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Camarines
Camarines
Norte (Central Bicolano: Amihanan na Camarines; Filipino: Hilagang Camarines) is a province located in the Bicol region in Luzon of the Philippines. Its capital is Daet. The province borders Quezon to the west, Camarines Sur
Camarines Sur
to the south, and the Philippine Sea
Philippine Sea
to the north.

Contents

1 History

1.1 Spanish period

1.1.1 Daet Revolt

1.2 First guerrilla encounter 1.3 Japanese Occupation and Liberation

2 Geography

2.1 Climate 2.2 Administrative divisions

3 Demographics

3.1 Religion 3.2 Language

4 Economy

4.1 Infrastructure

5 Festivals and Events 6 Notable people from Camarines
Camarines
Norte 7 See also 8 References 9 External links

History[edit] In 1573, Bicol province was founded. From Bicol, the province of Camarines
Camarines
was created in 1636, which was divided in 1829, creating Camarines
Camarines
Norte and Camarines
Camarines
Sur. They were briefly merged from 1854 to 1857 into Ambos Camarines
Camarines
(ambos is Spanish for "both"). They were merged into Ambos Camarines
Camarines
once again in 1893. The province was divided into Camarines
Camarines
Norte and Camarines Sur
Camarines Sur
once again in 1917. When Camarines
Camarines
Norte was separated from Ambos Camarines
Camarines
in 1829, it was assigned the towns of Daet, as capital, Talisay, Indan (now Vinzons), Labo, Paracale, Mambulao (now Jose Panganiban), Capalonga, Ragay, Lupi and Sipocot. Seventeen years later, it lost Sipocot, Lupi and Ragay to Camarines Sur in exchange for the town of Siruma. Spanish period[edit] Spanish conquistador Juan de Salcedo, dispatched by Legazpi to explore the island in 1571, influenced the existence of Camarines
Camarines
Norte. After subduing Taytay and Cainta, he marched further across Laguna and Tayabas. He visited the rich gold-laden town of Mambulao and Paracale, obsessed by them about which he heard from natives there of existing gold mines. When Francisco de Sande
Francisco de Sande
took over from Legazpi as Governor
Governor
General, Spanish influence started to be felt in the region. He established a permanent Spanish garrison in Naga to control the region and defend it from Chinese and Muslim
Muslim
pirates. Capt. Pedro de Chavez was assigned to head this force. Native settlements, which include Mambulao and Paracale, were already thriving when the Spaniards arrived. Indan and Daet were the other settlements besides Capalonga. But Paracale
Paracale
remained the most sought after because of its gold mines.[citation needed] The towns were chiefly inhabited by Tagalogs; the rests were of Visayan strain. However, most of the immigrants were from Mauban, Quezon. The Spanish missionaries established missions to Christianize the natives. Daet Revolt[edit] April 14–17, 1898 - Local members of the Katipunan
Katipunan
led by Ildefonso Moreno and other patriots staged an uprising against the Spanish authorities here who have fortified themselves in the house of one Florencio Arana, a Spanish merchant and a long time resident of Daet. Sporadic encounters started on April 14 until April 16 when the rebels occupied Daet and surrounded the Spaniards in the house of Arana. But the Katipuneros failed to repulse the reinforcements which arrived in Barra (now Mercedes) from Nueva Caceres on April 17. Said reinforcements broke the siege of Daet. This resulted in the death and/or execution of many patriots, including Ildefonso Moreno, Tomas Zaldua and his two sons, Jose Abaño, Domingo Lozada and Aniceto Gregorio, among others. While the Daet revolt collapsed, it signaled the start of a series of rebellion throughout the Bicol region. By virtue of Act 2809 of March 3, 1919, Governor
Governor
General F. B. Harrison separated Camarines
Camarines
Norte from Camarines Sur
Camarines Sur
with the installation of Don Miguel R. Lukban as its first governor. "In functional sense, April 15, 1920, was the date of the organization of Camarines
Camarines
Norte, as directed by Executive Order No. 22 dated March 20, 1920, in conformity with the provisions of Act No. 2809," according to Serafin D. Quiason, former chairman of the National Historical Institute (NHI). First guerrilla encounter[edit] The first guerrilla encounter in the Philippines
Philippines
during the second world war in the Pacific occurred on December 18, 1941 – 11 days after the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor in Hawaii on Dec. 7, 1941 and 10 days after the attack on Clark Airbase in Pampanga
Pampanga
on Dec. 8, 1941 - at Laniton, Basud, Camarines Norte
Basud, Camarines Norte
when the Vinzons guerrilla group with some elements of USAFFE
USAFFE
units engaged the vanguard of the Japanese Imperial Army
Japanese Imperial Army
advancing towards Daet, the capital town. A shrine was put up in Laniton to mark this historic feat of arms while surviving veterans and the sons and daughters of veterans who fell commemorate this event every Dec. 18 in Basud and Daet under the auspices of the Veterans Federation of the Philippines
Philippines
– Camarines Norte Chapter (VFP-CN), Basud Municipal Government and the Provincial Government. Back to contents Japanese Occupation and Liberation[edit]

