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The Canadian national men's ice hockey team (popularly known as Team Canada; French: Équipe Canada) is the ice hockey team representing Canada
Canada
internationally. The team is overseen by Hockey Canada, a member of the International Ice Hockey Federation. From 1920 until 1963, Canada's international representation was by senior amateur club teams. Canada's national men's team was founded in 1963 by Father David Bauer as a part of the Canadian Amateur Hockey Association, playing out of the University of British Columbia.[2] The nickname "Team Canada" was first used for the 1972 Summit Series
1972 Summit Series
and has been frequently used to refer to the Canadian national team ever since. Canada
Canada
is the leading national ice hockey team in international play, winners of the 1972 Summit Series
1972 Summit Series
against the Soviet Union, four of five Canada
Canada
Cups dating back to 1976, nine Olympic gold medals (the most in the world), including three of the last five: Salt Lake City 2002, Vancouver
Vancouver
2010, and Sochi 2014. They are 26-time IIHF
IIHF
World Champions and winner of the 2004 and 2016 World Cup of Hockey. Canada is a member of the so-called "Big Six", the unofficial group of the six strongest men's ice hockey nations, along with the Czech Republic, Finland, Russia, Sweden
Sweden
and the United States.[3]

Contents

1 History

1.1 List of teams representing Canada
Canada
from 1920 to 1963

2 Competition achievements

2.1 Olympic Games 2.2 World Championships 2.3 Summit Series 2.4 Canada
Canada
Cup 2.5 World Cup of Hockey 2.6 Spengler Cup

3 Team

3.1 Current roster 3.2 Coaches

4 See also 5 References 6 External links

History[edit] Hockey is Canada's national winter sport, and Canadians are extremely passionate about the game. Canada
Canada
was first represented internationally at the 1910 European Championships by the Oxford Canadians, a team of Canadians from the University of Oxford. They represented Canada
Canada
again at the 1912 World Championships. From 1920 until 1963, the senior amateur club teams representing Canada, were usually the most recent Allan Cup
Allan Cup
champions. The last amateur club team from Canada
Canada
to win a gold medal at the World Championship was the Trail Smoke Eaters
Trail Smoke Eaters
in 1961. Following the 1963 World Championships, Father David Bauer founded the national team as a permanent institution. The new permanent national team first competed at the 1964 Winter Olympics. Before the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
began international competition in 1954, Canada
Canada
dominated international hockey, winning six out of seven golds at the Olympics and 10 World Championship gold medals. Canada
Canada
then went 50 years without winning the Winter Olympic Gold medal
Gold medal
and from 1962 to 1993, didn't win any World Championships. This was in part because Canada's best professional players were unable to attend these events as they had commitments with their National Hockey League teams. Canada
Canada
withdrew from official IIHF
IIHF
events in 1970 and the National Team program was suspended after they were refused permission to use semi-professional players at the World Championship. Canada
Canada
returned to the IIHF
IIHF
in 1977 after a series of negotiations between IIHF President Dr. Sabetzki and top officials of professional ice hockey in Canada
Canada
and the United States. As a result, professionals are allowed to compete at the World Championship and the tournament is scheduled later in the year to ensure more players are available from among the NHL
NHL
teams eliminated from the Stanley Cup
Stanley Cup
playoffs. In return, a competition for the " Canada
Canada
Cup" was to be played every four years on North American territory with the participation of Canada, the United States, and the four strongest European national teams, including professionals.[citation needed] In 1983, Hockey Canada
Hockey Canada
began the "Program of Excellence", whose purpose was to prepare a team for the Winter Olympics
Winter Olympics
every four years. This new National Team played a full season together all over the world against both national and club teams, and often attracted top NHL
NHL
prospects. In 1986, the International Olympic Committee
International Olympic Committee
voted to allow professional athletes to compete in Olympic Games, starting in 1988.[4] Veteran pros with NHL
NHL
experience and, in a few cases, current NHLers who were holding out in contract disputes joined the team. This program was discontinued in 1998, when the NHL
NHL
began shutting down to allow its players to compete. After not winning a gold medal for 33 years, Canada
Canada
won the 1994 World Championship in Italy. Since that time, they have won in 1997, 2003, 2004, 2007, 2015 and 2016. Canada
Canada
captured its first Olympic gold medal in 50 years at Salt Lake City 2002. At Vancouver
Vancouver
2010, Canada won the gold medal with a 3–2 win against the United States
United States
in the final. Sidney Crosby's overtime goal secured Canada
Canada
the final gold medal awarded at the Games.[5] At the 2012 World Championship in Finland and Sweden, Ryan Murray
Ryan Murray
became the first draft eligible prospect to represent Canada
Canada
at the Ice Hockey World Championship. Canada
Canada
successfully defended gold at Sochi 2014, becoming the first men's team to do so since the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
in 1988, the first to finish the tournament undefeated since 1984 and the first to do both with a full NHL
NHL
participation. Their relentless offensive pressure and stifling defence has earned the 2014 squad praise as perhaps the best, most complete Team Canada
Canada
ever assembled.[6] Drew Doughty
Drew Doughty
and Shea Weber led the team in scoring, while Jonathan Toews
Jonathan Toews
scored the gold medal-winning goal in the first period of a 3–0 win over Sweden
Sweden
in the final. The architect behind the 2010 and 2014 teams, Steve Yzerman, immediately stepped down as general manager following the win.[7] Led by general manager Jim Nill, head coach Todd McLellan, and the late addition of captain Sidney Crosby, Canada
Canada
won the 2015 IIHF
IIHF
World Championship in dominating fashion over Russia, their first win at the Worlds since 2007. By winning all 10 of their games in regulation, Hockey Canada
Hockey Canada
was awarded a 1 million Swiss franc bonus prize in the first year of its existence.[8] Canada
Canada
scored 66 goals in their 10 games and had the top three scorers of the tournament: Jason Spezza, Jordan Eberle
Jordan Eberle
and Taylor Hall. Tyler Seguin
Tyler Seguin
also led the championship with nine goals. The win secured Canada’s return to number one on the IIHF
IIHF
world rankings for the first time since 2010.[9] List of teams representing Canada
Canada
from 1920 to 1963[edit]

