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Carol Creighton Burnett (born April 26, 1933) is an American actress, comedian, singer and writer, whose career spans seven decades of television. She is best known for her TV variety show, The Carol Burnett Show, originally aired on CBS. She has achieved success on stage, television and film in varying genres including dramatic and comedy roles. She has also appeared on various talk shows and as a panelist on game shows. Born in San Antonio, Texas, Burnett moved with her grandmother to Hollywood, where she attended Hollywood High School
Hollywood High School
and eventually studied theater and musical comedy at UCLA. Later she performed in nightclubs in New York City
New York City
and had a breakout success on Broadway
Broadway
in 1959 in Once Upon a Mattress, for which she received a Tony Award nomination. She soon made her television debut, regularly appearing on The Garry Moore Show
The Garry Moore Show
for the next three years, and won her first Emmy Award in 1962. Burnett had her television special debut in 1963 when she starred as Calamity Jane
Calamity Jane
in the Dallas State Fair Musicals production of Calamity Jane
Calamity Jane
on CBS.[1] Burnett moved to Los Angeles, California, and began an 11-year run as star of The Carol Burnett
Carol Burnett
Show on CBS
CBS
television from 1967 to 1978. With its vaudeville roots, The Carol Burnett
Carol Burnett
Show was a variety show that combined comedy sketches with song and dance. The comedy sketches included film parodies and character pieces. Burnett created many memorable characters during the show's run, and both she and the show won numerous Emmy and Golden Globe Awards. During and after her variety show, Burnett appeared in many television and film projects. Her film roles include Pete 'n' Tillie
Pete 'n' Tillie
(1972), The Front Page (1974), The Four Seasons (1981), Annie (1982), Noises Off (1992), and Horton Hears a Who!
Horton Hears a Who!
(2008). On television, she has appeared in other sketch shows; in dramatic roles in 6 Rms Riv Vu (1974) and Friendly Fire (1979); in various well-regarded guest roles, such as in Mad About You, for which she won an Emmy Award; and in specials with Julie Andrews, Dolly Parton, Beverly Sills, and others. She returned to the Broadway
Broadway
stage in 1995 in Moon Over Buffalo, for which she was again nominated for a Tony Award.

Contents

1 Early life 2 Career

2.1 Early career 2.2 The Carol Burnett
Carol Burnett
Show 2.3 Other roles

3 Personal life 4 Libel case 5 Memoirs and related works 6 Filmography 7 Television credits 8 Theatre 9 Books 10 Awards and recognition

10.1 Other honors

11 References

11.1 Notes 11.2 Citations 11.3 Sources

12 External links

Early life[edit] Burnett was born in San Antonio, Texas, on April 26, 1933,[2][3][4][5] the daughter of Ina Louise (née Creighton), a publicity writer for movie studios, and Joseph Thomas Burnett, a movie theater manager.[6][7] Both of her parents were alcoholics, and at a young age, she was left with her grandmother, Mabel Eudora White. Her parents divorced in the late 1930s, and she and her grandmother moved to an apartment near her mother’s in an impoverished area of Hollywood, California. There they stayed in a boarding house with Burnett's younger half-sister Chrissie.[8] When Burnett was in second grade, she briefly invented an imaginary twin sister named Karen, with Shirley Temple-like dimples. She later recalled that, motivated to further the pretense, she "fooled the other boarders in the rooming house where we lived by frantically switching clothes and dashing in and out of the house by the fire escape and the front door. Then I became exhausted and Karen mysteriously vanished."[9]

Carol and sister Chrissie on Person to Person, 1961

For a while, she worked as an usherette at the Warner Brothers Theater (now the Hollywood
Hollywood
Pacific Theatre). When the cinema screened Alfred Hitchcock's Strangers on a Train (1951), having already seen the film and loving it, she advised two patrons arriving during the last five minutes of a showing to wait until the beginning of the next showing to avoid spoiling the ending for them. The manager observed Burnett let the couple in, then callously fired her, stripping the epaulettes from her uniform.[10] Years later in the 1970s after achieving TV stardom, when the Hollywood
Hollywood
Chamber of Commerce
Chamber of Commerce
offered her a star on the Hollywood
Hollywood
Walk of Fame, they asked her where she wanted it. She replied "Right in front of where the old Warner Brothers Theater was, at Hollywood
Hollywood
and Wilcox", which is where it was placed,[5][11] at 6439 Hollywood
Hollywood
Blvd.[12] After graduating from Hollywood High School
Hollywood High School
in 1951, she received an anonymous envelope containing $50 for one year's tuition at UCLA, where she initially planned on studying journalism.[13] During her first year of college, she switched her focus to theatre arts and English, with the goal of becoming a playwright. She found she had to take an acting course to enter the playwright program; "I wasn't really ready to do the acting thing, but I had no choice."[14] She followed a sudden impulse in her first performance; "Don't ask me why, but when we were in front of the audience, I suddenly decided I was going to stretch out all my words and my first line came out 'I'm baaaaaaaack!'"[14] The audience response moved her deeply:

“ They laughed and it felt great. All of a sudden, after so much coldness and emptiness in my life, I knew the sensation of all that warmth wrapping around me. I had always been a quiet, shy, sad sort of girl and then everything changed for me. You spend the rest of your life hoping you'll hear a laugh that great again.[14] ”

During this time, she performed in several university productions, garnering recognition for her comedic and musical abilities. Her mother disapproved of her acting ambitions:

“ She wanted me to be a writer. She said you can always write, no matter what you look like. When I was growing up she told me to be a little lady, and a couple of times I got a whack for crossing my eyes or making funny faces. Of course, she never, I never, dreamed I would ever perform.[9] ”

The young Burnett, always insecure about her looks, responded many years later to her mother's advice of "You can always write, no matter what you look like" by noting "God, that hurt!" in her memoir One More Time (1986). During her junior year at UCLA in 1954, a professor invited Burnett and some other students to perform at a party in place of their class final that had been canceled (which required a performance in front of an audience). Afterwards, a man and his wife approached her while Carol was stuffing cookies in her purse to take home to her grandmother.[15] Instead of reprimanding her, the man complimented her performance and asked about her future plans. When he learned that she wished to travel to New York in order to try her luck in musical comedy but couldn't afford the trip, right then and there he offered her and her boyfriend Don Saroyan each a $1,000 interest-free loan.[15] His conditions were simply that the loans were to be repaid within five years, his name was never to be revealed, and if she achieved success, she would help other aspiring talents to pursue their artistic dreams.[15] Burnett took him up on his offer; she and Saroyan left college and moved to New York to pursue acting careers. That same year, her father died of causes related to his alcoholism.[citation needed] Career[edit] Early career[edit]

Hollywood Pacific Theatre
Hollywood Pacific Theatre
in 2010.

After spending her first year in New York working as a hat-check girl and failing to land acting jobs, Burnett along with other girls living at the Rehearsal Club, a boarding house for women seriously pursuing an acting career, put on The Rehearsal Club Revue
Revue
on March 3, 1955. They mailed invitations to agents, who showed up along with stars like Celeste Holm
Celeste Holm
and Marlene Dietrich, and this opened doors for several of the girls. She was cast in a minor role on The Paul Winchell
Paul Winchell
and Jerry Mahoney Show in 1955. She played the girlfriend of a ventriloquist’s dummy on the popular children’s program. This role led to her starring role opposite Buddy Hackett
Buddy Hackett
in the short-lived sitcom Stanley from 1956 to 1957.

Burnett and Larry Blyden from The Garry Moore Show, 1960

After Stanley, Burnett found herself unemployed for a short time. She eventually bounced back a few months later as a highly popular performer on the New York circuit of cabarets and night clubs, most notably for a hit parody number called "I Made a Fool of Myself Over John Foster Dulles" (Dulles was Secretary of State at the time). In 1957, she performed this number on both The Tonight Show, hosted by Jack Paar, and The Ed Sullivan
Ed Sullivan
Show. Dulles was asked about her on Meet the Press
Meet the Press
and joked, “I never discuss matters of the heart in public.”[16] She also worked as a regular on one of television's earliest game shows, Pantomime Quiz, during this time. In 1957, just as she was achieving her first small successes, her mother died.[citation needed] Burnett's first true taste of success came with her appearance on Broadway
Broadway
in the 1959 musical Once Upon a Mattress, for which she was nominated for a Tony Award. The same year, she became a regular player on The Garry Moore Show, a job that lasted until 1962. She won an Emmy Award[17] that year for her "Outstanding Performance in a Variety or Musical Program or Series" on the show. She portrayed a number of characters, most memorably the put-upon cleaning woman who would later become her signature alter-ego. With her success on the Moore Show, Burnett finally rose to headliner status and appeared in the special Julie and Carol at Carnegie Hall
Julie and Carol at Carnegie Hall
(1962), co-starring with her friend Julie Andrews. The show was produced by Bob Banner, directed by Joe Hamilton, and written by Mike Nichols
Mike Nichols
and Ken Welch.[18]1 Julie and Carol at Carnegie Hall won an Emmy Award
Emmy Award
for Outstanding Program Achievement in the Field of Music, and Burnett won an Emmy for her performance.[citation needed] She also guest-starred on a number of shows during this time, including The Twilight Zone
The Twilight Zone
episode "Cavender is Coming".