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The established general headquarters and military camps and bases of the Philippine Commonwealth Army
Philippine Commonwealth Army
that was active during January 3, 1942 to June 30, 1946 and the Philippine Constabulary
Philippine Constabulary
that was active during October 28, 1944 to June 30, 1946 was stationed in Camarines Norte and started the local military operations around the province with the aid of the Bicolano guerrilla fighters and U.S. liberation forces against the Imperial Japanese troops. The present local Filipino soldiers and military officers of the Commonwealth Army and Constabulary helped the Bicolano freedom fighters during the preparation for the counter attacks against the occupation of the Japanese Imperial forces that started their siege from 1942 to 1944 and 1945. With the aftermath of the almost 3 year siege, the Bicolano guerrillas retreated away from the Japanese military's hands. The U.S. liberation forces returned to the county and liberated the province on 1945 with the help of the local Filipino troops and Bicolano guerrillas that was preparing to attack the Japanese Imperial forces. It ended in World War II. Geography[edit] Camarines
Camarines
Norte covers a total area of 2,320.07 square kilometres (895.78 sq mi)[1] occupying the northwestern coast of the Bicol Peninsula in the southeastern section of Luzon. One of the six provinces comprising Region V (Bicol), it is bounded on the northeast by the Philippine Sea, east by the San Miguel Bay, west by the Lamon Bay, southwest by Quezon
Quezon
province, and southeast by Camarines
Camarines
Sur. Its capital town, Daet, is 342 kilometres (213 mi) southeast of Metro Manila, an 8 to 10 hour drive by bus, 6 to 7 hour by private car or a 45-minute trip by plane. Climate[edit]

Climate data for Camarines
Camarines
Norte

Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year

Average high °C (°F) 28.6 (83.5) 29 (84) 30 (86) 31.7 (89.1) 32.4 (90.3) 32.6 (90.7) 32 (90) 31.8 (89.2) 31.8 (89.2) 30.7 (87.3) 30.1 (86.2) 28.9 (84) 30.8 (87.46)

Average low °C (°F) 24 (75) 24 (75) 24.6 (76.3) 25.6 (78.1) 25.7 (78.3) 25.4 (77.7) 25.3 (77.5) 25.2 (77.4) 24.9 (76.8) 24.9 (76.8) 25.2 (77.4) 24.8 (76.6) 24.97 (76.91)

Average rainy days 20 14 13 9 11 16 16 15 17 21 24 23 199

Source: Storm247[3]

Administrative divisions[edit] Camarines
Camarines
Norte is subdivided into two legislative districts comprising a total of 12 municipalities.  †  Provincial capital

Municipality District[1] Population ±% p.a. Area[1] Density Brgy. Coordinates[A]

