HOME
The Info List - Cannabis Culture


--- Advertisement ---



Cannabis
Cannabis
culture describes a social atmosphere or series of associated social behaviors that depends heavily upon cannabis consumption, particularly as an entheogen, recreational drug and medicine. Cannabis — the plant that produces hemp and hashish — has been one of the most used psychoactive drugs in world use since the late 20th century, following only tobacco and alcohol in popularity.[1] According to Vera Rubin, the use of cannabis has been encompassed by two major cultural complexes over time: a continuous, traditional folk stream, and a more circumscribed, contemporary configuration.[2] The former involves both sacred and secular use, and is usually based on small-scale cultivation: the use of the plant for cordage, clothing, medicine, food, and a "general use as an euphoriant and symbol of fellowship."[2][3] The second stream of expansion of cannabis use encompasses "the use of hemp for commercial manufacturers utilizing large-scale cultivation primarily as a fiber for mercantile purposes"; but it is also linked to the search for psychedelic experiences (which can be traced back to the formation of the Parisian Club des Hashischins).[3] Cannabis
Cannabis
has "evolved its own language, humour, etiquette, art, literature and music."[4] Nick Brownlee writes: "Perhaps because of its ancient mystical and spiritual roots, because of the psychotherapeutic effects of the drug and because it is illegal, even the very act of smoking a joint has deep symbolism."[4] However, the culture of cannabis as "the manifestation of introspection and bodily passivity" — which has generated a negative "slacker" stereotype around its consumers — is a relatively modern concept, as cannabis has been consumed in various forms for almost 5,000 years.[4] The counterculture of the 1960s has been identified as the era that "sums up the glory years of modern cannabis culture," with the Woodstock Festival serving as "the pinnacle of the hippie revolution in the USA, and in many people's opinion the ultimate example of cannabis culture at work".[4] The influence of cannabis has encompassed holidays (most notably 4/20), cinema (such as the exploitation and stoner film genres), music (particularly jazz, reggae, psychedelia and rap music), and magazines including High Times
High Times
and Cannabis
Cannabis
Culture. Cannabis
Cannabis
has been used as an entheogen - most notably in India
India
and Nepal
Nepal
since the Vedic period
Vedic period
dating back to approximately 1500 BCE, but perhaps as far back as 2000 BCE.[5] Its entheogenic use was also recorded in Ancient China,[6] the Germanic peoples,[7] the Celts,[8] Ancient Central Asia,[9][10] and Africa.[11][12] In modern times, spiritual use of the drug is mostly associated with the Rastafari movement of Jamaica. Several Western subcultures have had marijuana consumption as an idiosyncratic feature, such as hippies, beatniks, hipsters (both the 1940s subculture and the contemporary subculture), ravers and hip hop.

Contents

1 Social custom 2 In the arts 3 Cultures

3.1 India 3.2 Jamaica 3.3 Beatnik 3.4 Hippie 3.5 Hipster

4 See also 5 Notes 6 References

Social custom[edit]

A 420 holiday event in Santa Cruz

Main article: Recreational drug
Recreational drug
use Cannabis
Cannabis
was once sold in clubs known as "Teapads" during Prohibition in the United States; jazz was usually played at these clubs. Cannabis was often viewed to be of lower class and was disliked by many.[13] After the outlawing of cannabis, its consumption was used in secret. Years later after cannabis has been once again tolerated legally in some regions. Holidays have formed around the consumption of cannabis such as 420, named after the popular time of day to consume cannabis (4:20 pm[14] and celebrated on April 20 (4/20). If consumed in a social setting it is encouraged to share your cannabis with others.[15] In the arts[edit]

This section needs expansion. You can help by adding to it. (April 2017)

As the psychoactive effects of cannabis include increased appreciation of the arts, including and especially music,[16][17] as well as increased creativity[18] its influence and usefulness can be found in a variety of works of art. Many popular musicians, not constrained to any drug-culture specific genre, are known to have taken cannabis purposely as inspiration for their works.[19][20][21][22] Cultures[edit]

Process of making bhang in a Sikh village in Punjab, India.