As Calamity Jane
Calamity Jane
in 1963

In 1964, Burnett starred in the Broadway
Broadway
musical Fade Out - Fade In but was forced to withdraw after sustaining a neck injury in a taxi accident. She returned to the show later but withdrew again to participate in a variety show, The Entertainers, opposite Caterina Valente and Bob Newhart. The producers of Fade Out – Fade In
Fade Out – Fade In
sued the actress for breach of contract after her absences from the popular show caused its failure, but the suit was later dropped. The Entertainers ran for only one season.[19] Around the same time, she became good friends with Jim Nabors, who was enjoying great success with his series Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C.
Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C.
As a result of their close friendship, she played a recurring role on Nabors' show as a tough corporal, later gunnery sergeant (starting with the episode Corporal Carol). Nabors would later be her first guest every season on her variety show. In 1966, Lucille Ball
Lucille Ball
became a friend and mentor to Burnett. After having guested on Burnett's highly successful CBS-TV special Carol + 2 and having the younger performer reciprocate by appearing on The Lucy Show, Ball reportedly offered Burnett her own sitcom called "Here's Agnes," to be produced by Desilu Productions. She declined the offer, not wanting to commit herself to a weekly series. The two remained close friends until Ball's death in 1989. Ball sent flowers every year on Burnett's birthday. When Burnett awoke on the day of her 56th birthday in 1989, she discovered via the morning news that Lucille Ball had died. Later that afternoon, flowers arrived at Burnett's house with a note reading, "Happy Birthday, Kid. Love, Lucy."[20] The Carol Burnett
Carol Burnett
Show[edit] Main article: The Carol Burnett
Carol Burnett
Show

Burnett, in her well-known charwoman character, gets a hand from guest star Rita Hayworth
Rita Hayworth
in 1971.

In 1967, CBS
CBS
offered to put Burnett in a weekly comedy series called Here's Agnes. However, she had a stipulation in her ten-year contract with CBS
CBS
that said she had five years from the date The Garry Moore Show ended to "push the button" on hosting thirty one-hour episodes of a music/comedy variety show. As a result, the hour-long Carol Burnett Show was born and debuted in September 1967, garnering 23 Emmy Awards and winning or being nominated for multiple Emmy and Golden Globe Awards every season it was on the air. Its ensemble cast included Tim Conway (who was a guest player until the ninth season),[21] Harvey Korman, Lyle Waggoner, and the teenaged Vicki Lawrence, whom Burnett herself discovered and mentored. The network initially did not want her to do a variety show because they believed only men could be successful at variety, but her contract required that they give her one season of whatever kind of show she wanted to make.[22] She chose to carry on the tradition of past variety show successes. A true variety show, The Carol Burnett Show
The Carol Burnett Show
struck a chord with viewers. Among other things, it parodied films ("Went With the Wind" for Gone With the Wind), television ("As the Stomach Turns" for the soap opera As the World Turns) and commercials. Musical numbers were also a frequent feature. Burnett and her team struck gold with the original sketch "The Family", which eventually was spun off into its own television show called Mama's Family, starring Vicki Lawrence. She opened most shows with an impromptu question-and-answer session with the audience, lasting a few minutes, during which she often demonstrated her ability to humorously ad lib. On numerous occasions, she obliged when asked to perform her trademark[23] Tarzan yell. She ended each show by tugging on her left ear, which was a message to her grandmother who raised her. This was done to let her know that she was doing well and that she loved her. During the show's run, her grandmother died. On an Intimate Portrait episode on Burnett, she tearfully recalled her grandmother's last moments: "She said to my husband Joe from her hospital bed 'Joe, you see that spider up there?' There was no spider, but Joe said he did anyhow. She said 'Every few minutes a big spider jumps on that little spider and they go at it like rabbits!!' And then she died. There's laughter in everything!"[24] She continued the tradition of tugging her ear. The Carol Burnett Show
The Carol Burnett Show
ceased production in 1978, Four post-script episodes were produced and aired on ABC during the summer of 1979 under the title, Carol Burnett
Carol Burnett
& Company basically using the same format and, with the exception of Harvey Korman
Harvey Korman
and Lyle Waggoner, the same supporting cast. Beginning in 1977, the comedy sketches of her series were edited into half-hour episodes entitled Carol Burnett
Carol Burnett
and Friends, which, for many years, proved to be extremely popular in syndication. In January 2015, Carol Burnett and Friends
Carol Burnett and Friends
began airing on MeTV. Other roles[edit]

Burnett in 1974

Burnett starred in a few films while her variety show was running, including Pete 'n' Tillie
Pete 'n' Tillie
(1972). She was nominated for an Emmy in 1974 for her role in the drama 6 Rms Riv Vu. After her show ended, she assumed a number of roles that departed from comedy. She appeared in several dramatic roles, most notably in the television movie Friendly Fire. She appeared as Beatrice O'Reilly in the film Life of The Party: The Story of Beatrice, a story about a woman fighting her alcoholism. Her other film work includes The Four Seasons (1981), Annie (1982), and Noises Off
Noises Off
(1992). She also returned in 2005 to star in a different role as Queen Aggravain in the movie version of Once Upon a Mattress. She guest-starred in season two of Desperate Housewives
Desperate Housewives
as Bree's stepmother, Elanor Mason. Burnett was the first celebrity to appear on the children's series Sesame Street, on that series' first episode on November 10, 1969.[25] She also made occasional returns to the stage in the 1970s and 1980s. In 1974, she appeared at the Muny Theatre in St. Louis, Missouri, in I Do! I Do! with Rock Hudson, and eleven years later, she took the supporting role of Carlotta Campion in the 1985 concert performance of Stephen Sondheim's Follies. She made frequent appearances as a panelist on the game show Password, an association she maintained until the early 1980s (in fact, Mark Goodson
Mark Goodson
awarded her his Silver Password All-Stars Award for best celebrity player; she's also credited with coming up with the title Password Plus, when it was originally planned to be titled Password '79). In the 1980s and 1990s, she made several attempts at starting a new variety program. She also appeared briefly on The Carol Burnett
Carol Burnett
Show's "The Family" sketches spinoff, Mama's Family, as her stormy character, Eunice Higgins. She played the matriarch in the cult comedy miniseries Fresno, which parodied the primetime soap opera Falcon Crest. She returned to TV in the mid-1990s as a supporting character on the sitcom Mad About You, playing Theresa Stemple, the mother of main character Jamie Buchman (Helen Hunt), for which she won another Emmy Award. In 1995, after an absence of 30 years, she was back on Broadway in Moon Over Buffalo, for which she was nominated for a Tony Award. Four years later, she appeared in the Broadway
Broadway
revue Putting It Together. Burnett had long been a fan of the soap opera All My Children, and realized a dream when Agnes Nixon
Agnes Nixon
created the role of Verla Grubbs for her in 1976. Burnett played the long-lost daughter of Langley Wallingford (Louis Edmonds), causing trouble for her stepmother Phoebe Tyler-Wallingford (Ruth Warrick). She made occasional appearances on the soap opera in each decade thereafter. She hosted a 25th-anniversary special about the show in 1995 and made a brief cameo appearance as Verla Grubbs on the January 5, 2005, episode which celebrated the show's 35th anniversary. She reprised her role as Grubbs in September 2011 as part of the series' finale. In 2008, she had her second role as an animated character in the film Horton Hears a Who!. Her first was in The Trumpet of the Swan in 2001. In 2009, she made a guest appearance on the Law & Order: Special Victims Unit, for which she was nominated for the Emmy Award
Emmy Award
for Outstanding Guest Actress in a Drama Series. In November 2010, she guest-starred on an episode of Glee as the mother of cheerleading coach Sue Sylvester.[26] In 2012 she had another voice role in The Secret World of Arrietty. She has made a recurring role, traditionally on Thanksgiving-themed episodes, of Hawaii Five-0 as Steve McGarrett's Aunt Debbie since 2013, until Aunt Deb died from cancer in the January 15, 2016 episode.[27][28] Personal life[edit] Burnett married her college sweetheart Don Saroyan on December 15, 1955; they divorced in 1962. On May 4, 1963, she married TV producer Joe Hamilton, a divorced father of eight, who had produced her 1962 Carnegie Hall concert and would produce The Carol Burnett
Carol Burnett
Show, among other projects.[29] The couple had three daughters:

Carrie Hamilton, born (1963-12-05)December 5, 1963 – died January 20, 2002 (at age 38) of lung and brain cancer. She was an actress and singer.[30][31] Jody Hamilton, born (1967-01-18) January 18, 1967 (age 51) Erin Hamilton, born (1968-08-14) August 14, 1968 (age 49). She is a singer.