(2015)[2] (2010)[4]

km2 sq mi /km2 /sq mi

Basud 2nd 7000700000000000000♠7.0% 41,017 38,176 1.38% 260.28 100.49 160 410 29 14°03′57″N 122°57′46″E / 14.0658°N 122.9629°E / 14.0658; 122.9629 (Basud)

Capalonga 1st 7000550000000000000♠5.5% 32,215 31,299 0.55% 290.00 111.97 110 280 22 14°19′54″N 122°29′38″E / 14.3317°N 122.4938°E / 14.3317; 122.4938 (Capalonga)

Daet † 2nd 7001180000000000000♠18.0% 104,799 95,572 1.77% 46.00 17.76 2,300 6,000 25 14°06′48″N 122°57′21″E / 14.1132°N 122.9559°E / 14.1132; 122.9559 (Daet)

Jose Panganiban 1st 7001102009999900000♠10.2% 59,639 55,557 1.36% 214.44 82.80 280 730 27 14°17′23″N 122°41′30″E / 14.2898°N 122.6917°E / 14.2898; 122.6917 (Jose Panganiban)

Labo 1st 7001173000000000000♠17.3% 101,082 92,041 1.80% 589.36 227.55 170 440 52 14°09′20″N 122°49′51″E / 14.1555°N 122.8309°E / 14.1555; 122.8309 (Labo)

Mercedes 2nd 7000870000000099999♠8.7% 50,841 47,674 1.23% 173.69 67.06 290 750 26 14°06′34″N 123°00′33″E / 14.1094°N 123.0093°E / 14.1094; 123.0093 (Mercedes)

Paracale 1st 7001101000000000000♠10.1% 59,149 53,243 2.02% 197.90 76.41 300 780 27 14°16′49″N 122°47′17″E / 14.2803°N 122.7880°E / 14.2803; 122.7880 (Paracale)

San Lorenzo Ruiz 2nd 7000240000000000000♠2.4% 14,063 12,592 2.13% 119.37 46.09 120 310 12 14°02′12″N 122°52′05″E / 14.0368°N 122.8681°E / 14.0368; 122.8681 (San Lorenzo Ruiz)

San Vicente 2nd 7000180000000000000♠1.8% 10,396 10,114 0.52% 57.49 22.20 180 470 9 14°06′23″N 122°52′23″E / 14.1064°N 122.8731°E / 14.1064; 122.8731 (San Vicente)

Santa Elena 1st 7000700000000000000♠7.0% 40,786 40,828 −0.02% 199.35 76.97 200 520 19 14°11′06″N 122°23′38″E / 14.1851°N 122.3938°E / 14.1851; 122.3938 (Santa Elena)

Talisay 2nd 7000440000000000000♠4.4% 25,841 23,904 1.49% 30.76 11.88 840 2,200 15 14°08′14″N 122°55′32″E / 14.1371°N 122.9256°E / 14.1371; 122.9256 (Talisay)

Vinzons 2nd 7000750000000000000♠7.5% 43,485 41,915 0.70% 141.43 54.61 310 800 19 14°10′25″N 122°54′35″E / 14.1736°N 122.9097°E / 14.1736; 122.9097 (Vinzons)

Total 583,313 542,915 1.38% 2,320.07 895.78 250 650 282 (see GeoGroup box)

^ Coordinates
Coordinates
mark the town center, and are sortable by latitude.

Demographics[edit]

Population census of Camarines
Camarines
Norte

Year Pop. ±% p.a.

1903 45,503 —    

1918 52,081 +0.90%

1939 98,324 +3.07%

1948 103,702 +0.59%

1960 188,091 +5.09%

1970 262,207 +3.37%

1975 288,406 +1.93%

Year Pop. ±% p.a.