Event Team Hometown

1920 Summer Olympics Winnipeg
Winnipeg
Falcons Winnipeg, Manitoba

1924 Winter Olympics Toronto
Toronto
Granites Toronto, Ontario

1928 Winter Olympics University of Toronto Toronto, Ontario

1930 World Championships Toronto
Toronto
CCMs Toronto

1931 World Championships University of Manitoba Winnipeg, Manitoba

1932 Winter Olympics Winnipeg
Winnipeg
Hockey Club Winnipeg, Manitoba

1933 World Championships Toronto
Toronto
National Sea Fleas Toronto, Ontario

1934 World Championships Saskatoon
Saskatoon
Quakers Saskatoon, Saskatchewan

1935 World Championships Winnipeg
Winnipeg
Monarchs Winnipeg, Manitoba

1936 Winter Olympics Port Arthur Bearcats Port Arthur, Ontario

1937 World Championships Kimberley Dynamiters Kimberley, British Columbia

1938 World Championships Sudbury Wolves Sudbury, Ontario

1939 World Championships Trail Smoke Eaters Trail, British Columbia

World Championships not held from 1940–1946 during World War II.

1947 World Championships Did not participate

1948 Winter Olympics Ottawa
Ottawa
RCAF Flyers RCAF Station Trenton, Ontario

1949 World Championships Sudbury Wolves Sudbury, Ontario

1950 World Championships Edmonton
Edmonton
Mercurys Edmonton, Alberta

1951 World Championships Lethbridge
Lethbridge
Maple Leafs Lethbridge, Alberta

1952 Winter Olympics Edmonton
Edmonton
Mercurys Edmonton, Alberta

1953 World Championships Did not participate

1954 World Championships East York
East York
Lyndhursts East York, Ontario

1955 World Championships Penticton
Penticton
Vees Penticton, British Columbia

1956 Winter Olympics Kitchener-Waterloo Dutchmen Kitchener–Waterloo, Ontario

1957 World Championships Did not participate

1958 World Championships Whitby Dunlops Whitby, Ontario

1959 World Championships Belleville McFarlands Belleville, Ontario

1960 Winter Olympics Kitchener-Waterloo Dutchmen Kitchener–Waterloo, Ontario

1961 World Championships Trail Smoke Eaters Trail, British Columbia

1962 World Championships Galt Terriers Galt, Ontario

1963 World Championships Trail Smoke Eaters Trail, British Columbia

Competition achievements[edit] Olympic Games[edit] All Olympic ice hockey tournaments between 1920 and 1968 also counted as World Championships. They have won a total of 15 Olympic medals.[10]

Games Representative GP W L T GF GA Coach Manager/GM Captain Finish Ref.