Their marriage ended in divorce in 1984, and Hamilton died of cancer in 1991.[29] On November 24, 2001, she married Brian Miller, principal drummer in and contractor of the Hollywood
Hollywood
Bowl Orchestra, who is 23 years her junior.[32] She was good friends with the late performers Lucille Ball, Beverly Sills, and Jim Nabors; and remains good friends with Julie Andrews
Julie Andrews
and Betty White. She is the acting mentor to her protégée Vicki Lawrence. They share a close friendship, as noted by Lawrence in a testimonial speech during her appearance at Burnett's 2013 Mark Twain Award in Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C.
(recorded and broadcast on PBS Television).[citation needed] Libel case[edit] Main article: Burnett v. National Enquirer, Inc. In 1976, a false report in the nation's leading supermarket tabloid, The National Enquirer, incorrectly implied that Burnett had been drunk and boisterous in public at a restaurant with U.S. Secretary of State Henry Kissinger
Henry Kissinger
in attendance. The fact that both of her parents suffered from alcoholism made this a particularly sensitive issue to her. Through years of persistent litigation, she won a judgment against the Enquirer, in 1981. Though the initial jury award of $1.6 million was reduced to $200,000 by a series of appeals, and the final settlement was out-of-court, the event was widely viewed as a historic victory for libel victims of tabloid journalism.[33][34][35][36][37][38][39] The former longtime chief editor Iain Calder in his book The Untold Story, asserted that after the Burnett lawsuit, while under his leadership, the Enquirer worked hard to check the reliability of its facts and its sources. Memoirs and related works[edit]

Star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame
Hollywood Walk of Fame
at 6439 Hollywood
Hollywood
Blvd.

Burnett and her oldest daughter, Carrie Hamilton, co-wrote Hollywood Arms (2002), a play based on Burnett's bestselling memoir, One More Time (1986). Sara Niemietz
Sara Niemietz
and Donna Lynne Champlin shared the role of Helen (the character based on Burnett); Michele Pawk played Louise, Helen's mother, and Linda Lavin
Linda Lavin
played Helen's grandmother. For her performance, Pawk received the 2003 Tony Award
Tony Award
for Best Performance by a Featured Actress in a Play.[40] In 2010, she wrote the memoir This Time Together.[41] In 2016, she wrote the behind-the-scenes memoir In Such Good Company, for which she won a Grammy Award
Grammy Award
in 2017.[42] Filmography[edit]

Note: Made-for-TV movies are listed in the Television credits section.

Year Title Role Notes

1963 Who's Been Sleeping in My Bed? Stella Irving[43][44] Comedy film directed by Daniel Mann.[45]

1968 Rowan & Martin at the Movies Herself Short / documentary film directed by Jack Arnold.[46]

Star Spangled Salesman Miss Grebs Short / Documentary film
Documentary film
directed by Norman Maurer
Norman Maurer
and Wingate Smith.[47]

1972 Pete 'n' Tillie Tillie

Comedy-drama film directed by Martin Ritt.[48] Based on two novels by Peter De Vries: The Blood of the Lamb and Witch's Milk.[49][50]

1974 The Front Page Mollie Malloy

Comedy film directed by Billy Wilder.[51] Based on Ben Hecht
Ben Hecht
and Charles MacArthur's 1928 play of the same name.[52]

1978 A Wedding Tulip Brenner Comedy film directed by Robert Altman.[53]

1980 Health[54] Gloria Burbank

Ensemble comedy film directed by Robert Altman.[55] Also known as H.E.A.L.T.H.[56]

1981 The Four Seasons Kate Burroughs Romantic comedy
Romantic comedy
film written, co–starring, and directed by Alan Alda.[57]

Chu Chu and the Philly Flash Emily Comedy film directed by David Lowell Rich.[58]

1982 Annie Miss Hannigan Musical comedy drama film directed by John Huston.[59]

1992 Noises Off Dotty Otley / Mrs. Clackett

Comedy film directed by Peter Bogdanovich.[60] Based on the 1982 play of the same name by Michael Frayn.[61]

1997 Moon Over Broadway Herself Documentary film
Documentary film
directed by Chris Hegedus and D. A. Pennebaker.[62]

1999 Get Bruce Herself Documentary film
Documentary film
produced and directed by Andrew J. Kuehn.[63]

2001 The Trumpet of the Swan Mrs. Hammerbotham (voice) Animated film directed by Richard Rich & Terry L. Noss.[64]

2004 Broadway: The Golden Age, by the Legends Who Were There Herself Documentary film
Documentary film
directed by Rick McKay.[65]

2008 Horton Hears a Who! Kangaroo (voice)

Computer-animated fantasy adventure comedy film directed by Jimmy Hayward and Steve Martino.[66] Based on the book of the same name by Dr. Seuss.

2009 Post Grad Grandma Maureen Romantic comedy
Romantic comedy
film directed by Vicky Jenson.[67]

2012 The Secret World of Arrietty Hara (voice)

Animated fantasy film directed by Hiromasa Yonebayashi.[68] The Borrower Arrietty
Arrietty
(Japanese: 借りぐらしのアリエッティ, Hepburn: Kari-gurashi no Arietti)

Television credits[edit]

Year Title Role Notes

1955 The Paul Winchell
Paul Winchell
Show Guest Episode: "Episode #6.19"

1956 Stanley Celia Episode: "The New Year's Party"

Omnibus Singer Episode: "The American Musical Comedy"

1959–62 The Garry Moore Show Herself Contract role

1962 Julie and Carol at Carnegie Hall[69] Herself Television special directed by Joe Hamilton.[70]

1962 The Jack Benny Program Herself / Jane Episode: "Jack Plays Tarzan"

The Twilight Zone Agnes Grep Episode: "Cavender Is Coming"

1963 An Evening with Carol Burnett[69] Herself Television special directed by Ernest Chambers.

The Jack Benny Program Herself / Cindy Lou Wilson Episode: "Riverboat Sketch"

Calamity Jane Calamity Jane[71][72][73][74] Made-for-TV movie directed by Dick Altman.

1964 Once Upon a Mattress Princess Winnifred[75] Made-for-TV movie directed by Joe Layton
Joe Layton
and Dave Geisel.

1964–65 The Entertainers Herself Recurring role, 7 episodes

1966–67 The Lucy Show Carol Bradford Recurring role, 4 episodes

1966 Carol + 2 Herself Variety / sketch comedy directed by Marc Breaux.[76][77]

1967 Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C. Sergeant Carol Barnes Episode: "Corporal Carol"

Get Smart "Ozark" Annie Jones Episode: "One of Our Olives Is Missing"

1967–78 The Carol Burnett
Carol Burnett
Show Herself / Skit characters Variety / sketch comedy television series.

1969–71 Here's Lucy Herself / Carol Krausmeyer Recurring role, 3 episodes

1969 Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C. Sergeant Carol Barnes Episode: "Showtime with Sgt. Carol"

1971 Julie and Carol at Lincoln Center[69] Herself Television special directed by Dave Powers.[78]

1969–71 Sesame Street Herself Recurring[79][80]

1972 Once Upon a Mattress Princess Winifred the Woebegone Made-for-TV movie directed by Ron Field and Dave Powers.[81]

1974 6 Rms Riv Vu Anne Miller Made-for-TV movie directed by Alan Alda
Alan Alda
and Clark Jones.[82]

Out to Lunch Herself Television special directed by Bill Davis.

