2014) Scooby-Doo! WrestleMania Mystery
Scooby-Doo! WrestleMania Mystery
(2014) Son of Batman
Batman
(2014) Batman: Assault on Arkham (2014) Scooby-Doo! Frankencreepy
Scooby-Doo! Frankencreepy
(2014) Tom and Jerry: The Lost Dragon (2014) Justice League: Throne of Atlantis (2015) Lego DC Comics
DC Comics
Super Heroes: Justice League
Justice League
vs. Bizarro League (2015) Scooby-Doo! Moon Monster Madness
Scooby-Doo! Moon Monster Madness
(2015) The Flintstones
The Flintstones
& WWE: Stone Age SmackDown! (2015) Batman
Batman
vs. Robin (2015) Batman
Batman
Unlimited: Animal Instincts (2015) Tom and Jerry: Spy Quest (2015) Scooby-Doo! and Kiss: Rock and Roll Mystery (2015) Justice League: Gods and Monsters (2015) Looney Tunes: Rabbits Run (2015) Batman
Batman
Unlimited: Monster Mayhem (2015) Lego DC Comics
DC Comics
Super Heroes: Justice League
Justice League
– Attack of the Legion of Doom (2015) Batman: Bad Blood (2016) Lego DC Comics
DC Comics
Super Heroes: Justice League
Justice League
– Cosmic Clash (2016) Justice League
Justice League
vs. Teen Titans
Teen Titans
(2016) Lego Scooby-Doo! Haunted Hollywood
Lego Scooby-Doo! Haunted Hollywood
(2016) Tom and Jerry: Back to Oz (2016) Lego DC Comics
DC Comics
Super Heroes: Justice League
Justice League
– Gotham City Breakout (2016) Batman: The Killing Joke (2016) Scooby-Doo! and WWE: Curse of the Speed Demon (2016) DC Super Hero Girls: Hero of the Year (2016) Batman
Batman
Unlimited: Mechs vs. Mutants (2016) Batman: Return of the Caped Crusaders (2016) Justice League
Justice League
Dark (2017) Scooby-Doo! Shaggy's Showdown
Scooby-Doo! Shaggy's Showdown
(2017) The Jetsons
The Jetsons
& WWE: Robo-WrestleMania! (2017) Teen Titans: The Judas Contract (2017) DC Super Hero Girls: Intergalactic Games (2017) Tom and Jerry: Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory (2017) Lego Scooby-Doo! Blowout Beach Bash
Lego Scooby-Doo! Blowout Beach Bash
(2017) Lego DC Super Hero Girls: Brain Drain (2017) Batman
Batman
and Harley Quinn (2017) Batman
Batman
vs. Two-Face (2017) Scooby-Doo! & Batman: The Brave and the Bold (2018) Batman: Gotham by Gaslight (2018) Lego DC Comics
DC Comics
Super Heroes: The Flash (2018) Suicide Squad: Hell to Pay (2018) Batman
Batman
Ninja (2018) Lego DC Super Hero Girls: Super-Villain High (2018)

Short films

The Duxorcist (1987) The Night of the Living Duck (1988) Box-Office Bunny
Box-Office Bunny
(1990) I'm Mad (1994) Chariots of Fur (1994) Carrotblanca (1995) Another Froggy Evening (1995) Superior Duck (1996) Pullet Surprise (1997) Marvin the Martian in the Third Dimension
Marvin the Martian in the Third Dimension
(1997) From Hare to Eternity
From Hare to Eternity
(1997) Father of the Bird (1997) Little Go Beep (2000) Chase Me
Chase Me
(2003) The Karate Guard
The Karate Guard
(2005) DC Showcase: The Spectre (2010) DC Showcase: Jonah Hex (2010) Coyote Falls
Coyote Falls
(2010) Fur of Flying
Fur of Flying
(2010) DC Showcase: Green Arrow (2010) Superman/Shazam!: The Return of Black Adam (2010) Rabid Rider
Rabid Rider
(2010) DC Showcase: Catwoman (2011) I Tawt I Taw a Puddy Tat
I Tawt I Taw a Puddy Tat
(2011) Daffy's Rhapsody
Daffy's Rhapsody
(2012) The Master (2016)