1920 Antwerp Winnipeg
Winnipeg
Falcons 3 3 0 0 21 1 Sigurjonson, GordonGordon Sigurjonson Axford, H. A.H. A. Axford Fredrickson, FrankFrank Fredrickson 01 ! Gold [11]

1924 Chamonix Toronto
Toronto
Granites 5 5 0 0 110 3 Rankin, FrankFrank Rankin Hewitt, WilliamWilliam Hewitt Munro, DuncDunc Munro 01 ! Gold [12]

1928 St. Moritz University of Toronto
Toronto
Grads 3 3 0 0 38 0 Smythe, ConnConn Smythe Hewitt, WilliamWilliam Hewitt Porter, JohnJohn Porter 01 ! Gold [13]

1932 Lake Placid Winnipeg
Winnipeg
Hockey Club 6 5 0 1 32 4 Hughes, JackJack Hughes Marsh, LouLou Marsh Cockburn, WilliamWilliam Cockburn 01 ! Gold [14]

1936 Garmisch- Partenkirchen Port Arthur Bearcats 8 7 1 0 54 7 Pudas, AlAl Pudas Cochrane, MalcolmMalcolm Cochrane Murray, HermanHerman Murray 02 ! Silver [15]

1948 St. Moritz Ottawa
Ottawa
RCAF Flyers 8 7 0 1 69 5 Boucher, FrankFrank Boucher Watson, SandySandy Watson Mara, GeorgeGeorge Mara 01 ! Gold [16]

1952 Oslo Edmonton
Edmonton
Mercurys 8 7 0 1 71 14 Holmes, LouLou Holmes Christianson, JimJim Christianson Dawe, BillyBilly Dawe 01 ! Gold [17]

1956 Cortina d'Ampezzo Kitchener-Waterloo Dutchmen 8 6 2 0 53 12 Bauer, BobbyBobby Bauer Goman, ErnieErnie Goman McKenzie, JackJack McKenzie 03 ! Bronze [18]

1960 Squaw Valley Kitchener-Waterloo Dutchmen 7 6 1 0 55 15 Bauer, BobbyBobby Bauer Goman, ErnieErnie Goman Sinden, HarryHarry Sinden 02 ! Silver [19]

1964 Innsbruck — 7 5 2 0 32 17 Bauer, DavidDavid Bauer Hindmarch, BobBob Hindmarch Akervall, HankHank Akervall 4th [20]

1968 Grenoble — 7 5 2 0 28 15 McLeod, JackieJackie McLeod Bauer, DavidDavid Bauer Johnston, MarshallMarshall Johnston 03 ! Bronze [21]

1972 Sapporo Did not participate

1976 Innsbruck Did not participate

1980 Lake Placid — 6 3 3 0 29 18 Davis, LorneLorne Davis Drake, ClareClare Drake Watt, TomTom Watt Noonan, RickRick Noonan Gregg, RandyRandy Gregg 6th [22]

1984 Sarajevo — 7 4 3 0 24 16 King, DaveDave King King, DaveDave King Tippett, DaveDave Tippett 4th [23]

1988 Calgary — 8 9 2 1 31 21 King, DaveDave King King, DaveDave King Yawney, TrentTrent Yawney 4th [24]

1992 Albertville — 8 6 2 0 37 17 King, DaveDave King King, DaveDave King Schlegel, BradBrad Schlegel 02 ! Silver [25]

1994 Lillehammer — 8 5 2 1 27 19 Renney, TomTom Renney Kingston, GeorgeGeorge Kingston Joseph, FabianFabian Joseph 02 ! Silver [26]

1998 Nagano — 6 4 2 0 19 8 Crawford, MarcMarc Crawford Clarke, BobbyBobby Clarke Lindros, EricEric Lindros[27] 4th [28]

2002 Salt Lake City — 6 4 1 1 22 14 Quinn, PatPat Quinn Gretzky, WayneWayne Gretzky Lemieux, MarioMario Lemieux 01 ! Gold

2006 Turin — 6 3 3 0 15 11 Quinn, PatPat Quinn Gretzky, WayneWayne Gretzky Sakic, JoeJoe Sakic 7th

2010 Vancouver — 7 6 1 — 32 14 Babcock, MikeMike Babcock Yzerman, SteveSteve Yzerman Niedermayer, ScottScott Niedermayer 01 ! Gold [29]

2014 Sochi — 6 6 0 — 17 3 Babcock, MikeMike Babcock Yzerman, SteveSteve Yzerman Crosby, SidneySidney Crosby 01 ! Gold

2018 Pyeongchang — 6 4 2 — 21 12 Desjardins, WillieWillie Desjardins Burke, SeanSean Burke Kelly, ChrisChris Kelly 03 ! Bronze —

World Championships[edit] See also: List of Men's World Ice Hockey Championship players for Canada
Canada
(1977–present) All Olympic ice hockey tournaments between 1920 and 1968 also counted as World Championships.[10] The 1920 Olympics were the first world championship. IIHF
IIHF
World Championships were not held during the Winter Olympic years of 1980, 1984 or 1988.[10]

Year Location Result

1920 Antwerp, Belgium Gold

1924 Chamonix, France Gold

1928 St. Moritz, Switzerland Gold

1930 Chamonix, France; Berlin, Germany; Vienna, Austria Gold

1931 Krynica, Poland Gold

1932 Lake Placid, US Gold

1933 Prague, Czechoslovakia Silver

1934 Milan, Italy Gold

1935 Davos, Switzerland Gold

1936 Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany Silver

1937 London, Great Britain Gold

1938 Prague, Czechoslovakia Gold

1939 Zürich
Zürich
/ Basel, Switzerland Gold

World Championships not held from 1940–1946 during World War II.