1975 Twigs Emily / Celia / Dorothy / Ma Made-for-TV movie directed by Alan Arkin
Alan Arkin
and Clark Jones.[83]

1976 The Sonny and Cher
Cher
Show Herself / Various Characters Episodes:

"Episode #1.1" (S 1:Ep 1–Pilot) "Episode #2.4" (S 2:Ep 4)

Van Dyke and Company Herself Episode: "Episode #1.5"

Sills and Burnett at the Met[69] Herself Music special directed by Dave Powers.[84]

1977 Insight Eve Episode: "This Side of Eden"

3 Girls 3 Guest Episode: "Episode #1.1" (S 1:Ep 1–Pilot)[85][86][87]

1978 Dolly and Carol in Nashville Herself Variety special

The Grass Is Always Greener over the Septic Tank Dorothy Benson

Made-for-TV movie directed by Robert Day.[88] Based on the 1976 novel of the same name written by Erma Bombeck.[89]

1979 Friendly Fire Peg Mullen

Made-for-TV movie directed by David Greene.[90] Based on the 1976 book of the same name written by C. D. B. Bryan,[91]

Carol Burnett
Carol Burnett
& Company Skit characters Variety / sketch comedy television series.

The Tenth Month Dori Grey

Made-for-TV movie directed by Joan Tewkesbury.[92] Based on the 1970 novel of the same name by Laura Z. Hobson.[93]

1980 The Wild Wacky Wonderful World of Winter Stripper HBO
HBO
special[94]

The Muppet Show Herself Episode: "Carol Burnett"

1981–95 Great Performances Herself / Carlotta Campion Recurring role, 4 episodes

1982 Eunice Eunice Harper Higgins

Made-for-TV movie directed by Roger Beatty and Harvey Korman.[95] Based on The Family and served as a precursor to the spin-off television sitcom Mama's Family.

Life of the Party: The Story of Beatrice Beatrice O'Reilly Made-for-TV movie directed by Lamont Johnson.[96]

1983 All My Children Verla Grubbs Recurring 1983–95, 2011

Between Friends Mary Catherine Castelli

Made-for-TV movie directed by Lou Antonio.[97] Based on the 1975 novel Nobody Makes Me Cry by Shelley List.[98]

Mama's Family Eunice Higgins Recurring role, 6 episodes

1984 Burnett Discovers Domingo Herself Musical special directed by Marty Pasetta.[99][100][101]

1984–88 Magnum, P.I. Susan Johnson 2 episodes

1985 The Laundromat Alberta Johnson Made-for-TV movie directed by Robert Altman.[102]

Happily Ever After Narrator Made-for-TV movie directed by Bill Melendez and Steven Melendez.[103]

1986 Fresno Charlotte Kensington Miniseries[104] directed by Jeff Bleckner.[105]

1987 Plaza Suite[69][106] Karen Nash / Muriel Tate / Norma Hubley

Made-for-TV movie directed by Roger Beatty and Kenny Solms.[107] Also executive producer.

Carol, Carl, Whoopi and Robin[69] Herself Comedy
Comedy
special directed by Roger Beatty and Harvey Korman.[108]

Fame Rose Episode: "Reggie and Rose"

1988 Hostage[109] Martha Made-for-TV movie directed by Peter Levin.[110]

1989 Julie & Carol: Together Again Herself Music special directed by Jeff Margolis.[111]

1990–91 Carol & Company Skit characters Comedy
Comedy
anthology series.[112]

1991 The Carol Burnett
Carol Burnett
Show Skit characters

Variety/sketch comedy television series. Revival of the 1967–78 series.

The Tale of Peter Rabbit Mr. Mcgregor's Cat / Narrator / Mrs Rabbit

Made-for-TV movie directed by Clive A. Smith.[113] Based on the children's book of the same name by Beatrix Potter.

1992 The Larry Sanders Show Herself 2 episodes

1993 The Carol Burnett
Carol Burnett
Show: A Reunion[69] Herself Documentary film
Documentary film
directed by Dave Powers.[114]

1994 Carol Burnett: The Special
Special
Years Archival footage of herself

Documentary film
Documentary film
directed by Paul Miller.[115] Also executive producer

Seasons of the Heart Vivian Levinson Made-for-TV movie directed by Lee Grant.[116]

Men, Movies & Carol[69] Herself Documentary film
Documentary film
directed by Paul Miller and written by Burnett.[117]

1995 Women of the House Herself Episode: "Women in Film"

1996–99 Mad About You Theresa Stemple, Jamie's mother Recurring role, 10 episodes

1997 Touched by an Angel Lillian Bennett Episode: "The Comeback"

1998 The Marriage Fool Florence Made-for-TV movie directed by Charles Matthau.[118]

2000 Putting It Together The Wife Musical revue directed by Don Roy King
Don Roy King
and Eric D. Schaeffer.[119]

2001 The Carol Burnett
Carol Burnett
Show: Show Stoppers[69] Archival footage of herself

Special
Special
directed by Paul Miller.[120] Also executive producer

2004 The Carol Burnett
Carol Burnett
Show: Let's Bump Up the Lights Archival footage of herself

Special
Special
directed by Steve Purcell.[121] Also executive producer

2005 Once Upon a Mattress Queen Aggravain

Made-for-TV movie directed by Kathleen Marshall.[122] Co–executive producer with Martin Tudor.[122]

2006 Desperate Housewives Eleanor Mason Episode: "Don't Look at Me"

2007 American Masters: Tribute to Carol Burnett Archival footage of herself Episode: "Carol Burnett: A Woman of Character"

2009 Law & Order: Special
Special
Victims Unit Birdie Sulloway

Episode: "Ballerina" (Emmy Award-nominated guest appearance)[15]

2010–15 Glee Doris Sylvester[26] 2 episodes

2013–14 Curious George Great Aunt Sylvia (voice) Episodes: "George and Allie's Lawn Service/Curious George's Scavenger Hunt" (S 7:Ep 6), "Toy Monkey/George and Allie's Game Plan" (S 8:Ep 1)

2013–15 Hot in Cleveland Penny 2 episodes

2013–16 Hawaii Five-0 Aunt Deb McGarrett[27][28] Recurring role, 3 episodes

2014 Signed, Sealed, Delivered Ardis Paine Episode: "A Hope and a Future"

2016 A Celebration of American Creativity: In Performance at the White House[123] Herself Music special directed by Leon Knoles.

2017 Julie's Greenroom Mrs. Edna Brightful Episode: "Mash-Up: The Musical"[124]

Household Name Vivian Valmont TV Pilot

The Carol Burnett Show
The Carol Burnett Show
50th Anniversary Special Herself TV Special

Theatre[edit]

1959: Once Upon a Mattress
Once Upon a Mattress
(Broadway) 1961/63: Calamity Jane 1964: Fade Out – Fade In 1970: Plaza Suite 1974: I Do! I Do! 1977/80: Same Time, Next Year 1985: Follies 1990: Love Letters 1993: Company 1995: Moon Over Buffalo 1998: Putting It Together 2002: Broadway
Broadway
on Broadway 2014: Love Letters

Books[edit]

Mendoza, George; Burnett, Carol (1975). What I Want to Be When I Grow Up. New York City: Simon & Schuster. ISBN 978-0671221591.  Burnett, Carol (1986). One More Time : A Memoir
Memoir
By Carol Burnett (1st ed.). New York City: Random House. ISBN 978-0394552545.  Burnett, Carol (2011). This Time Together: Laughter and Reflection (Reprint ed.). New York City: Three Rivers Press. ISBN 978-0307461193.  Burnett, Carol (2014). Carrie and Me: A Mother-Daughter Love Story (Reprint ed.). New York City: Simon & Schuster. ISBN 978-1476755793.  Burnett, Carol (2016). In Such Good Company: Eleven Years of Laughter, Mayhem, and Fun in the Sandbox. New York City: Crown Archetype. ISBN 978-1101904657. 

Awards and recognition[edit]

Year Award Category Nominated work Role Result Ref.