See also

Warner Animation
Animation
Group Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
Cartoons Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
Family Entertainment Hanna-Barbera Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
Productions

Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
Studios Williams Street Cartoon Network Studios
Cartoon Network Studios
Europe

Category

v t e

Turner Broadcasting System

North American television

Boomerang Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
(Adult Swim; Toonami) CNN CNN
CNN
Airport CNN
CNN
International HLN NBA TV1 TBS TNT truTV Turner Classic Movies

TBS Europe

Boing

Africa France Italy Spain

Boomerang

Central and Eastern Europe Arab World, Africa, Greece and Cyprus France Germany Italy Netherlands Nordic Portugal Spain Turkey UK & Ireland

Cartoon Network

Arabic Arab World and Africa Central & Eastern Europe France Germany Italy Netherlands Nordic Poland Portugal Russia and Southeastern Europe Turkey UK & Ireland

Turner Classic Movies

Africa TCM Cinéma Middle East Nordic Spain UK & Ireland

TNT

Comedy Film Serie Nordic Poland Romania Spain

CNN

CNN
CNN
International CNN
CNN
Türk

Cartoonito

Italy UK and Ireland

Others

Toonami
Toonami
(France) Warner TV

TBS Asia Pacific

Cartoon Network

Australia
Australia
and New Zealand China (on demand) India Japan Pakistan Philippines3 Southeast Asia South Korea Taiwan

CNN

CNN-News18 CNN
CNN
International Asia Pacific CNN
CNN
International South Asia Indonesia2 Philippines 3

HBO

Cinemax HBO HBO
HBO
Family HBO
HBO
Hits HBO
HBO
Signature RED by HBO

Boomerang

Australia
Australia
and New Zealand Southeast Asia South Korea Thailand

Others

Oh!K Pogo Toonami
Toonami
(India) truTV Turner Classic Movies WB Channel Warner TV World Heritage Channel

TBS Latin America

Boomerang Cartoon Network CDF Chilevisión CNN
CNN
Chile CNN
CNN
en Español CNN
CNN
International Esporte Interativo Glitz HispanicTV I.Sat Space TBS TNT Series Tooncast Warner TV truTV TNT Sports

TV production/distribution

Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
Studios Cartoon Network Studios
Cartoon Network Studios
Europe Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
Productions CNN
CNN
Films Turner Sports World Championship Wrestling4 Williams Street Hulu
Hulu
(10%)

Internet assets

Bleacher Report CNNMoney FilmStruck Super Deluxe

Former

Cable Music Channel Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
Spain Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
Too Cartoonito
Cartoonito
Asia Cartoonito
Cartoonito
Spain China Entertainment Television CNN
CNN
Checkout Channel CNNfn CNN/SI CNX CNN+ Crime Library Gameloft Imagine TV Infinito Lumiere Movies Nuts TV Real Retro Showtime Scandinavia Silver Star! Scandinavia TCM Autor TCM Clásico The Smoking Gun TNT UK Toonami
Toonami
Jetstream (50% with Viz Media) Toonami
Toonami
Southeast Asia Toonami
Toonami
UK and Ireland truTV UK and Ireland (sold to Sony Pictures Television) Turner Classic Movies
Turner Classic Movies
2 Turner Entertainment
Turner Entertainment
Co. Turner Program Services Turner South
Turner South
(now Fox Sports Southeast) Voom HD International WPCH-TV WRET (now WCNC-TV)

^1 Owned by the NBA, operated by Turner. ^2 Co-owned by Trans Media. ^3 Co-owned with Nine Media Corporation
Nine Media Corporation
and Radio Philippines Network through a brand licensing agreement. ^4 Assets now owned by WWE, Inc. through WCW, Inc.

v t e

Time Warner

Board of directors

William P. Barr Jeff Bewkes Robert C. Clark Mathias Döpfner Jessica Einhorn Carlos Gutierrez Fred Hassan Paul Wachter Deborah Wright

Other people

Richard Parsons Steve Ross

v t e

Turner Broadcasting System

North American television

Boomerang Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
(Adult Swim; Toonami) CNN CNN
CNN
Airport CNN
CNN
International HLN NBA TV1 TBS TNT truTV Turner Classic Movies