Canada
Canada
did not participate in 1947.

1948 St. Moritz, Switzerland Gold

1949 Stockholm, Sweden Silver

1950 London, Great Britain Gold

1951 Paris, France Gold

1952 Oslo, Norway Gold

1954 Stockholm, Sweden Silver

1955 Krefeld
Krefeld
/ Dortmund
Dortmund
/ Cologne, West Germany Gold

1956 Cortina d'Ampezzo, Italy Bronze

1958 Oslo, Norway Gold

1959 Prague
Prague
/ Bratislava, Czechoslovakia Gold

1960 Squaw Valley, US Silver

1961 Geneva
Geneva
/ Lausanne, Switzerland Gold

1962 Colorado Springs / Denver, US Silver

1963 Stockholm, Sweden 4th place

1964 Innsbruck, Austria 4th place

1965 Tampere, Finland 4th place

1966 Ljubljana, Yugoslavia Bronze

1967 Vienna, Austria Bronze

1968 Grenoble, France Bronze

1969 Stockholm, Sweden 4th place

Canada
Canada
did not participate in IIHF
IIHF
events from 1970–1976.

1977 Vienna, Austria 4th place

1978 Prague, Czechoslovakia Bronze

1979 Moscow, Soviet Union 4th place

1981 Gothenburg
Gothenburg
/ Stockholm, Sweden 4th place

1982 Helsinki
Helsinki
/ Tampere, Finland Bronze

1983 Düsseldorf
Düsseldorf
/ Dortmund
Dortmund
/ Munich, West Germany Bronze

1985 Prague, Czechoslovakia Silver

1986 Moscow, Soviet Union Bronze

1987 Vienna, Austria 4th place

1989 Stockholm
Stockholm
/ Södertälje, Sweden Silver

1990 Bern
Bern
/ Fribourg, Switzerland 4th place

1991 Turku
Turku
/ Helsinki
Helsinki
/ Tampere, Finland Silver

1992 Prague
Prague
/ Bratislava, Czechoslovakia 8th place

1993 Dortmund
Dortmund
/ Munich, Germany 4th place

1994 Bolzano
Bolzano
/ Canazei
Canazei
/ Milan, Italy Gold

1995 Stockholm
Stockholm
/ Gävle, Sweden Bronze

1996 Vienna, Austria Silver

1997 Helsinki
Helsinki
/ Turku
Turku
/ Tampere, Finland Gold

1998 Zürich
Zürich
/ Basel, Switzerland 6th place

1999 Oslo
Oslo
/ Lillehammer
Lillehammer
/ Hamar, Norway 4th place

2000 Saint Petersburg, Russia 4th place

2001 Cologne
Cologne
/ Hanover
Hanover
/ Nuremberg, Germany 5th place

2002 Gothenburg
Gothenburg
/ Karlstad
Karlstad
/ Jönköping, Sweden 6th place

2003 Helsinki
Helsinki
/ Tampere
Tampere
/ Turku, Finland Gold

2004 Prague
Prague
/ Ostrava, Czech Republic Gold

2005 Innsbruck
Innsbruck
/ Vienna, Austria Silver

2006 Riga, Latvia 4th place

2007 Moscow
Moscow
/ Mytishchi, Russia Gold

2008 Quebec City
Quebec City
/ Halifax, Canada Silver

2009 Bern
Bern
/ Kloten, Switzerland Silver

2010 Cologne
Cologne
/ Mannheim
Mannheim
/ Gelsenkirchen, Germany 7th place

2011 Bratislava
Bratislava
/ Košice, Slovakia 5th place

2012 Helsinki, Finland / Stockholm, Sweden 5th place

2013 Stockholm, Sweden
Sweden
/ Helsinki, Finland 5th place

2014 Minsk, Belarus 5th place

2015 Prague
Prague
/ Ostrava, Czech Republic Gold

2016 Moscow
Moscow
/ Saint Petersburg, Russia Gold

2017 Cologne, Germany
Germany
/ Paris, France Silver

Summit Series[edit]

1972  – Won 1974  – Lost

Canada
Canada
Cup[edit]

1976 – Champions 1981 – Runners-up 1984 – Champions 1987 – Champions 1991 – Champions

World Cup of Hockey[edit]

1996 – Runners-up 2004 – Champions 2016 – Champions

Spengler Cup[edit] In the Spengler Cup, Team Canada
Canada
competes against European club teams such as HC Davos
Davos
who host the tournament every year in Vaillant Arena. Canada
Canada
was initially represented by the standing national team at this event, but subsequently is usually made up of Canadians playing in European leagues or the AHL. Team Canada
Canada
has won a total of 15 Spengler Cups, which is tied with the host team HC Davos
Davos
for the most titles.