Main article: Drug culture Cannabis
Cannabis
has been used in the ancient past in places such as ancient India, Romania, Egypt, and Mesopotamia.[23][10] It was often used as medicine or for hemp, its main route of consumption was smoking. Over time the culture became more international and a general "cannabis culture" formed. The culture has been responsible for the genre of films known as stoner films, which has come to be accepted as a mainstream cinema movement.[24][25] In the United States the culture has also spawned its own celebrities (such as Tommy Chong
Tommy Chong
and Terence McKenna), and magazines such as ( Cannabis
Cannabis
Culture
Culture
and High Times). In the 30 years after 1900, more than 1 million Mexico laborers entered the southwest of the United States. The customs of smoking marijuana also followed them into the United States. Tens of thousands of people spread to the central and western parts of the country, found jobs in railways, construction sites and factories, and reached the farthest distance to Chicago. Meanwhile, before and after 1910, the marijuana smoke brought by the Caribbean and South American sailors to New Orleans also spread northward and eastward. By the middle of the 1930s, there were people everywhere in Louisiana that saw cannabis selling, even the remote "Civilian Conservation Corps", the government employed unemployed young men for timber, flood control, forest, fire, road repair and other organizations. The ongoing cigarette revolution taught Americans to use their lungs for inhalation of addictions, and by the way the spread of cannabis, the abundant supply of cannabis in the United States is another power. Cannabis
Cannabis
is originally a commercial crop to be grown for its fiber and seeds, but hemp is often seen around the abandoned ropes and waste cannabis fields, so English is also used in Weed (originally "weed") to refer to cannabis. Criminals in Tennessee only need to pick up the corolla found on the roadside and dry up with hemp smoke. San Quentin (San Quentin) of the inmates in prison simply on the ground inside for their own use of marijuana. In 1936 years, the New York police station destroyed 18 thousand kilograms of cannabis planted in the municipal boundaries. Because it is generally easy to get, the price of marijuana cigarettes is low, and a package of marijuana cigarettes is priced at 5-50 cents. This is the price that urban young nigger can afford to identify with this new subculture. This sub culture hero is a jazz musician. They play the role of promoting marijuana and promoting their skills. One of them promoted the way of promotion. Chicago born Jewish Clarinet (Milton "Mezz" Mezzrow), the first "White Negro" - the first "White Negro" - believed to be a black man, and as a proponent of cannabis, hawked a plump, 3 - cent, 50 - cent smoke on the streets of the Harlem Yu district. He said to the person who smoked cigarettes, "click on one and raise your head." During the Second World War, the American Army psychiatrists carefully examined the situation of smoking cannabis smoking in the army to prevent morale and discipline in the army. In a case study, a 26 year old soldier's experience is recorded, which is whispered in a whisper, and a dreamy and fancy expression on his face. "You'll be hot all over and you'll get cold. You will like to see strange things, and you will want to go to a ghost place that can see people naked and lounging to smoke marijuana. That is the culmination of the addiction. You want to see that stuff. You will like people to kiss you all over. You're going to look at this. Go together to smoke pot where you would like to hear the sound of drums and drums mad, want to see naked woman insane." Diagnosis: anesthetic addiction. The reason for the withdrawal is: according to the eighth paragraph, it has the habit of being inappropriate and unable to adapt to the army life.[26] India[edit] Main article: Cannabis
Cannabis
in India Cannabis
Cannabis
is indigenous to Central and South Asia.[27] Cannabis
Cannabis
is also known to have been used by the ancient Hindus of India
India
and Nepal thousands of years ago. The herb is called ganja (Sanskrit: गञ्जा, IAST: gañjā) or ganjika in Sanskrit
Sanskrit
and other modern Indo-Aryan languages.[28][29] Some scholars suggest that the ancient drug soma, mentioned in the Vedas, was cannabis, although this theory is disputed.[30] Today cannabis is often formed into bhang, which has become an integral part of tradition and custom in the Indian subcontinent. In some sections of rural India, people attribute various medicinal properties to the cannabis plant. If taken in proper quantity, bhang is believed to cure fever, dysentery, sunstroke, to clear phlegm, aid in digestion, appetite, cure speech imperfections and lisping, and give alertness to the body.[31] Jamaica[edit]

A Rasta man holding cannabis.

