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The Cape of Good Hope, also known as the Cape Colony
Colony
(Dutch: Kaapkolonie), was a British colony in present-day South Africa, named after the Cape of Good Hope. The British colony was preceded by an earlier Dutch colony of the same name, the Kaap de Goede Hoop, established in 1652 by the Dutch East India
India
Company. The Cape was under Dutch rule from 1652 to 1795 and again from 1803 to 1806.[4] The Dutch lost the colony to Great Britain following the 1795 Battle of Muizenberg, but had it returned following the 1802 Peace of Amiens. It was re-occupied by the UK following the Battle of Blaauwberg
Battle of Blaauwberg
in 1806, and British possession affirmed with the Anglo-Dutch Treaty of 1814. The Cape of Good Hope then remained in the British Empire, becoming self-governing in 1872, and uniting with three other colonies to form the Union of South Africa
Union of South Africa
in 1910. It then was renamed the Province of the Cape of Good Hope.[5] South Africa
South Africa
became a sovereign state in 1931 by the Statute of Westminster. In 1961 it became the Republic of South Africa
South Africa
and obtained its own monetary unit called the Rand. Following the 1994 creation of the present-day South African provinces, the Cape Province
Cape Province
was partitioned into the Eastern Cape, Northern Cape, and Western Cape, with smaller parts in North West province. The Cape of Good Hope was coextensive with the later Cape Province, stretching from the Atlantic coast inland and eastward along the southern coast, constituting about half of modern South Africa: the final eastern boundary, after several wars against the Xhosa, stood at the Fish River. In the north, the Orange River, also known as the Gariep River, served as the boundary for some time, although some land between the river and the southern boundary of Botswana
Botswana
was later added to it. From 1878, the colony also included the enclave of Walvis Bay and the Penguin Islands, both in what is now Namibia.

Contents

1 History

1.1 Dutch settlement 1.2 British conquest 1.3 British Colonisation 1.4 Responsible Government

2 Governors of the Cape of Good Hope (1797–1910)

2.1 British occupation (1st, 1797–1804) 2.2 Batavian Republic
Batavian Republic
(Dutch colony) (1803–1806) 2.3 British occupation (2nd, 1806–1814) 2.4 British colony (1814–1910)

3 Prime Ministers of the Cape of Good Hope (1872–1910) 4 Demographics

4.1 1904 Census

5 See also 6 References

6.1 Sources

History[edit] Dutch settlement[edit] Main article: Dutch Cape Colony An expedition of the Dutch East India Company
Dutch East India Company
(VOC) led by Jan van Riebeeck established a trading post and naval victualing station at the Cape of Good Hope in 1652.[6] Van Riebeeck's objective was to secure a harbour of refuge for Dutch ships during the long voyages between Europe and Asia.[6] Within about three decades, the Cape had become home to a large community of "vrijlieden", also known as "vrijburgers" (free citizens), former VOC employees who settled in Dutch colonies overseas after completing their service contracts.[7] Vrijburgers were mostly married Dutch citizens who undertook to spend at least twenty years farming the land within the fledgling colony's borders; in exchange they received tax exempt status and were loaned tools and seeds.[8] Reflecting the multi-national nature of the early trading companies, the Dutch also granted vrijburger status to a number of former Scandinavian and German employees as well.[9] In 1688 they also sponsored the immigration of nearly two hundred French Huguenot
Huguenot
refugees who had fled to the Netherlands upon the Edict of Fontainebleau.[10] There was a degree of cultural assimilation due to intermarriage, and the almost universal adoption of the Dutch language.[11] Many of the colonists who settled directly on the frontier became increasingly independent and localised in their loyalties.[12] Known as Boers, they migrated westwards beyond the Cape Colony's initial borders and had soon penetrated almost a thousand kilometres inland.[13] Some Boers even adopted a nomadic lifestyle permanently and were denoted as trekboers.[14] The Dutch colonial period was marred by a number of bitter conflicts between the colonists and the Khoisan, followed by the Xhosa, both of which they perceived as unwanted competitors for prime farmland.[14] Dutch traders imported thousands of slaves to the Cape of Good Hope from the Dutch East Indies
Dutch East Indies
and other parts of Africa.[15] By the end of the eighteenth century the Cape's population swelled to about 26,000 people of European descent and 30,000 slaves.[16][17] British conquest[edit] Main article: Invasion of the Cape Colony
Colony
(1795) In 1795, France occupied the Seven Provinces of the Netherlands, the mother country of the Dutch East India
India
Company. This prompted Great Britain to occupy the territory in 1795 as a way to better control the seas in order to stop any potential French attempt to reach India. The British sent a fleet of nine warships which anchored at Simon's Town and, following the defeat of the Dutch militia at the Battle of Muizenberg, took control of the territory. The Dutch East India Company transferred its territories and claims to the Batavian Republic (the Revolutionary period Dutch state) in 1798, and ceased to exist in 1799. Improving relations between Britain and Napoleonic France, and its vassal state the Batavian Republic, led the British to hand the Cape of Good Hope over to the Batavian Republic
Batavian Republic
in 1803, under the terms of the Treaty of Amiens.