1962 Peabody Award Personal Award Her comedic performances Herself Won [125]

Primetime Emmy Award Outstanding Performance in a Variety or Musical Program or Series The Garry Moore Show Won [126]

1963 Julie and Carol at Carnegie Hall Won [127]

An Evening with Carol Burnett Won [128]

1968 Golden Globe Award Best TV Star – Female The Carol Burnett
Carol Burnett
Show Herself /Skit Characters Won [129]

1969 Primetime Emmy Award Outstanding Performance in a Variety or Musical Program or Series Nominated [130]

1970 Golden Globe Award Best TV Actress – Musical or Comedy Won [131]

Primetime Emmy Award Outstanding Performance in a Variety or Musical Program or Series Nominated [132]

1971 Golden Globe Award Best Television Series – Musical or Comedy Producer (shared with executive producer Joe Hamilton and producer Arnie Rosen) Won [133]

Primetime Emmy Award Outstanding Performance in a Variety or Musical Program or Series Nominated [134]

1972 Outstanding Variety Series – Musical Won [135]

Outstanding Single Program – Variety or Musical – Variety and Popular Music Julie and Carol at Lincoln Center Herself Nominated [136]

Golden Globe Award Best TV Actress – Musical or Comedy The Carol Burnett
Carol Burnett
Show Herself /Skit Characters Won [137]

1973 Nominated [138]

Best Motion Picture Actress – Musical or Comedy Pete 'n' Tillie Tillie Nominated [139]

Primetime Emmy Award Outstanding Variety Musical Series The Carol Burnett
Carol Burnett
Show Producer (with executive producer Joe Hamilton and producers Bill Angelos, Buz Kohan and Arnie Rosen) Nominated [140]

1974 Outstanding Music-Variety Series Won [141]

Best Lead Actress in a Drama 6 Rms Riv Vu Anne Miller Nominated [142]

Golden Globe Award Best TV Actress – Musical or Comedy The Carol Burnett
Carol Burnett
Show Herself /Skit Characters Nominated [143]

1975 Nominated [144]

Hollywood
Hollywood
Walk of Fame

Achievement in the entertainment industry Herself Won [5][11]

Primetime Emmy Award Outstanding Comedy-Variety or Music Series The Carol Burnett
Carol Burnett
Show Producer (with executive producer Joe Hamilton and producer Ed Simmons) Won [145]

1976 Nominated [146]

Outstanding Special
Special
- Comedy-Variety or Music Sills and Burnett at the Met Herself (with Beverly Sills
Beverly Sills
and producer Joe Hamilton) Nominated [147]

Golden Globe Award Best TV Actress – Musical or Comedy The Carol Burnett
Carol Burnett
Show Herself /Skit Characters Nominated [148]

1977 Golden Globe Award Best TV Actress – Musical or Comedy Herself /Skit Characters Won [149]

1978 Won [150]

Primetime Emmy Award Outstanding Comedy-Variety or Music Series Producer (with executive producer Joe Hamilton and producer Ed Simmons) Nominated [151]

1979 Golden Globe Award Best TV Actress – Musical or Comedy The Carol Burnett
Carol Burnett
Show Nominated [152]

Best Motion Picture Actress in a Supporting Role A Wedding Tulip Brenner Nominated [153]

Primetime Emmy Award Outstanding Lead Actress in a Limited Series or a Special Friendly Fire Peg Mullen Nominated [154]

1980 Crystal Award Women in Film

In recognition of her excellence and innovation in her creative works that have enhanced the perception of women through the medium of television Won [155]

1982 Golden Globe Award Best Motion Picture Actress – Comedy
Comedy
or Musical The Four Seasons Kate Burroughs Nominated [156]

1983 Best Actress in a Motion Picture – Comedy
Comedy
or Musical Annie Miss Hannigan Nominated [157]

Best Performance by an Actress in a Miniseries
Miniseries
or Motion Picture Made for TV Life of the Party: The Story of Beatrice Beatrice O'Reilly Nominated [158]

1985 Television Hall of Fame Inductee Achievement in the entertainment industry Herself Won [159]

1991 Golden Globe Award Best Performance by an Actress in a TV Series – Comedy
Comedy
or Musical Carol & Company Skit characters Nominated [160]

1992 Primetime Emmy Award Outstanding Guest Actress in a Comedy
Comedy
Series The Larry Sanders Show Herself Nominated [161]

1995 Achievement or Performance Music Dance Cultural Men, Movies & Carol Nominated [162]

1997 Outstanding Guest Actress in a Comedy
Comedy
Series Mad About You Theresa Stemple Won [163]

Crystal Award Women in Film

In recognition of her excellence and innovation in her creative works that have enhanced the perception of women through the medium of television Won [155]

1998 Primetime Emmy Award Outstanding Guest Actress in a Comedy
Comedy
Series Mad About You Theresa Stemple Nominated [164]

2002 Outstanding Variety, Music or Comedy
Comedy
Special The Carol Burnett
Carol Burnett
Show: Show Stoppers Producer (with executive producers John Hamilton and Rick Hawkins, producers Jody Hamilton and Mary Jo Blue) Nominated [165]

2005 Presidential Medal of Freedom Civil awards and decorations of the United States Civil award on November 9 Herself Won [166]

2009 Primetime Emmy Award Outstanding Guest Actress in a Drama Series Law & Order: Special
Special
Victims Unit Birdie Sulloway Nominated [167]

2011 Grammy Award Best Spoken Word Album This Time Together: Laughter and Reflection Herself Nominated [168]

2013 Mark Twain Prize Mark Twain Prize for American Humor Achievement in the entertainment industry awarded on October 20 Won [16]

2014 Grammy Award Best Spoken Word Album Carrie and Me Nominated [169]

2015 Lifetime Achievement Award Screen Actors Guild Achievement in the entertainment industry Won [170]

2017 Grammy Award Best Spoken Word Album In Such Good Company: Eleven Years Of Laughter, Mayhem, And Fun In The Sandbox Won [171]

Other honors[edit]

1998: Grand Marshal of the 109th Rose Parade
Rose Parade
and the 84th Rose Bowl Game on New Year's Day [172] 1999: The first honoree and presenter at second annual awards ceremony of the Back Stage West Garland Awards[citation needed] 2003: Kennedy Center Honors
Kennedy Center Honors
recipient[173] 2009: Inducted into the California
California
Hall of Fame at The California Museum for History, Women and the Arts[174] 2014: Harvey Award recipient by The Jimmy Stewart Museum on August 12[175]

References[edit] Notes[edit]

^ Book has no page numbers; source: Chapter V, They Called Them Spectaculars

Citations[edit]

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Carol Burnett
jokes with President George W. Bush ..." White House. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government. November 9, 2005. Retrieved February 20, 2012.  ^ "49th Primetime Emmy Awards". Primetime Emmy Award. United States: Academy of Television Arts & Sciences. Retrieved October 31, 2016.  ^ "53rd Annual Grammy Awards". National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences.  ^ "56th Annual Grammy Awards". National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences.  ^ "52nd Lifetime Achievement recipient Carol Burnett". Screen Actors Guild. Los Angeles: SAG-AFTRA. January 30, 2016. Retrieved January 30, 2016.  ^ "59th Annual Grammy Awards". National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences.  ^ "THEME AND GRAND MARSHAL". Pasadena Tournament of Roses. Retrieved January 10, 2017.  ^ "History of the Kennedy Center Honors". The Kennedy Center. Retrieved January 10, 2016.  ^ "Californiamuseum-Carol Burnett". California
California
Museum. Retrieved January 10, 2017.  ^ Harley, Tim. "The Harvey Award Names Carol Burnett
Carol Burnett
the 2014 Harvey Award Recipient!" (PDF). jimmy.org. The Jimmy Stewart Museum. Archived from the original (PDF) on May 5, 2015. Retrieved August 12, 2014. 

Sources[edit]