1980 308,007 +1.32%

1990 390,982 +2.41%

1995 439,151 +2.20%

2000 470,654 +1.50%

2007 513,785 +1.22%

2010 542,915 +2.03%

2015 583,313 +1.38%

Source: Philippine Statistics Authority[2][4][4][5]

The population of Camarines
Camarines
Norte in the 2015 census was 583,313 people,[2] with a density of 250 inhabitants per square kilometre or 650 inhabitants per square mile. Religion[edit] The majority of the population are followers of Roman Catholic church with 93%[citation needed] of the population adherence, while the rest of the people's faith is divided by several Christian groups such as Aglipayan Church, Iglesia ni Cristo
Iglesia ni Cristo
(INC), Baptists, Methodists, Mormons, Jehovah's Witnesses, Seventh-day Adventist, other Christians and also Muslims which demographic is mostly traced to Mindanao. Language[edit] Coastal Bikol
Coastal Bikol
( Central Bikol variant) is the main dialect spoken in the province. Tagalog and English are also widely understood and are used in businesses and education.

Economy[edit] The province’s economy largely depends on agriculture, with grain crops, vegetables, coconuts, rootcrops and fruits as its main products. The four major manufacturing and processing industries in the province are mining (particularly gold and iron ore), jewelry craft, pineapple and coconut industry. Infrastructure[edit] The province has an international seaport located at Barangay
Barangay
Osmeña, Jose Panganiban town servicing one of its major industries, Pan Century Surfactants. The seaport is approximately 5 kilometres (3.1 mi) from the town proper and an hour ride to the capital town of Daet. The province has 13 fishing ports in the coastal municipalities and one feeder airport in Bagasbas, Daet. Festivals and Events[edit] The Bantayog Festival The Bantayog Festival is a historical commemorating festival in Camarines
Camarines
Norte that features the first Rizal
Rizal
monument which is also the centerpiece of the celebration held simultaneous with the foundation anniversary of the province.[6] The Bantayog Festival is also celebrated in each town of the province with their own festivals such as the “Pinayasan” in Daet; “Palayogan” (from the root word Palay and Niyog) in Sta. Elena; “Babakasin” in Vinzonz; “Pabirik ng Bayan” in Paracale
Paracale
town; and the “Mananap” in San Vicente.[7] Bantayog Climb The Bantayog climb is an annual event organized by Oryol Outdoor Group Inc. as part of the activities during Bantayog Festival. The Pineapple (pinyasan) Festival Pinyasan (Pineapple) Festival showcases Camarines
Camarines
Norte’s premier agri-product which is the sweetest pineapple called Formosa.[8]

Summer Surf Fest Annual Kiteboarding Competition Paragliding and Hang-gliding Towing Competition

Gold-panning or Pabirik Festival The Pabirik Festival is a week long celebration which commemorates the past culture, traditions, history and customs of Paracale
Paracale
considered as a gold town of Camarines
Camarines
Norte. A highlight of the Pabirik Festival gives emphasis on its rich mining industry while showcasing its gold products all of which are available in the municipality. Pabirik means “pan” which is a medium used by the natives of Paracale
Paracale
in gold panning.[9] Palong Festival The Palong festival coincides with the feast of the Black Nazarene and is celebrated through street dancing and an agro-industrial fair to which the natives express their gratitude for the abundance of ornamental plants known as rooster combs or “palong manok”.[10] Kadagatan Festival The Kadagatan festival is celebrated by fishermen to give respect, express gratitude and recognize Mother Nature for the vast marine resources the town of Mercedes are blessed with.[11] Busig-on Festival The Busig-on festival is based on the epic of the hero Busig-on who hails from Labo town and also of Bicolano values. The festival is a showcase of talent and skills in a competitive manner while showing the town’s places of interest and featuring the town’s unique historical values.[12] Mambulawan Festival Mambulawan festival coincides with the Feast of Our Lady of the Most Holy Rosary.[13] Notable people from Camarines
Camarines
Norte[edit]