Part of a series on

Cape Colony
Colony
history

Pre-1806 1806–1870 1870–1899 1899–1910

v t e

Map of the Cape of Good Hope in 1809.

In 1806, the Cape, now nominally controlled by the Batavian Republic, was occupied again by the British after their victory in the Battle of Blaauwberg. The temporary peace between Britain and Napoleonic France had crumbled into open hostilities, whilst Napoleon had been strengthening his influence on the Batavian Republic
Batavian Republic
(which Napoleon would subsequently abolish later the same year). The British, who set up a colony on 8 January 1806,[citation needed] hoped to keep Napoleon out of the Cape, and to control the Far East trade routes. In 1814 the Dutch government formally ceded sovereignty over the Cape to the British, under the terms of the Convention of London. British Colonisation[edit] The British started to settle the eastern border of the colony, with the arrival in Port Elizabeth
Port Elizabeth
of the 1820 Settlers. They also began to introduce the first rudimentary rights for the Cape's black African population and, in 1833, abolished slavery. The resentment that the Dutch farmers felt against this social change, as well as the imposition of English language and culture, caused them to trek inland en masse. This was known as the Great Trek, and the migrating Boers settled inland, forming the " Boer
Boer
republics" of Transvaal and the Orange Free State. British immigration continued in the Cape, even as many of the Boers continued to trek inland, and the ending of the British East India Company's monopoly on trade led to economic growth. At the same time, the long series of border wars fought against the Xhosa people
Xhosa people
of the Cape's eastern frontier finally died down when the Xhosa partook in a mass destruction of their own crops and cattle, in the belief that this would cause their spirits to appear and defeat the whites. The resulting famine crippled Xhosa resistance and ushered in a long period of stability on the border. Peace and prosperity led to a desire for political independence. In 1853, the Cape Colony
Colony
became a British Crown colony.[18] In 1854, the Cape of Good Hope elected its first parliament, on the basis of the multi-racial Cape Qualified Franchise. Cape residents qualified as voters based on a universal minimum level of property ownership, regardless of race. The fact that executive power remained completely in the authority of the British governor did not relieve tensions in the colony between its eastern and western sections.[19] Responsible Government[edit]

Map of the Cape of Good Hope in 1885 (blue)