Results Years

Winner 1984, 1986, 1987, 1992, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 2002, 2003, 2007, 2012, 2015, 2016, 2017

Runners-up 1985, 1988, 1990, 2000, 2001, 2005, 2006, 2008, 2010

Third Place 1989, 1991, 1994, 1999, 2004, 2009

Team[edit] Main articles: List of Canadian national ice hockey team rosters and List of men's Olympic ice hockey players for Canada Current roster[edit] Roster for the 2018 Winter Olympics.[30] NHL
NHL
players were not allowed to participate.[31] The following is the Canadian roster for the men's ice hockey tournament at the 2018 Winter Olympics.[32][33][34] view Head coach: Willie Desjardins     Assistant coaches: Dave King, Scott Walker, Craig Woodcroft

No. Pos. Name Height Weight Birthdate Birthplace 2017–18 team

3 D Stollery, KarlKarl Stollery 5 ft 11 in (1.80 m) 7001821002189700000♠181 lb (82 kg) 000000001987-11-21-0000November 21, 1987 Camrose, Alberta Dinamo Riga
Riga
(KHL)

4 D Lee, ChrisChris Lee – A 6 ft 0 in (1.83 m) 7001839145884500000♠185 lb (84 kg) 000000001980-10-03-0000October 3, 1980 MacTier, Ontario Metallurg Magnitogorsk
Metallurg Magnitogorsk
(KHL)

5 D Genoway, ChayChay Genoway 5 ft 9 in (1.75 m) 7001798322571200000♠176 lb (80 kg) 000000001986-12-20-0000December 20, 1986 Morden, Manitoba HC Lada Togliatti
HC Lada Togliatti
(KHL)

7 F Brulé, GilbertGilbert Brulé 5 ft 10 in (1.78 m) 7001861825503000000♠190 lb (86 kg) 000000001987-01-01-0000January 1, 1987 Edmonton, Alberta Kunlun Red Star
Kunlun Red Star
(KHL)

8 F Wolski, WojtekWojtek Wolski 6 ft 3 in (1.91 m) 7001997903214000000♠220 lb (100 kg) 000000001986-02-24-0000February 24, 1986 Zabrze, Poland Metallurg Magnitogorsk
Metallurg Magnitogorsk
(KHL)

9 F Roy, Derek Derek Roy
Derek Roy
– A 5 ft 9 in (1.75 m) 7001848217731900000♠187 lb (85 kg) 000000001983-05-04-0000May 4, 1983 Rockland, Ontario Linköpings HC
Linköpings HC
(SHL)

11 F Kelly, ChrisChris Kelly – C 6 ft 0 in (1.83 m) 7001879969197800000♠194 lb (88 kg) 000000001980-11-11-0000November 11, 1980 Toronto, Ontario Belleville Senators
Belleville Senators
(AHL)

12 F Klinkhammer, RobRob Klinkhammer 6 ft 2 in (1.88 m) 7001979759519200000♠216 lb (98 kg) 000000001986-08-12-0000August 12, 1986 Lethbridge, Alberta Ak Bars Kazan
Ak Bars Kazan
(KHL)

15 F Kozun, BrandonBrandon Kozun 5 ft 8 in (1.73 m) 7001780178876400000♠172 lb (78 kg) 000000001990-03-08-0000March 8, 1990 Los Angeles, California, United States Lokomotiv Yaroslavl
Lokomotiv Yaroslavl
(KHL)

16 F Howden, QuintonQuinton Howden 6 ft 2 in (1.88 m) 7001861825503000000♠190 lb (86 kg) 000000001992-01-21-0000January 21, 1992 Oakbank, Manitoba HC Dinamo Minsk
Minsk
(KHL)

17 F Bourque, Rene Rene Bourque
Rene Bourque
– A 6 ft 2 in (1.88 m) 7001979759519200000♠216 lb (98 kg) 000000001981-12-10-0000December 10, 1981 Lac La Biche, Alberta Djurgårdens IF (SHL)

18 D Gragnani, Marc-AndréMarc-André Gragnani 6 ft 3 in (1.91 m) 7001929864358500000♠205 lb (93 kg) 000000001987-03-11-0000March 11, 1987 L'Île-Bizard, Quebec HC Dinamo Minsk
Minsk
(KHL)

19 F Ebbett, Andrew Andrew Ebbett
Andrew Ebbett
– A 5 ft 9 in (1.75 m) 7001798322571200000♠176 lb (80 kg) 000000001983-01-02-0000January 2, 1983 Vernon, British Columbia SC Bern
Bern
(NL)