Horace Newcomb, ed. (2004). Encyclopedia of Television (2nd ed.). Abingdon-on-Thames: Routledge. p. 364. ISBN 978-1579583941.  Pilato, Herbie J. (2013). The Essential Elizabeth Montgomery: A Guide to Her Magical Performances. Lanham, Maryland: Taylor Trade Publishing. p. 88. ISBN 978-1589798243.  Lenburg, Jeff; Maurer, Joan Howard; Lenburg, Greg (2012). The Three Stooges Scrapbook (Updated ed.). Chicago: Chicago
Chicago
Review Press. p. 267. ISBN 978-1613740743.  De Vries, Peter (2005). The Blood of the Lamb (Paperback ed.). Chicago: University Of Chicago
Chicago
Press. p. ix. ISBN 978-0226143880.  Blum, Daniel (1979). Daniel Blum's Screen World, 1964 (15th ed.). Cheshire, Connecticut: Biblo-Moser. p. 96. ISBN 978-0819603050.  Leszczak, Bob (2015). From Small Screen to Vinyl: A Guide to Television Stars Who Made Records, 1950-2000. Lanham, Maryland: Rowman & Littlefield. p. 40. ISBN 978-1442242739.  Dietz, Dan (2015). The Complete Book of 1970s Broadway
Broadway
Musicals. Lanham, Maryland: Rowman & Littlefield. p. 514. ISBN 978-1442251656.  Rowan, Terry (1982). Western films: A complete guide (1st ed.). New York City: Rawson Associates. p. 76. ISBN 978-0892562183.  Rowan, Terry (2016). Character-Based Film Series Part 3 (1st ed.). Raleigh, North Carolina: Lulu. p. 50. ISBN 978-1365021312.  Rowan, Terry (2016). Character-Based Film Series Part 1 (1st ed.). Raleigh, North Carolina: Lulu. p. 235. ISBN 978-1365021282.  Rowan, Terry (2016). Motion Pictures From the Fabulous 1950's (1st ed.). Raleigh, North Carolina: Lulu. p. 36. ISBN 978-1329760776.  Horace Newcomb, ed. (2004). Encyclopedia of Television (2nd ed.). Abingdon-on-Thames: Routledge. p. 60. ISBN 978-1579583941.  Fearn-Banks, Kathleen (2009). The A to Z of African-American Television (The A to Z Guide Series) (49th ed.). Lanham, Maryland: Scarecrow Press. p. 460. ISBN 978-0810868328.  Fearn-Banks, Kathleen (2005). Historical Dictionary of African-American Television (Historical Dictionaries of Literature and the Arts). Lanham, Maryland: Scarecrow Press. p. 488. ISBN 978-0810853355.  Downs, Joan (May 14, 1971). "Here's to you, Mrs. Hamilton". Life. United States: Time Inc.
Time Inc.
70 (18): 93–97. Retrieved October 14, 2016.  Burnett, Carol (1986). One More Time : A Memoir
Memoir
By Carol Burnett (1st ed.). New York City: Random House. pp. 194–195. ISBN 978-0394552545.  "Television Highlights". New York. New York City: New York Media, LLC. August 30, 1993. p. 177.  Maltin, Leonard (2007). "Health". Leonard Maltin's Movie Guide 2008. New York City: Signet Books. p. 587. ISBN 978-0451221865.  O'Brien, Daniel (1995). Robert Altman: Hollywood
Hollywood
Survivor. New York: Continuum. p. 135. ISBN 0-8264-0791-9.  Horace Newcomb, ed. (2004). Encyclopedia of Television (2nd ed.). Abingdon-on-Thames: Routledge. p. 365. ISBN 978-1579583941.  Suskin, Steven (2006). Second Act Trouble: Behind the Scenes at Broadway's Big Musical Bombs (Annotated ed.). Milwaukee: Applause Theatre & Cinema Books. pp. 90–93. ISBN 978-1557836311.  The Courier-Journal
The Courier-Journal
Staff (September 19, 1999). "Life of the Party: The Story of Beatrice". The Courier-Journal. Louisville, Kentucky: Gannett Company. p. 195. Retrieved October 10, 2016.  (subscription required)

External links[edit]

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Comedy
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Awards for Carol Burnett

v t e

Primetime Emmy Award
Emmy Award
for Outstanding Individual Performance in a Variety or Music Program

Perry Como
Perry Como
/ Dinah Shore
Dinah Shore
(1959) Harry Belafonte
Harry Belafonte
(1960) Fred Astaire
Fred Astaire
(1961) Carol Burnett
Carol Burnett
(1962) Carol Burnett
Carol Burnett
(1963) Danny Kaye
Danny Kaye
(1964) Art Carney
Art Carney
(1967) Art Carney
Art Carney
/ Pat Paulsen
Pat Paulsen
(1968) Arte Johnson
Arte Johnson
/ Harvey Korman
Harvey Korman
(1969) Harvey Korman
Harvey Korman
(1971) Harvey Korman
Harvey Korman
(1972) Tim Conway
Tim Conway
(1973) Harvey Korman
Harvey Korman
/ Brenda Vaccaro
Brenda Vaccaro
(1974) Jack Albertson
Jack Albertson
/ Cloris Leachman
Cloris Leachman
(1975) Chevy Chase
Chevy Chase
/ Vicki Lawrence
Vicki Lawrence
(1976) Tim Conway
Tim Conway
/ Rita Moreno
Rita Moreno
(1977) Tim Conway
Tim Conway
/ Gilda Radner
Gilda Radner
(1978) Sarah Vaughan
Sarah Vaughan
(1981) Nell Carter
Nell Carter
/ André De Shields
André De Shields
(1982) Leontyne Price
Leontyne Price
(1983) Cloris Leachman
Cloris Leachman
(1984) George Hearn (1985) Whitney Houston
Whitney Houston
(1986) Robin Williams
Robin Williams
(1987) Robin Williams
Robin Williams
(1988) Linda Ronstadt
Linda Ronstadt
(1989) Tracey Ullman
Tracey Ullman
(1990) Billy Crystal
Billy Crystal
(1991) Bette Midler
Bette Midler
(1992) Dana Carvey (1993) Tracey Ullman
Tracey Ullman
(1994) Barbra Streisand
Barbra Streisand
(1995) Tony Bennett
Tony Bennett
(1996) Bette Midler
Bette Midler
(1997) Billy Crystal
Billy Crystal
(1998) John Leguizamo
John Leguizamo
(1999) Eddie Izzard
Eddie Izzard
(2000) Barbra Streisand
Barbra Streisand
(2001) Sting (2002) Wayne Brady
Wayne Brady
(2003) Elaine Stritch
Elaine Stritch
(2004) Hugh Jackman
Hugh Jackman
(2005) Barry Manilow
Barry Manilow
(2006) Tony Bennett
Tony Bennett
(2007) Don Rickles
Don Rickles
(2008)

v t e

Primetime Emmy Award
Emmy Award
for Outstanding Guest Actress in a Comedy
Comedy
Series

Cloris Leachman
Cloris Leachman
(1975) Beah Richards
Beah Richards
(1988) Colleen Dewhurst
Colleen Dewhurst
(1989) Swoosie Kurtz
Swoosie Kurtz
(1990) Colleen Dewhurst
Colleen Dewhurst
(1991) No award (1992) Tracey Ullman
Tracey Ullman
(1993) Eileen Heckart (1994) Cyndi Lauper
Cyndi Lauper
(1995) Betty White
Betty White
(1996) Carol Burnett
Carol Burnett
(1997) Emma Thompson
Emma Thompson
(1998) Tracey Ullman
Tracey Ullman
(1999) Jean Smart
Jean Smart
(2000) Jean Smart
Jean Smart
(2001) Cloris Leachman
Cloris Leachman
(2002) Christina Applegate
Christina Applegate
(2003) Laura Linney
Laura Linney
(2004) Kathryn Joosten
Kathryn Joosten
(2005) Cloris Leachman
Cloris Leachman
(2006) Elaine Stritch
Elaine Stritch
(2007) Kathryn Joosten
Kathryn Joosten
(2008) Tina Fey
Tina Fey
(2009) Betty White
Betty White
(2010) Gwyneth Paltrow
Gwyneth Paltrow
(2011) Kathy Bates
Kathy Bates
(2012) Melissa Leo
Melissa Leo
(2013) Uzo Aduba
Uzo Aduba
(2014) Joan Cusack
Joan Cusack
(2015) Tina Fey
Tina Fey
& Amy Poehler
Amy Poehler
(2016) Melissa McCarthy
Melissa McCarthy
(2017)

v t e

Golden Globe Award
Golden Globe Award
for Best Actress – Television Series Musical or Comedy

Donna Reed
Donna Reed
(1962) Inger Stevens
Inger Stevens
(1963) Mary Tyler Moore
Mary Tyler Moore
(1964) Anne Francis
Anne Francis
(1965) Marlo Thomas
Marlo Thomas
(1966) Carol Burnett
Carol Burnett
(1967) Diahann Carroll
Diahann Carroll
(1968) Carol Burnett/ Julie Sommars
Julie Sommars
(1969) Mary Tyler Moore
Mary Tyler Moore
(1970) Carol Burnett
Carol Burnett
(1971) Jean Stapleton
Jean Stapleton
(1972) Cher/ Jean Stapleton
Jean Stapleton
(1973) Valerie Harper
Valerie Harper
(1974) Cloris Leachman
Cloris Leachman
(1975) Carol Burnett
Carol Burnett
(1976) Carol Burnett
Carol Burnett
(1977) Linda Lavin
Linda Lavin
(1978) Linda Lavin
Linda Lavin
(1979) Katherine Helmond
Katherine Helmond
(1980) Eileen Brennan
Eileen Brennan
(1981) Debbie Allen
Debbie Allen
(1982) Joanna Cassidy
Joanna Cassidy
(1983) Shelley Long
Shelley Long
(1984) Estelle Getty/ Cybill Shepherd
Cybill Shepherd
(1985) Cybill Shepherd
Cybill Shepherd
(1986) Tracey Ullman
Tracey Ullman
(1987) Candice Bergen
Candice Bergen
(1988) Jamie Lee Curtis
Jamie Lee Curtis
(1989) Kirstie Alley
Kirstie Alley
(1990) Candice Bergen
Candice Bergen
(1991) Roseanne Barr
Roseanne Barr
(1992) Helen Hunt
Helen Hunt
(1993) Helen Hunt
Helen Hunt
(1994) Cybill Shepherd
Cybill Shepherd
(1995) Helen Hunt
Helen Hunt
(1996) Calista Flockhart
Calista Flockhart
(1997) Jenna Elfman
Jenna Elfman
(1998) Sarah Jessica Parker
Sarah Jessica Parker
(1999) Sarah Jessica Parker
Sarah Jessica Parker
(2000) Sarah Jessica Parker
Sarah Jessica Parker
(2001) Jennifer Aniston
Jennifer Aniston
(2002) Sarah Jessica Parker
Sarah Jessica Parker
(2003) Teri Hatcher
Teri Hatcher
(2004) Mary-Louise Parker
Mary-Louise Parker
(2005) America Ferrera
America Ferrera
(2006) Tina Fey
Tina Fey
(2007) Tina Fey
Tina Fey
(2008) Toni Collette
Toni Collette
(2009) Laura Linney
Laura Linney
(2010) Laura Dern
Laura Dern
(2011) Lena Dunham
Lena Dunham
(2012) Amy Poehler
Amy Poehler
(2013) Gina Rodriguez
Gina Rodriguez
(2014) Rachel Bloom
Rachel Bloom
(2015) Tracee Ellis Ross
Tracee Ellis Ross
(2016) Rachel Brosnahan
Rachel Brosnahan
(2017)