In 1872, after a long political battle, the Cape of Good Hope achieved "Responsible Government" under its first Prime Minister, John Molteno. Henceforth, an elected Prime Minister and his cabinet had total responsibility for the affairs of the country. A period of strong economic growth and social development ensued, and the eastern-western division was largely laid to rest. The system of multi-racial franchise also began a slow and fragile growth in political inclusiveness, and ethnic tensions subsided.[20] In 1877, the state expanded by annexing Griqualand West
Griqualand West
and Griqualand East.[21] However, the discovery of diamonds around Kimberley and gold in the Transvaal led to a return to instability, particularly because they fuelled the rise to power of the ambitious imperialist Cecil Rhodes. On becoming the Cape's Prime Minister, he instigated a rapid expansion of British influence into the hinterland. In particular, he sought to engineer the conquest of the Transvaal, and although his ill-fated Jameson Raid
Jameson Raid
failed and brought down his government, it led to the Second Boer
Boer
War and British conquest at the turn of the century. The politics of the colony consequently came to be increasingly dominated by tensions between the British colonists and the Boers. Rhodes also brought in the first formal restrictions on the political rights of the Cape of Good Hope's black African citizens.[22] The Cape of Good Hope remained nominally under British rule until the formation of the Union of South Africa
Union of South Africa
in 1910, when it became the Province of the Cape of Good Hope, better known as the Cape Province. Governors of the Cape of Good Hope (1797–1910)[edit] British occupation (1st, 1797–1804)[edit]

George Macartney, 1st Earl Macartney
George Macartney, 1st Earl Macartney
(1797–1798) Francis Dundas
Francis Dundas
(1st time) (acting) (1798–1799) Sir George Yonge (1799–1801) Francis Dundas
Francis Dundas
(2nd time) (acting) (1801–1803)

Batavian Republic
Batavian Republic
(Dutch colony) (1803–1806)[edit]

Jacob Abraham Uitenhage de Mist (1803–1804) Jan Willem Janssens
Jan Willem Janssens
(1803–1806)

British occupation (2nd, 1806–1814)[edit]

Sir David Baird (acting) (1806–1807) Henry George Grey
Henry George Grey
(1st time) (acting) (1807) Du Pre Alexander, 2nd Earl of Caledon
Du Pre Alexander, 2nd Earl of Caledon
(1807–1811) Henry George Grey
Henry George Grey
(2nd time) (acting) (1811) Sir John Francis Cradock (1811–1814) Hon. Robert Meade (acting for Cradock) (1813–1814), (son of Theodosia, Countess of Clanwilliam),

British colony (1814–1910)[edit]

Cape Governor Lord Charles Somerset

Sir Henry Bartle Frere

Lord Charles Somerset
Lord Charles Somerset
(1814–1826) Sir Rufane Shaw Donkin
Rufane Shaw Donkin
(acting for Somerset) (1820–1821) Sir Richard Bourke
Richard Bourke
(acting) (1826–1828) Sir Galbraith Lowry Cole
Lowry Cole
(1828–1833) Sir Thomas Francis Wade
Thomas Francis Wade
(acting for D'Urban from 10 January 1834) (1833–1834) Sir Benjamin d'Urban
Benjamin d'Urban
(1834–1838) Sir George Thomas Napier
George Thomas Napier
(1838–1844) Sir Peregrine Maitland
Peregrine Maitland
(1844–1847) Sir Henry Pottinger (1847) Sir Harry Smith (Sir Henry George Wakelyn Smith) (1847–1852) Sir George Cathcart
George Cathcart
(1852–1854) Sir Charles Henry Darling
Charles Henry Darling
(acting) (1854) Sir George Grey
George Grey
(1854–1861) Sir Robert Henry Wynyard (1st time) (acting for Grey) (1859–1860) Sir Robert Henry Wynyard (2nd time) (acting) (1861–1862) Sir Philip Edmond Wodehouse
Philip Edmond Wodehouse
(1862–1870) Charles Craufurd Hay
Charles Craufurd Hay
(acting) (1870) Sir Henry Barkly
Henry Barkly
(1870–1877) Henry Bartle Frere
Henry Bartle Frere
(1877–1880) Henry Hugh Clifford
Henry Hugh Clifford
(acting) (1880) Sir George Cumine Strahan (acting) (1880–1881) Hercules Robinson (1st time) (1881–1889) Sir Leicester Smyth
Leicester Smyth
(1st time) (acting for Robinson) (1881) Sir Leicester Smyth
Leicester Smyth
(2nd time) (acting for Robinson) (1883–1884) Sir Henry D'Oyley Torrens (acting for Robinson) (1886) Henry Augustus Smyth
Henry Augustus Smyth
(acting) (1889) Henry Brougham Loch (1889–1895) Sir William Gordon Cameron
William Gordon Cameron
(1st time) (acting for Loch) (1891–1892) Sir William Gordon Cameron
William Gordon Cameron
(2nd time) (acting for Loch) (1894) Hercules Robinson (2nd time) (1895–1897) Sir William Howley Goodenough
William Howley Goodenough
(acting) (1897) Sir Alfred Milner (1897–1901) Sir William Francis Butler
William Francis Butler
(acting for Milner) (1898–1899) Sir Walter Hely-Hutchinson (1901–1910) Sir Henry Jenner Scobell
Henry Jenner Scobell
(acting for Hely-Hutchinson) (1909)