Main articles: Cannabis
Cannabis
in Jamaica
Jamaica
and Rastafari By the 8th century, cannabis had been introduced by Arab traders to Central and Southern Africa, where it is known as "dagga"[32] and many Rastas say it is a part of their African culture that they are reclaiming.[33] It is sometimes also referred to as "the healing of the nation", a phrase adapted from Revelation 22:2.[34] Alternatively, the migration of many thousands of Hindus and Muslims from British India
India
to the Caribbean in the 20th century may have brought this culture to Jamaica. Many academics point to Indo-Caribbean origins for the ganja sacrament resulting from the importation of Indian migrant workers in a post-abolition Jamaican landscape. "Large scale use of ganja in Jamaica
Jamaica
... dated from the importation of indentured Indians...."(Campbell 110). Dreadlocked mystics Jata, often ascetic known as sadhus or Sufi
Sufi
Qalandars and Derwishes, have smoked cannabis from both chillums and coconut shell hookahs in South Asia
South Asia
since the ancient times. Also, the reference of "chalice" may be a transliteration of "jam-e-qalandar" (a term used by Sufi
Sufi
ascetics meaning 'bowl or cup of qalandar'). In South Asia, in addition to smoking, cannabis is often consumed as a drink known as bhang and most qalandars carry a large wooden pestle for that reason.[35] Today the Jamaican religion Rastafari
Rastafari
promotes cannabis use for religious use. Beatnik[edit] Main article: Beatnik Marijuana
Marijuana
use was associated with the subculture, and during the 1950s, Aldous Huxley's The Doors of Perception
The Doors of Perception
further influenced views on drugs. This would later influence the hippie movement. Hippie[edit]

Hippies smoking cannabis in Thailand

Main article: Hippie Following in the footsteps of the Beatniks, many hippies used cannabis, considering it pleasurable and benign. On the East Coast of the United States, Harvard University
Harvard University
professors Timothy Leary, Ralph Metzner and Ram Dass
Ram Dass
advocated psychotropic drugs for psychotherapy, self-exploration, religious and spiritual use. Regarding LSD, Leary, a prominent hippie thinker, said, "Expand your consciousness and find ecstasy and revelation within."[26] These attitudes greatly influenced the hippie movement and culture, not just on the topic of LSD
LSD
but with drugs in general, including cannabis. Hipster[edit] See also: Hipster (1940s subculture)
Hipster (1940s subculture)
and Hipster (contemporary subculture) The term "Hipsters" define two cultural groups, the 1940s subculture dedicated to jazz, and the contemporary subculture today. Both are stereotyped as enjoying cannabis. In fact the early hipsters of the 1940s had many slang terms dedicated to the drug and its distribution. Cannabis
Cannabis
use among modern hipsters is common.[citation needed] See also[edit]

Cannabis
Cannabis
portal Culture
Culture
portal

Coffee
Coffee
culture Drinking culture Drug culture Entheogenic use of cannabis Kava
Kava
culture Tea
Tea
culture

Notes[edit]