v t e

Grammy Award
Grammy Award
for Best Spoken Word Album

1959−1980

Stan Freberg
Stan Freberg
– The Best of the Stan Freberg
Stan Freberg
Shows (1959) Carl Sandburg
Carl Sandburg
Lincoln Portrait (1960) Robert Bialek (producer) – FDR Speaks (1961) Leonard Bernstein
Leonard Bernstein
– Humor in Music (1962) Charles Laughton
Charles Laughton
– The Story-Teller: A Session With Charles Laughton (1963) Edward Albee
Edward Albee
(playwright) – Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?
Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?
(1964) That Was the Week That Was
That Was the Week That Was
– BBC Tribute to John F. Kennedy (1965) Goddard Lieberson
Goddard Lieberson
(producer) – John F. Kennedy - As We Remember Him (1966) Edward R. Murrow
Edward R. Murrow
Edward R. Murrow
Edward R. Murrow
- A Reporter Remembers, Vol. I The War Years (1967) Everett Dirksen
Everett Dirksen
– Gallant Men (1968) Rod McKuen
Rod McKuen
– Lonesome Cities (1969) Art Linkletter
Art Linkletter
& Diane Linkletter – We Love You Call Collect (1970) Martin Luther King Jr.
Martin Luther King Jr.
– Why I Oppose the War in Vietnam (1971) Les Crane
Les Crane
– Desiderata (1972) Bruce Botnick (producer) – Lenny performed by the original Broadway cast (1973) Richard Harris
Richard Harris
Jonathan Livingston Seagull (1974) Peter Cook
Peter Cook
and Dudley Moore
Dudley Moore
– Good Evening (1975) James Whitmore
James Whitmore
Give 'em Hell, Harry!
Give 'em Hell, Harry!
(1976) Henry Fonda, Helen Hayes, James Earl Jones
James Earl Jones
and Orson Welles
Orson Welles
- Great American Documents (1977) Julie Harris – The Belle of Amherst
The Belle of Amherst
(1978) Orson Welles
Orson Welles
Citizen Kane
Citizen Kane
Original Motion Picture Soundtrack (1979) John Gielgud
John Gielgud
– Ages of Man - Readings From Shakespeare
Shakespeare
(1980)

1981−2000

Pat Carroll – Gertrude Stein, Gertrude Stein, Gertrude Stein
Gertrude Stein
(1981) Orson Welles
Orson Welles
Donovan's Brain
Donovan's Brain
(1982) Tom Voegeli (producer) – Raiders of the Lost Ark
Raiders of the Lost Ark
- The Movie on Record performed by Various Artists (1983) William Warfield
William Warfield
Lincoln Portrait (1984) Ben Kingsley
Ben Kingsley
– The Words of Gandhi (1985) Mike Berniker (producer) & the original Broadway
Broadway
cast – Ma Rainey's Black Bottom (1986) Johnny Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis, Chips Moman, Ricky Nelson, Roy Orbison, Carl Perkins
Carl Perkins
and Sam Phillips
Sam Phillips
– Interviews From the Class of '55 Recording Sessions (1987) Garrison Keillor
Garrison Keillor
Lake Wobegon Days (1988) Jesse Jackson
Jesse Jackson
– Speech by Rev. Jesse Jackson
Jesse Jackson
(1989) Gilda Radner
Gilda Radner
– It's Always Something (1990) George Burns
George Burns
– Gracie: A Love Story (1991) Ken Burns
Ken Burns
– The Civil War (1992) Earvin "Magic" Johnson and Robert O'Keefe – What You Can Do to Avoid AIDS (1993) Maya Angelou
Maya Angelou
On the Pulse of Morning
On the Pulse of Morning
(1994) Henry Rollins
Henry Rollins
– Get in the Van (1995) Maya Angelou
Maya Angelou
– Phenomenal Woman (1996) Hillary Clinton
Hillary Clinton
It Takes a Village (1997) Charles Kuralt
Charles Kuralt
– Charles Kuralt's Spring (1998) Christopher Reeve
Christopher Reeve
Still Me
Still Me
(1999) LeVar Burton
LeVar Burton
– The Autobiography of Martin Luther King Jr.
Martin Luther King Jr.
(2000)

2001−present

Sidney Poitier, Rick Harris & John Runnette (producers) – The Measure of a Man: A Spiritual Autobiography (2001) Quincy Jones, Jeffrey S. Thomas, Steven Strassman (engineers) and Elisa Shokoff (producer) – Q: The Autobiography of Quincy Jones (2002) Maya Angelou
Maya Angelou
and Charles B. Potter (producer) – A Song Flung Up to Heaven / Robin Williams, Nathaniel Kunkel (engineer/mixer) and Peter Asher (producer) – Live 2002 (2003) Al Franken
Al Franken
and Paul Ruben (producer) – Lies and the Lying Liars Who Tell Them (2004) Bill Clinton
Bill Clinton
– My Life (2005) Barack Obama
Barack Obama
Dreams from My Father
Dreams from My Father
(2006) Jimmy Carter
Jimmy Carter
– Our Endangered Values: America's Moral Crisis / Ossie Davis and Ruby Dee
Ruby Dee
- With Ossie and Ruby (2007) Barack Obama
Barack Obama
and Jacob Bronstein (producer) – The Audacity of Hope (2008) Beau Bridges, Cynthia Nixon
Cynthia Nixon
and Blair Underwood
Blair Underwood
– An Inconvenient Truth by Al Gore
Al Gore
(2009) Michael J. Fox
Michael J. Fox
– Always Looking Up (2010) Jon Stewart
Jon Stewart
– The Daily Show with Jon Stewart
Jon Stewart
Presents Earth (The Audiobook) (2011) Betty White
Betty White
– If You Ask Me (And Of Course You Won't) (2012) Janis Ian
Janis Ian
– Society's Child (2013) Stephen Colbert
Stephen Colbert
– America Again: Re-becoming The Greatness We Never Weren't (2014) Joan Rivers
Joan Rivers
– Diary of a Mad Diva (2015) Jimmy Carter
Jimmy Carter
– A Full Life: Reflections at 90 (2016) Carol Burnett
Carol Burnett
– In Such Good Company: Eleven Years of Laughter, Mayhem, and Fun in the Sandbox (2017) Carrie Fisher
Carrie Fisher
The Princess Diarist
The Princess Diarist
(2018)

v t e

Hasty Pudding Woman of the Year

1951–1975

Gertrude Lawrence
Gertrude Lawrence
(1951) Barbara Bel Geddes
Barbara Bel Geddes
(1952) Mamie Eisenhower
Mamie Eisenhower
(1953) Shirley Booth
Shirley Booth
(1954) Debbie Reynolds
Debbie Reynolds
(1955) Peggy Ann Garner
Peggy Ann Garner
(1956) Carroll Baker
Carroll Baker
(1957) Katharine Hepburn
Katharine Hepburn
(1958) Joanne Woodward
Joanne Woodward
(1959) Carol Lawrence
Carol Lawrence
(1960) Jane Fonda
Jane Fonda
(1961) Piper Laurie
Piper Laurie
(1962) Shirley MacLaine
Shirley MacLaine
(1963) Rosalind Russell
Rosalind Russell
(1964) Lee Remick
Lee Remick
(1965) Ethel Merman
Ethel Merman
(1966) Lauren Bacall
Lauren Bacall
(1967) Angela Lansbury
Angela Lansbury
(1968) Carol Burnett
Carol Burnett
(1969) Dionne Warwick
Dionne Warwick
(1970) Carol Channing
Carol Channing
(1971) Ruby Keeler
Ruby Keeler
(1972) Liza Minnelli
Liza Minnelli
(1973) Faye Dunaway
Faye Dunaway
(1974) Valerie Harper
Valerie Harper
(1975)