The post of High Commissioner for Southern Africa was also held from 27 January 1847 to 6 March 1901 by the Governor of the Cape of Good Hope. The post of Governor of the Cape of Good Hope became extinct on 31 May 1910, when it joined the Union of South Africa. Prime Ministers of the Cape of Good Hope (1872–1910)[edit]

Sir John Charles Molteno, first Prime Minister of the Cape

Prime Minister Cecil John Rhodes

No. Name Party Assumed office Left office

1 Sir John Charles Molteno Independent 1 December 1872 5 February 1878

2 Sir John Gordon Sprigg Independent 6 February 1878 8 May 1881

3 Thomas Charles Scanlen Independent 9 May 1881 12 May 1884

4 Thomas Upington Independent 13 May 1884 24 November 1886

— Sir John Gordon Sprigg
Gordon Sprigg
(2nd time) Independent 25 November 1886 16 July 1890

5 Cecil John Rhodes Independent 17 July 1890 3 May 1893

— Cecil John Rhodes (2nd time) Independent 4 May 1893 12 January 1896

— Sir John Gordon Sprigg
Gordon Sprigg
(3rd time) Independent 13 January 1896 13 October 1898

6 William Philip Schreiner Independent 13 October 1898 17 June 1900

— Sir John Gordon Sprigg
Gordon Sprigg
(4th time) Progressive Party 18 June 1900 21 February 1904

7 Leander Starr Jameson Progressive Party 22 February 1904 2 February 1908

8 John Xavier Merriman South African Party 3 February 1908 31 May 1910

The post of prime minister of the Cape of Good Hope also became extinct on 31 May 1910, when it joined the Union of South Africa. Demographics[edit] 1904 Census[edit] Population Figures for the 1904 Census. Source:[23]

Population group Number Percent (%)

Black 1,424,787 59.12

White 579,741 24.05

Coloured 395,034 16.39

Asian 10,242 0.42

Total 2,409,804 100.00

See also[edit]

Parliament of the Cape of Good Hope Cape Colonial Forces Cape Government Railways Cape Qualified Franchise

References[edit]