21 F Raymond, MasonMason Raymond 6 ft 1 in (1.85 m) 7001811930342300000♠179 lb (81 kg) 000000001985-09-17-0000September 17, 1985 Cochrane, Alberta SC Bern
Bern
(NL)

22 F O'Dell, EricEric O'Dell 6 ft 1 in (1.85 m) 7001911720663700000♠201 lb (91 kg) 000000001990-06-21-0000June 21, 1990 Ottawa, Ontario HC Sochi
HC Sochi
(KHL)

24 D Elliott, StefanStefan Elliott 6 ft 1 in (1.85 m) 7001861825503000000♠190 lb (86 kg) 000000001991-01-30-0000January 30, 1991 Vancouver, British Columbia HV71
HV71
(SHL)

27 D Goloubef, CodyCody Goloubef 6 ft 1 in (1.85 m) 7001911720663700000♠201 lb (91 kg) 000000001989-11-30-0000November 30, 1989 Oakville, Ontario Stockton Heat
Stockton Heat
(AHL)

30 G Scrivens, BenBen Scrivens 6 ft 2 in (1.88 m) 7001898112892600000♠198 lb (90 kg) 000000001986-09-11-0000September 11, 1986 Spruce Grove, Alberta Salavat Yulaev Ufa
Salavat Yulaev Ufa
(KHL)

31 G Poulin, KevinKevin Poulin 6 ft 2 in (1.88 m) 7001929864358500000♠205 lb (93 kg) 000000001990-04-12-0000April 12, 1990 Montreal, Quebec EHC Kloten
Kloten
(NL)

35 G Peters, JustinJustin Peters 6 ft 1 in (1.85 m) 7001948008053300000♠209 lb (95 kg) 000000001986-08-30-0000August 30, 1986 Blyth, Ontario Kölner Haie
Kölner Haie
(DEL)

37 D Robinson, MatMat Robinson 5 ft 9 in (1.75 m) 7001839145884500000♠185 lb (84 kg) 000000001986-06-20-0000June 20, 1986 Calgary, Alberta CSKA Moscow
Moscow
(KHL)

40 F Lapierre, MaximMaxim Lapierre 6 ft 0 in (1.83 m) 7001979759519200000♠216 lb (98 kg) 000000001985-03-29-0000March 29, 1985 Saint-Leonard, Quebec HC Lugano
HC Lugano
(NL)

56 D Noreau, Maxim Maxim Noreau – A 6 ft 0 in (1.83 m) 7001898112892600000♠198 lb (90 kg) 000000001987-05-24-0000May 24, 1987 Montreal, Quebec SC Bern
Bern
(NL)

91 F Vey, LindenLinden Vey 6 ft 0 in (1.83 m) 7001861825503000000♠190 lb (86 kg) 000000001991-07-17-0000July 17, 1991 Wakaw, Saskatchewan ZSC Lions
ZSC Lions
(NL)

92 F Thomas, ChristianChristian Thomas 5 ft 9 in (1.75 m) 7001789250723800000♠174 lb (79 kg) 000000001992-05-26-0000May 26, 1992 Toronto, Ontario Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins
Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins
(AHL)

Coaches[edit] List of coaches of the Canada
Canada
men's national ice hockey team.

Olympics

Gordon Sigurjonson, 1920 Frank Rankin, 1924 Conn Smythe, 1928 Jack Hughes, 1932 Al Pudas, 1936 Sgt. Frank Boucher, 1948 Louis Holmes, 1952 Bobby Bauer, 1956, 1960 Father David Bauer, 1964 Jackie McLeod, 1968 Lorne Davis, Clare Drake, Tom Watt (co-coaches), 1980 Dave King, 1984, 1988, 1992 Tom Renney, 1994 Marc Crawford, 1998 Pat Quinn, 2002, 2006 Mike Babcock, 2010, 2014 Willie Desjardins, 2018

Summit Series, Canada
Canada
Cup, World Cup

Harry Sinden, 1972 Summit Series Bill Harris, 1974 Summit Series Scotty Bowman, 1976, 1981 Canada
Canada
Cups Glen Sather, 1984 Canada
Canada
Cup Mike Keenan, 1987 and 1991 Canada
Canada
Cups Glen Sather, 1996 World Cup Pat Quinn, 2004 World Cup Mike Babcock, 2016 World Cup