1976–2000

Bette Midler
Bette Midler
(1976) Elizabeth Taylor
Elizabeth Taylor
(1977) Beverly Sills
Beverly Sills
(1978) Candice Bergen
Candice Bergen
(1979) Meryl Streep
Meryl Streep
(1980) Mary Tyler Moore
Mary Tyler Moore
(1981) Ella Fitzgerald
Ella Fitzgerald
(1982) Julie Andrews
Julie Andrews
(1983) Joan Rivers
Joan Rivers
(1984) Cher
Cher
(1985) Sally Field
Sally Field
(1986) Bernadette Peters
Bernadette Peters
(1987) Lucille Ball
Lucille Ball
(1988) Kathleen Turner
Kathleen Turner
(1989) Glenn Close
Glenn Close
(1990) Diane Keaton
Diane Keaton
(1991) Jodie Foster
Jodie Foster
(1992) Whoopi Goldberg
Whoopi Goldberg
(1993) Meg Ryan
Meg Ryan
(1994) Michelle Pfeiffer
Michelle Pfeiffer
(1995) Susan Sarandon
Susan Sarandon
(1996) Julia Roberts
Julia Roberts
(1997) Sigourney Weaver
Sigourney Weaver
(1998) Goldie Hawn
Goldie Hawn
(1999) Jamie Lee Curtis
Jamie Lee Curtis
(2000)

2001–present

Drew Barrymore
Drew Barrymore
(2001) Sarah Jessica Parker
Sarah Jessica Parker
(2002) Anjelica Huston
Anjelica Huston
(2003) Sandra Bullock
Sandra Bullock
(2004) Catherine Zeta-Jones
Catherine Zeta-Jones
(2005) Halle Berry
Halle Berry
(2006) Scarlett Johansson
Scarlett Johansson
(2007) Charlize Theron
Charlize Theron
(2008) Renée Zellweger
Renée Zellweger
(2009) Anne Hathaway
Anne Hathaway
(2010) Julianne Moore
Julianne Moore
(2011) Claire Danes
Claire Danes
(2012) Marion Cotillard
Marion Cotillard
(2013) Helen Mirren
Helen Mirren
(2014) Amy Poehler
Amy Poehler
(2015) Kerry Washington
Kerry Washington
(2016) Octavia Spencer
Octavia Spencer
(2017) Mila Kunis
Mila Kunis
(2018)

v t e

Kennedy Center Honorees (2000s)

2000

Mikhail Baryshnikov Chuck Berry Plácido Domingo Clint Eastwood Angela Lansbury

2001

Julie Andrews Van Cliburn Quincy Jones Jack Nicholson Luciano Pavarotti

2002

James Earl Jones James Levine Chita Rivera Paul Simon Elizabeth Taylor

2003

James Brown Carol Burnett Loretta Lynn Mike Nichols Itzhak Perlman

2004

Warren Beatty Ossie Davis
Ossie Davis
& Ruby Dee Elton John Joan Sutherland John Williams

2005

Tony Bennett Suzanne Farrell Julie Harris Robert Redford Tina Turner

2006

Zubin Mehta Dolly Parton Smokey Robinson Steven Spielberg Andrew Lloyd Webber

2007

Leon Fleisher Steve Martin Diana Ross Martin Scorsese Brian Wilson

2008

Morgan Freeman George Jones Barbra Streisand Twyla Tharp Pete Townshend
Pete Townshend
& Roger Daltrey

2009

Mel Brooks Dave Brubeck Grace Bumbry Robert De Niro Bruce Springsteen

Complete list 1970s 1980s 1990s 2000s 2010s

v t e

Mark Twain Prize winners

Richard Pryor
Richard Pryor
(1998) Jonathan Winters
Jonathan Winters
(1999) Carl Reiner
Carl Reiner
(2000) Whoopi Goldberg
Whoopi Goldberg
(2001) Bob Newhart
Bob Newhart
(2002) Lily Tomlin
Lily Tomlin
(2003) Lorne Michaels
Lorne Michaels
(2004) Steve Martin
Steve Martin
(2005) Neil Simon
Neil Simon
(2006) Billy Crystal
Billy Crystal
(2007) George Carlin
George Carlin
(2008) Bill Cosby
Bill Cosby
(2009) Tina Fey
Tina Fey
(2010) Will Ferrell
Will Ferrell
(2011) Ellen DeGeneres
Ellen DeGeneres
(2012) Carol Burnett
Carol Burnett
(2013) Jay Leno
Jay Leno
(2014) Eddie Murphy
Eddie Murphy
(2015) Bill Murray
Bill Murray
(2016) David Letterman
David Letterman
(2017)

v t e

Screen Actors Guild
Screen Actors Guild
Life Achievement Award

1962: Eddie Cantor 1963: Stan Laurel 1965: Bob Hope 1966: Barbara Stanwyck 1967: William Gargan 1968: James Stewart 1969: Edward G. Robinson 1970: Gregory Peck 1971: Charlton Heston 1972: Frank Sinatra 1973: Martha Raye 1974: Walter Pidgeon 1975: Rosalind Russell 1976: Pearl Bailey 1977: James Cagney 1978: Edgar Bergen 1979: Katharine Hepburn 1980: Leon Ames 1982: Danny Kaye 1983: Ralph Bellamy 1984: Iggie Wolfington 1985: Paul Newman
Paul Newman
and Joanne Woodward 1986: Nanette Fabray 1987: Red Skelton 1988: Gene Kelly 1989: Jack Lemmon 1990: Brock Peters 1991: Burt Lancaster 1992: Audrey Hepburn 1993: Ricardo Montalbán 1994: George Burns 1995: Robert Redford 1996: Angela Lansbury 1997: Elizabeth Taylor 1998: Kirk Douglas 1999: Sidney Poitier 2000: Ossie Davis
Ossie Davis
and Ruby Dee 2001: Ed Asner 2002: Clint Eastwood 2003: Karl Malden 2004: James Garner 2005: Shirley Temple 2006: Julie Andrews 2007: Charles Durning 2008: James Earl Jones 2009: Betty White 2010: Ernest Borgnine 2011: Mary Tyler Moore 2012: Dick Van Dyke 2013: Rita Moreno 2014: Debbie Reynolds 2015: Carol Burnett 2016: Lily Tomlin 2017: Morgan Freeman

v t e

TCA Career Achievement Award

Grant Tinker
Grant Tinker
(1985) Walter Cronkite
Walter Cronkite
(1986) Hill Street Blues
Hill Street Blues
(1987) David Brinkley
David Brinkley
(1988) Lucille Ball
Lucille Ball
(1989) Jim Henson
Jim Henson
(1990) Brandon Tartikoff
Brandon Tartikoff
(1991) Johnny Carson
Johnny Carson
(1992) Bob Hope
Bob Hope
(1993) Charles Kuralt
Charles Kuralt
(1994) Ted Turner
Ted Turner
(1995) Angela Lansbury
Angela Lansbury
(1996) Fred Rogers
Fred Rogers
(1997) Roone Arledge (1998) Norman Lear
Norman Lear
(1999) Dick Van Dyke
Dick Van Dyke
(2000) Sid Caesar
Sid Caesar
(2001) Bill Cosby
Bill Cosby
(2002) Carl Reiner
Carl Reiner
(2003) Don Hewitt
Don Hewitt
(2004) Bob Newhart
Bob Newhart
(2005) Carol Burnett
Carol Burnett
(2006) Mary Tyler Moore
Mary Tyler Moore
(2007) Lorne Michaels
Lorne Michaels
(2008) Betty White
Betty White
(2009) James Garner
James Garner
(2010) Oprah Winfrey
Oprah Winfrey
(2011) David Letterman
David Letterman
(2012) Barbara Walters
Barbara Walters
(2013) James Burrows (2014) James L. Brooks
James L. Brooks
(2015) Lily Tomlin
Lily Tomlin
(2016) Ken Burns
Ken Burns
(2017)

v t e

Television Hall of Fame Class of 1985

Carol Burnett Sid Caesar Walter Cronkite Joyce Hall Rod Serling Ed Sullivan Sylvester Weaver

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 10032676 LCCN: n50032348 ISNI: 0000 0001 1487 6108 GND: 123439361 SUDOC: 059754508 BNF: cb138919894 (data) BIBSYS: 98066009 MusicBrainz: 08f5c64e-52f6-41f3-9d23-cbb9301a2639 SN

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