^ Alexander Wilmot; John Centlivres Chase (1869). History of the Colony
Colony
of the Cape of Good Hope: From Its Discovery to the Year 1819. J. C. Juta. pp. 268–. Retrieved 10 September 2013.  ^ "Census of the colony of the Cape of Good Hope. 1865". HathiTrust Digital Library. p. 11. Retrieved 26 December 2013.  ^ "Lesotho: History". The Commonwealth. Retrieved 8 November 2017.  ^ J. A. Heese, Die Herkoms van die Afrikaner 1657 - 1867. A. A. Balkema, Kaapstad, 1971. CD Colin Pretorius 2013. ISBN 978-1-920429-13-3. Bladsy 15. ^ Statemans Year Book, 1920, section on Cape Province ^ a b Hunt, John (2005). Campbell, Heather-Ann, ed. Dutch South Africa: Early Settlers at the Cape, 1652-1708. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press. pp. 13–35. ISBN 978-1904744955.  ^ Parthesius, Robert. Dutch Ships in Tropical Waters: The Development of the Dutch East India Company
Dutch East India Company
(VOC) Shipping Network in Asia 1595-1660. Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press. ISBN 978-9053565179.  ^ Lucas, Gavin (2004). An Archaeology of Colonial Identity: Power and Material Culture in the Dwars Valley, South Africa. New York: Springer, Publishers. pp. 29–33. ISBN 978-0306485381.  ^ Worden, Nigel. Slavery
Slavery
in Dutch South Africa
South Africa
(2010 ed.). Cambridge University Press. pp. 94–140. ISBN 978-0521152662.  ^ Lambert, David (2009). The Protestant International and the Huguenot Migration to Virginia. New York: Peter Land Publishing, Incorporated. pp. 32–34. ISBN 978-1433107597.  ^ Mbenga, Bernard; Giliomee, Hermann (2007). New History of South Africa. Cape Town: Tafelburg, Publishers. pp. 59–60. ISBN 978-0624043591.  ^ Ward, Kerry (2009). Networks of Empire: Forced Migration in the Dutch East India
India
Company. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 322–342. ISBN 978-0-521-88586-7.  ^ Greaves, Adrian. The Tribe that Washed its Spears: The Zulus at War (2013 ed.). Barnsley: Pen & Sword Military. pp. 36–55. ISBN 978-1629145136.  ^ a b Stapleton, Timothy (2010). A Military History of South Africa: From the Dutch-Khoi Wars to the End of Apartheid. Santa Barbara: Praeger Security International. pp. 4–6. ISBN 978-0313365898.  ^ Worden, Nigel. Slavery
Slavery
in Dutch South Africa
South Africa
(2010 ed.). Cambridge University Press. pp. 40–43. ISBN 978-0521152662.  ^ Lloyd, Trevor Owen (1997). The British Empire, 1558-1995. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 201–206. ISBN 978-0198731337.  ^ Entry: Cape Colony. Encyclopedia Britannica Volume 4 Part 2: Brain to Casting. Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc. 1933. James Louis Garvin, editor. ^ The Kingfisher Illustrated History of the World. Italy: Kingfisher. 1993. p. 576. ISBN 9780862729530.  ^ Illustrated History of South Africa. The Reader's Digest Association South Africa
South Africa
(Pty) Ltd, 1992. ISBN 0-947008-90-X. ^ Parsons, Neil, A New History of Southern Africa, Second Edition. Macmillan, London (1993) ^ John Dugard: International Law, A South African Perspective. Cape Town. 2006. p.136. ^ Ziegler, Philip (2008). Legacy: Cecil Rhodes, the Rhodes Trust and Rhodes Scholarships. Yale: Yale University Press. ISBN 978-0-300-11835-3. ^ Smuts I: The Sanguine Years 1870–1919, W.K. Hancock, Cambridge University Press, 1962, pg 219

Sources[edit]

Wikisource
Wikisource
has the text of the 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica article Cape Colony.

Beck, Roger B. (2000). The History of South Africa. Westport, CT: Greenwood. ISBN 0-313-30730-X. Davenport, T. R. H., and Christopher Saunders (2000). South Africa: A Modern History, 5th ed. New York: St. Martin's Press. ISBN 0-312-23376-0. Elbourne, Elizabeth (2002). Blood Ground: Colonialism, Missions, and the Contest for Christianity in the Cape Colony
Colony
and Britain, 1799–1853. McGill-Queen's University Press. ISBN 0-7735-2229-8. Le Cordeur, Basil Alexander (1981). The War of the Axe, 1847: Correspondence between the governor of the Cape Colony, Sir Henry Pottinger, and the commander of the British forces at the Cape, Sire George Berkeley, and others. Brenthurst Press. ISBN 0-909079-14-5. Mabin, Alan (1983). Recession and its aftermath: The Cape Colony
Colony
in the eighteen eighties. University of the Witwatersrand, African Studies Institute. Ross, Robert, and David Anderson (1999). Status and Respectability in the Cape Colony, 1750–1870 : A Tragedy of Manners. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-62122-4. Theal, George McCall (1970). History of the Boers in South Africa; Or, the Wanderings and Wars of the Emigrant Farmers from Their Leaving the Cape Colony
Colony
to the Acknowledgment of Their Independence by Great Britain. Greenwood Press. ISBN 0-8371-1661-9. Van Der Merwe, P.J., Roger B. Beck (1995). The Migrant Farmer in the History of the Cape Colony. Ohio University Press. ISBN 0-8214-1090-3. Worden, Nigel, Elizabeth van Heyningen, and Vivian Bickford-Smith (1998). Cape Town: The Making of a City. Cape Town: David Philip. ISBN 0-86486-435-3.