TBS Europe

Boing

Africa France Italy Spain

Boomerang

Central and Eastern Europe Arab World, Africa, Greece and Cyprus France Germany Italy Netherlands Nordic Portugal Spain Turkey UK & Ireland

Cartoon Network

Arabic Arab World and Africa Central & Eastern Europe France Germany Italy Netherlands Nordic Poland Portugal Russia and Southeastern Europe Turkey UK & Ireland

Turner Classic Movies

Africa TCM Cinéma Middle East Nordic Spain UK & Ireland

TNT

Comedy Film Serie Nordic Poland Romania Spain

CNN

CNN
CNN
International CNN
CNN
Türk

Cartoonito

Italy UK and Ireland

Others

Toonami
Toonami
(France) Warner TV

TBS Asia Pacific

Cartoon Network

Australia
Australia
and New Zealand China (on demand) India Japan Pakistan Philippines3 Southeast Asia South Korea Taiwan

CNN

CNN-News18 CNN
CNN
International Asia Pacific CNN
CNN
International South Asia Indonesia2 Philippines 3

HBO

Cinemax HBO HBO
HBO
Family HBO
HBO
Hits HBO
HBO
Signature RED by HBO

Boomerang

Australia
Australia
and New Zealand Southeast Asia South Korea Thailand

Others

Oh!K Pogo Toonami
Toonami
(India) truTV Turner Classic Movies WB Channel Warner TV World Heritage Channel

TBS Latin America

Boomerang Cartoon Network CDF Chilevisión CNN
CNN
Chile CNN
CNN
en Español CNN
CNN
International Esporte Interativo Glitz HispanicTV I.Sat Space TBS TNT Series Tooncast Warner TV truTV TNT Sports

TV production/distribution

Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
Studios Cartoon Network Studios
Cartoon Network Studios
Europe Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
Productions CNN
CNN
Films Turner Sports World Championship Wrestling4 Williams Street Hulu
Hulu
(10%)

Internet assets

Bleacher Report CNNMoney FilmStruck Super Deluxe

Former

Cable Music Channel Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
Spain Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
Too Cartoonito
Cartoonito
Asia Cartoonito
Cartoonito
Spain China Entertainment Television CNN
CNN
Checkout Channel CNNfn CNN/SI CNX CNN+ Crime Library Gameloft Imagine TV Infinito Lumiere Movies Nuts TV Real Retro Showtime Scandinavia Silver Star! Scandinavia TCM Autor TCM Clásico The Smoking Gun TNT UK Toonami
Toonami
Jetstream (50% with Viz Media) Toonami
Toonami
Southeast Asia Toonami
Toonami
UK and Ireland truTV UK and Ireland (sold to Sony Pictures Television) Turner Classic Movies
Turner Classic Movies
2 Turner Entertainment
Turner Entertainment
Co. Turner Program Services Turner South
Turner South
(now Fox Sports Southeast) Voom HD International WPCH-TV WRET (now WCNC-TV)

^1 Owned by the NBA, operated by Turner. ^2 Co-owned by Trans Media. ^3 Co-owned with Nine Media Corporation
Nine Media Corporation
and Radio Philippines Network through a brand licensing agreement. ^4 Assets now owned by WWE, Inc. through WCW, Inc.

v t e

Warner Bros.

Founders

Jack L. Warner Harry Warner Albert Warner Sam Warner

Executives

Kevin Tsujihara (Chairman and CEO)

Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
Pictures Group

Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
Pictures Warner Animation
Animation
Group New Line Cinema Castle Rock Entertainment Flagship Entertainment (joint venture with CMC)

Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
Television Group

Alloy Entertainment Telepictures WB Animation Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
Television Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
International Television Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
International Television Production (WB TV Productions UK (Shed Productions) Eyeworks)

Broadcast TV

Terrestrial TV

The CW
The CW
(co-owned with CBS)

Cable TV

Warner TV
Warner TV
(with HBO
HBO
Latin America Group and HBO
HBO
Asia) WB Channel (with Turner International India)

Warner Bros. Interactive

Avalanche Software Monolith Productions NetherRealm Studios Portkey Games Rocksteady Studios TT Games

TT Games
TT Games
Publishing TT Fusion Traveller's Tales TT Animation Playdemic

Turbine WB Games Montréal WB Games New York WB Games San Francisco

Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
Digital Networks

DramaFever Machinima, Inc. Warner Archive Instant

DC Entertainment

DC Films DC Comics

Mad Vertigo

Home video

Warner Home Video Warner Archive Collection

Public attractions

Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
Studio Tours

Miscellaneous assets

Turner Entertainment
Turner Entertainment
Co. Hanna-Barbera WaterTower Music Fandango (30%)

v t e

Home Box Office Inc.