World Championships

Les Allen, 1930 Blake Wilson, 1931 Harold Ballard, 1933 Johnny Walker, 1934 Scotty Oliver, 1935 John Achtzener, 1937 Max Silverman, 1938 Elmer Piper, 1939 Max Silverman, 1949 Jimmy Graham, 1950 Dick Gray, 1951 Greg Currie, 1954 Grant Warwick, 1955 Sid Smith, 1958 Ike Hildebrand, 1959 Lloyd Roubell, 1961, 1962 Bobby Kromm, 1963 Gordon Simpson, 1965 Jackie McLeod, 1966, 1967, 1969 Johnny Wilson, 1977 Harry Howell, 1978 Marshall Johnston, 1979 Don Cherry, 1981 Red Berenson, 1982 Dave King, 1983 Doug Carpenter, 1985 Pat Quinn, 1986 Dave King, 1987, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992 Mike Keenan, 1993 George Kingston, 1994 Tom Renney, 1995, 1996 Andy Murray, 1997, 1998 Mike Johnston, 1999 Tom Renney, 2000 Wayne Fleming, 2001, 2002 Andy Murray, 2003 Mike Babcock, 2004 Marc Habscheid, 2005, 2006 Andy Murray, 2007 Ken Hitchcock, 2008 Lindy Ruff, 2009 Craig MacTavish, 2010 Ken Hitchcock, 2011 Brent Sutter, 2012 Lindy Ruff, 2013 Dave Tippett, 2014 Todd McLellan, 2015 Bill Peters, 2016 Jon Cooper, 2017 TBD, 2018

See also[edit]

Sport in Canada
Canada
portal

Canada
Canada
men's national junior ice hockey team Canada
Canada
men's national ice sledge hockey team List of Canadian national ice hockey team rosters Canada
Canada
men's national field hockey team List of IIHF
IIHF
World Under-20 Championship players for Canada

References[edit]

^ "A century of Jerseys". Hockey Canada. Retrieved 2018-01-12.  ^ Hockey Canada ^ " NHL
NHL
announces World Cup of Hockey
World Cup of Hockey
for 2016". The Canadian Press. 2015-01-24. Retrieved January 29, 2015.  ^ Monsebraaten, Laurie (October 15, 1986). "Players in NHL
NHL
are now eligible in the Olympics". Toronto
Toronto
Star.  ^ " Canada
Canada
win thrilling final gold of Winter Olympics". BBC Sport. February 28, 2010. Retrieved March 1, 2010.  ^ "Sochi hockey squad one of the greatest Canada
Canada
has ever iced". Toronto
Toronto
Sun. 23 February 2014. Retrieved 24 February 2014.  ^ " Steve Yzerman
Steve Yzerman
steps down as GM after Team Canada
Canada
wins gold". Sports Illustrated. 23 February 2014. Retrieved 24 February 2014.  ^ "Will Canada
Canada
hit jackpot?". IIHF. Retrieved 16 May 2015.  ^ " Canada
Canada
wins first hockey worlds gold since 2007". ESPN. Retrieved 19 May 2015.  ^ a b c Hockey Canada- IIHF
IIHF
World Men's championship ^ Podnieks 1997, pp. 1–10 ^ Podnieks 1997, pp. 11–22 ^ Podnieks 1997, pp. 23–32 ^ Podnieks 1997, pp. 33–40 ^ Podnieks 1997, pp. 41–52 ^ Podnieks 1997, pp. 53–66 ^ Podnieks 1997, pp. 67–78 ^ Podnieks 1997, pp. 79–88 ^ Podnieks 1997, pp. 89–100 ^ Podnieks 1997, pp. 101–112 ^ Podnieks 1997, pp. 113–124 ^ Podnieks 1997, pp. 137–146 ^ Podnieks 1997, pp. 147–158 ^ Podnieks 1997, pp. 159–172 ^ Podnieks 1997, pp. 173–182 ^ Podnieks 1997, pp. 183–194 ^ Lapointe, Joe (February 1, 1998). "NAGANO '98; Wearing C, for Canada". The New York Times. Retrieved March 30, 2009.  ^ Wallechinsky 2002, p. 31 ^ Elliott, Helene (February 28, 2010). " Canada
Canada
defeats U.S., 3–2, to win gold medal in men's hockey". Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Times. Retrieved March 1, 2010.  ^ 2018 Winter Olympics
2018 Winter Olympics
roster ^ NHL
NHL
will not participate in 2018 Winter Olympics ^ " Hockey Canada
Hockey Canada
unveils men's Olympic roster". www.tsn.ca. Bell Media. 11 January 2018. Retrieved 11 January 2018.  ^ McCann, Ellen (11 January 2018). "Team Canada
Canada
nominated for men's hockey at PyeongChang 2018". www.olympic.ca/. Canadian Olympic Committee. Retrieved 27 January 2018.  ^ Team Roster Canada

Podnieks, Andrew (1997). Canada's Olympic Hockey Teams: The Complete History, 1920–1998. Toronto: Doubleday Canada. ISBN 0-385-25688-4.  Wallechinsky, David (2002). The Complete Book of the Winter Olympics (2002 ed.). New York: The Overlook Press. ISBN 1-58567-185-1.  Meltzer, Bill NHL.com article on 2007 IIHF
IIHF
World Championship gold medal. Retrieved 2008-03-25.