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Kingdom of Mapungubwe
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Mthethwa Paramountcy
(c. 1780–1817) Ndwandwe
Ndwandwe
Kingdom (c. 1780–1819) Zulu Kingdom
Zulu Kingdom
(1816–97)

Dutch Cape Colony
Dutch Cape Colony
(1652–1806) Cape Colony
Colony
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Colony
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Orange River
Colony
Colony
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Colony
(1902–10)

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Stellaland
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Nieuwe Republiek
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Upingtonia
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Ciskei
(1981–94) KaNgwane
KaNgwane
(1981–94) KwaNdebele
KwaNdebele
(1981–94) KwaZulu
KwaZulu
(1981–94)

Cape Qualified Franchise
Cape Qualified Franchise
(1853–1910) South African Republic
South African Republic
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Union of South Africa
(1910–61) Republic of South Africa
South Africa
(1961–Present)

Current Government

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Since 1658 Saint Helena14 1792–1961 Sierra Leone 1795–1803 Cape Colony

Since 1815 Ascension Island14 Since 1816 Tristan da Cunha14 1806–1910 Cape of Good Hope 1807–1808 Madeira 1810–1968 Mauritius 1816–1965 The Gambia 1856–1910 Natal 1862–1906 Lagos 1868–1966 Basutoland 1874–1957 Gold Coast 1882–1922 Egypt

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6. League of Nations mandate. 7. Self-governing Southern Rhodesia
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9. Now part of the *Realm of New Zealand. 10. Suspended member. 11. Now Kiribati
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and *Tuvalu. 12. Now the *Solomon Islands. 13. Now *Papua New Guinea.

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Since 1658 Saint Helena14 Since 1815 Ascension Island14 Since 1816 Tristan da Cunha14 Since 1908 British Antarctic Territory15 1841–1933 Australian Antarctic Territory
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Tristan da Cunha
(1938–) were previously dependencies of Saint Helena. 15. Both claimed in 1908; territories formed in 1962 (British Antarctic Territory) and 1985 (South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands).

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Political history of South Africa

Defunct polities

Kingdom of Mapungubwe
Kingdom of Mapungubwe
(c. 1075–c. 1220) Dutch Cape Colony
Dutch Cape Colony
(1652–1806) Mthethwa Paramountcy
Mthethwa Paramountcy
(c. 1780–1817) Ndwandwe
Ndwandwe
Kingdom (c. 1780–1819) Cape Colony
Colony
(1795–1910) Zulu Kingdom
Zulu Kingdom
(1816–97) Natalia Republic
Natalia Republic
(1839–43) Natal Colony
Colony
(1843–1910) Orange Free State
Orange Free State
(1854–1902) South African Republic
South African Republic
(1856–1902) Griqualand East
Griqualand East
(1861–79) Griqualand West
Griqualand West
(1870–73) Goshen (1882–83) Stellaland
Stellaland
(1882–85) Nieuwe Republiek
Nieuwe Republiek
(1884–88) Upingtonia
Upingtonia
(1885–87) Klein Vrystaat
Klein Vrystaat
(1886–91) Orange River
Orange River
Colony
Colony
(1902–10) Transvaal Colony
Colony
(1902–10) Union of South Africa
Union of South Africa
(1910–61) Transkei
Transkei
(1976–94) Bophuthatswana
Bophuthatswana
(1977–94) Venda
Venda
(1979–94) Ciskei
Ciskei
(1981–94)