^ Rubin, 1975. p.1 ^ a b Rubin, 1975. p.3 ^ a b Rubin, 1975. p.4 ^ a b c d Brownlee, 2002. "01: Culture" ^ Courtwright, David (2001). Forces of Habit: Drugs and the Making of the Modern World. Harvard Univ. Press. p. 39. ISBN 0-674-00458-2.  ^ Joseph Needham and Gwei-djen Lu (1974). Science and Civilisation in China: Volume 5, Chemistry and Chemical Technology; Part 2, Spagyrical Discovery and Invention: Magisteries of Gold and Immortality. Cambridge University Press, p. 152 ^ Rätsch, Christian (2003–2004). The Sacred Plants of our Ancestors. TYR: Myth— Culture
Culture
Tradition. 2. ISBN 0-9720292-1-4.  ^ Creighton, John (2000). Coins and Power in Late Iron Age Britain. Cambridge University Press. p. 52. ISBN 978-0-521-77207-5.  ^ Booth, Martin (2005). Cannabis: A History. Picador. p. 29. As the seeds of cannabis contain no psycho-active chemicals, it is believed the Scythians were actually casting cannabis flowers onto the stones.  ^ a b "Lab work to identify 2,800-year-old mummy of shaman". People's Daily Online. 2006.  ^ [Dunhill, Alfred "The Pipe Book" London A & C Black, 1924] ^ Rubin, 1975. p.45 ^ http://masscann.org/education/social-history-of-marijuana/ ^ Ryan Grim (April 20, 2010). "420 Meaning: The True Story Of How April 20 Became 'Weed Day'". The Huffington Post.  ^ http://www.angelfire.com/rings/toker/ ^ Osborne, Geraint B.; Fogel, Curtis (2009). "Understanding the Motivations for Recreational Marijuana
Marijuana
Use Among Adult Canadians" (PDF). Substance Use & Misuse. 43 (3–4): 539–572. doi:10.1080/10826080701884911. Archived from the original on 2016-03-03. CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link) ^ "We Asked Some Experts Why Weed and Music
Music
Go So Well Together". Thump. Retrieved 22 April 2017.  ^ " Cannabis
Cannabis
and Creativity". Psychology Today. Retrieved 22 April 2017.  ^ "Beatles' Acid Test: How LSD
LSD
Opened the Door to 'Revolver'". Rolling Stone. Retrieved 22 April 2017.  ^ "Rihanna, Billie Holiday, Bob Marley and 6 of the most famous stoners in music history". Retrieved 22 April 2017.  ^ Branco, Nelson. "Melissa Etheridge: From LGBT to O'Cannabiz". Toronto Sun. Retrieved 22 April 2017.  ^ "Sound Bathing With Sigur Rós and Their Lord Jones Edibles". Billboard. Retrieved 22 April 2017.  ^ Rudgley, Richard (1998). Lost Civilisations of the Stone Age. New York: Free Press. ISBN 0-684-85580-1.  ^ Peters, Jon. "top ten stoner movies". Killerfilm.com. Retrieved 2013-03-15.  ^ "top ten stoner movies". Ign.com. 2008-08-08. Retrieved 2013-03-15.  ^ a b Stolley 1998, pp. 139. ^ " Marijuana
Marijuana
and the Cannabinoids", ElSohly (p. 8). ^ Leary, Timothy (1990). Tarcher & Putnam, ed. Flashbacks. New York: GP Putnam's Sons. ISBN 0-87477-870-0.  ^ Miller, Ga (1911). Encyclopædia Britannica. Science. 34 (11 ed.). pp. 761–2. doi:10.1126/science.34.883.761. PMID 17759460. Archived from the original on August 26, 2013.  ^ Rudgley, Richard (1998). Little, Brown; et al., eds. The Encyclopedia of Psychoactive Substances. ISBN 0-349-11127-8.  ^ "Holi Festival".  Tradition of Bhang ^ Hamid, The Ganjah Complex: Rastafari
Rastafari
and Marijuana, introduction, p. xxxii. ^ Chanting Down Babylon, p. 130 ff. ^ Barry Chevannes, Rastafari
Rastafari
and Other African-Caribbean Worldviews, pp. 35, 85; Edmonds, p. 52. ^ Bhang
Bhang
is often produced in large vessels at dargah gatherings known as "shaam-e-qalandar". During these gatherings large kettle drums known as naggara are played or alternatively, the Dhol. It is known as Qalandri dhamaal. Both groups, the Qalandar's and Sadhu's were lumped together by the British as faqeers. They are still frowned upon by the industrious population and are considered "dreadfull". Yet they are considered holy men by many. Both groups practice either some sort of chilla nashini or yoga in remote jungles, mountains or charnel grounds in which ganja aids to put a veil on the worldly and to transcend the various societal trends and pressures. It is also used to induce a state of euphoria and trance by some in conjunction with drumming, dance or whirling. Arrow of the Blue-Skinned God: Retracing the Ramayana Through India, Jonah Blank, p. 89.