TV channels

HBO Cinemax HBO
HBO
Asia RED by HBO HBO
HBO
Europe HBO
HBO
Netherlands HBO
HBO
Canada Warner TV WB Channel International

Other

HBO
HBO
Films

Miscellaneous

MovieTickets.com

v t e

Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
original programming

Former

1990s debuts

The Moxy Show (1993–2000) Space Ghost Coast to Coast
Space Ghost Coast to Coast
(1994–2001) What a Cartoon!
What a Cartoon!
(1995–1997) Dexter's Laboratory
Dexter's Laboratory
(1996–2003) Big Bag
Big Bag
(1996–1998) Johnny Bravo (1997–2004) Cow and Chicken
Cow and Chicken
(1997–2004) I Am Weasel
I Am Weasel
(1997–2000) The Powerpuff Girls
The Powerpuff Girls
(1998) (1998–2005) Ed, Edd n Eddy
Ed, Edd n Eddy
(1999–2009) Mike, Lu & Og (1999–2001) Courage the Cowardly Dog
Courage the Cowardly Dog
(1999–2002)

2000s debuts

Sheep in the Big City
Sheep in the Big City
(2000–2002) Time Squad
Time Squad
(2001–2003) Samurai Jack
Samurai Jack
(2001–2017) Grim & Evil (2001–2002) Justice League
Justice League
(2001–2004) Whatever Happened to... Robot Jones?
Whatever Happened to... Robot Jones?
(2002–2003) Codename: Kids Next Door (2002–2008) The Grim Adventures of Billy & Mandy (2003–2008) Evil Con Carne (2003–2004) Teen Titans
Teen Titans
(2003–2006) Duck Dodgers (2003–2005) Star Wars: Clone Wars (2003–2005) Megas XLR
Megas XLR
(2004–v05) Justice League Unlimited
Justice League Unlimited
(2004–2006) Foster's Home for Imaginary Friends
Foster's Home for Imaginary Friends
(2004–2009) Baby Looney Tunes
Looney Tunes
(2004–2006) The Batman
Batman
(2004–2006) Hi Hi Puffy AmiYumi
Hi Hi Puffy AmiYumi
(2004–2006) Krypto the Superdog (2005–2006) The Life and Times of Juniper Lee (2005–2007) Camp Lazlo
Camp Lazlo
(2005–2008) Firehouse Tales (2005–2006) Sunday Pants
Sunday Pants
(2005–2006) My Gym Partner's a Monkey
My Gym Partner's a Monkey
(2005–2008) Ben 10 (2005) (2005–2008) Squirrel Boy (2006–2007) Class of 3000 (2006–2008) Out of Jimmy's Head
Out of Jimmy's Head
(2007–2008) Chowder (2007–2010) Transformers: Animated (2007–2009) The Mr. Men Show
The Mr. Men Show
(2008–2009) Ben 10: Alien Force (2008–2010) The Marvelous Misadventures of Flapjack
The Marvelous Misadventures of Flapjack
(2008–2010) Star Wars: The Clone Wars (2008–2013) The Secret Saturdays
The Secret Saturdays
(2008–2010) Batman: The Brave and the Bold (2008–2011) The Othersiders
The Othersiders
(2009) BrainRush (2009) Destroy Build Destroy
Destroy Build Destroy
(2009–2011) Bobb'e Says (2009) Dude, What Would Happen (2009–2011)