Robin Padilla
Robin Padilla
— Actor José María Panganiban
José María Panganiban
— Bicolano propagandist, linguist, and essayist. He is one of the main writers and contributors for La Solidaridad, writing under the pen names "Jomapa" and "J.M.P." Gen. Vicente R. Lukban
Vicente R. Lukban
— officer in Emilio Aguinaldo's staff during the Philippine Revolution
Philippine Revolution
and the politico-military chief of Samar and Leyte during the Philippine-American War. On September 28, 1901, Sunday, he led Filipino rebels, armed only with bolos and sharpened bamboo poles, in an attack against the contingent of American forces in Balangiga, Samar. Only 36 troopers of Company C, 9th Infantry Regiment of the US Forces survived the attack against 16 casualties among the Filipino rebels, giving the encounter its famous label "Balangiga Massacre" in Philippine history. Wenceslao Q. Vinzons, Sr. — Lawyer, orator, labor leader, writer, youngest delegate to the 1935 Constitutional Convention and youngest signatory of the Charter at the age of 25. As the governor in 1940 and congressman-elect in 1941 and refusing to surrender, he evacuated the provincial government during the Japanese occupation to the hinterlands of Labo and led a guerrilla force against the Japanese forces.

See also[edit]

List of Bicol Region
Bicol Region
Cities and Municipalities

References[edit]

^ a b c d "Province: Camarines
Camarines
Norte". PSGC Interactive. Quezon
Quezon
City, Philippines: Philippine Statistics Authority. Retrieved 8 January 2016.  ^ a b c d Census of Population (2015). "Region V (Bicol Region)". Total Population by Province, City, Municipality and Barangay. PSA. Retrieved 20 June 2016.  ^ "Weather forecast for Camarines
Camarines
Norte, Philippines". Storm247. Retrieved 1 February 2016.  ^ a b c Census of Population and Housing (2010). "Region V (Bicol Region)". Total Population by Province, City, Municipality and Barangay. NSO. Retrieved 29 June 2016.  ^ "Census 2000; Population and Housing; Region V" (PDF). Philippine Statistics Authority ( Philippine Statistics Authority
Philippine Statistics Authority
- Region V). Retrieved 29 June 2016.  ^ " Camarines
Camarines
Norte Festivals of Gold Panning, Pineapples and More Philippine Travel Destinations". www.philippinetraveldestinations.com. Retrieved 2017-10-03.  ^ "CamNor celebrates 'Bantayog Festival'". Manila
Manila
Bulletin News. Retrieved 2017-10-03.  ^ " Camarines
Camarines
Norte Festivals of Gold Panning, Pineapples and More Philippine Travel Destinations". www.philippinetraveldestinations.com. Retrieved 2017-10-03.  ^ " Camarines
Camarines
Norte Festivals of Gold Panning, Pineapples and More Philippine Travel Destinations". www.philippinetraveldestinations.com. Retrieved 2017-10-03.  ^ " Camarines
Camarines
Norte Festivals of Gold Panning, Pineapples and More Philippine Travel Destinations". www.philippinetraveldestinations.com. Retrieved 2017-10-03.  ^ " Camarines
Camarines
Norte Festivals of Gold Panning, Pineapples and More Philippine Travel Destinations". www.philippinetraveldestinations.com. Retrieved 2017-10-03.  ^ " Camarines
Camarines
Norte Festivals of Gold Panning, Pineapples and More Philippine Travel Destinations". www.philippinetraveldestinations.com. Retrieved 2017-10-03.  ^ " Camarines
Camarines
Norte Festivals of Gold Panning, Pineapples and More Philippine Travel Destinations". www.philippinetraveldestinations.com. Retrieved 2017-10-03. 

External links[edit]

Map all coordinates using: OpenStreetMap · Google Maps

Download coordinates as: KML · GPX

Media related to Camarines
Camarines
Norte at Wikimedia Commons Geographic data related to Camarines
Camarines
Norte at OpenStreetMap Official Camarines
Camarines
Norte website

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Camarines
Norte

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Camarines
Camarines
Norte

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Sur

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Sur

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Province of Camarines
Camarines
Norte

Daet (capital)

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Basud Capalonga Daet Jose Panganiban Labo Mercedes Paracale San Lorenzo Ruiz San Vicente Santa Elena Talisay Vinzons

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Norte

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