References[edit]

Rubin, Vera (1975). Cannabis
Cannabis
and Culture. De Gruyter. ISBN 978-9027976697.  Brownlee, Nick (2002). This is Cannabis. Sanctuary Publishing. ISBN 978-1860743993. 

v t e

Recreational drug
Recreational drug
use

Major recreational drugs

Depressants

Barbiturates Benzodiazepines Carbamates Ethanol (alcohol)

Alcoholic drinks Beer Wine

Gabapentinoids GHB Inhalants

Medical

Nitrous oxide

Hazardous solvents

contact adhesives Gasoline nail polish remover Paint thinner

Other

Freon

Kava Nonbenzodiazepines Quinazolinones

Opioids

Buprenorphine

Suboxone Subutex

Codeine Desomorphine

Krokodil

Dextropropoxyphene

Darvocet Darvon

Fentanyl Diamorphine

Heroin

Hydrocodone Hydromorphone

Dilaudid

Methadone Mitragyna speciosa

Kratom

Morphine

Opium

Oxycodone

/paracetamol

Tramadol

Stimulants

Amphetamine Arecoline

Areca

Betel Caffeine

Coffee Energy drinks Tea

Cathinone

Khat

Cocaine

Coca Crack

Ephedrine

Ephedra

MDPV Mephedrone Methamphetamine Methylone Methylphenidate Modafinil Nicotine

Tobacco

Theobromine

Cocoa Chocolate

Entactogens

2C series 6-APB

Benzofury

AMT MDA MDMA

Ecstasy

Hallucinogens

Psychedelics

Bufotenin

Psychoactive toads Vilca Yopo

DMT

Ayahuasca

LSA LSD-25 Mescaline

Peruvian torch Peyote San Pedro

Psilocybin
Psilocybin
/ Psilocin

Psilocybin
Psilocybin
mushrooms

Dissociatives

DXM Glaucine Inhalants

Nitrous oxide alkyl nitrites poppers amyl nitrite

Ketamine MXE Muscimol

Amanita muscaria

PCP Salvinorin A

Salvia divinorum

Deliriants

Atropine
Atropine
and Scopolamine

Atropa belladonna Datura Hyoscyamus niger Mandragora officinarum

Dimenhydrinate Diphenhydramine

Cannabinoids

JWH-018 THC

Cannabis Hashish Hash oil Marijuana

Oneirogens

Calea zacatechichi Silene capensis

Club drugs

Cocaine Quaaludes MDMA
MDMA
(Ecstasy) Nitrous oxide Poppers

Drug culture

Cannabis
Cannabis
culture

420 Cannabis
Cannabis
cultivation Cannabis
Cannabis
smoking Head shop Legal history of cannabis in the United States Legality of cannabis Marijuana
Marijuana
Policy Project Medical cannabis NORML Cannabis
Cannabis
and religion Stoner film

Coffee
Coffee
culture

Coffee
Coffee
break Coffeehouse Latte art Tea
Tea
house

Drinking culture

Bartending Beer
Beer
culture Beer
Beer
festival Binge drinking Diethyl ether Drinking games Drinking song Happy hour Hip flask Nightclub Pub Pub
Pub
crawl Sommelier Sports bar Tailgate party Wine
Wine
bar Wine
Wine
tasting

Psychedelia

Psychonautics Art Drug Era Experience Literature Music Microdosing Therapy

Smoking culture

Cigarette card Fashion cigarettes Cloud-chasing Loosie Smokeasy Smoking fetishism Tobacco
Tobacco
smoking

Other

Club drug Counterculture of the 1960s Dance party Drug paraphernalia Drug tourism Entheogen Hippie Nootropic Party and play Poly drug use Rave Religion and drugs Self-medication Sex and drugs Whoonga

Drug production and trade

Drug production

Coca
Coca
production in Colombia Drug precursors Opium
Opium
production in Afghanistan Rolling meth lab