External links[edit]

Official website IIHF
IIHF
profile

v t e

Members and events of Hockey Canada

Member branches

BC Hockey Hockey Alberta Saskatchewan Hockey Association Hockey Manitoba Hockey Northwestern Ontario Ontario Hockey Federation Hockey Eastern Ontario Hockey Québec Hockey New Brunswick Hockey PEI Hockey Nova Scotia Hockey Newfoundland and Labrador Hockey North

Associate bodies

Canadian Junior Hockey League

Interbranch events

Men's

Allan Cup Royal Bank Cup Telus Cup Canada
Canada
Winter Games Aboriginal Championships

Women's

Clarkson Cup CIS Championship Esso Cup Under-18 Championship Canada
Canada
Winter Games Aboriginal Championships

Regional

ANAVET Cup Doyle Cup Dudley Hewitt Cup Fred Page Cup Keystone Cup Don Johnson Memorial Cup Maritime- Hockey North
Hockey North
Junior C Championship Brewers Cup

National teams

Men's (rosters) Men's U–20 (rosters) Men's U–18 Men's sledge Women's (rosters) Women's U–18 Women's sledge

International events

HC organized

World U-17 Hockey Challenge World Junior A Challenge World Sport School Challenge World Sledge Hockey Challenge

IIHF
IIHF
organized

Olympic Winter Games Paralympic Games Youth Olympic Games Ice Hockey World Championships IIHF
IIHF
World Women's Championships IIHF
IIHF
World U20 Championship IIHF
IIHF
World U18 Championships IIHF
IIHF
World Women's U18 Championships 4 Nations Cup Meco Cup

Other

World Cup of Hockey Ivan Hlinka Memorial Tournament Spengler Cup Universiade Sledge World Championships

Canada Ice hockey Hockey Hall of Fame International Ice Hockey Federation

v t e

National sports teams of Canada

A1GP American football

M M-U19 W

Australian football Ball hockey

M W

Bandy

M W

Badminton Baseball

M W

Basketball

M M-U19 M-U17 W W-U19 W-U17

Beach soccer Cricket

M W

Field hockey

M W

Floorball

M M-U19 W W-U19

Futsal Goalball

W W-U19

Gymnastics Handball

M W

Ice hockey

M M-U20 M-U18 W W-U18

Ice sledge hockey

M W

Inline hockey

M W

Lacrosse

M M-U19 Indoor W W-U19

Motorcycle Speedway

Open U-21

Netball Quidditch Roller derby Rugby league

M W

Rugby union

M M-U20 M7 W W7

Soccer

M M-U23 M-U20 M-U18 M-U17 W W-U20 W-U17 CP

Softball

M W W-U19

Squash

M W

Tennis

Davis Cup Fed Cup Hopman Cup

Volleyball

M M-U21 W

Wheelchair Basketball

M W

Water polo

M W

Olympics

Summer Winter

Paralympics

Summer Winter

Commonwealth Games Pan Am Games Universiade

Sport in Canada
Canada
portal

v t e

Men's national ice hockey teams

Africa

AlgeriaN Morocco* NamibiaN South Africa TunisiaN

Americas

Argentina* Brazil* Canada Chile** ColombiaN Costa RicaN Falkland IslandsN HaitiN Jamaica* Mexico United States Multinational

North America

Asia and Oceania

Australia BahrainN China Chinese Taipei Hong Kong India Indonesia* IranN Israel Japan Kazakhstan North Korea South Korea Kuwait* Kyrgyzstan* LebanonN Macau* Malaysia* Mongolia Nepal* New Zealand Oman* Philippines* Qatar Saudi ArabiaN Singapore* Thailand Turkmenistan* United Arab Emirates UzbekistanN

Europe

Andorra* Armenia* Austria Azerbaijan Belarus Belgium Bosnia and Herzegovina Bulgaria Croatia Czech Republic Denmark Estonia Finland France Georgia Germany Great Britain Greece* Hungary Iceland Ireland Italy Latvia Liechtenstein* Lithuania Luxembourg Macedonia* Moldova* Netherlands Norway Poland Portugal* Romania Russia Serbia Slovakia Slovenia Spain Sweden Switzerland Turkey Ukraine Multinational

Europe

Former teams

Basque Country Bohemia Catalonia Commonwealth of Independent States Czechoslovakia East Germany England Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia Saint Pierre and Miquelon Scotland Serbia and Montenegro Soviet Union West Germany Yugoslavia

*: IIHF
IIHF
associate members **: IIHF
IIHF
affiliate members N: Non-

.