Events

1652–1815

Dutch settlement French Huguenot
Huguenot
settlement Khoikhoi–Dutch Wars Xhosa Wars Battle of Muizenberg Battle of Blaauwberg Anglo-Dutch Treaty of 1814

1815–1910

Mfecane 1820 Settlers Great Trek Boer
Boer
Republics Transvaal Civil War Mineral Revolution Witwatersrand Gold Rush South African Wars South Africa
South Africa
Act 1909

1910–1948

Maritz Rebellion Rand Rebellion Great Depression 1946 African Mine Workers' Union strike Bantustans

Apartheid
Apartheid
era

1948 general election Apartheid
Apartheid
legislation

Pass laws

Internal resistance Coloured-vote constitutional crisis Defiance Campaign Congress of the People

Freedom Charter

Women's March 1956 1957 Alexandra bus boycott Sharpeville massacre 1960 republic referendum International isolation

Academic boycott Disinvestment Sporting boycott

Olympics Rugby union

Rivonia Trial Tar Baby Option Durban Moment Border War Israeli alliance

Israel– South Africa
South Africa
Agreement

Soweto Uprising Weapons of mass destruction Project Coast Constructive engagement Church Street bombing 1983 constitutional reform referendum Langa massacre Rubicon speech Dakar Conference Third Force CODESA 1992 apartheid referendum Saint James Church massacre Bophuthatswana
Bophuthatswana
crisis Shell House massacre

Post-apartheid

1994 general election Government of National Unity Reconstruction and Development Programme Truth and Reconciliation Commission Arms Deal Floor crossing Soweto bombings African Renaissance Xenophobia Marikana massacre 2012 Western Cape
Western Cape
farm workers' strike Nkandlagate 2014 platinum strike #RhodesMustFall protests # FeesMustFall
FeesMustFall
student protests Tshwane riots

Political culture

African nationalism Afrikaner Calvinism Afrikaner nationalism Azania Baasskap Boerehaat Black Consciousness Movement Day of the Vow Greater South Africa Honorary whites Rooi gevaar Slavery Swart gevaar Uitlander Volkstaat

Defunct organisations

Civic and political organisations

Afrikaner Bond Afrikaner Broederbond Afrikaner Party AITUP APO AVF BPC Black Sash CDA CTEG COD Congress Alliance COSG CP Dominion
Dominion
Party DP (1973–1977) DP (1989–2000) DPP ECC FA FD Genootskap van Regte Afrikaners GNP Het Volk HNP IDASA ID IP ISL Jeugkrag Johannesburg Reform Committee Labour Party (1910–1958) Labour Party (1969–1994) Liberal Party (1953–1968) NA NCP Natal Indian Congress NLP NNP NP NPP NRP NUSAS PFP Progressive Party (Cape Colony) Progressive Party PRP Radio Freedom Reform Party SABP SADECO SAIC SASO SAYCO SAYRCO South African Party (Cape Colony) South African Party (1911–1934) South African Party (1977–1980) TNIP Torch Commando UFP United Party Unionist Party Volksparty Workers Party WOSA

Trade unions and social movements

APF BCM BLATU CNETU CTSWU FCWU FNETU FOSATU ICU IWW MUSA NEUM NURHS PAWE SAAPAWU SACTU SAIF SARHU SATUC Die Spoorbund UDF Umkosi Wezintaba

Paramilitary and terrorist organisations

APLA ARM BBB Boeremag Greyshirts MK Ossewabrandwag Orde van die Dood SANF

Histories of political parties

African National Congress Democratic Alliance Pan Africanist Congress of Azania

Category

v t e

Governors, Civil Commissioners and Administrators of British dependencies

Overseas territories

Governor of Anguilla Governor of Bermuda Commissioner for the British Antarctic Territory Commissioner for the British Indian Ocean Territory Governor of the Virgin Islands Governor of the Cayman Islands Governor of the Falkland Islands Governor of Gibraltar Governor of Montserrat Governor of Pitcairn