Drug trade

Illegal drug trade

Colombia

Darknet market Drug distribution

Beer
Beer
shop Cannabis
Cannabis
shop Liquor store Liquor license

Issues with drug use

Abuse Date rape drug Impaired driving Drug harmfulness

Effects of cannabis

Addiction Dependence

Prevention Opioid
Opioid
replacement therapy Rehabilitation Responsible use

Drug-related crime Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder Long-term effects of cannabis Neurotoxicity Overdose Passive smoking

of tobacco or other substances

Legality of drug use

International

1961 Narcotic Drugs 1971 Psychotropic Substances 1988 Drug Trafficking Council of the European Union decisions on designer drugs

State level

Drug policy

Decriminalization Prohibition Supply reduction

Policy reform

Demand reduction Drug Policy Alliance Harm reduction Law Enforcement Action Partnership Liberalization

Latin America

Students for Sensible Drug Policy Transform Drug Policy Foundation

Drug policy by country

Australia Canada Germany India Netherlands Portugal Slovakia Soviet Union Sweden Switzerland United States

Just Say No Office of National Drug Control Policy School district drug policies California Colorado Maryland Virginia

Other

Arguments for and against drug prohibition Capital punishment for drug trafficking Cognitive liberty Designer drug Drug court Drug possession Drug test Narc Politics of drug abuse War on Drugs

Mexican Drug War Plan Colombia Philippine Drug War

Zero tolerance

Lists of countries by...

Alcohol
Alcohol
legality

Alcohol
Alcohol
consumption

Anabolic steroid legality Cannabis
Cannabis
legality

Annual use Lifetime use

Cigarette consumption Cocaine
Cocaine
legality

Cocaine
Cocaine
use

Methamphetamine
Methamphetamine
legality Opiates use Psilocybin
Psilocybin
mushrooms legality Salvia legality

v t e

Cannabis
Cannabis
plant

Recreational and medical applications

rights

Industrial applications

General

Autoflowering cannabis Cannabis

indica ruderalis sativa Difference between C. indica and C. sativa

Consumption Cultivation Etymology (cannabis, marijuana) Glossary Cannabis
Cannabis
strains Synthetic cannabis

Usage

General

Medical cannabis

History

Timeline Religious and spiritual use

Chalice

Hemp

Hanfparade List of hemp diseases List of hemp products
List of hemp products
( Hempcrete
Hempcrete
 • Jewelry  • Milk  • Oil  • Paper) Hemp
Hemp
for Victory Hemp
Hemp
Industries Association The Emperor Wears No Clothes

Variants

Cannabis
Cannabis
edible

Bhang Cannabis
Cannabis
tea

Cannabis
Cannabis
smoking Vaporizing

Preparations

Kief Charas Essential oil Tincture

Extracts by potency

Hash oil Hashish

Phytocannabinoids

Cannabidiol
Cannabidiol
(CBD) Tetrahydrocannabinol
Tetrahydrocannabinol
(THC)

Effects

Cannabis
Cannabis
in pregnancy Effects of cannabis

Long-term

Endocannabinoid system Dependence

Culture

420 Cannabis
Cannabis
Culture Competitions Films High Times Music Religion Head shop

Pro-Cannabis organizations

ACT AMMA Aotearoa (ALCP) ASA Buyers Club CCRMG CLEAR CRC DPA FCA GMM LEAP MAPS MPP NCIA NORML SAFER Social Club SSDP SCC

Use demographics

Adult lifetime use by country Annual use by country

Politics

General

Bootleggers and Baptists Drug testing Global Marijuana
Marijuana
March Legality

Legality by country Legal and medical status Legal history in the United States

Marijuana
Marijuana
Anonymous (MA) Marijuana
Marijuana
Control, Regulation, and Education Act Marihuana Tax Act of 1937

Major legal reforms

UK: Return to class B Uruguay: Law No. 19172 US:

Decriminalization of non-medical use Rescheduling per the Controlled Substances Act

Politicians and parties

Cannabis
Cannabis
political parties List of British politicians who have acknowledged cannabis use List of US politicians who have acknowledged cannabis use