2010s debuts

Pink Panther and Pals
Pink Panther and Pals
(2010) Ben 10: Ultimate Alien (2010–2012) Scooby-Doo! Mystery Incorporated
Scooby-Doo! Mystery Incorporated
(2010–2013) Generator Rex
Generator Rex
(2010–2013) Mad (2010–2013) Regular Show
Regular Show
(2010–2017) Sym-Bionic Titan
Sym-Bionic Titan
(2010–2012) Tower Prep
Tower Prep
(2010) Hole in the Wall (2010–2012) Robotomy
Robotomy
(2010–2011) Young Justice (2010–2013) The Problem Solverz
The Problem Solverz
(2011–2013) The Looney Tunes
Looney Tunes
Show (2011–2014) ThunderCats (2011–2012) Secret Mountain Fort Awesome
Secret Mountain Fort Awesome
(2011–v12) Level Up (2012–2013) Green Lantern: The Animated Series (2012–2013) Cartoon Planet
Cartoon Planet
(2012–2014) The High Fructose Adventures of Annoying Orange
The High Fructose Adventures of Annoying Orange
(2012–2014) Dragons: Riders of Berk (2012–2014) Ben 10: Omniverse (2012–2014) Incredible Crew (2013) Beware the Batman
Beware the Batman
(2013–2014) Uncle Grandpa
Uncle Grandpa
(2013–2017) Mixels
Mixels
(2014–2016) Over the Garden Wall
Over the Garden Wall
(2014) Be Cool, Scooby-Doo!
Be Cool, Scooby-Doo!
(2015–2018) Long Live the Royals
Long Live the Royals
(2015) Apple & Onion (2018)

Current

Adventure Time
Adventure Time
(since 2010) The Amazing World of Gumball
The Amazing World of Gumball
(since 2011) Teen Titans Go!
Teen Titans Go!
(since 2013) Steven Universe
Steven Universe
(since 2013) The Tom and Jerry
Tom and Jerry
Show (since 2014) Clarence (since 2014) Sonic Boom (since 2014) Mighty Magiswords
Mighty Magiswords
(since 2015) We Bare Bears
We Bare Bears
(since 2015) New Looney Tunes
Looney Tunes
(since 2015) Bunnicula (since 2016) The Powerpuff Girls
The Powerpuff Girls
(2016) (since 2016) Ben 10 (2016) (since 2016) Justice League Action
Justice League Action
(since 2016) Dorothy and the Wizard of Oz
Dorothy and the Wizard of Oz
(since 2017) Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs (since 2017) OK K.O.! Let's Be Heroes
OK K.O.! Let's Be Heroes
(since 2017) Wacky Races (since 2017) Unikitty!
Unikitty!
(since 2017) The Heroic Quest of the Valiant Prince Ivandoe (since 2017) Craig of the Creek (since 2018)

Upcoming

Summer Camp Island DC Super Hero Girls Victor and Valentino Infinity Train

See also: Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
pilots, films and specials

v t e

Family-oriented television channels in the United States

Preschoolers

BabyFirst BabyTV Disney Junior Nick Jr.

Pre-teens and teens

Cartoon Network Disney Channel Disney XD Discovery Familia Freeform Kids & Teens TV Nickelodeon NickMusic Nicktoons Semillitas ¡Sorpresa! TeenNick Universal Kids

General audiences

Boomerang Discovery Family Hallmark Channel Hallmark Movies & Mysteries Hallmark Drama HBO
HBO
Family INSP PBS Kids PixL Qubo Showtime Family Zone Smile Starz Kids & Family Up

Former

Jetix Nick GaS PBJ Toon Disney

v t e

Williams Street

Mike Lazzo Keith Crofford

Matt Harrigan Dave Willis Matt Maiellaro

Channels

Adult Swim

programming

Toonami

programming Jetstream

Films

Aqua Teen Hunger Force
Aqua Teen Hunger Force
Colon Movie Film for Theaters

Record label

Adult Swim
Adult Swim
Singles Program

2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016

African Swim ATL RMX Chocolate Swim Definitive Swim Garage Swim Ghostly Swim Ghostly Swim
Ghostly Swim
2 Metal Swim Unclassified Warm & Scratchy World Wide Renewal Program