Administrator of the Pitcairn Islands

Commissioner for South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands Governor of Saint Helena

Governor of Ascension

Administrator of Ascension

Governor of Tristan da Cunha

Administrator of Tristan da Cunha

Governor of the Turks and Caicos Islands

Crown dependencies

Lieutenant Governor of Guernsey Lieutenant Governor of the Isle of Man Lieutenant Governor of Jersey

Former (Africa)

Governor of British Mauritius Governor of British Cameroons Governor of Cape Colony Governor of the Gambia Governor of Gold Coast Lieutenant Governor of Griqualand West Governor of Kenya Governor of Lagos Colony Governor-General of the Federation of Rhodesia
Rhodesia
and Nyasaland

Governor of Northern Rhodesia Governor of Nyasaland Governor of Southern Rhodesia

Governor of Natal Governor of Nigeria Governor of Senegal Governor of the Seychelles Governor of Sierra Leone Governor-General of the Union of South Africa High Commissioner for Southern Africa Governor of British Somaliland Governors of Tanganyika Governor of Uganda Resident in Zanzibar

Former (Americas)

Governor of the Bahamas Governor of Barbados

Lieutenant Governor of Grenada

Lieutenant-Governor of Berbice Governor of British Guiana Governor of British Honduras Governor of Cuba Governor of Dominica Lieutenant-Governor of Demerara-Essequibo Governor of Grenada Governor of Jamaica Governor of the Leeward Islands Governor of St. Lucia Governor of St. Vincent Governor of Trinidad and Tobago Lieutenant governors of Tobago Governor of Trinidad Governor of Newfoundland Governor General of Canada Governor of British Columbia Governor of New Brunswick Governor of Nova Scotia Governor of Prince Edward Island Lieutenant Governor of Quebec Governor of Saint Christopher, Nevis
Nevis
and Anguilla Governor-in-Chief of the Windward Islands Governor-General of the West Indies Federation Colonial Governors of Connecticut Colonial governors of Delaware Colonial Governors of Florida Colonial Governors of Georgia Colonial Governors of Maryland Colonial Governors of Massachusetts Colonial Governors of New Hampshire Colonial Governors of New Jersey Colonial Governor of New York Colonial Governors of North Carolina Colonial Governors of Pennsylvania Colonial Governors of Rhode Island Colonial Governors of South Carolina Colonial Governors of Virginia

Former (Asia)

Governor of Aden Governor of Burma Governor of Ceylon High Commissioner for the Federated Malay States

Senior British representatives in the constituent protected states Senior British representatives in the neighbouring Malayan protected states

General Adviser to the Government of Johore Adviser to the Sultan of Kedah Adviser to the Government of Kelantan Adviser to the Government of Perlis Adviser, Trengganu

Governor of Hong Kong Viceroy and Governor-General of India

Heads of the provinces of British India

Governor of Aden Governor of Bengal Governor of Bombay Governor of Madras Governor of Sind

Senior British representatives in neighbouring protected states

Resident of Gwalior

High Commissioner for Iraq Governor of Labuan High Commissioner for Malaya Governor of the Malayan Union Governor of North Borneo Resident Minister in Nepal High Commissioners for Palestine and Transjordan Governor of Penang Governor of Sarawak Governor of Singapore

Former (Australasia)

Governor-General of Australia

Government Resident of Central Australia Governor of New South Wales Government Resident of North Australia Governor of Queensland Governor of South Australia Governor of Tasmania Governor of Victoria Governor of Western Australia

Lieutenant Governor of the Swan River Colony Governor-General of New Zealand Governor-General of Papua New Guinea Consul in Tonga

Former (Europe)

Governor of Cyprus Lieutenant Governor of Heligoland High Commissioner of the Ionian Islands Governor of the Isle of Wight Governor of Malta Governor of Minorca Governor of Northern Ireland

Former (Oceania)

Governor of Fiji Governor of the Solomon Islands High Commissioner for t

.