Legal cases

ADPF 187 Gonzales v. Raich Ker v. California Kyllo v. United States
Kyllo v. United States
(thermal imaging) Leary v. United States

Category Portal

v t e

Culture

Outline

Sciences

Cultural anthropology Cultural astronomy Cultural ecology Cultural geography Cultural neuroscience Cultural studies Culturology Culture
Culture
theory Neuroculture

Subfields

Bioculture Cross-cultural studies

Cross-cultural communication Cross-cultural leadership Cross-cultural psychiatry Cross-cultural psychology

Cultural analytics Cultural economics Cultural entomology Cultural health Cultural history Cultural mapping Cultural mediation Cultural psychology Culturomics Intercultural learning Intercultural relations Philosophy of culture Popular culture studies Semiotics of culture Sociology of culture Sound culture Theology of culture Transcultural nursing

Types

Constructed culture Dominant culture Folk culture High culture Individualistic culture Legal culture Low culture Microculture Official culture Political culture

Civic

Popular culture

Urban

Primitive culture Subculture

Alternative culture list

Super culture Vernacular culture Culture
Culture
by location

Aspects

Acculturation Cultural appropriation Cultural area Cultural artifact Cultural baggage Cultural behavior Cultural bias Cultural capital

Cross-cultural

Cultural communication Cultural conflict Cultural cringe Cultural dissonance Cultural emphasis Cultural framework Cultural heritage Cultural icon Cultural identity Cultural industry Cultural invention Cultural landscape Cultural learning Cultural leveling Cultural memory Cultural pluralism Cultural practice Cultural property Cultural reproduction Cultural system Cultural technology Cultural universal Cultureme Enculturation High- and low-context cultures Interculturality Manuscript culture Material culture Non-material culture Organizational culture Print culture Protoculture Safety culture Technoculture Trans-cultural diffusion Transculturation Visual culture

Politics

Colonial mentality Consumer capitalism Cross cultural sensitivity Cultural assimilation Cultural attaché Cultural backwardness Cultural Bolshevism Cultural conservatism Cultural contracts Cultural deprivation Cultural diplomacy Cultural environmentalism Cultural exception Cultural feminism Cultural genocide Cultural globalization Cultural hegemony Cultural imperialism Cultural intelligence Cultural liberalism Cultural nationalism Cultural pessimism Cultural policy Cultural racism Cultural radicalism Cultural retention Cultural Revolution Cultural rights Cultural safety Cultural silence Cultural subsidy Cultural Zionism Culture
Culture
change Culture
Culture
minister Culture
Culture
of fear Culture
Culture
war Deculturalization Dominator culture Interculturalism Intraculturalism Monoculturalism Multiculturalism

Biculturalism

Pluriculturalism Security culture Transculturism

Related

Animal culture Archaeological culture Bennett scale Bullying culture Cannabis
Cannabis
culture Circuit of culture Coffee
Coffee
culture Cross-cultural Cultural center Cultural Christian

Cultural Mormon

Cultural competence Cultural critic Cultural Detective Cultural determinism Cultural diversity Cultural encoding Cultural evolutionism Cultural Hindu Cultural homogenization Cultural institution Cultural jet lag Cultural Judaism Cultural lag Cultural literacy Cultural mosaic Cultural movement Cultural mulatto Cultural Muslim Cultural probe Cultural relativism Culture
Culture
speculation Cultural tourism

Pop-culture

Cultural translation Cultural turn Cultural sensibility Culture
Culture
and positive psychology Culture
Culture
and social cognition Culture
Culture
gap Culture
Culture
hero Culture
Culture
industry Culture
Culture
shock Culturgen Children's culture Culturalism Cyberculture Death and culture Disability culture

Deaf culture

Emotions and culture Intercultural communication Intercultural competence Languaculture Living things in culture Media culture Oppositional culture Participatory culture Permission culture Rape culture Remix culture Tea
Tea
culture Transformation of culture Urban culture Welfare culture

Category Portal Commons W

.