See also

Adult Swim
Adult Swim
in a Box Cartoon Network Super Deluxe

Book Category

v t e

Children's programming on TBS/TNT

First-run animated programs

2 Stupid Dogs
2 Stupid Dogs
(1993–95) Captain Planet and the Planeteers
Captain Planet and the Planeteers
(1990–97) Cartoon Planet
Cartoon Planet
(1995–96) Dexter's Laboratory
Dexter's Laboratory
(1996–97) The Real Adventures of Jonny Quest
The Real Adventures of Jonny Quest
(1996–98) Space Ghost Coast to Coast
Space Ghost Coast to Coast
(1995) SWAT Kats: The Radical Squadron (1993–95) What a Cartoon!
What a Cartoon!
(1995)

First-run live-action programs

The Baseball Bunch Feed Your Mind (1994–98) Kid's Beat (1983–96) The New Howdy Doody
Howdy Doody
Show (1976–77) The New Mickey Mouse Club
The New Mickey Mouse Club
(1977–79) Romper Room Starcade
Starcade
(1982–83)

Programming blocks

The Rudy and Gogo World Famous Cartoon Show Superstation Funtime Tom and Jerry's Funhouse on TBS

Japanese series

Astro Boy Battle of the Planets
Battle of the Planets
(1984–85) G-Force: Guardians of Space (1986) Kimba the White Lion Marine Boy The Space Giants
The Space Giants
(1978–81) Spectreman (1978–80) Speed Racer Ultraman Ultra Seven
Ultra Seven
(1994–2001)

Hanna-Barbara rebroadcasts

The Flintstones Huckleberry Hound
Huckleberry Hound
(1994) The Jetsons
The Jetsons
(1992–98) Jonny Quest (1994) The New Scooby-Doo
Scooby-Doo
Movies (1994–98) Scooby-Doo, Where Are You!
Scooby-Doo, Where Are You!
(1986–89, 1994–98) Snorks
Snorks
(1992) Tom and Jerry
Tom and Jerry
Kids (1994–95) Yo, Yogi!
Yo, Yogi!
(1992–93) Yogi Bear
Yogi Bear
(1993–95)

Other rebroadcasts

The Alvin Show
The Alvin Show
(1985–86) The Archies Dusty's Treehouse Infinity Factory (1981–82) Fraggle Rock
Fraggle Rock
(1988–92) Garfield and Friends (1995–97) Gigglesnort Hotel
Gigglesnort Hotel
(1979–80) Heckle and Jeckle
Heckle and Jeckle
(1984–85) The Little Rascals Looney Tunes
Looney Tunes
(1979–98) The Muppet Show
The Muppet Show
(1988–92) Our Gang
Our Gang
(1992–2001) The Pink Panther (1991–96) Popeye
Popeye
the Sailor (1979–94) Rebop (1980–81) Taz-Mania (1996–98) The Three Stooges Tom and Jerry
Tom and Jerry
(1986–98) Vegetable Soup (1979–83) Woody Woodpecker
Woody Woodpecker
(1991–92)

Programming lists

TBS programs TNT programs

Related topics

Animation
Animation
in the United States in the television era Modern animation in the United States Weekday cartoon Cartoon Network

v t e

Atlanta
Atlanta
companies

Aaron's, Inc. AGCO
AGCO
(Duluth) American Megatrends
American Megatrends
(Gwinnett County) Arby's
Arby's
(Sandy Springs) AT&T Mobility Atlanta
Atlanta
Bread Company (Smyrna) Atlanta
Atlanta
Gas Light BellSouth Chick-fil-A
Chick-fil-A
(College Park) Church's Chicken
Church's Chicken
(Sandy Springs) Coca-Cola Cox Enterprises Delta Air Lines EarthLink Equifax ExpressJet
ExpressJet
(College Park) Georgia Natural Gas Georgia-Pacific Georgia Power Holiday Inn Holiday Inn
Holiday Inn
Express The Home Depot
The Home Depot
(Cobb County) Hooters Intercontinental Exchange Krystal Kool Smiles
Kool Smiles
(Marietta) Merial
Merial
(Duluth) NCR Corporation
NCR Corporation
(Gwinnett County) Popeyes
Popeyes
(Sandy Springs) RaceTrac Rheem Scientific Atlanta
Atlanta
(Lawrenceville) Simmons Bedding Company Southern Company SunTrust Banks Turner Broadcasting System United Parcel Service
United Parcel Service
(Sandy Springs) Waffle House
Waffle House
(Gwinnett County) The Weather Cha

.